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  • Bordone, Paris Paschalinus (Italian painter)

    Paris Bordone, Renaissance Venetian painter of religious, mythological, and anecdotal subjects. He is perhaps best known for his striking sexualized paintings of women. After his father’s death, Bordone moved with his mother to Venice. He probably became a pupil of Titian about 1516 but remained in

  • Bordoni, Faustina (Italian opera singer)

    Faustina Bordoni, Italian mezzo-soprano, one of the first great prima donnas, known for her beauty and acting as well as her vocal range and breath control. Of a noble family, she studied with Michelangelo Gasparini under the patronage of Alessandro and Benedetto Marcello. In 1716 she made a

  • Borduas, Paul-émile (Canadian painter)

    Paul-émile Borduas, Canadian painter. He was trained in Montreal as a church decorator and later studied in Paris. In the early 1940s, influenced by Surrealism, he began to produce “automatic” paintings and with Jean-Paul Riopelle founded the radical abstract group known as Les Automatistes (c.

  • bordure (heraldry)

    heraldry: Ordinaries: The border, or bordure, is in Scotland used as a mark of difference, and in English heraldry since the mid-18th century a bordure compony (alternating sections of two tinctures) has been used to signify illegitimacy. The orle is an inner border, not touching the sides of…

  • bore (engineering)

    gasoline engine: Combustion chamber: Bore is the inner diameter of the cylinder. The volume at bottom dead centre (VBDC) is defined as the volume occupied between the cylinder head and the piston face when the piston is farthest from the cylinder head. The volume at top dead centre (VTDC)…

  • bore (firearms)

    Bore, in weaponry, the interior of the barrel of a gun or firearm. In guns that have rifled barrels, e.g., rifles, pistols, machine guns, and artillery or naval guns, the diameter of the bore is termed the calibre. (The term “calibre” also designates the outside diameter of the projectile or

  • bore (tidal current)

    Tidal bore, body of water that, during exceptionally high sea tides, rushes up some rivers and estuaries near a coast where there is a large tidal range and the incoming tide is confined to a narrow channel. Traveling upstream about two or three times as fast as the normal tidal current, a bore

  • bore (wind instruments)

    sound: Bore configuration and harmonicity: The bore shapes of musical instruments, which have developed over the centuries, have rather interesting effects. Cylindrical and conical bores can produce resonances that are harmonics of the fundamental frequencies, but bores that flare faster than a cone create nonharmonic overtones…

  • Boré, Jean étienne (American agriculturalist)

    Jean étienne de Boré, founder of the sugar industry in Louisiana. Of noble Norman ancestry, de Boré was educated in France and served for 10 years in the household guard of Louis XV before he established himself as an indigo planter in Louisiana. When pests ruined the indigo crop in the early

  • Boreal Climatic Interval (geology)

    Europe: Climatic change: …first postglacial climatic phase (the Boreal), spruce, fir, pine, birch, and hazel nevertheless established themselves as far north as central Sweden and Finland. During the succeeding climatic optimum (the Atlantic phase), which was probably wetter and certainly somewhat warmer, mixed forests of oak, elm, common lime (linden), and elder spread…

  • boreal forest (northern forest)

    Taiga, biome (major life zone) of vegetation composed primarily of cone-bearing needle-leaved or scale-leaved evergreen trees, found in northern circumpolar forested regions characterized by long winters and moderate to high annual precipitation. The taiga, “land of the little sticks” in Russian,

  • boreal forest moss (plant species)

    Feather moss, (Ptilium, formerly Hypnum, crista-castrensis), the only species of the genus Ptilium, it is a widely distributed plant of the subclass Bryidae that forms dense light green mats on rocks, rotten wood, or peaty soil, especially in mountain forests of the Northern Hemisphere. The erect

  • Boreal kingdom (biogeography)

    biogeographic region: Boreal kingdom: The Boreal, or Holarctic, kingdom (Figure 1) consists of Eurasia and North America, which essentially have been a contiguous mass since the Eocene Epoch (55.8 million to 33.9 million years ago). The narrow Bering Strait, between Siberia and Alaska, has existed only since…

  • Boreal Stage (geology)

    Europe: Climatic change: …first postglacial climatic phase (the Boreal), spruce, fir, pine, birch, and hazel nevertheless established themselves as far north as central Sweden and Finland. During the succeeding climatic optimum (the Atlantic phase), which was probably wetter and certainly somewhat warmer, mixed forests of oak, elm, common lime (linden), and elder spread…

  • Boreal–Atlantic Transition (geochronology)

    Holocene Epoch: Continental shelf and coastal regions: …forests in western Europe (the BAT, or “Boreal–Atlantic Transition”). In The Netherlands the barrier beaches re-formed close to the present coastline, and widespread tidal flats developed to the interior. These are known as the Calais Beds (or Calaisian) from the definition in Flanders by Dubois. In the protected inner margins,…

  • Boreas (Greek mythology)

    Boreas, in Greek mythology, the personification of the north wind. He carried off the beautiful Oreithyia, a daughter of Erechtheus, king of Athens; they lived in Thrace as king and queen of the winds and had two sons, Calais and Zetes, and two daughters, Cleopatra and Chione. To show friendliness

  • boredom

    occupational disease: Disorders due to psychological factors: …commonly encountered at work are boredom and mental stress. Workers who perform simple, repetitious tasks for prolonged periods are subject to boredom, as are people who work in bland, colourless environments. Boredom can cause frustration, unhappiness, inattentiveness, and other detriments to mental well-being. More practically, boredom decreases worker output and…

  • borehole (geological science)

    Earth exploration: The deepest borehole so far drilled extends only to a depth of about 10 kilometres (6 miles). Because direct exploration is so restricted, investigators are forced to rely extensively on geophysical measurements (see below Methodology and instrumentation).

  • borehole camera logging (mining)

    well logging: Borehole cameras are sometimes used as part of the logging process.

  • borehole deformeter (instrument)

    tunnels and underground excavations: Rock-mechanics investigation: …cylindrical instrument known as a borehole deformeter. A small hole is drilled into the rock and the deformeter inserted. Diameter changes of the borehole are measured and recorded by the deformeter as the geostress is relieved by overcoring (cutting a circular core around the small hole) with a six-inch bit.…

  • Borel, émile (French mathematician)

    émile Borel, French mathematician who created the first effective theory of the measure of sets of points and who shares credit with René-Louis Baire and Henri Lebesgue of France for launching the modern theory of functions of a real variable. The son of a Protestant pastor, Borel exhibited his

  • Borel, Félix-édouard-Justin-émile (French mathematician)

    émile Borel, French mathematician who created the first effective theory of the measure of sets of points and who shares credit with René-Louis Baire and Henri Lebesgue of France for launching the modern theory of functions of a real variable. The son of a Protestant pastor, Borel exhibited his

  • Borel, Jacques (French author)

    Jacques Borel, French writer, translator, and critic. The son of a civil servant, Borel was educated at the Sorbonne, graduating in 1949, and for several years was an English teacher at various lycées in France (1952–67) and a visiting professor at various colleges and universities in the United

  • Borel, Joseph-Pierre (French author)

    Petrus Borel, French poet, novelist, and critic active in the Romantic movement. The 12th of an ironmonger’s 14 children, Borel was trained as an architect but turned to literature and became one of the most eccentric young writers of the 1830s, assuming the name of “Lycanthrope” (“Wolf-Man”). He

  • Borel, Petrus (French author)

    Petrus Borel, French poet, novelist, and critic active in the Romantic movement. The 12th of an ironmonger’s 14 children, Borel was trained as an architect but turned to literature and became one of the most eccentric young writers of the 1830s, assuming the name of “Lycanthrope” (“Wolf-Man”). He

  • Borelli, Giovanni Alfonso (Italian physiologist and physicist)

    Giovanni Alfonso Borelli, Italian physiologist and physicist who was the first to explain muscular movement and other body functions according to the laws of statics and dynamics. He was appointed professor of mathematics at Messina in 1649 and at Pisa in 1656. In 1667 he returned to Messina and in

  • Boreman, Linda (American actress)

    Linda Lovelace, (Linda Boreman), American actress (born Jan. 10, 1949, Bronx, N.Y.—died April 22, 2002, Denver, Colo.), starred in the classic feature-length pornographic movie Deep Throat (1972), which ended up being shown in mainstream theatres and earned some $600 million. She later revealed t

  • Boreman, Thomas (British publisher)

    children's literature: From T.W. to Alice (1712?–1865): …start from merchants such as Thomas Boreman, of whom little is known, and especially John Newbery, of whom a great deal more is known. Research has established that at least as early as 1730 Boreman began publishing for children (largely educational works) and that in 1742 he produced what sounds…

  • Boren, David (United States senator)

    National Security Education Program: David Boren and authorized by the David L. Boren National Security Act of 1991.

  • Borenius, Tancred (Finnish art historian)

    Tancred Borenius, Finnish art historian who had a profound knowledge of Italian painting. After studying at Helsinki and in Italy, Borenius was appointed in 1914 lecturer and in 1922 professor of art history at University College, London. When Finland became independent, he acted as secretary of

  • borer (bivalve)

    bivalve: Food and feeding: Shipworms are wood borers and are both protected and nourished by the wood they inhabit. They possess ctenidia and are capable of filtering food from the sea. When elongating the burrow, they digest the wood as well. In the Tridacnidae, symbiotic zooxanthellae (minute algal cells) are contained…

  • borer beetle (insect)

    Borer beetle, any of a number of species of insects that are included in the family Anobiidae (order Coleoptera). These beetles tend to be small (1 to 9 mm, or less than 0.5 inch) and cylindrical. When disturbed, they usually pull in their legs and play dead. The best-known borers are the cigarette

  • Borg Naffz, Anita (American computer scientist)

    Anita Borg, American computer scientist who advocated for women’s advancement in technology. Borg attended the University of Washington in Seattle for two years. She later studied at New York University, where she received a doctorate (1981) for her work on synchronization efficiency in operating

  • Borg Olivier, George (prime minister of Malta)

    George Borg Olivier, Maltese politician who led the Maltese Nationalist Party from 1950 to 1976 and twice served as the island’s prime minister (December 1950 to March 1955 and March 1962 to June 1971), including the period during which Malta gained independence from Britain in 1964. Borg Olivier’s

  • Borg, Anita (American computer scientist)

    Anita Borg, American computer scientist who advocated for women’s advancement in technology. Borg attended the University of Washington in Seattle for two years. She later studied at New York University, where she received a doctorate (1981) for her work on synchronization efficiency in operating

  • Borg, Arne (Swedish athlete)

    Arne Borg, Swedish athlete, one of the dominant swimmers of the 1920s. Between 1921 and 1929 Borg set 32 world records in swimming. He was the winner of two silver medals and a bronze medal at the 1924 Olympics in Paris and a gold and a bronze medal at the 1928 Games in Amsterdam. At the 1924

  • Borg, Bj?rn (Swedish tennis player)

    Bj?rn Borg, Swedish tennis player who was one of the finest competitors of the modern era. He was the first man to win the Wimbledon singles championship five successive times (1976–80) since Laurie Doherty (1902–06). He won the French Open men’s singles championship an unprecedented four times in

  • Borg, Bj?rn Rune (Swedish tennis player)

    Bj?rn Borg, Swedish tennis player who was one of the finest competitors of the modern era. He was the first man to win the Wimbledon singles championship five successive times (1976–80) since Laurie Doherty (1902–06). He won the French Open men’s singles championship an unprecedented four times in

  • Borg? (Finland)

    Porvoo, city, southern Finland, at the mouth of the Porvoo River on the Gulf of Finland, northeast of Helsinki. About one-third of the population is Swedish speaking. One of Finland’s oldest communities, it has been a trade centre since the early 14th century and received town rights in 1346. It

  • Borg? Diet (Finnish politics)

    Finland: The era of bureaucracy: …was laid down by the Porvoo (Borg?) Diet in 1809. Finland was still formally a part of Sweden until the peace treaty of Hamina (Fredrikshamn) later that year, but most of the Finnish leaders had already grown tired of Swedish control and wanted to acquire as much self-government as possible…

  • Borgar Fjord (inlet, Iceland)

    Faxa Bay: …arms: Hval Fjord (Hvalfj?rdhur) and Borgar Fjord (Borgarfj?rdhur). Hval Fjord provides shelter for ships and was used as an anchorage for Allied naval convoys during World War II. It is now a fishing and whaling base.

  • Borgarfj?rdhur (inlet, Iceland)

    Faxa Bay: …arms: Hval Fjord (Hvalfj?rdhur) and Borgar Fjord (Borgarfj?rdhur). Hval Fjord provides shelter for ships and was used as an anchorage for Allied naval convoys during World War II. It is now a fishing and whaling base.

  • borgate romane (residential areas, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: Housing and education: …rural-urban fringe known as the borgate romane. The exodus of lower-class Romans to the periphery was further encouraged by Mussolini, whose creation of grand boulevards in the city centre destroyed entire neighbourhoods there. Many of the numerous rural Italians who moved to Rome in the mid-20th century also crowded into…

  • Borge Martínez, Tomás (Nicaraguan revolutionary)

    Tomás Borge Martínez, Nicaraguan revolutionary and politician (born Aug. 13, 1930, Matagalpa, Nic.—died April 30, 2012, Managua, Nic.), was a founder (1961) and leader of the Sandinista National Liberation Front, the rebel group that overthrew (1979) Pres. Anastasio Somoza Debayle and thereby ended

  • B?rge Mountains National Park (national park, Norway)

    B?rge Mountains National Park, national park occupying an area of 420 square miles (1,087 square km) in northern Norway. Designated a national park in 1970, the site consists mostly of granitic mountains with an alpine terrain of cirques and steep-walled valleys. The highest peak in the park is

  • Borge, Victor (American comedian and musician)

    Victor Borge, Danish-born American pianist and comedian who was known worldwide for his irrepressible humour, which combined deadpan delivery, clever wordplay, satire, irreverence, and physical comedy as well as music. Borge’s mother began teaching him to play the piano when he was three, and it

  • B?rgefjell Nasjonalpark (national park, Norway)

    B?rge Mountains National Park, national park occupying an area of 420 square miles (1,087 square km) in northern Norway. Designated a national park in 1970, the site consists mostly of granitic mountains with an alpine terrain of cirques and steep-walled valleys. The highest peak in the park is

  • Borgen, Johan (Norwegian author)

    Johan Borgen, Norwegian novelist, short-story writer, dramatist, and essayist, one of 20th-century Norway’s most important and versatile writers. Borgen was born into a bourgeois family, but, though he was politically inactive, he himself was often considered a member of the radical left. His

  • Borgen, Johan Collet Müller (Norwegian author)

    Johan Borgen, Norwegian novelist, short-story writer, dramatist, and essayist, one of 20th-century Norway’s most important and versatile writers. Borgen was born into a bourgeois family, but, though he was politically inactive, he himself was often considered a member of the radical left. His

  • Borger (Texas, United States)

    Borger, city, Hutchinson county, northwestern Texas, U.S., in the Texas Panhandle, near Sanford Dam, 45 miles (72 km) northeast of Amarillo. Part of the Borger-Phillips-Bunavista tri-city industrial complex in an area producing oil and gas, Borger was founded in 1926 and incorporated the same year

  • Borges, Jorge Luis (Argentine author)

    Jorge Luis Borges, Argentine poet, essayist, and short-story writer whose works became classics of 20th-century world literature. Borges was reared in the then-shabby Palermo district of Buenos Aires, the setting of some of his works. His family, which had been notable in Argentine history,

  • Borgg?rdstalet (Swedish history)

    Gustav V: During the Courtyard Crisis in February 1914, Gustav declared his support for demands that Sweden strengthen its defenses. He was accused of overstepping his authority, but, with wide popular support for his actions, he was able to force the resignation of the Liberal government that had decreased…

  • Borghese family (Italian family)

    Borghese Family, a noble Italian family, originally from Siena, who first gained fame in the 13th century as magistrates, ambassadors, and other public officials. They moved to Rome in the 16th century and there, following the election (1605) of Camillo as Pope Paul V, rose in wealth and fame.

  • Borghese Gallery (museum, Rome, Italy)

    Borghese Gallery, state museum in Rome distinguished for its collection of Italian Baroque painting and ancient sculpture. It is located in the Borghese Gardens on the Pincian Hill and is housed in the Villa Borghese, a building designed by the Dutch architect Jan van Santen (Giovanni Vasanzio)

  • Borghese Gladiator (sculpture by Agasias)

    Agasias: …of Ephesus, known for his Borghese Warrior, a statue of a warrior on foot in combat with a warrior on horseback.

  • Borghese, Camillo (pope)

    Paul V, Italian pope from 1605 to 1621. A distinguished canon lawyer, he was papal envoy to Spain for Pope Clement VIII, who made him cardinal in 1596. He became vicar of Rome in 1603 and on May 16, 1605, was elected as Pope Leo XI’s successor at a time when the Kingdom of Naples and the Venetian

  • Borghese, Villa (estate, Rome, Italy)

    Borghese Family: …project was to have the Villa Borghese built in Rome, where he assembled an important collection of paintings and sculptures.

  • Borghesi, Bartolomeo (San Marinese statesman)

    Theodor Mommsen: Early years: …of inscriptions—under the guidance of Bartolomeo Borghesi, the learned statesman of San Marino. Within the next several decades Mommsen made the corpus of Latin inscriptions into a source work that was essential in complementing the one-sidedly literary tradition and that, for the first time, made a comprehensive understanding of life…

  • Borghn?s (ancient city, Sweden)

    Borl?nge: …Ages a stronghold known as Borghn?s was located near the present site; its destruction in 1434 opened a war of liberation against the Danes. With the coming of railroads, beginning in 1875, Borl?nge developed into an important commercial centre for the surrounding agricultural and industrial areas. In 1891 it became…

  • Borgia (novel by Klabund)

    Klabund: …the Fool) and Borgia (1928; The Incredible Borgias). Li-tai-pe (1916) and Lao-tse (1921) are also among his works.

  • Borgia family (Italian family)

    Borgia Family, descendants of a noble line, originally from Valencia, Spain, that established roots in Italy and became prominent in ecclesiastical and political affairs in the 1400s and 1500s. The house of the Borgias produced two popes and many other political and church leaders. Some members of

  • Borgia, Alfonso di (pope)

    Calixtus III, pope from 1455 to 1458. As a member of the Aragonese court, he reconciled King Alfonso V with Pope Martin V, who appointed (1429) Calixtus bishop of Valencia. Pope Eugenius IV made him cardinal in 1444. As a compromise between the influential Colonna and Orsini families of Rome,

  • Borgia, Cesare (Italian noble)

    Cesare Borgia, natural son of Pope Alexander VI. He was a Renaissance captain who, as holder of the offices of duke of the Romagna and captain general of the armies of the church, enhanced the political power of his father’s papacy and tried to establish his own principality in central Italy. His

  • Borgia, Cesare, duke of Valentinois (Italian noble)

    Cesare Borgia, natural son of Pope Alexander VI. He was a Renaissance captain who, as holder of the offices of duke of the Romagna and captain general of the armies of the church, enhanced the political power of his father’s papacy and tried to establish his own principality in central Italy. His

  • Borgia, Juan (Italian duke)

    Alexander VI: His son Juan was made duke of Gandía (Spain) and was married to Maria Enriquez, the cousin of King Ferdinand IV of Castile; Jofré was married to Sancia, the granddaughter of the king of Naples; and Lucrezia was given first to Giovanni Sforza of Milan, and, when…

  • Borgia, Lucrezia (Italian noble)

    Lucrezia Borgia, Italian noblewoman and a central figure of the infamous Borgia family of the Italian Renaissance. Daughter of the Spanish cardinal Rodrigo Borgia, later Pope Alexander VI, and his Roman mistress Vannozza Catanei, and sister of Cesare, Lucrezia is often accused of sharing in their

  • Borgia, Pedro Luis, duke of Gandía (Italian noble)

    Cesare Borgia: Youth and education: His elder half brother, Pedro Luis, was duke of Gandía, and all of his early benefices were in Spain. At the age of seven Cesare was made an apostolic prothonotary and canon of the cathedral of Valencia.

  • Borgia, Rodrigo (pope)

    Alexander VI, corrupt, worldly, and ambitious pope (1492–1503), whose neglect of the spiritual inheritance of the church contributed to the development of the Protestant Reformation. Rodrigo was born into the Spanish branch of the prominent and powerful Borgia family. His uncle Alonso de Borgia,

  • Borgia, Saint Francis (Jesuit superior general)

    Saint Francis Borgia, ; canonized 1671; feast day October 10), Spanish nobleman who, as the third general of the Society of Jesus, was instrumental in spreading the Jesuits’ influence throughout Europe. Educated at Saragossa, Spain, he married Eleanor de Castro, a Portuguese noblewoman, in 1529.

  • Borgias, The (television program)

    Neil Jordan: …Jordan created the television series The Borgias (2011–13) and wrote and directed several of its episodes. Jordan’s fiction writing included the short-story collection Night in Tunisia (1976) and the novels The Past (1980), Sunrise with Sea Monster (1994), Shade (2004), Mistaken (2011), and The Drowned Detective (2016).

  • Borglum, Gutzon (American sculptor)

    Gutzon Borglum, American sculptor, who is best known for his colossal sculpture of the faces of four U.S. presidents on Mount Rushmore in South Dakota. The son of Danish immigrants, Borglum was raised from age seven in Nebraska. He studied art in San Francisco and then, from 1890 to 1893, in Paris

  • Borglum, John Gutzon de la Mothe (American sculptor)

    Gutzon Borglum, American sculptor, who is best known for his colossal sculpture of the faces of four U.S. presidents on Mount Rushmore in South Dakota. The son of Danish immigrants, Borglum was raised from age seven in Nebraska. He studied art in San Francisco and then, from 1890 to 1893, in Paris

  • Borgnine, Ernest (American actor)

    Ernest Borgnine, American actor whose portly physique and coarse features made him a commanding presence in scores of films and television productions, in which he skillfully portrayed characters ranging from brutish thugs to hapless everymen. Borgnino was born to Italian immigrant parents. As a

  • Borgnino, Ermes Effron (American actor)

    Ernest Borgnine, American actor whose portly physique and coarse features made him a commanding presence in scores of films and television productions, in which he skillfully portrayed characters ranging from brutish thugs to hapless everymen. Borgnino was born to Italian immigrant parents. As a

  • Borgo Maggiore (San Marino, Europe)

    Borgo Maggiore, town, Republic of San Marino, located northeast of the city of San Marino, the republic’s capital, on the slopes of Monte Titano, at an elevation of 1,706 ft (520 m) above sea level. It is considered a suburb of the city of San Marino and has most of the capital’s shops and offices.

  • Borgongini-Duca, Francesco (Italian cardinal)

    Francesco Borgongini-Duca, cardinal, Vatican dignitary, and author of the Lateran Treaty, which assured the Holy See independence from Italy and sovereignty in international relations. Ordained priest on Dec. 22, 1906, Borgongini-Duca was, from 1907 to 1921, professor of theology at the Urban

  • Borgou (region, West Africa)

    Borgu, inland region of western Africa, covering parts of what is now Benin and Nigeria and bounded northeast and east by the Niger River. Its name probably derives from the aquatic grass called borgu, a cattle food. The peoples of the region formerly gave allegiance to the sultan of Borgu and the

  • Borgsl?gtens historie (work by Gunnarsson)

    Gunnar Gunnarsson: …first volume of his novel Borgsl?gtens historie (“The Family from Borg”) appeared. It became a Scandinavian best-seller. The other three parts appeared from 1912 to 1914 (partial Eng. trans., Guest the One-Eyed). Gunnarsson married a Dane and lived and wrote in Denmark until 1939, when he returned to Iceland and…

  • Borgu (region, West Africa)

    Borgu, inland region of western Africa, covering parts of what is now Benin and Nigeria and bounded northeast and east by the Niger River. Its name probably derives from the aquatic grass called borgu, a cattle food. The peoples of the region formerly gave allegiance to the sultan of Borgu and the

  • Borgu (emirate, Nigeria)

    Borgu, traditional emirate, Niger State, western Nigeria. After a race by the colonial developer Frederick Lugard, on behalf of the Royal Niger Company, in 1894 to beat the French to Nikki (now in Benin), the capital of the Borgu kingdom, to sign a commercial treaty, France and Britain settled

  • Borgund Stave church (Norway)

    stave church: …the stave church is the Borgund church (c. 1150) in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. Its complicated, ambulatory plan utilizes freestanding posts in the nave to support the tall central portion of the structure. The church’s six levels of gable roofs, shell-like exterior shingles, and elaborate carvings of grotesque masks…

  • Borhyaena (fossil marsupial genus)

    Borhyaenidae: …is named for the genus Borhyaena; hyena-like specimens of this genus, found in early Miocene rocks of Argentina (23 million years old), had large skulls and heavy crushing teeth. Not all borhyaenids, however, were hyenoid. Thylacosmilus was a Pliocene-aged marsupial counterpart of the sabre-toothed tiger. Many other forms were wolflike…

  • Borhyaenidae (fossil marsupial family)

    Borhyaenidae, family of extinct South American marsupial mammals occurring from the Early Paleocene Epoch into the Early Pliocene (from about 63.5 to 5 million years ago). It is named for the genus Borhyaena; hyena-like specimens of this genus, found in early Miocene rocks of Argentina (23 million

  • Bori cult (Hausa culture)

    African dance: The religious context: …and spirit possession in the Bori cult. Among the Jukun of Nigeria, a similar organization is called the Ajun, whose elders deal with hysterical disorders in women by exorcising evil spirits in initiation ceremonies. During a three-month period in a house shrine, the sufferer is taught songs and dances that…

  • boric acid (chemical compound)

    Boric acid, (H3BO3), white crystalline, oxygen-bearing acid of boron found in certain minerals and volcanic waters or hot springs (see

  • boric oxide (chemical compound)

    glass: Optical and high-temperature glass: …a flux is replaced by boric oxide (B2O3) and some of the lime by alumina. Another familiar special glass is the lead crystal glass used in the manufacture of superior tableware; by using lead monoxide (PbO) as a flux, it is possible to obtain a glass with a high refractive…

  • Boridae (insect family)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Boridae Widely distributed small group; sometimes placed in Tenebrionidae. Family Ciidae (minute tree-fungus beetles) Occur under bark, in wood, or in dry woody fungi; about 360 species; widely distributed. Family Melandryidae (false darkling

  • boride (chemical compound)

    Boride, any of a class of hard substances in which boron is chemically combined with various metals (see

  • Borinage (region, Belgium)

    Borinage, coal-mining and industrial region of southwestern Belgium, Hainaut province, southwest of Mons. Borinage’s development was based on coal extracted from the area since the Middle Ages. The mines are no longer operative; the principal industries are metallurgy (in the town of Jemappes) and

  • boring (construction)

    hand tool: Drilling and boring tools: A varied terminology is related to making holes with revolving tools. A hole may be drilled or bored; awls, gimlets, and augers also produce holes. An awl is the simplest hole maker, for, like a needle, it simply pushes material to one side…

  • boring clam (mollusk)

    Piddock, any of the marine bivalve mollusks of the family Pholadidae (Adesmoidea). Worldwide in distribution, they are especially adapted for boring into rock, shells, peat, hard clay, or mud. Most species occur in the intertidal zone, a few in deeper water. One end of each of the two valves is

  • boring machine

    Boring machine, device for producing smooth and accurate holes in a workpiece by enlarging existing holes with a bore, which may bear a single cutting tip of steel, cemented carbide, or diamond or may be a small grinding wheel. Single-point tools, gripped in a boring head attached to a rotating

  • boring sponge (sponge)

    Clionid, any member of the sponge family Clionidae (class Demospongiae, phylum Porifera), noted for its ability to dissolve and bore into calcium-containing substances, such as limestone, coral, and mollusk shells. Clionid sponges occur in all oceans. The microscopic clionid larva attaches itself

  • boring tool (construction)

    hand tool: Drilling and boring tools: A varied terminology is related to making holes with revolving tools. A hole may be drilled or bored; awls, gimlets, and augers also produce holes. An awl is the simplest hole maker, for, like a needle, it simply pushes material to one side…

  • Boring, Edwin G. (American psychologist)

    Edwin G. Boring, American psychologist first recognized for his experimental work but later known as a historian of psychology. Boring studied engineering and psychology at Cornell University, receiving his Ph.D. in the latter in 1914. He taught at Clark University and then went to Harvard

  • Boring, Edwin Garrigues (American psychologist)

    Edwin G. Boring, American psychologist first recognized for his experimental work but later known as a historian of psychology. Boring studied engineering and psychology at Cornell University, receiving his Ph.D. in the latter in 1914. He taught at Clark University and then went to Harvard

  • Borinquen

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