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  • Bak? (national capital, Azerbaijan)

    Baku, city, capital of Azerbaijan. It lies on the western shore of the Caspian Sea and the southern side of the Ab?eron Peninsula, around the wide curving sweep of the Bay of Baku. The bay, sheltered by the islands of the Baku Archipelago, provides the best harbour of the Caspian, while the Ab?eron

  • Bak? (Turkish author)

    Bak?, one of the greatest lyric poets of the classical period of Ottoman Turkish literature. The son of a muezzin, he lived in Constantinople. After an apprenticeship as a saddler, he entered a religious college, where he studied Islāmic law. He also came into contact with many famous men of

  • Bakikhanov (Azerbaijani playwright)

    Azerbaijan: Russian suzerainty: …of the Azerbaijani language were ?Abbās Qolī āghā Bāq?khānl? (Bakikhanov), who wrote poetry as well as histories of the region, and Mīrzā Fat? ?Alī ākhūndzādeh (Akhundov), author of the first Azerbaijani plays. Though eventually these figures would be incorporated into a national narrative as predecessors of the Turkic revival, a…

  • baking (cooking)

    Baking, process of cooking by dry heat, especially in some kind of oven. It is probably the oldest cooking method. Bakery products, which include bread, rolls, cookies, pies, pastries, and muffins, are usually prepared from flour or meal derived from some form of grain. Bread, already a common

  • baking chocolate

    cocoa: Baking chocolate: Baking (bitter) chocolate, popular for household baking, is pure chocolate liquor made from finely ground nibs, the broken pieces of roasted, shelled cocoa beans. This chocolate, bitter because it contains no sugar, can be either the natural or the alkalized type.

  • baking powder

    Baking powder, leavening agent (q.v.) used in making baked

  • baking soda (chemical compound)

    alkali: …of which gives the desired sodium bicarbonate as well as ammonium chloride. The sodium bicarbonate is then heated to decompose it to the desired sodium carbonate. The ammonia involved in the process is almost completely recovered by treating the ammonium chloride with lime to yield ammonia and calcium chloride. The…

  • baking squash (plant)

    pumpkin: …and used interchangeably with other winter squashes. In the United States and Canada, pumpkin pie is a traditional Thanksgiving and Christmas dessert. In some places, pumpkins are used as Halloween decorations known as jack-o’-lanterns, in which the interior of the pumpkin is cleaned out and a light is inserted to…

  • Bakiyev, Kurmanbek (president of Kyrgyzstan)

    Kurmanbek Bakiyev, Kyrgyz politician who served as prime minister (2000–02) and president (2005–10) of Kyrgyzstan. After graduating in 1972 from the Kuybyshev (now Samara) Polytechnic Institute in Russia, Bakiyev worked as an electrical engineer until 1990, when he began serving in a series of

  • Bakkah (Saudi Arabia)

    Mecca, city, western Saudi Arabia, located in the ?irāt Mountains, inland from the Red Sea coast. It is the holiest of Muslim cities. Muhammad, the founder of Islam, was born in Mecca, and it is toward this religious centre that Muslims turn five times daily in prayer. All devout and able Muslims

  • Bakke decision (law case)

    Bakke decision, ruling in which, on June 28, 1978, the U.S. Supreme Court declared affirmative action constitutional but invalidated the use of racial quotas. The medical school at the University of California, Davis, as part of the university’s affirmative action program, had reserved 16 percent

  • Bakke, Allan (American medical student)

    Bakke decision: Allan Bakke, a white California man who had twice unsuccessfully applied for admission to the medical school, filed suit against the university. Citing evidence that his grades and test scores surpassed those of many minority students who had been accepted for admission, Bakke charged that…

  • Bakken, Jill (American athlete)

    bobsledding: …inaugural women’s event went to Jill Bakken and Vonetta Flowers of the United States. Flowers was the first black athlete to win an Olympic gold medal at the Winter Games.

  • Bakker, James Orsen (American televangelist)

    Jimmy Swaggart: …Swaggart publicly accused fellow televangelist Jim Bakker of immoral sexual behaviour. This denunciation, which some saw as a move by Swaggart to take over Bakker’s empire, precipitated a closer look at Swaggart’s own life, leading to the revelation that he had performed voyeuristic acts with a female prostitute. Indeed, another…

  • Bakker, Jim (American televangelist)

    Jimmy Swaggart: …Swaggart publicly accused fellow televangelist Jim Bakker of immoral sexual behaviour. This denunciation, which some saw as a move by Swaggart to take over Bakker’s empire, precipitated a closer look at Swaggart’s own life, leading to the revelation that he had performed voyeuristic acts with a female prostitute. Indeed, another…

  • Bakker, Tammy Faye (American televangelist)

    Tammy Faye Messner, (Tammy Faye LaValley; Tammy Faye Bakker), American televangelist (born March 7, 1942, International Falls, Minn.—died July 20, 2007 , near Kansas City, Mo.), was best remembered as the diminutive wife of Jim Bakker and as his cohost on the televised Jim and Tammy Show, which was

  • Baklanov, Oleg (Soviet politician)

    collapse of the Soviet Union: The coup against Gorbachev: …chief of staff, Valery Boldin; Oleg Baklanov, first deputy chairman of the U.S.S.R. defense council; Oleg Shenin, secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU); and Gen. Valentin Varennikov, chief of the Soviet Army’s ground forces. They were accompanied by KGB Gen. Yury Plekhanov,…

  • baklava (food)

    Baklava, rich Turkish, Greek, and Middle Eastern pastry of phyllo (filo) dough and nuts. Phyllo is a simple flour-and-water dough that is stretched to paper thinness and cut into sheets, a process so exacting that it is frequently left to commercial manufacturers. For baklava, 30 or 40 sheets of

  • Bakocs, Tamás (Hungarian archbishop)

    Tamás Bakócz, archbishop who led a Crusade against the Ottoman Turks in 1514. Bakócz was born into a serf family, but he benefited from the fact that his older brother Bálint was provost of Titel. Bakócz was able to study in Krakow and at various Italian universities. Matthias I took notice of

  • Bakócz Chapel (chapel, Hungary)

    Western architecture: Eastern Europe: The Bakócz Chapel (1507) erected by Cardinal Tamás Bakócz as his sepulchral chapel at the cathedral of Esztergom is completely Italianate. Built on a Greek cross plan surmounted by a dome, the chapel resembles late 15th-century Florentine chapels. Turkish occupation, however, soon delayed the adoption of…

  • Bakócz Tamás (Hungarian archbishop)

    Tamás Bakócz, archbishop who led a Crusade against the Ottoman Turks in 1514. Bakócz was born into a serf family, but he benefited from the fact that his older brother Bálint was provost of Titel. Bakócz was able to study in Krakow and at various Italian universities. Matthias I took notice of

  • Bakócz, Tamás (Hungarian archbishop)

    Tamás Bakócz, archbishop who led a Crusade against the Ottoman Turks in 1514. Bakócz was born into a serf family, but he benefited from the fact that his older brother Bálint was provost of Titel. Bakócz was able to study in Krakow and at various Italian universities. Matthias I took notice of

  • Bakolori Dam (dam, Nigeria)

    Sokoto: The 3-mile- (5-kilometre-) long Bakolori Dam (1975), one of the world’s longest, on the Sokoto River provides year-round irrigation in the Sokoto-Rima basin, but the project has become an economic disaster because the soil is becoming increasingly infertile as a result of irrigation and there is less water available…

  • Bakong (temple mountain, Cambodia)

    Indravarman I: At Roluos, Indravarman built Bakong, which was the first Cambodian temple built mainly of stone and was the model from which the later Angkor temples developed.

  • Bakongo (people)

    Kongo, group of Bantu-speaking peoples related through language and culture and dwelling along the Atlantic coast of Africa from Pointe-Noire, Congo (Brazzaville), in the north, to Luanda, Angola, in the south. In the east, their territory is limited by the Kwango River and in the northeast by

  • Bakony Mountains (mountains, Hungary)

    Bakony Mountains, mountain range in western Hungary, covering about 1,500 square miles (4,000 square km) between Lake Balaton and the Little Alfold and running southwest-northeast for 70 miles (110 km) from the Zala River. The range forms the major component of the highlands of Dunántúl, or

  • Bakoye River (river, Africa)

    Bakoye River, river in western Africa, rising in the Fouta Djallon massif of Guinea and flowing generally northeast through the sandstone Mandingues Hills to the Mali border. It then flows north-northwest through less elevated terrain to be fed by the Baoulé River. It turns west down a river

  • Bakr, A?mad ?asan al- (president of Iraq)

    A?mad ?asan al-Bakr, president of Iraq from 1968 to 1979. Al-Bakr entered the Iraqi Military Academy in 1938 after spending six years as a primary-school teacher. He was a member of the Ba?th Party and was forced to retire from the Iraqi army for revolutionary activities in 1959. He became prime

  • Baksar (India)

    Buxar, historic city, western Bihar state, northeastern India. It is situated just south of the Ganges (Ganga) River. The Battle of Baksar (Buxar; 1764) resulted in the final acquisition of lower Bengal by the British. A place of great sanctity, it is believed to have been originally called

  • Baksar, Battle of (British-Mughal conflict [1764])

    Battle of Buxar, Buxur also spelled Baksar, (22 October 1764), conflict at Buxar in northeastern India between the forces of the British East India Company, commanded by Major Hector Munro, and the combined army of an alliance of Indian states including Bengal, Awadh, and the Mughal Empire. This

  • Bakst, Léon (Russian artist)

    Léon Bakst, Jewish Russian artist who revolutionized theatrical design both in scenery and in costume. His designs for the Ballets Russes, especially during its heyday (1909–14), were opulent, innovative, and extraordinary, and his influence on fashion and interior design was widespread. The

  • bakteria (ecclesiastical symbol)

    crosier: …churches carry the baktēria (dikanikion), a pastoral staff with either a tau cross or two serpents facing each other on top.

  • Baku (national capital, Azerbaijan)

    Baku, city, capital of Azerbaijan. It lies on the western shore of the Caspian Sea and the southern side of the Ab?eron Peninsula, around the wide curving sweep of the Bay of Baku. The bay, sheltered by the islands of the Baku Archipelago, provides the best harbour of the Caspian, while the Ab?eron

  • Baku rug

    Baku rug, handwoven floor covering made in the vicinity of Baku, Azerbaijan, a major port on the Caspian Sea. Rugs have been woven in this area since at least the 18th century and probably long before, although it is difficult to determine which were woven in the city and which in such nearby

  • Baku Stage

    Caspian Sea: Geology: …itself—in successive phases known as Baku, Khazar, and Khvalyn—alternately shrank and expanded. That process left a legacy in the form of peripheral terraces that mark old shorelines and can also be traced in the geologically recent underlying sedimentary layers.

  • Baku, Bay of (bay, Azerbaijan)

    Baku: …wide curving sweep of the Bay of Baku. The bay, sheltered by the islands of the Baku Archipelago, provides the best harbour of the Caspian, while the Ab?eron Peninsula gives protection from violent northerly winds. The name Baku is possibly a contraction of the Persian bad kube (“blown upon by…

  • Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan pipeline

    Caspian Sea: Transportation: One of those, an oil pipeline from Baku to Ceyhan, Turkey, on the Mediterranean coast, opened in 2005. Another project, a trans-Caspian pipeline, would transport Turkmeni natural gas beneath the Caspian Sea to Azerbaijan.

  • Bakuba (people)

    Kuba, a cluster of about 16 Bantu-speaking groups in southeastern Congo (Kinshasa), living between the Kasai and Sankuru rivers east of their confluence. Kuba cultivate corn (maize), cassava, millet, peanuts (groundnuts), and beans as staples. They grow raffia and oil palms, raise corn as a cash

  • bakufu (Japanese history)

    Shogunate, government of the shogun, or hereditary military dictator, of Japan from 1192 to 1867. The term shogun appeared in various titles given to military commanders commissioned for the imperial government’s 8th- and 9th-century campaigns against the Ezo (Emishi) tribes of northern Japan. The

  • bakuhan (Japanese history)

    Japanese architecture: The Tokugawa, or Edo, period: …Tokugawa rulers is called the bakuhan, a combination of bakufu (“tent government,” or military shogunate) and han (“domain of a daimyo”). The new order allowed for comparative discretionary rule within the several hundred domains, but the daimyo were required to pay periodic visits to Edo and to maintain a residence…

  • Bakunin, Mikhail (Russian anarchist)

    Mikhail Bakunin, chief propagator of 19th-century anarchism, a prominent Russian revolutionary agitator, and a prolific political writer. His quarrel with Karl Marx split the anarchist and Marxist wings of the revolutionary socialist movement for many years after their deaths. Bakunin was the

  • Bakunin, Mikhail Aleksandrovich (Russian anarchist)

    Mikhail Bakunin, chief propagator of 19th-century anarchism, a prominent Russian revolutionary agitator, and a prolific political writer. His quarrel with Karl Marx split the anarchist and Marxist wings of the revolutionary socialist movement for many years after their deaths. Bakunin was the

  • Bakwanga (Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Mbuji-Mayi, city, south-central Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is situated on the Mbuji-Mayi River. It was developed by Europeans as a mining town after diamonds were found in the area in 1909. The region in which Mbuji-Mayi is situated annually produces one-tenth in weight of the world’s

  • Bakwena (people)

    South Africa: The Great Trek: …the east and even the Kwena and Hurutshe in the west were strong enough to avoid being conscripted as labour and thus limited the labour supply.

  • BAL (drug)

    Dimercaprol, drug that was originally developed to combat the effects of the blister gas lewisite, which was used in chemical warfare. By the end of World War II, dimercaprol had also been found useful as an antidote against poisoning by several metals and semimetals—including arsenic, gold, lead,

  • bal maiden (mining)

    Cobar: …who had worked as a bal maiden in copper mines, and she identified their find as copper. (Bal was an ancient Cornish word for mine, and bal maidens were women who worked at the surface of mines in Cornwall and Devon, England, especially during the 18th and 19th centuries.) That…

  • Bala (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Bala, market town, Gwynedd county, historic county of Merioneth (Meirionnydd), northern Wales. It lies in Snowdonia National Park at the northern end of mountain-girt Bala Lake (Llyn Tegid), the largest natural lake in Wales. The town was founded under a charter of 1324. In the 18th century it

  • Bala (people)

    human sexual activity: Social control of sexual activity: The African Bala, according to one researcher, had coitus on the average of once or twice per day from young adulthood into the sixth decade of life.

  • Bala Calvinistic Methodist College (college, Bala, Wales, United Kingdom)

    Lewis Edwards: …David Charles, he opened the Bala Calvinistic Methodist College to prepare men for the ministry; in 1867 this became the theological college for his church in North Wales. Through Edwards’ influence his denomination adopted a more presbyterian form of church government on the Scottish model.

  • Bala Hissar (fort, Pakistan)

    Peshawar: Peshawar’s historic buildings include Bala Hissar, a fort built by the Sikhs on the ruins of the state residence of the Durranis, which was destroyed by them after the battle of Nowshera; Gor Khatri, once a Buddhist monastery and later a sacred Hindu temple, which stands on an eminence…

  • bala system (Ur history)

    history of Mesopotamia: Administration: …this was a system called bala, “cycle” or “rotation,” in which the ensis of the southern provinces took part; among other things, they had to keep the state stockyards supplied with sacrificial animals. Although the “province” often corresponded to a former city-state, many others were no doubt newly established. The…

  • Balaam (biblical prophet)

    Balaam, a non-Israelite prophet described in the Old Testament (Num. 22–24) as a diviner who is importuned by Balak, the king of Moab, to place a malediction on the people of Israel, who are camped ominously on the plains of Moab. Balaam states that he will utter only what his god Yahweh inspires,

  • Balabac (island, Philippines)

    Balabac, island, extreme southwestern Philippines. It is located about 19 miles (30 km) southwest of the southern tip of Palawan island and roughly twice that distance north of the island of Borneo. Balabac rises to an elevation of about 1,890 feet (576 metres) and has swamps on its northwestern

  • Balabanov, Aleksey (Russian filmmaker)

    Aleksey Oktyabrinovich Balabanov, Russian filmmaker (born Feb. 25, 1959, Sverdlovsk, Russia, U.S.S.R. [now Yekaterinburg, Russia]—died May 18, 2013, Solnechnoye, near St. Petersburg, Russia), created a string of dark, violent art-house movies in which he examined what he perceived as the corruption

  • Balabanov, Aleksey Oktyabrinovich (Russian filmmaker)

    Aleksey Oktyabrinovich Balabanov, Russian filmmaker (born Feb. 25, 1959, Sverdlovsk, Russia, U.S.S.R. [now Yekaterinburg, Russia]—died May 18, 2013, Solnechnoye, near St. Petersburg, Russia), created a string of dark, violent art-house movies in which he examined what he perceived as the corruption

  • Balabhadra (Hindu mythology)

    Balarama, in Hindu mythology, the elder half brother of Krishna, with whom he shared many adventures. Sometimes Balarama is considered one of the 10 avatars (incarnations) of the god Vishnu, particularly among those members of Vaishnava sects who elevate Krishna to the rank of a principal god.

  • Balaclava, Battle of (Crimean War [1854])

    Battle of Balaklava, also spelled Balaclava, (Oct. 25 [Oct. 13, Old Style], 1854), indecisive military engagement of the Crimean War, best known as the inspiration of the English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s “Charge of the Light Brigade.” In this battle, the Russians failed to capture Balaklava,

  • Balade de campie (novel by Dru?a)

    Moldova: The arts: His novel Balade de campie (1963; “Ballads of the Steppes”), an investigation of the psychology of the village, marked a significant turning point in the evolution of Moldovan fiction, and his play Casa Mare (1962; “The Parlour”) turned away from the concept of collectivity to probe the…

  • Balādhurī, al- (Muslim historian)

    Al-Balādhurī, Muslim historian best known for his history of the formation of the Arab Muslim empire. Al-Balādhurī lived most of his life in Baghdad and studied there and in Syria. He was for some time a favoured visitor at the Baghdad court of the ?Abbāsid caliphs. His chief extant work, a

  • Baladites (religious order)

    Basilian: (4) The Basilian Order of St. John the Baptist, also known as the Order of Suwayr, or the Baladites, was founded in 1712 and added the vow of humility to the usual vows. Its motherhouse is in Lebanon, and the Vatican set its canonical status in 1955.…

  • baladiyyūn (Spanish Muslims)

    Spain: The conquest: …a distinction was made between baladiyyūn (i.e., Arabs who had entered Spain in 712 under Mūsā) and Syrians (who arrived in 740 under Balj ibn Bishr). Below them in status were the Imazighen, who made up the majority of the invading troops, whose numbers and influence continued to grow over…

  • Balaena glacialis (Atlantic sea mammal)

    right whale: …classified into three different species: E. glacialis of the North Atlantic and E. japonica of the North Pacific, both commonly called northern right whales, and E. australis of the Southern Hemisphere, referred to as the southern right whale. Whether found in northern or southern latitudes, these right whales are estimated…

  • Balaena mysticetus (mammal)

    right whale: …right whale refers to the bowhead, or Greenland right whale (Balaena mysticetus), and to the whales of the genus Eubalaena (though originally only to E. glacialis). The bowhead has a black body, a white chin and throat, and, sometimes, a white belly. It can grow to a length of about…

  • Balaena sieboldii (Atlantic sea mammal)

    right whale: …classified into three different species: E. glacialis of the North Atlantic and E. japonica of the North Pacific, both commonly called northern right whales, and E. australis of the Southern Hemisphere, referred to as the southern right whale. Whether found in northern or southern latitudes, these right whales are estimated…

  • Balaeniceps (bird genus)

    ciconiiform: Critical appraisal: …the order involves the genus Balaeniceps, which was at one time placed in the order Pelecaniformes. Although much osteological evidence continues to support its close relationship to the pelecaniforms, some authorities attribute the resemblances to convergent evolution. Also still unresolved is the possibility that New World vultures (Cathartidae) are indeed…

  • Balaeniceps rex (bird)

    Shoebill, (Balaeniceps rex), large African wading bird, a single species that constitutes the family Balaenicipitidae (order Balaenicipitiformes, Ciconiiformes, or Pelecaniformes). The species is named for its clog-shaped bill, which is an adaptation for catching and holding the large, slippery

  • Balaenicipitidae (bird family)

    shoebill: …species that constitutes the family Balaenicipitidae (order Balaenicipitiformes, Ciconiiformes, or Pelecaniformes). The species is named for its clog-shaped bill, which is an adaptation for catching and holding the large, slippery lungfish, its favourite food. This big bird also eats turtles, fish, and young crocodiles. Shoebills stand

  • Balaenidae (mammal)

    Right whale, (family Balaenidae), any of four species of stout-bodied whales having an enormous head measuring one-quarter to one-third their total body length. From the 17th to 19th century, these whales were hunted for their oil and their strong, elastic baleen. Because of the considerable

  • Balaenoptera (mammal)

    Rorqual, (genus Balaenoptera), any of five particular species of baleen whales—specifically the blue whale, fin whale, sei whale, Bryde’s whale, and minke whale. The term is often extended to include the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangeliae), the only other member of the family Balaenopteridae,

  • Balaenoptera acutorostrata (mammal)

    conservation: Whaling: …1950s—and finally the even smaller minke whale (B. acutorostrata), which whalers still hunt despite an international moratorium in effect since 1986 that seeks to curb commercial whaling.

  • Balaenoptera borealis (mammal)

    Sei whale, (Balaenoptera borealis), species of baleen whale capable of short bursts of speed that make it the swiftest of the rorquals. Usually attaining a length of about 13–15 metres (43–49 feet), this cetacean is bluish gray or blackish above with paler underparts and a relatively large

  • Balaenoptera musculus (mammal)

    Blue whale, (Balaenoptera musculus), the most massive animal ever to have lived, a species of baleen whale that weighs approximately 150 tons and may attain a length of more than 30 metres (98 feet). The largest accurately measured blue whale was a 29.5-metre female that weighed 180 metric tons

  • Balaenoptera physalus (mammal)

    Fin whale, (Balaenoptera physalus), a slender baleen whale, second in size to the blue whale and distinguishable by its asymmetrical coloration. The fin whale is generally gray with a white underside, but the right side of the head has a light gray area, a white lower jaw, and white baleen at the

  • Balaenopteridae (mammal family)

    cetacean: Annotated taxonomy: Family Balaenopteridae (rorquals and humpback whale) 8 species in 2 genera. Skull broader and less arched than in Balaenidae; baleen plates shorter, broader, less flexible; neck vertebrae not fused. Dorsal fin present; flippers narrow. Conspicuous longitudinal grooves on throat. Length 10 to perhaps 33.6 metres; blue…

  • balafon (musical instrument)

    Central African Republic: The arts and cultural institutions: …and musical instruments, including the balafon (much like a xylophone but constructed of animal horns, skins, and wood), are all that remain of older handiwork. More recently, handicraft workers have begun producing unique designs and pictures made from butterfly wings glued to paper and some ebony and other tropical hardwood…

  • Balafré, Le (French noble)

    Fran?ois de Lorraine, 2e duc de Guise, the greatest figure produced by the House of Guise, a man of action, a political intriguer, a soldier loved by his men and feared by his enemies. He was generally loyal to the French crown and served it well. As comte d’Aumale he fought in Francis I’s army and

  • Balafrej, A?mad (Moroccan nationalist)

    Morocco: The French Zone: The nationalist leaders, including A?mad Balafrej, secretary general of the Istiqlāl, were unjustly accused and arrested for collaborating with the Nazis. This caused rioting in Fès and elsewhere in which some 30 or more demonstrators were killed. As a result, the sultan, who in 1947 persuaded a new and…

  • balag di (drum)

    percussion instrument: Membranophones: …was appointed player of the balag di in the Temple of the Moon at Ur about 2400 bce. Ever since, frame drums have been predominantly women’s instruments. The Bible says that in ancient Israel “Miriam, the prophetess, the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand; and all the…

  • balāghah (Arabic literary element)

    Arabic literature: Compilations and manuals: …explain the basic elements of balāghah (“correct style”), including such topics as grammatical accuracy and plagiarism. Al-?Askarī’s work was carried on and expanded in another important piece of synthesis, Ibn Rashīq’s Al-?Umdah fī ma?āsin al-shi?r wa adabihi wa naqdihi (“The Mainstay Concerning Poetry’s Embellishments, Correct Usage, and Criticism”). The comprehensive…

  • Balaghat (India)

    Balaghat, town, southeastern Madhya Pradesh state, central India. The town lies in a plateau region at the southern base of the Satpura Range, just east of the Wainganga River, and is about 95 miles (155 km) south of Jabalpur. Balaghat formerly consisted of two villages, Burha and Burhi, which

  • Balaghat Range (hills, India)

    Balaghat Range, series of hills in western Maharashtra state, western India. Originating in the Western Ghats at the Harishchandra Range, the Balaghats extend southeastward for about 200 miles (320 km) to the border of Maharashtra and Karnataka states. Its width varies from 3 to 6 miles (5 to 9

  • Balagtas, Francisco (Filipino writer)

    Southeast Asian arts: The Philippines: …native writer to achieve prominence—Francisco Balagtas—who wrote in Tagalog. In the latter half of the 19th century, an intellectual renaissance coincided with the beginnings of a national movement toward freedom; writers began using Spanish, for their work was part of the nationalist propaganda. The most famous author was José Rizal,…

  • Balaguer i Cirera, Victor (Catalan poet and Spanish politician and historian)

    Victor Balaguer, Catalan poet and Spanish politician and historian. Balaguer was a precocious youth; his first dramatic essay, Pépin el Jorobado; o, el hijo de Carlomagno (1838; “Pippin the Hunchbacked; or, The Son of Charlemagne”), was staged in Barcelona when he was 14. At 19 he was publicly

  • Balaguer y Albás, Josémaria Escrivá de (Spanish prelate)

    St. Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer, ; canonized October 6, 2002; feast day June 26), Spanish prelate of the Roman Catholic Church, founder in 1928 of Opus Dei, a Catholic organization of laypeople and priests claiming to strive to live Christian lives in their chosen professions. By the time of

  • Balaguer y Ricardo, Joaquín Vidella (president of Dominican Republic)

    Joaquín Balaguer, lawyer, writer, and diplomat who was vice president of the Dominican Republic (1957–60) during the regime of President Hector Trujillo and was president from 1960 to 1962, 1966 to 1978, and from 1986 to 1996. Balaguer earned a law degree from the University of Santo Domingo and a

  • Balaguer, Joaquín (president of Dominican Republic)

    Joaquín Balaguer, lawyer, writer, and diplomat who was vice president of the Dominican Republic (1957–60) during the regime of President Hector Trujillo and was president from 1960 to 1962, 1966 to 1978, and from 1986 to 1996. Balaguer earned a law degree from the University of Santo Domingo and a

  • Balaguer, Mark (American philosopher)

    philosophy of mathematics: Nontraditional versions: According to Balaguer and Zalta, on the other hand, the only versions of Platonism that are tenable are those that maintain not just the existence of abstract objects but the existence of as many abstract objects as there can possibly be. If this is right, then any…

  • Balaguer, Victor (Catalan poet and Spanish politician and historian)

    Victor Balaguer, Catalan poet and Spanish politician and historian. Balaguer was a precocious youth; his first dramatic essay, Pépin el Jorobado; o, el hijo de Carlomagno (1838; “Pippin the Hunchbacked; or, The Son of Charlemagne”), was staged in Barcelona when he was 14. At 19 he was publicly

  • Bālājī Bājī Rāo (peshwa of the Marā?hā)

    India: Nādir Shah’s invasion: …the Maratha chief minister (peshwa), Balaji Baji Rao, as governor of Malwa. The province of Katehar (Rohilkhand) was seized by an adventurer, ?Alī Mu?ammad Khan Ruhela, who could not be suppressed by the feeble government of Delhi. The loss of Kabul opened the empire to the threat of invasions from…

  • Balak (biblical figure)

    Balaam: …diviner who is importuned by Balak, the king of Moab, to place a malediction on the people of Israel, who are camped ominously on the plains of Moab. Balaam states that he will utter only what his god Yahweh inspires, but he is willing to accompany the Moabite messengers to…

  • Balak Singh (Indian religious leader)

    Namdhari: …Namdhari movement was founded by Balak Singh (1797–1862), who did not believe in any religious ritual other than the repetition of God’s name (or nam, for which reason members of the sect are called Namdharis). His successor, Ram Singh (1816–85), introduced the sect’s distinctive style of wearing the turban (bound…

  • Balakirev, Mily (Russian composer)

    Mily Balakirev, Russian composer of orchestral music, piano music, and songs. He was a dynamic leader of the Russian nationalist group of composers of his era. Balakirev received his early musical education from his mother. He also studied with Alexander Dubuque and with Karl Eisrich, music

  • Balakirev, Mily Alekseyevich (Russian composer)

    Mily Balakirev, Russian composer of orchestral music, piano music, and songs. He was a dynamic leader of the Russian nationalist group of composers of his era. Balakirev received his early musical education from his mother. He also studied with Alexander Dubuque and with Karl Eisrich, music

  • Balaklava, Battle of (Crimean War [1854])

    Battle of Balaklava, also spelled Balaclava, (Oct. 25 [Oct. 13, Old Style], 1854), indecisive military engagement of the Crimean War, best known as the inspiration of the English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s “Charge of the Light Brigade.” In this battle, the Russians failed to capture Balaklava,

  • Balakot (archaeological site, Pakistan)

    India: Other important sites: …industry have been found at Balakot. Not far from Mehrgarh, at the head of the Kachchhi desert region in Balochistan, the small settlement of Naushahro Firoz provides valuable evidence of the actual transformation of Early Harappan into mature Harappan. Near the Rann of Kachchh, Surkotada is a small settlement with…

  • Balakovo (Russia)

    Balakovo, city, Saratov oblast (province), southwestern Russia, on the left bank of the Volga River. Founded in 1762, it long remained a small agricultural town. Its growth was greatly stimulated by the construction in 1967–70 of the Saratov hydroelectric station on the Volga. Balakovo is also the

  • balalaika (musical instrument)

    Balalaika, Russian stringed musical instrument of the lute family. It was developed in the 18th century from the dombra, or domra, a round-bodied long-necked three-stringed lute played in Russia and Central Asia. The balalaika is made in six sizes, from piccolo to double bass, and has a flat back

  • Balālīn, Al- (Palestinian theatre troupe)

    Arabic literature: Modern Arabic drama: …in the Middle East, the ?akawātī troupe (named for the ?akawātī, or traditional storyteller), which emerged from an earlier group known as Al-Balālīn (“Balloons”). An itinerant troupe established in 1977, ?akawātī toured villages and performed its own plays in a variety of public spaces through the turn of the 21st…

  • Balalyk Tepe (archaeological site, Asia)

    Central Asian arts: Sogdiana: …and a 5th-century mural from Balalyk Tepe displays the head of a tusked, boarlike animal set in a roundel that is almost identical to that on a Sāsānian fabric found at Nursultan in eastern Turkistan.

  • balam (boat)

    Tigris-Euphrates river system: Navigation: Balams are slender, double-ended, flat-bottom craft with a shallow draft. Until the 1970s gufas—huge circular coracles of basketwork, coated with bitumen and capable of carrying up to 20 passengers—were in regular use in the vicinity of Baghdad.

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