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Question: The term "D-Day" refers to the invasion of Japan.
Answer: D-Day refers to June 6, 1944, when Allied troops—British, American, Canadian, Australian, Indian, and others—landed on the beaches of German-occupied Normandy, in France. It signaled the beginning of the end of World War II.
Question: In World War II, Turkey fought on the side of Germany.
Answer: Turkey did not take sides during most of World War II (1939–45). It entered the war on the Allied side just months before the fighting ended.
Question: Brazil fought on the side of the Allies in World War II.
Answer: During World War II (1939–45), Brazil patrolled against German submarines in the Atlantic Ocean and contributed thousands of troops to the Allied invasion of Italy.
Question: During World War II, the Germans had a great victory at Stalingrad.
Answer: Stalingrad, a city deep inside the Soviet Union, was the first major defeat of Nazi forces during World War II.
Question: Naples, Italy, suffered extensive damage during World War II.
Answer: The city suffered heavily from air attacks and ground fighting during World War II. It took many years to rebuild Naples after the war.
Question: No World War II battles were fought in North America.
Answer: The Battle of Attu, in Alaska, involved Japanese and American forces. It lasted for about three months, in 1943.
Question: Teflon was widely used during World War II.
Answer: During World War II, polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) was used only to protect metal equipment used in the handling of radioactive material for the Manhattan Project. It gained more widespread use after the war.
Question: World War II began in 1939.
Answer: Hostilities had threatened earlier, but World War II formally began on September 1, 1939, when Germany invaded Poland. The war did not end until 1945.
Question: Japan won the Battle of Midway.
Answer: In June 1942, a strong invasion fleet of Japanese ships moved to capture Midway Island. U.S. Navy warplanes attacked the Japanese and won a decisive battle, destroying much of the fleet.
Question: Russia was the part of Axis powers during World War II.
Answer: The Axis powers was a coalition headed by Germany, Italy, and Japan that opposed the Allied powers in World War II. The alliance originated in a series of agreements between Germany and Italy, followed by the proclamation of an “axis” binding Rome and Berlin (October 25, 1936), with the two powers claiming that the world would henceforth rotate on the Rome-Berlin axis. This was followed by the German-Japanese Anti-Comintern Pact against the Soviet Union (November 25, 1936).
Question: Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact was a nonaggression pact between Germany and the Soviet Union.
Answer: German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact also called Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact (August 23, 1939) was a nonaggression pact between Germany and the Soviet Union. The pact was concluded only a few days before the beginning of World War II and divided eastern Europe into German and Soviet spheres of influence. The terms of the German-Soviet Nonaggression Pact were as follows: the two countries agreed not to attack each other, either independently or in conjunction with other powers; not to support any third power that might attack the other party to the pact; to remain in consultation with each other upon questions touching their common interests; not to join any group of powers directly or indirectly threatening one of the two parties; to solve all differences between the two by negotiation or arbitration.
Question: Battle of the Ardennes was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during World War II.
Answer: The Battle of the Bulge, also called Battle of the Ardennes (December 16, 1944–January 16, 1945), was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during World War II—an unsuccessful attempt to push the Allies back from German home territory. The name Battle of the Bulge was appropriated from Winston Churchill’s optimistic description in May 1940 of the resistance that he mistakenly supposed was being offered to the Germans breakthrough in that area just before the Anglo-French collapse; the Germans were overwhelmingly successful. The “bulge” refers to the wedge that the Germans drove into the Allied lines.
Question: Norwegian army officer Vidkun Quisling collaborated with the Germans in their occupation of Norway during World War II.
Answer: Vidkun Quisling was a Norwegian army officer whose collaboration with the Germans in their occupation of Norway during World War II established his name as a synonym for “traitor.” At a meeting with Adolf Hitler in December 1939, Quisling urged a German occupation of Norway; after the German invasion of April 1940, he proclaimed himself head of the government. He was held responsible for sending nearly 1,000 Jews to die in concentration camps. After the liberation of Norway in May 1945, he was arrested, found guilty of treason and other crimes, and executed.
Question: The Battle of Iwo Jima is the bloodiest in the history of the U.S. Marine Corps.
Answer: The Battle of Iwo Jima (February 19–March 16, 1945) was a conflict between the United States and the Empire of Japan. The United States mounted an amphibious invasion of the island of Iwo Jima as part of its Pacific campaign against Japan. A costly victory for the United States, the battle was one of the bloodiest in the history of the U.S. Marine Corps and was cited as proof of the Japanese military’s willingness to fight to the last man.
Question: The July Plot was an assassination attempt on Benito Mussolini.
Answer: The July Plot was an abortive attempt on July 20, 1944, by German military leaders to assassinate Adolf Hitler, seize control of the government, and seek more favorable peace terms from the Allies.
Question: Sherman tank was a battle tank designed and built by the United States in World War II.
Answer: Sherman tank, officially M4 General Sherman, was the main battle tank designed and built by the United States for the conduct of World War II. The M4 General Sherman was the most widely used tank series among the Western Allies, being employed not only by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps but also by British, Canadian, and Free French forces. The M4 was employed in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, and western Europe and throughout the Pacific theatre. A total of 49,324 Sherman tanks were produced in 11 plants between 1942 and 1946.
Question: The Cowra breakout incident was the largest prison escape of World War II.
Answer: The Cowra breakout (August 5, 1944) was a mass escape by nearly 400 Japanese prisoners of war from a prison camp in Cowra, New South Wales, Australia. It was the largest prison break staged during World War II.
Question: Dwight D. Eisenhower was the supreme commander of the Allied forces in western Europe during World War II.
Answer: Dwight D. Eisenhower, the 34th president of the United States (1953–61), had been supreme commander of the Allied forces in western Europe during World War II. On December 24, 1943, Eisenhower was appointed supreme commander of the Allied Expeditionary Force and, on June 6, 1944, he gambled on a break in bad weather and gave the order to launch the Normandy Invasion, the largest amphibious attack in history.
Question: Panzer division was an infantry division of the Nazi German army.
Answer: The Panzer-Division was a self-contained combined-arms military unit of the German army, built around and deriving its mission largely from the capabilities of armored fighting vehicles. A panzer division in World War II consisted of a tank brigade with four battalions, a motorized infantry brigade with four rifle battalions, an artillery regiment, and reconnaissance, antitank, and engineer battalions and service units. Early in the war, the panzer divisions used mostly light tanks, and later they used mostly medium tanks.
Question: Hitler Youth was an organization set up by Adolf Hitler in 1933.
Answer: Hitler Youth was an organization set up by Adolf Hitler in 1933 for educating and training male youth in Nazi principles. Under the leadership of Baldur von Schirach, who was the head of all German youth programs, the organization was included in 1935, almost 60 percent of German boys. On July 1, 1936, it became a state agency that all “Aryan” Germans were expected to join.
Question: Second Reich was the official Nazi designation for the regime in Germany.
Answer: The Third Reich was the official Nazi designation for the regime in Germany from January 1933 to May 1945, as the presumed successor of the medieval and early modern Holy Roman Empire of 800 to 1806 or the First Reich and the German Empire of 1871 to 1918 or the Second Reich.
Question: Auschwitz was Nazi Germany’s first concentration camp and extermination camp.
Answer: Auschwitz was the Nazi Germany’s largest concentration camp and extermination camp. It was located near the industrial town of O?wi?cim in southern Poland in a portion of the country that was annexed by Germany at the beginning of World War II. Auschwitz was actually three camps in one - a prison camp, an extermination camp, and a slave-labor camp.
Question: Adolf Hitler was appointed the Chancellor of Germany in 1933.
Answer: Adolf Hitler or Der Führer was the leader of the Nazi Party who became the chancellor from January 30, 1933, and, after President Paul von Hindenburg’s death, and assumed the twin titles of Führer and chancellor.
Question: Winston Churchill was the prime minister of England during World War II.
Answer: Winston Churchill was a British statesman, orator, and author who as prime minister rallied the British people during World War II and led his country from the brink of defeat to victory.
Question: Joseph Stalin was the premier of the Soviet Union during World War II.
Answer: Joseph Stalin was the secretary-general of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and the premier of the Soviet state (1941–53) who ruled the Soviet Union and transformed it into a major world power.
Question: Enola Gay is the name of the B-29 bomber that was used by the United States during World War II.
Answer: Enola Gay is a B-29 bomber that was used by the United States on August 6, 1945, to drop an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, for the first time used on an enemy target. The aircraft was named after the mother of pilot Paul Warfield Tibbets, Jr. The B-29, also called Superfortress, was a four-engine heavy bomber built by Boeing and was first flown in 1942 which soon became popular in the Pacific theatre during World War II.
Question: The chief Allied powers during World War II included Germany, Italy, and Japan.
Answer: The Allied powers or Allies, were the countries allied in opposition to the Central Powers (Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Turkey) in World War I or to the Axis powers (Germany, Italy, and Japan) in World War II. In World War II, the chief Allied powers were Great Britain, France, the Soviet Union, the United States, and China. It included all the wartime members of the United Nations and the signatories to the Declaration of the United Nations.
Question: Operation Barbarossa was the code name for the German invasion of Japan.
Answer: Operation Barbarossa, during World War II, was a code name for the German invasion of the Soviet Union, which was launched on June 22, 1941. The failure of German troops to defeat Soviet forces in the campaign signaled a crucial turning point in the war. The invasion of the Soviet Union was originally given the code name Operation Fritz, but Hitler renamed it Operation Barbarossa, after Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, who sought to establish German predominance in Europe.
Question: Battle of Stalingrad was a successful defense of the city of Stalingrad by the Soviet Union during World War II.
Answer: The Battle of Stalingrad was a successful Soviet defense of the city of Stalingrad, Russia, U.S.S.R., during World War II. Russians consider it to be one of the greatest battles of their Great Patriotic War, and most historians consider it to be the greatest battle of the entire conflict. The Battle of Stalingrad stopped German advance into the Soviet Union and turned the tide of war in favor of the Allies.
Question: The Battle of Kursk was the largest tank battle in World War II.
Answer: The Battle of Kursk was an unsuccessful German assault on the Soviet Union that took place between July 5–August 23, 1943, around the city of Kursk, in western Russia, during World War II. The Battle of Kursk was the largest tank battle in history, involving some 6,000 tanks, 2,000,000 troops, and 4,000 aircraft. It marked the decisive end of the German offensive capability on the Eastern Front and cleared the way for the great Soviet offensives of 1944–45.
Question: U-boat was the name of a German submarine.
Answer: The U-boat was a German submarine known for the destruction of enemy shipping, which was a spectacular feature of both World Wars I and II.
Question: Enigma was a German code device used by German armed forces to encode strategic messages during World War II.
Answer: Enigma was a device used by the German military command to encode strategic messages before and during World War II. The Enigma code was first broken by the Poles, under the leadership of mathematician Marian Rejewski, in the early 1930s. In 1939, with the growing likelihood of a German invasion, the Poles turned their information over to the British, who set up a secret code-breaking group, known as Ultra, under mathematician Alan M. Turing.
Question: The Japanese surrendered on the USS Missouri on September 2, 1945.
Answer: The Japanese formally surrendered on September 2, 1945 onboard the American battleship Missouri formally ended World War II. Gen. Douglas MacArthur, the Allied supreme commander, chose the Missouri for the surrender ceremony. The Missouri entered Tokyo Bay flying the flag that had flown over the White House on December 7, 1941, the day of the Pearl Harbor attack that brought the United States into the war. On Sunday morning, September 2, 1945, a nine-man Japanese delegation arrived on board, and, at MacArthur’s invitation, Foreign Minister Shigemitsu Mamoru and Gen. Umezu Yoshijiro signed two copies of the document proclaiming “unconditional surrender…of all Japanese armed forces.”
Question: “Operation Meetinghouse” was the code name of the bombing of Tokyo during World War II.
Answer: The Bombing of Tokyo (March 9–10, 1945), (code-named “Operation Meetinghouse”) was a firebombing raid by the United States on the capital of Japan during the final stages of World War II. It is often cited as one of the most destructive acts of war in history. Although the precise death toll is unknown, conservative estimates suggest that the firestorm caused by incendiary bombs killed at least 80,000 people, and likely more than 100,000, in a single night; some one million people were left homeless. The Japanese later called this the “Night of the Black Snow.”
Question: Ultra was the code name of the Allied intelligence project in World War II.
Answer: Ultra was the Allied intelligence project that tapped the very highest level of encrypted communications of the German armed forces, as well as those of the Italian and Japanese armed forces, and thus contributed to the Allied victory in World War II.
Question: The goal of the Cairo Conference was to defeat and occupy Nazi Germany.
Answer: Cairo Conference (November–December 1943) was either of two meetings of Allied leaders held in Cairo during World War II. At the first Cairo Conference (November 22–26), British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt discussed plans for the prosecution of the Normandy Invasion. With Chinese leader Chiang Kai-shek, they issued a declaration of the goal of stripping Japan of all the territories it had seized since 1914 and restoring Korea to independence. In the second Cairo Conference (December 2–7). There they tried without success to persuade President ?smet ?n?nü of Turkey to bring his country into the war on the side of the Allied powers.
Question: Paul Warfield Tibbets, Jr. was the pilot to drop the world’s first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan.
Answer: Paul Warfield Tibbets, Jr. was a brigadier general (ret.) of U.S. Army Air Forces. He was a colonel when he piloted the B-29 bomber nicknamed the Enola Gay, which on Aug. 6, 1945, dropped the world’s first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Following World War II, Tibbets became a technical adviser for the U.S.’s nuclear bomb tests, and he later did a tour of duty with NATO in France.
Question: Singapore remained under Japanese occupation until the Japanese surrendered in 1945.
Answer: In early December 1941, the Japanese landed in northern Malaya and southern Thailand on the Malay Peninsula. They quickly gained air and naval superiority in the region, and by the end of January 1942, they had overrun the peninsula and were opposite Singapore Island. The Japanese crossed the Johor Strait on February 8, 1942, and the British command surrendered the island and city one week later. Singapore remained in Japanese hands until September 1945.
Question: Warsaw Ghetto Uprising was a revolt by Polish Jews against German-occupied Poland during World War II.
Answer: The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising was the resistance by Polish Jews under Nazi occupation in 1943 to the deportations from Warsaw to the Treblinka extermination camp. The revolt began on April 19, 1943, and was crushed four weeks later, on May 16.
Question: Chester W. Nimitz led the decisive victory at the Battle of Midway and the Coral Sea.
Answer: Chester W. Nimitz was commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet during World War II. One of the navy’s foremost administrators and strategists, he commanded all land and sea forces in the central Pacific area. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor (December 1941), Nimitz was elevated to commander in chief of the Pacific Fleet, a command that brought both land and sea forces under his authority. By June 1942, he had proudly announced the decisive victory at the Battle of Midway and the Battle of Coral Sea, where enemy losses were 10 times greater than those of the United States at Pearl Harbor.
Question: The Alliance between Germany and Italy was known as the Pact of Steel.
Answer: The Pact of Steel was an Alliance between Germany and Italy that was signed by Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini on May 22, 1939. It formalized the 1936 Rome-Berlin Axis agreement, linking the two countries politically and militarily.
Question: Tripartite Pact was an agreement concluded by Germany, Italy, and Japan in 1945.
Answer: The Tripartite Pact was an agreement concluded by Germany, Italy, and Japan on September 27, 1940. It created a defense alliance between the countries and was largely intended to deter the United States from entering the conflict. Hungary, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, and Croatia were later signatories to the pact.
Question: Atlantic Charter was a joint declaration during World War II by the Soviet Union and the U.S.
Answer: The Atlantic Charter was a joint declaration issued on August 14, 1941, during World War II, by the British prime minister, Winston Churchill, and Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt of the still nonbelligerent United States, after four days of conferences aboard warships anchored at Placentia Bay, off the coast of Newfoundland.
Question: Tuskegee Airmen were Black servicemen of the Free French Air Forces during World War II.
Answer: The Tuskegee Airmen were black servicemen of the U.S. Army Air Forces who trained at Tuskegee Army Air Field in Alabama during World War II. They constituted the first African American flying unit in the U.S. military.
Question: The lend-lease act was passed by Nazi Germany to aid its World War II allies.
Answer: The lend-lease act was the system by which the United States aided its World War II allies with war materials, such as ammunition, tanks, airplanes, and trucks, and with food and other raw materials. President Franklin D. Roosevelt had committed the United States in June 1940 to materially aiding the opponents of fascism, but, under existing U.S. law, the United Kingdom had to pay for its growing arms purchases from the United States with cash, popularly known as cash-and-carry. To remedy this situation, Roosevelt, on December 8, 1940, proposed the concept of lend-lease, and the U.S. Congress passed his Lend-Lease Act in March 1941. This legislation gave the president the authority to aid any nation whose defense he believed vital to the United States and to accept repayment “in kind or property, or any other direct or indirect benefit which the President deems satisfactory.”
Question: G.I. Bill was U.S. legislation adopted to benefit veterans of the Vietnam War.
Answer: The G.I. Bill, also called Servicemen’s Readjustment Act, was a U.S. legislation adopted in 1944 that provided various benefits to veterans of World War II. Through the Veterans Administration, the act enabled veterans to obtain grants for school and college tuition, low-interest mortgage and small-business loans, job training, hiring privileges, and unemployment benefits.
Question: Bismarck was a German aircraft used in World War II.
Answer: Bismarck was a German battleship used in World War II that had a short but spectacular career. The battleship was laid down in 1936 and launched in 1939. It displaced 52,600 tons, mounted eight 15-inch guns, and had a speed of 30 knots.
Question: The Anti-Comintern Pact was an agreement between Germany, Italy, and Japan.
Answer: The Anti-Comintern Pact was an agreement concluded first between Germany and Japan on Nov. 25, 1936, and then between Italy, Germany, and Japan on Nov. 6, 1937. It was ostensibly directed against the Communist International (Comintern) but, by implication, specifically against the Soviet Union.
Question: Operation Husky is the code name of the Allied Invasion of Japan.
Answer: The Allied Invasion of Sicily or Operation Husky was an Anglo-American invasion and capture of Sicily that was a vital stepping-stone for the campaign in Italy, although the Allies were at fault in failing to prevent the Axis from successfully evacuating their best divisions from the island to continue the defensive battle on the mainland.
Question: Erwin Rommel was the commander of the Panzer Army Africa in World War II.
Answer: Erwin Rommel was a German field marshal who became the most popular general at home and gained the respect of his enemies with his spectacular victories as commander of the Afrika Korps in World War II.
Question: The Bataan Death March was the forcible march of Japanese prisoners of war by the American military.
Answer: The Bataan Death March was the march in the Philippines of some 66 miles (106 km) that 76,000 prisoners of war (66,000 Filipinos, 10,000 Americans) were forced by the Japanese military to endure in April 1942, during the early stages of World War II. After the end of World War II, the Japanese commander of the invasion forces in the Philippines, Lieutenant-general Homma Masaharu, was charged with responsibility for the march and widespread abuses at Camp O’Donnell. He was tried and convicted by a U.S. military commission in Manila in January–February 1946 and was executed by firing squad on April 3, 1946.
Question: Benito Mussolini was also known by the title Der Führer.
Answer: Benito Mussolini, known by the nickname Il Duce (Italian: “The Leader”), was the Italian prime minister and the first of 20th-century Europe’s fascist dictators.
Question: Nazi Germany described the Holocaust as “the final solution to the Jewish question.”
Answer: Holocaust, also known as the final solution to the Jewish question by the Germans, was the systematic state-sponsored killing of six million Jewish men, women, and children and millions of others by Nazi Germany and its collaborators during World War II.
Question: T?j? Hideki was the Prime Minister of the Philippines during the Pacific-War.
Answer: T?j? Hideki was a soldier and statesman who was prime minister of Japan (1941–44) during most of the Pacific theatre portion of World War II and who was subsequently tried and executed for war crimes. On September 11, 1945, after Japan’s formal surrender, Tōjō shot himself in a suicide attempt, but he was nursed back to health and on April 29, 1946, with other Japanese wartime leaders, was indicted for war crimes before the International Military Tribunal for the Far East in Tokyo. At the trial, he was found guilty and then hanged.
Question: Signal Corps is the branch of the U.S. Army that provides combat service support services.
Answer: The Signal Corps was officially established as a branch of the U.S. Army in March 1863. It is the branch of the U.S. Army that manages all aspects of communications and information systems support. During World War I and World War II, the Signal Corps was responsible for implementing and designing radio technology. The contemporary mission of the Signal Corps includes the management of all modern telecommunications and information systems, including computer systems, Internet and local area networks, and voice and data communications.
Question: Joseph Goebbels was the minister of propaganda under Benito Mussolini.
Answer: Joseph Goebbels was the minister of propaganda for the German Third Reich under Adolf Hitler. A master orator and propagandist, he is generally accounted responsible for presenting a favorable image of the Nazi regime to the German people. Following Hitler’s suicide, Goebbels served as chancellor of Germany for a single day before he and his wife, Magda Goebbels, poisoned their six children and took their own lives.
Question: The first city to be bombed by an atomic bomb during World War II was Nagasaki.
Answer: Nagasaki was the target for the second atomic bomb dropped on Japan by the United States in World War II. Hiroshima in southwestern Honshu, Japan became the first city in the world to be struck by an atomic bomb on August 6, 1945. From 1868 onward, it was a military center, which made it a potential target for Allied bombing during World War II. The atomic bomb was dropped by a B-29 bomber of the U.S. Army Air Forces at about 8:15 on the morning of August 6. Most of the city was destroyed, and estimates of the number of people killed outright or shortly after the blast has ranged upward from 70,000.
Question: The invasion of Okinawa is the largest amphibious landing conducted by the U.S. during the Pacific War.
Answer: The Battle of Okinawa was a battle fought between the U.S. and Japanese forces on Okinawa, the largest of the Ryukyu Islands. The invasion of Okinawa turned out to be, in fact, the largest amphibious landing conducted by the U.S. during the Pacific War.
Question: Charles de Gaulle led the Anders' Army against Germany during World War II.
Answer: Led by Charles de Gaulle, the Free French was able to unify most French resistance forces in their struggle against Germany. De Gaulle was a French soldier, writer, statesman, and architect of France’s Fifth Republic.
Question: The Potsdam Conference was held in Potsdam, German between the Axis powers.
Answer: The Potsdam Conference (July 17–August 2, 1945) was an Allied conference of World War II held at Potsdam, a suburb of Berlin. The chief participants were U.S. President Harry S. Truman, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill (or Clement Attlee, who became prime minister during the conference), and Soviet Premier Joseph Stalin. The conferees discussed the substance and procedures of the peace settlements in Europe but did not attempt to write peace treaties.
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