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  • bitter almond (tree and nut)

    almond: dulcis variety dulcis) and bitter almond (P. dulcis variety amara). Sweet almonds are the familiar, edible type consumed as nuts and used in cooking or as a source of almond oil or almond meal. The oil of bitter almonds is used in the manufacture of flavouring extracts for foods…

  • bitter apple (plant)

    Colocynth, (Citrullus colocynthis), hairy-stemmed perennial vine of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), native to the Mediterranean region. The colocynth grows in sandy, coastal, or desert soils and commonly spreads vegetatively. The plant has small, pale greenish yellow flowers, forked tendrils, and

  • bitter chocolate

    cocoa: Milk chocolate: …to either baking chocolate or bittersweet chocolate. Bittersweet is similar to sweet chocolate but contains less sugar and more chocolate liquor. Minimum percentages of chocolate liquor are fixed by law in some countries, such as the United States.

  • bitter cucumber (plant)

    Colocynth, (Citrullus colocynthis), hairy-stemmed perennial vine of the gourd family (Cucurbitaceae), native to the Mediterranean region. The colocynth grows in sandy, coastal, or desert soils and commonly spreads vegetatively. The plant has small, pale greenish yellow flowers, forked tendrils, and

  • Bitter Face-Off Between Keynesian Economics and Monetarism, The

    In 2012 much of the world was still struggling to make a full recovery from the so-called Great Recession of 2008–09. The collapse in September 2008 of Lehman Brothers, a giant American banking group, had sparked a chain of events that caused great turbulence in global financial markets, the

  • bitter garcinia (tree)

    Garcinia: Garlic fruit, or bitter garcinia (G. spicata), is planted as an ornamental in tropical salt-spray oceanfront areas. Orange dyes (gamboge) are extracted from the bark of G. xanthochymus and G. cowa. A number of species are listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List of

  • bitter lake (geography)

    lake: Chemical precipitates: …of sodium sulfate are called bitter lakes, and those containing sodium carbonate are called alkali lakes. Soda Lake, California, is estimated to contain nearly one million tons of anhydrous sulfate. Magnesium salts of these types are also quite common and can be found in the same sediments as the sodium…

  • Bitter Lakes (lakes, Egypt)

    Suez Canal: …Timsah (Bu?ayrat al-Timsā?), and the Bitter Lakes—Great Bitter Lake (Al-Bu?ayrah al-Murrah al-Kubrā) and Little Bitter Lake (Al-Bu?ayrah al-Murrah al-?ughrā). The Suez Canal is an open cut, without locks, and, though extensive straight lengths occur, there are eight major bends. To the west of the canal is the low-lying delta of…

  • Bitter Medicine (novel by Paretsky)

    Sara Paretsky: …many of her books, including Bitter Medicine (1987), which deals with abortion rights and the medical community, Burn Marks (1990), Guardian Angel (1992), and Tunnel Vision (1994). Many critics considered Paretsky’s best novel to be Blood Shot (1988), which follows Warshawski’s search for an old friend’s missing father and her…

  • Bitter Moon (film by Polanski [1992])

    Roman Polanski: …in his films Frantic (1988), Bitter Moon (1992), The Ninth Gate (1999), La Vénus à la fourrure (2013; Venus in Fur), and D’après une histoire vraie (2017; Based on a True Story).

  • Bitter Reunion (film by Chabrol [1958])

    Claude Chabrol: …Beau Serge (1958; “Handsome Serge”; Bitter Reunion), written and produced by Chabrol, was an important film of the New Wave (Nouvelle Vague), a term applied in the late 1950s to a widely diversified experimental movement in French films. That same year he wrote, directed, and produced Les Cousins (1958; The…

  • Bitter Rice (film by De Santis [1949])

    Dino De Laurentiis: …hit with Riso amaro (1949; Bitter Rice), a drama about Italian rice-field workers that was dominated by the sensuous presence of Silvana Mangano, his future wife.

  • Bitter Springs Formation (geological feature, Australia)

    Bitter Springs microfossils: …fossil structures uncovered in the Bitter Springs Formation, a rock layer about 800,000,000 years old exposed in central Australia. Collections first made in 1965 revealed at least four general groups of organisms that possibly inhabited shallow seas of central Australia in Late Precambrian times (ending about 540,000,000 years ago); these…

  • Bitter Springs microfossils (paleontology)

    Bitter Springs microfossils, assemblage of microscopic fossil structures uncovered in the Bitter Springs Formation, a rock layer about 800,000,000 years old exposed in central Australia. Collections first made in 1965 revealed at least four general groups of organisms that possibly inhabited

  • Bitter Sweet (film by Van Dyke [1940])

    W.S. Van Dyke: Later films: …with MacDonald and Eddy on Bitter Sweet (1940), which was based on the No?l Coward operetta. Although the film failed to match the success of their earlier collaborations, it was still a modest hit. With I Love You Again (1940), Van Dyke worked with another popular team, Powell and Loy,…

  • Bitter Tea of General Yen, The (film by Capra [1933])

    Frank Capra: The early 1930s: The Bitter Tea of General Yen (1933) was Capra’s most erotic work. Stanwyck starred as a missionary in civil-war-torn Shanghai; she becomes the unwilling guest of a Chinese warlord (Nils Asther), who falls hopelessly in love with her. Joseph Walker’s lush, intoxicating cinematography in Bitter…

  • Bitter Victory (novel by Guilloux)

    Louis Guilloux: …masterpiece, Le Sang noir (1935; Bitter Victory). Set in Guilloux’s hometown during World War I, it has as its central character an idealist embittered by experience, driven by his sense of the absurdity of existence to a point beyond hope or despair. Guilloux’s own left-wing ideals were severely tested by…

  • Bitter Victory (film by Ray [1957])

    Nicholas Ray: Films of the late 1950s: …the World War II drama Bitter Victory (1957), a French-English production that starred Curt Jurgens and Richard Burton. Wind Across the Everglades (1958) was an offbeat collaboration with writer Budd Schulberg that featured Christopher Plummer as a game warden in the early 1900s whose efforts to save the Everglades

  • Bitter Wheat (play by Mamet)

    David Mamet: …a wealthy con man; and Bitter Wheat (produced 2019), a topical drama featuring a powerful filmmaker who is accused of sexual misconduct (the character was modeled on Harvey Weinstein). In all these works, Mamet used the rhythms and rhetoric of everyday speech to delineate character, describe intricate relationships, and drive…

  • bittercress (plant)

    Bittercress, (genus Cardamine), large genus of annual or perennial herbs of the mustard family (Brassicaceae), native to northern temperate areas. Bittercress plants bear white, pink, or pale purple four-petaled flowers in a terminal cluster and produce dry fruits known as siliques. Some—such as

  • bitterling (fish)

    Bitterling, (Rhodeus), any of several small, carplike fish of the family Cyprinidae noted for their unusual manner of breeding. Native to clear, stony streams of central and southern Europe, the bitterling is a silvery fish of little economic value, about 5 to 7.5 centimetres (2 to 3 inches) long.

  • bittern (bird)

    Bittern, any of 12 species of solitary marsh birds of the subfamily Botaurinae, family Ardeidae (order Ciconiiformes), allied to the herons (subfamily Ardeinae) but with shorter neck and stouter body. Most bitterns bear a camouflage pattern—streaks of variegated brown and buff—which enables them to

  • bittern (chemistry)

    Bittern, very bitter-tasting solution that remains after evaporation and crystallization of sodium chloride (table salt) from brines and seawater. It contains in concentrated form the calcium and magnesium chlorides and sulfates, bromides, iodides, and other chemicals originally present in the

  • bitterroot (plant)

    Bitterroot, (Lewisia rediviva), ornamental succulent plant of the purslane family (Portulacaceae), native to western North America and cultivated in rock gardens. The main stem and root merge into a tuberous structure. The leaves are barely 2.5 cm (1 inch) long, and the flowering stalk with pink or

  • Bitterroot Range (mountains, United States)

    Bitterroot Range, segment of the northern Rocky Mountains, U.S., extending southward for 300 mi (480 km) along the Idaho–Montana border. Peaks average about 9,000 ft (2,700 m), with Scott Peak, in Idaho, the highest (11,394 ft). Owing to the inaccessibility of the mountains from the east, the

  • bitters (alcoholic beverage)

    Bitters, any of numerous aromatized and often alcoholic liquids containing bitter substances (chiefly alkaloids, glycosides, or complexes), used as tonics, liqueurs, appetizers, digestives, flavourings, and ingredients to add tang or smoothness to alcoholic drinks. Bitters are prepared according

  • bittersweet (plant)

    Bittersweet, any of several vines with colourful fruit. The genus Celastrus, in the staff tree family (Celastraceae), includes the American bittersweet, or staff vine (C. scandens), and the Oriental bittersweet (C. orbiculatus), woody vines grown as ornamentals. The flowers, in whitish clusters,

  • bittersweet (plant)

    bittersweet: ) or woody nightshade (Solanum dulcamara), belongs to the family Solanaceae. It is an herbaceous vine, up to 4.5 m long; the violet and yellow star-shaped flowers are followed by shiny green berries that gradually turn bright red.

  • bittersweet chocolate

    cocoa: Milk chocolate: …to either baking chocolate or bittersweet chocolate. Bittersweet is similar to sweet chocolate but contains less sugar and more chocolate liquor. Minimum percentages of chocolate liquor are fixed by law in some countries, such as the United States.

  • bittersweet family (plant family)

    Celastraceae, the staff-tree family, in the order Celastrales, comprising about 55 genera of woody vines, shrubs, and trees, native in tropical and temperate zones but best known for ornamental forms of the genera Euonymus and Celastrus (bittersweet). Fruit of the family is often colourful. Leaves

  • bitterweed (plant)

    ragweed: The common ragweed (A. artemisiifolia), also called Roman wormwood, hogweed, hogbrake, and bitterweed, is found across the North American continent. It typically grows about 1 metre (3.5 feet) high and has thin, alternate or opposite, much-divided leaves. The great, or giant, ragweed (A. trifida), also called…

  • Bitti, Bernardo (Italian painter)

    Bernardo Bitti, Jesuit painter who introduced Mannerism to Peruvian art. Bitti began training as an artist as a teenager in Rome, where he learned the Italian Mannerist style that he would later disseminate in Peru. In 1568 he became a Jesuit, and in 1571 he received orders to join a Jesuit

  • BitTorrent (computing)

    BitTorrent, protocol for sharing large computer files over the Internet. BitTorrent was created in 2001 by Bram Cohen, an American computer programmer who was frustrated by the long download times that he experienced using applications such as FTP. Files shared with BitTorrent are divided into

  • bitumen (mining)

    Bitumen, dense, highly viscous, petroleum-based hydrocarbon that is found in deposits such as oil sands and pitch lakes (natural bitumen) or is obtained as a residue of the distillation of crude oil (refined bitumen). In some areas, particularly in the United States, bitumen is often called

  • bituminous coal (coal classification)

    Bituminous coal, the most abundant form of coal, intermediate in rank between subbituminous coal and anthracite according to the coal classification used in the United States and Canada. In Britain bituminous coal is commonly called “steam coal,” and in Germany the term Steinkohle (“rock coal”) is

  • bituminous sand (geology)

    Tar sand, deposit of loose sand or partially consolidated sandstone that is saturated with highly viscous bitumen. Oil recovered from tar sands is commonly referred to as synthetic crude and is a potentially significant form of fossil fuel. A brief treatment of tar sands follows. For full

  • bituminous shale (geology)

    Oil shale, any sedimentary rock containing various amounts of solid organic material that yields petroleum products, along with a variety of solid by-products, when subjected to pyrolysis—a treatment that consists of heating the rock to above 300 °C (about 575 °F) in the absence of oxygen. The

  • Bituriges (ancient Celtic people)

    Bituriges, Celtic tribe that in about 600 bc was the most powerful in Gaul. By about 500 bc the tribe was divided into two groups: the Cubi, with a capital at Avaricum (modern Bourges) in the region later known as Berry; and the Vivisci, with a capital at the port of Burdigala (modern Bordeaux) on

  • Bitzer, Billy (American cinematographer)

    Billy Bitzer, U.S. motion-picture cameraman who, in partnership with the pioneer director D.W. Griffith, developed camera techniques that set the standard for all future motion pictures and stimulated important experimentation in the field. Bitzer achieved success in 1896 when his film of William

  • Bitzer, Gottfried Wilhelm (American cinematographer)

    Billy Bitzer, U.S. motion-picture cameraman who, in partnership with the pioneer director D.W. Griffith, developed camera techniques that set the standard for all future motion pictures and stimulated important experimentation in the field. Bitzer achieved success in 1896 when his film of William

  • Bitzius, Albert (Swiss writer)

    Jeremias Gotthelf, Swiss novelist and short-story writer whose vivid narrative works extol the virtues of Bernese rural people and defend traditional church and family life. The son of a pastor, Bitzius studied theology at Bern and G?ttingen and took part in the political activities that ended the

  • Biu (Nigeria)

    Biu, town, historic kingdom, and traditional emirate, Borno State, northeastern Nigeria. The town lies on the Biu Plateau and has road connections to Damaturu, Mubi, and Shani. According to tradition, the Biu kingdom was founded by conquest in the mid-16th century by Yamta-ra-Wala (Yamta the Great;

  • Biu Plateau (plateau, Nigeria)

    Biu Plateau, highlands in northeastern Nigeria, covering an area of approximately 2,000 square miles (5,200 square km) with an average elevation of 2,300 feet (700 m). Its highest point is Wiga Hill (2,693 feet [821 m]), and its most prominent relief features are the many well-defined, extinct

  • Biutiful (film by González I?árritu [2010])

    Javier Bardem: …Alejandro González I?árritu’s Spanish-language drama Biutiful (2010), Bardem earned a third Academy Award nomination. His role as a flamboyantly vengeful terrorist served as a villainous foil for James Bond in the blockbuster Skyfall (2012). In Terrence Malick’s To the Wonder (2012), Bardem portrayed a priest experiencing a crisis of faith.…

  • bivalence (chemistry)

    crystal: Conductivity of metals: Divalent atoms, such as magnesium or calcium, donate both valence electrons to become conduction electrons, while monovalent atoms, such as lithium or gold, donate one. As will be recalled, the number of conduction electrons alone does not determine conductivity; it depends on electron mobility as…

  • bivalent (chromosome)

    meiosis: Each pair of chromosomes—called a tetrad, or a bivalent—consists of four chromatids. At this point, the homologous chromosomes exchange genetic material by the process of crossing over (see linkage group). The homologous pairs then separate, each pair being pulled to opposite ends of the cell, which then pinches in half…

  • bivalent sulfur

    organosulfur compound: Organic compounds of bivalent sulfur: Assorted Referencescrude oil

  • bivalve (class of mollusks)

    Bivalve, (class Bivalvia), any of more than 15,000 species of clams, oysters, mussels, scallops, and other members of the phylum Mollusca characterized by a shell that is divided from front to back into left and right valves. The valves are connected to one another at a hinge. Primitive bivalves

  • Bivalvia (class of mollusks)

    Bivalve, (class Bivalvia), any of more than 15,000 species of clams, oysters, mussels, scallops, and other members of the phylum Mollusca characterized by a shell that is divided from front to back into left and right valves. The valves are connected to one another at a hinge. Primitive bivalves

  • bivariant system (chemistry and physics)

    phase: Unary systems: …is stable) the system is divariant—i.e., two degrees of freedom exist. Thus, the two variables (pressure and temperature) can be changed independently, and the same phase assemblage continues to exist.

  • Bivins, James Louis (American boxer)

    Jimmy Bivins, (James Louis Bivins), American boxer(born Dec. 6, 1919, Dry Branch, Ga.—died July 4, 2012, Cleveland, Ohio), defeated numerous future boxing champions in the ring—including Ezzard Charles and Archie Moore—but he was never given the opportunity to fight for a world title. Despite that

  • Bivins, Jimmy (American boxer)

    Jimmy Bivins, (James Louis Bivins), American boxer(born Dec. 6, 1919, Dry Branch, Ga.—died July 4, 2012, Cleveland, Ohio), defeated numerous future boxing champions in the ring—including Ezzard Charles and Archie Moore—but he was never given the opportunity to fight for a world title. Despite that

  • biwa (musical instrument)

    Biwa, Japanese short-necked lute, distinguished by its graceful, pear-shaped body. The biwa has a shallow, rounded back and silk strings (usually four or five) attached to slender lateral pegs. The instrument is played with a large wedge-shaped plectrum called a bachi. The strings are tuned in

  • biwa hōshi (Japanese troubadour)

    Japan: Kamakura culture: the new Buddhism and its influence: …country by Buddhist troubadours called biwa hōshi. After the middle Kamakura period, as Buddhist pessimism grew fainter, various kinds of instruction manuals and family injunctions were composed, while collections of essays such as Yoshida Kenkō’s Essays in Idleness (Tsurezuregusa) also made their appearance. The new nationalistic fervour aroused by the…

  • Biwa, Lake (lake, Japan)

    Lake Biwa, largest freshwater lake in Japan, located in Shiga ken (prefecture), west-central Honshu. Approximately 40 miles (64 km) long from north to south, the lake covers an area of 259 square miles (672 square km). Its name refers to the biwa, a Japanese musical instrument that the lake

  • Biwa-Ko (lake, Japan)

    Lake Biwa, largest freshwater lake in Japan, located in Shiga ken (prefecture), west-central Honshu. Approximately 40 miles (64 km) long from north to south, the lake covers an area of 259 square miles (672 square km). Its name refers to the biwa, a Japanese musical instrument that the lake

  • Biwat (people)

    Oceanic art and architecture: The Sepik River regions: …people, especially the Biwat (Mundugumor), carved slit gongs, shields, masks, and various types of figure sculpture. Masks, like those of the Kambot, were usually hemispheric. Small figures used as flute stops had grossly enlarged heads that projected forward; they were often carved in conjunction with parrots and other creatures.…

  • Bixa (plant genus)

    Malvales: Bixaceae: …to include only one genus, Bixa). The plants in Bixaceae have fibrous bark, canals containing exudate, branches that end at the inflorescence, large flowers, and seed coats with a very distinctive anatomy.

  • Bixa orellana (plant)

    Annatto, (Bixa orellana), tree native to the New World tropics and the only species of the family Bixaceae. Annatto grows up to 9 metres (30 feet) tall and has rose-pink flowers about 5 cm (2 inches) wide and ovate leaves about 8 to 18 cm (3 to 7 inches) long. The brown fruits, about 5 cm (2

  • Bixaceae (plant family)

    Malvales: Bixaceae: Cochlospermaceae (with genera Cochlospermum and Amoreuxia) and Diegodendraceae (with genus Diegodendron) are former families that are now included in Bixaceae (which used to include only one genus, Bixa). The plants in Bixaceae have fibrous bark, canals containing exudate, branches that end at the inflorescence,…

  • Bixby, Bill (American actor)

    Bill Bixby, U.S. actor (born Jan. 22, 1934, San Francisco, Calif.—died Nov. 21, 1993, Los Angeles, Calif.), was best remembered for three starring television roles: as reporter Tim O’Hara on "My Favorite Martian" (1963-66); as the widowed father of a six-year-old boy on "The Courtship of Eddie’s F

  • Bixia Yunjun (Chinese deity)

    Mount Tai: …spirit himself to his daughter, Taishan Niangniang (“The Lady of Mount Tai”)—also called Bixia Yunjun (“Goddess of the Colourful Clouds”)—whose cult had begun to grow from about 1000 and who became a northern Daoist equivalent to the Buddhist Guanyin (Kuan-yin) or to Avalokitesvara (bodhisattva of mercy), whose cult was powerful…

  • Biya (river, Russia)

    Altai Mountains: Drainage: The Katun, Bukhtarma, and Biya—all tributaries of the Ob River—are among the biggest. Rivers of the Gobi Altai are shorter, shallower, and often frozen in winter and dry in summer. There are more than 3,500 lakes, most of structural or glacial origin. Those of the Gobi Altai are often…

  • Biya, Paul (president of Cameroon)

    Cameroon: Transition: …was succeeded by Prime Minister Paul Biya under the constitution; however, Ahidjo remained head of the UNC, the sole political party. Despite Ahidjo’s resignation, he still had expectations of retaining control over the government—intentions that did not sit well with Biya. A confrontation soon followed when Ahidjo tried to assert…

  • Biyidi-Awala, Alexandre (Cameroonian author)

    Mongo Beti, Cameroonian novelist and political essayist. A member of the Beti people, he wrote his books in French. An essential theme of Beti’s early novels, which advocate the removal of all vestiges of colonialism, is the basic conflict of traditional modes of African society with the system of

  • Biysk (Russia)

    Biysk, city, Altay kray (region), central Russia. The city is situated on the right bank of the Biya River, just above the latter’s confluence with the Katun, which then forms the Ob. Biysk is located at the head of navigation on the Biya and is the terminus of a railway from Barnaul. The city is

  • Bizaia (province, Spain)

    Vizcaya, provincia (province) in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Basque Country, northern Spain. Originally a tribal territory of the Vascones (4th century), Vizcaya was vested in the crown of Castile and Leon in 1379, but the central government has always had difficulties ruling

  • bizarreness effect (psychology)

    mnemonic: Later developments: …a phenomenon known as the bizarreness effect. The bizarreness effect holds that items associated with bizarre sentences or phrases are more readily recalled than those associated with common sentences or phrases. For example, a student might better remember the five main vowels of the English alphabet (A, E, I, O,…

  • Bizen (Japan)

    Japanese pottery: Kamakura and Muromachi periods (1192–1573): …the size of its production; Bizen (Okayama prefecture), which produced an excellent unglazed stoneware from the Heian period to the 20th century; Tamba (Kyōto prefecture); Shigaraki (Shiga prefecture); and Echizen (Fukui prefecture). The wares of Seto, especially those made for Buddhist ceremonies, were regarded as the finest pottery of this…

  • Bizen ware (pottery)

    Bizen ware, pottery manufactured at and near Imbe, Okayama ken (prefecture), on the Inland Sea of Japan, from at least the 6th century ad, in what was once Bizen province. Bizen ware has a dark gray stoneware body that generally fires to a brick-red, brown, or deep bronze colour. The surface of B

  • Bizerta (Tunisia)

    Bizerte, town in northern Tunisia. It lies along the Mediterranean coast at the mouth of a channel that links Lake Bizerte with the sea. The town originated as a Phoenician outpost and was known through Carthaginian and Roman times as Hippo Diarrhytus or Hippo Zarytus. Captured in 661 ce by

  • Bizerte (Tunisia)

    Bizerte, town in northern Tunisia. It lies along the Mediterranean coast at the mouth of a channel that links Lake Bizerte with the sea. The town originated as a Phoenician outpost and was known through Carthaginian and Roman times as Hippo Diarrhytus or Hippo Zarytus. Captured in 661 ce by

  • Bizet, Alexandre-César-Léopold (French composer)

    Georges Bizet, French composer best remembered for his opera Carmen (1875). His realistic approach influenced the verismo school of opera at the end of the 19th century. Bizet’s father was a singing teacher and his mother a gifted amateur pianist, and his musical talents declared themselves so

  • Bizet, Georges (French composer)

    Georges Bizet, French composer best remembered for his opera Carmen (1875). His realistic approach influenced the verismo school of opera at the end of the 19th century. Bizet’s father was a singing teacher and his mother a gifted amateur pianist, and his musical talents declared themselves so

  • Bizika (people)

    Tujia, any member of a people distributed over western Hunan and southwestern Hubei provinces in China. The Tujia numbered more than eight million in the early 21st century. Their language, which remains unwritten and is spoken by only a few hundred thousand of the total population, belongs to the

  • Bizimungu, Pasteur (president of Rwanda)

    Rwanda: Genocide and aftermath: …transitional government was established, with Pasteur Bizimungu, a Hutu, as president and Paul Kagame, a Tutsi, as vice president.

  • Biziou, Peter (British cinematographer)
  • Bizkaia (province, Spain)

    Vizcaya, provincia (province) in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Basque Country, northern Spain. Originally a tribal territory of the Vascones (4th century), Vizcaya was vested in the crown of Castile and Leon in 1379, but the central government has always had difficulties ruling

  • Bizonia (historical division, Germany)

    20th-century international relations: The division of Europe: “Bizonia,” the product of an economic merger between the U.S. and British occupation zones, was announced on May 29, 1947, and a new U.S. policy followed on July 11 that ended Germany’s punitive period and aimed at making its economy self-sufficient. When in March 1948…

  • Bizzozero, Giulio (Italian pathologist)

    Giulio Bizzozero, Italian pathologist who, as professor of general pathology at the University of Turin, made it one of the most important European centres of medical scholarship. Among those who studied or worked in his laboratory were Edoardo Bassini, the surgeon who perfected the operation for

  • Bi?r ?awīl (geographic area, northwestern Africa)

    micronation: …micronations claim as their territory Bi?r ?awīl, a section of desert between Egypt and Sudan that remains unclaimed by any country. Others exist solely in concept and may possess little more than a Web site. A great number of micronations are tongue-in-cheek, such as the Conch Republic in Key West,…

  • bi?ur ?ametz (Judaism)

    Judaism: Pilgrim Festivals: …are destroyed by fire (bi?ur ?ametz). From then until after Pesa?, no leaven is consumed. Many Jews sell their more valuable leaven products to non-Jews before Passover (mekhirat ?ametz), repurchasing the foodstuffs immediately after the holiday.

  • Bjarni Benediktsson (prime minister of Iceland)

    Iceland: Political developments: …government with Independence Party leader Bjarni Benediktsson as prime minister.

  • Bjarni Herjólfsson (Viking explorer)

    European exploration: Exploration of the Atlantic coastlines: About 1000 ce, one Bjarni Herjulfsson, on his way from Iceland to Greenland, was blown off course far to the southwest; he saw an unknown shore and returned to tell his tale. Leif, Erik’s son, together with some 30 others, set out in 1001 to explore. They probably reached…

  • Bjarni Herjulfsson (Viking explorer)

    European exploration: Exploration of the Atlantic coastlines: About 1000 ce, one Bjarni Herjulfsson, on his way from Iceland to Greenland, was blown off course far to the southwest; he saw an unknown shore and returned to tell his tale. Leif, Erik’s son, together with some 30 others, set out in 1001 to explore. They probably reached…

  • BJD (political party, India)

    Biju Janata Dal (BJD), regional political party in Odisha (Orissa) state, eastern India. Although the party’s focus has been primarily in the state, it also has had a small but significant presence on the national political scene in New Delhi. The BJD does not profess any particular ideology,

  • Bjelke-Peterson, Sir Johannes (Australian politician)

    Sir Joh Bjelke-Peterson, Australian politician (born Jan. 13, 1911, Dannevirke, N.Z.—died April 23, 2005, Kingaroy, Queen., Australia), was the idiosyncratic right-wing premier of Queensland for a record 19 years (1968–87); he ruled with autocratic, near-absolute power until he was brought down i

  • Bjerknes, Jacob (Norwegian-American meteorologist)

    Jacob Bjerknes, Norwegian American meteorologist whose discovery that cyclones (low-pressure centres) originate as waves associated with sloping weather fronts that separate different air masses proved to be a major contribution to modern weather forecasting. The work of his father, the Norwegian

  • Bjerknes, Vilhelm (Norwegian meteorologist)

    Vilhelm Bjerknes, Norwegian meteorologist and physicist, one of the founders of the modern science of weather forecasting. As a youth Bjerknes assisted his father, a professor of mathematics at Christiania, with research in hydrodynamics. In 1890 he went to Germany and became an assistant to and

  • Bj?rgen, Marit (Norwegian skier)

    Marit Bj?rgen, Norwegian cross-country skier who was the greatest female athlete in the sport and who was also the most-decorated Winter Olympian in history; her record 15 medals included 8 golds. Bj?rgen grew up on a farm in Rognes, Norway, and took the typical route of a young Norwegian by

  • Bj?rgvin (Norway)

    Bergen, city and port, southwestern Norway. The principal port and business section is on a peninsula projecting into By Fjord, bounded to the north by the inlet and harbour of V?gen (for small ships) and on the south by Pudde Bay (for larger vessels) and the Store Lungeg?rds Lake. Originally

  • Bj?rk (Icelandic musician)

    Bj?rk, Icelandic singer-songwriter and actress best known for her solo work covering a wide variety of music styles. Integrating electronic and organic sounds, her music frequently explored the relationship between nature and technology. Bj?rk recorded her first solo album, a collection of cover

  • Bj?rketorp Stone (monument, Blekinge, Sweden)

    Bj?rketorp Stone, well-preserved 7th-century monument in Blekinge, Swed. More than 12 ft (3 12 m) high, it bears a runic inscription, the exact interpretation of which has been much debated. The inscription is magical in nature and is obviously intended to protect a grave. One possible

  • Bj?rling, Gunnar (Finnish author)

    Finnish literature: Lyric poetry: Gunnar Bj?rling, the Dadaist of Finland, expressed his philosophical idea of the relativity and incompleteness of everything in elliptic poems with highly idiosyncratic grammar and broken syntax. Both Diktonius and Bj?rling turned later to more-serene nature poetry. Rabbe Enckell was a key theoretician of the…

  • Bj?rling, Johan Jonaton (Swedish singer)

    Jussi Bj?rling, Swedish tenor, admired for the musicianship of his performances, particularly in the Italian and French repertory. At the age of six Bj?rling began singing under the guidance of his father, who then took him and his two brothers on tours in Scandinavia and the United States as a

  • Bj?rling, Jussi (Swedish singer)

    Jussi Bj?rling, Swedish tenor, admired for the musicianship of his performances, particularly in the Italian and French repertory. At the age of six Bj?rling began singing under the guidance of his father, who then took him and his two brothers on tours in Scandinavia and the United States as a

  • Bj?rndalen, Ole Einar (Norwegian athlete)

    Ole Einar Bj?rndalen, Norwegian biathlete whose 13 Olympic Games medals are the most for any male Winter Olympian and who is widely considered the greatest biathlete of all time. Bj?rndalen, the youngest of five children, grew up on a farm in Simostranda, Norway, where he became a skilled

  • Bj?rneboe, Jens (Norwegian author)

    Jens Bj?rneboe, Norwegian novelist, dramatist, essayist, and poet whose work was generally inspired by a sense of outrage at the misuse of power in the modern world. At the beginning of the 21st century, he was considered to be one of Norway’s more significant postwar writers. Bj?rneboe began his

  • Bj?rneboe, Jens Ingvald (Norwegian author)

    Jens Bj?rneboe, Norwegian novelist, dramatist, essayist, and poet whose work was generally inspired by a sense of outrage at the misuse of power in the modern world. At the beginning of the 21st century, he was considered to be one of Norway’s more significant postwar writers. Bj?rneboe began his

  • Bj?rneborg (Finland)

    Pori, city, southwestern Finland. It lies along the Kokem?en River near the Gulf of Bothnia, north-northwest of Turku. Originally settled in the 12th century farther up the Kokem?en and chartered as Ulvila in 1365, it was moved to its present site in 1558. It was destroyed by fire in the 16th and

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