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  • baldachin (cloth)

    baldachin: …term originates from the Spanish baldaquin, an elaborately brocaded material imported from Baghdad that was hung as a canopy over an altar or doorway. Later it came to stand for a freestanding canopy over an altar.

  • baldachino (architecture)

    Baldachin, in architecture, the canopy over an altar or tomb, supported on columns, especially when freestanding and disconnected from any enclosing wall. The term originates from the Spanish baldaquin, an elaborately brocaded material imported from Baghdad that was hung as a canopy over an altar

  • Baldad (biblical figure)

    Bildad, in the Old Testament, one of the three principal comforters of Job. Bildad is introduced (Job 2:11) as a Shuhite, probably a member of a nomadic tribe dwelling in southeastern Palestine. Bildad’s arguments with Job reveal him to be a sage who looks to the authority of tradition. His w

  • Baldamus, Eduard (German ornithologist)

    cuculiform: Brood parasitism: …host, and a German ornithologist, Eduard Baldamus, in 1892 showed that the frequency and degree of similarity were too great to be coincidental. Subsequent studies by a number of workers, especially by the English naturalist, Edgar P. Chance, have revealed much of the basis for the resemblance, which is now…

  • baldaquin (architecture)

    Baldachin, in architecture, the canopy over an altar or tomb, supported on columns, especially when freestanding and disconnected from any enclosing wall. The term originates from the Spanish baldaquin, an elaborately brocaded material imported from Baghdad that was hung as a canopy over an altar

  • baldaquin (cloth)

    baldachin: …term originates from the Spanish baldaquin, an elaborately brocaded material imported from Baghdad that was hung as a canopy over an altar or doorway. Later it came to stand for a freestanding canopy over an altar.

  • Balder (poetry by Dobell)

    Sydney Thompson Dobell: Another long poem, Balder (1853), is concerned with the inner life of a poet who kills his wife after she has gone mad. It was devastatingly burlesqued in Firmilian: . . . a Spasmodic Tragedy (1854) by William Edmondstoune Aytoun, who, with Charles Kingsley, deemed Dobell one of…

  • Balder (Norse mythology)

    Balder, in Norse mythology, the son of the chief god Odin and his wife Frigg. Beautiful and just, he was the favourite of the gods. Most legends about him concern his death. Icelandic stories tell how the gods amused themselves by throwing objects at him, knowing that he was immune from harm. The

  • Balders d?d (work by Ewald)

    Johannes Ewald: …the ode; Balders d?d (1775; The Death of Balder), a lyric drama on a subject from Saxo and Old Norse mythology; and the first chapters of his memoirs, Levnet og meninger (written c. 1774–78: “Life and Opinions”), explaining his enthusiasm for the adventurous and fantastic. In 1775 he was transferred…

  • Baldessari, John (American artist)

    John Baldessari, American artist whose work in altered and adjusted photographic imagery and video were central to the development of conceptual art in the United States. Baldessari received a B.A. at San Diego State College (SDSC; now San Diego State University) in 1953 and attended the University

  • Baldetti Elías, Ingrid Roxana (Guatemalan politician)

    Guatemala: Moving toward peace: Roxana Baldetti resigned after it was alleged that her private secretary was the mastermind of the fraud ring, known as “the Line,” but hers was only one of many high-level resignations over the coming months, as tens of thousands of Guatemalans took to the streets…

  • Baldini, Stefano (Italian athlete)

    Athens 2004 Olympic Games: …men’s marathon, was won by Stefano Baldini of Italy after the leader, Brazil’s Vanderlei Lima, was assaulted by a deranged spectator about 4 miles (6.4 km) from the finish line. Lima, who recovered to take the bronze, was awarded the Pierre de Coubertin medal for “his exceptional demonstration of fair…

  • Baldinucci, Filippo (Italian art historian)

    Filippo Baldinucci, Florentine art historian, the first to make full use of documents and to realize the importance of drawings in the study of painting. Working for Cardinal Leopoldo de’ Medici, Baldinucci advised on the acquisition of the great collection of drawings now in the Uffizi Gallery in

  • Baldío, El (work by Roa Bastos)

    Augusto Roa Bastos: Stories collected in El baldío (1966; “The Untilled”) treat tenderly and understandingly the problems of Paraguayan exiles. In some of the stories there is a clear indictment of civil war atrocities. The story collections Los pies sobre el agua (1967; “The Feet on the Water”) and Madera quemada…

  • Baldishol Tapestry (tapestry)

    tapestry: Early Middle Ages in western Europe: …for the Norwegian church of Baldishol in the district of Hedmark. Originally a set of wool hangings on the 12 months of the year, only the panels of April and May have survived. The pronounced stylization of the images relates these tapestries to those executed for Halberstadt Cathedral.

  • baldness (dermatology)

    Baldness, the lack or loss of hair. Two primary types of baldness can be distinguished: permanent hair loss, arising from abnormalities in or destruction of hair follicles, and temporary hair loss, arising from transitory damage to the follicles. The first category is dominated by male pattern

  • Baldomir, Alfredo (president of Uruguay)

    Uruguay: Economic and political uncertainties: …presidency of his brother-in-law General Alfredo Baldomir during the period 1938–42, formulated a conservative response to the Great Depression. The state interfered with labour unions, postponed social legislation, preserved as much as it could of the British market for Uruguayan meat, and halted government attempts to nationalize foreign, mainly British,…

  • Baldorioty de Castro, Román (Puerto Rican leader)

    Puerto Rico: Movements toward self-government: During the 1880s Román Baldorioty de Castro led a movement for political autonomy under Spanish rule, which gained momentum at the expense of calls for directly integrating Puerto Rico into the Spanish government. In 1887 the liberal movement was denounced as disloyal and was violently suppressed; however, such…

  • Baldovinetti, Alessio (Italian painter)

    Alessio Baldovinetti, painter whose work exemplified the careful modeling of form and the accurate depiction of light characteristic of the most progressive style of Florentine painting during the last half of the 15th century. At the same time, he contributed importantly to the fledgling art of

  • Baldovinetti, Alesso (Italian painter)

    Alessio Baldovinetti, painter whose work exemplified the careful modeling of form and the accurate depiction of light characteristic of the most progressive style of Florentine painting during the last half of the 15th century. At the same time, he contributed importantly to the fledgling art of

  • baldpate (bird)

    Baldpate, popular North American game duck, also known as the American wigeon. See

  • Baldr (Norse mythology)

    Balder, in Norse mythology, the son of the chief god Odin and his wife Frigg. Beautiful and just, he was the favourite of the gods. Most legends about him concern his death. Icelandic stories tell how the gods amused themselves by throwing objects at him, knowing that he was immune from harm. The

  • Baldrige, Letitia (American author, columnist, and White House official)

    Letitia Baldrige, (Tish), American author, columnist, and White House official (born Feb. 9, 1926, Miami, Fla.—died Oct. 29, 2012, Bethesda, Md.), dispensed advice for proper etiquette and modern manners in a newspaper column and in a slew of books that addressed those issues in various locales—the

  • Baldrs draumar (Norse poem)

    Germanic religion and mythology: Balder (Baldr): …a west Norse poem (Baldrs draumar). According to this Loki does not seem to be directly responsible for Balder’s death but H?d alone. Balder’s name occurs rarely in place-names, and it does not appear that his worship was widespread.

  • Baldry, John William (Canadian musician)

    Long John Baldry, (John William Baldry), British-born Canadian blues musician (born Jan. 12, 1941, Haddon, Derbyshire, Eng.—died July 21, 2005, Vancouver, B.C.), was one of the founding fathers of the 1960s British blues scene and a mentor to many later stars, including members of the Rolling S

  • Baldry, Long John (Canadian musician)

    Long John Baldry, (John William Baldry), British-born Canadian blues musician (born Jan. 12, 1941, Haddon, Derbyshire, Eng.—died July 21, 2005, Vancouver, B.C.), was one of the founding fathers of the 1960s British blues scene and a mentor to many later stars, including members of the Rolling S

  • Baldung, Hans (German artist)

    Hans Baldung, painter and graphic artist, one of the most outstanding figures in northern Renaissance art. He served as an assistant to Albrecht Dürer, whose influence is apparent in his early works, although the demonic energy of his later style is closer to that of Matthias Grünewald. Baldung was

  • Baldung-Grien, Hans (German artist)

    Hans Baldung, painter and graphic artist, one of the most outstanding figures in northern Renaissance art. He served as an assistant to Albrecht Dürer, whose influence is apparent in his early works, although the demonic energy of his later style is closer to that of Matthias Grünewald. Baldung was

  • Baldur’s Gate (electronic game)

    Baldur’s Gate, computer and console role-playing fantasy electronic game, developed by the Canadian game developer BioWare Corp. and released in 1998 by the American game publisher Interplay Entertainment Corporation. Baldur’s Gate is set in the Forgotten Realms fantasy universe of the popular

  • Baldur’s Gate II: Shadows of Amn (electronic game)

    Baldur's Gate: The sequel Baldur’s Gate II: Shadows of Amn (2000) expanded on the success of the original with additional character classes, a branching story line that provided hundreds of hours of gameplay, and subplots based on characters’ moral choices and romantic interests that greatly added to the game’s…

  • Baldus (poem by Folengo)

    Teofilo Folengo: …various forms, Folengo’s masterpiece is Baldus, a poem in macaronic hexameters, published under the pseudonym Merlin Cocai. Four versions of Baldus are known, published in 1517, 1521, 1539–40, and 1552 (modern edition, Le maccheronee, 1927–28). Written with a rich vein of satire, humour, and fantasy, Folengo’s poem narrates the adventures…

  • Baldwin I (count of Flanders)

    Baldwin I, the first ruler of Flanders. A daring warrior under Charles II the Bald of France, he fell in love with the king’s daughter Judith, the youthful widow of two English kings, married her (862), and fled with his bride to Lorraine. Charles, though at first angry, was at last conciliated,

  • Baldwin I (king of Jerusalem)

    Baldwin I, king of the Crusader state of Jerusalem (1100–18) who expanded the kingdom and secured its territory, formulating an administrative apparatus that was to serve for 200 years as the basis for Frankish rule in Syria and Palestine. Son of Eustace II, count of Boulogne, and Ida d’Ardenne,

  • Baldwin I (count of Flanders)

    Robert I: …disputed by his elder brother, Baldwin VI, who had succeeded to the countship of Flanders. War broke out between the two brothers, and Baldwin was killed in battle in 1070. Robert then claimed the tutelage of Baldwin’s children and obtained the support of the German emperor Henry IV, while Richilde,…

  • Baldwin I (Byzantine emperor)

    Baldwin I, count of Flanders (as Baldwin IX) and of Hainaut (as Baldwin VI), a leader of the Fourth Crusade, who became the first Latin emperor of Constantinople (now Istanbul). The son of Baldwin V, count of Hainaut, and Margaret of Alsace, countess of Flanders, Baldwin I was an ally of the

  • Baldwin II (king of Jerusalem)

    Baldwin II, count of Edessa (1100–18), king of Jerusalem (1118–31), and Crusade leader whose support of the religious-military orders founded during his reign enabled him to expand his kingdom and to withstand Muslim attacks. A son of Hugh, count of Réthel, in the Ardennes region of France, he held

  • Baldwin II (count of Flanders)

    Baldwin II, second ruler of Flanders, who, from his stronghold at Bruges, maintained, as his father Baldwin I before him, a vigorous defense of his lands against the incursions of the Norsemen. On his mother’s side a descendant of Charlemagne, he strengthened the dynastic importance of his family b

  • Baldwin II Porphyrogenitus (Byzantine emperor)

    Baldwin II Porphyrogenitus, the last Latin emperor of Constantinople, who lost his throne in 1261 when Michael VIII Palaeologus restored Greek rule to the capital. The son of Yolande, sister of Baldwin I, the first Latin emperor of Constantinople, and Peter of Courtenay, the third Latin emperor, he

  • Baldwin III (count of Flanders)

    Arnulf I: …of his son Baldwin (Baldwin III), and the young man, though his reign was a very short one, did a great deal for the commercial and industrial progress of the country, establishing the first weavers and fullers at Ghent and instituting yearly fairs at Ypres, Bruges, and other places.…

  • Baldwin III (king of Jerusalem)

    Baldwin III, king of the Crusader state of Jerusalem (1143–63), military leader whose reputation among his contemporaries earned him the title of “ideal king.” The son of King Fulk of Jerusalem (reigned 1131–43) and Melisende (the daughter of Fulk’s predecessor, Baldwin II), Baldwin III and his

  • Baldwin Iron-Arm (count of Flanders)

    Baldwin I, the first ruler of Flanders. A daring warrior under Charles II the Bald of France, he fell in love with the king’s daughter Judith, the youthful widow of two English kings, married her (862), and fled with his bride to Lorraine. Charles, though at first angry, was at last conciliated,

  • Baldwin IV (count of Flanders)

    Baldwin IV, count of Flanders (988–1035) who greatly expanded the Flemish dominions. He fought successfully both against the Capetian king of France, Robert II, and the Holy Roman emperor Henry II. Henry found himself obliged to grant to Baldwin IV in fief Valenciennes, the burgraveship of Ghent,

  • Baldwin IV (king of Jerusalem)

    Baldwin IV, king of Jerusalem (1174–85), called the “leper king” for the disease that afflicted him for most of his short life. His reign saw the growth of factionalism among the Latin nobility that weakened the kingdom during the years when its greatest adversary, the Muslim leader Saladin,

  • Baldwin IX (Byzantine emperor)

    Baldwin I, count of Flanders (as Baldwin IX) and of Hainaut (as Baldwin VI), a leader of the Fourth Crusade, who became the first Latin emperor of Constantinople (now Istanbul). The son of Baldwin V, count of Hainaut, and Margaret of Alsace, countess of Flanders, Baldwin I was an ally of the

  • Baldwin of Bewdley, Stanley Baldwin, 1st Earl, Viscount Corvedale of Corvedale (prime minister of United Kingdom)

    Stanley Baldwin, British Conservative politician, three times prime minister between 1923 and 1937; he headed the government during the General Strike of 1926, the Ethiopian crisis of 1935, and the abdication crisis of 1936. A relative of the author Rudyard Kipling and the painter Sir Edward

  • Baldwin of Boulogne (king of Jerusalem)

    Baldwin I, king of the Crusader state of Jerusalem (1100–18) who expanded the kingdom and secured its territory, formulating an administrative apparatus that was to serve for 200 years as the basis for Frankish rule in Syria and Palestine. Son of Eustace II, count of Boulogne, and Ida d’Ardenne,

  • Baldwin of Bourcq (king of Jerusalem)

    Baldwin II, count of Edessa (1100–18), king of Jerusalem (1118–31), and Crusade leader whose support of the religious-military orders founded during his reign enabled him to expand his kingdom and to withstand Muslim attacks. A son of Hugh, count of Réthel, in the Ardennes region of France, he held

  • Baldwin of Courtenay (Byzantine emperor)

    Baldwin II Porphyrogenitus, the last Latin emperor of Constantinople, who lost his throne in 1261 when Michael VIII Palaeologus restored Greek rule to the capital. The son of Yolande, sister of Baldwin I, the first Latin emperor of Constantinople, and Peter of Courtenay, the third Latin emperor, he

  • Baldwin of Flanders (Byzantine emperor)

    Baldwin I, count of Flanders (as Baldwin IX) and of Hainaut (as Baldwin VI), a leader of the Fourth Crusade, who became the first Latin emperor of Constantinople (now Istanbul). The son of Baldwin V, count of Hainaut, and Margaret of Alsace, countess of Flanders, Baldwin I was an ally of the

  • Baldwin of Le Bourcq (king of Jerusalem)

    Baldwin II, count of Edessa (1100–18), king of Jerusalem (1118–31), and Crusade leader whose support of the religious-military orders founded during his reign enabled him to expand his kingdom and to withstand Muslim attacks. A son of Hugh, count of Réthel, in the Ardennes region of France, he held

  • Baldwin of Lille (count of Flanders)

    William I: New alliances: In 1049 William negotiated with Baldwin V of Flanders for the hand of his daughter, Matilda. Baldwin, an imperial vassal with a distinguished lineage, was in rebellion against the emperor, Henry III, and was in desperate need of allies. At the Council of Reims in October 1049, the emperor’s cousin,…

  • Baldwin of Mons (Byzantine emperor)

    Baldwin I, count of Flanders (as Baldwin IX) and of Hainaut (as Baldwin VI), a leader of the Fourth Crusade, who became the first Latin emperor of Constantinople (now Istanbul). The son of Baldwin V, count of Hainaut, and Margaret of Alsace, countess of Flanders, Baldwin I was an ally of the

  • Baldwin of Trier (German archbishop)

    Germany: Henry VII of Luxembourg: Archbishop Baldwin of Trier sponsored the candidacy of his brother, Count Henry of Luxembourg, who was elected at Frankfurt am Main in 1308 as Henry VII. The house of Luxembourg (Luxemburg) was not a major territorial power, and Henry lost no time in exploiting his new…

  • Baldwin the Bald (count of Flanders)

    Baldwin II, second ruler of Flanders, who, from his stronghold at Bruges, maintained, as his father Baldwin I before him, a vigorous defense of his lands against the incursions of the Norsemen. On his mother’s side a descendant of Charlemagne, he strengthened the dynastic importance of his family b

  • Baldwin the Bearded (count of Flanders)

    Baldwin IV, count of Flanders (988–1035) who greatly expanded the Flemish dominions. He fought successfully both against the Capetian king of France, Robert II, and the Holy Roman emperor Henry II. Henry found himself obliged to grant to Baldwin IV in fief Valenciennes, the burgraveship of Ghent,

  • Baldwin the Leper (king of Jerusalem)

    Baldwin IV, king of Jerusalem (1174–85), called the “leper king” for the disease that afflicted him for most of his short life. His reign saw the growth of factionalism among the Latin nobility that weakened the kingdom during the years when its greatest adversary, the Muslim leader Saladin,

  • Baldwin V (count of Flanders)

    William I: New alliances: In 1049 William negotiated with Baldwin V of Flanders for the hand of his daughter, Matilda. Baldwin, an imperial vassal with a distinguished lineage, was in rebellion against the emperor, Henry III, and was in desperate need of allies. At the Council of Reims in October 1049, the emperor’s cousin,…

  • Baldwin V (king of Jerusalem)

    Baldwin V, nominal king of Jerusalem who reigned from March 1185 until his death a year and a half later. The son of William Longsword of Montferrat and Sybil, the sister of King Baldwin IV, Baldwin V came to the throne when his uncle died of leprosy at the age of 24. The able knight Raymond III,

  • Baldwin VI (Byzantine emperor)

    Baldwin I, count of Flanders (as Baldwin IX) and of Hainaut (as Baldwin VI), a leader of the Fourth Crusade, who became the first Latin emperor of Constantinople (now Istanbul). The son of Baldwin V, count of Hainaut, and Margaret of Alsace, countess of Flanders, Baldwin I was an ally of the

  • Baldwin VI (count of Flanders)

    Robert I: …disputed by his elder brother, Baldwin VI, who had succeeded to the countship of Flanders. War broke out between the two brothers, and Baldwin was killed in battle in 1070. Robert then claimed the tutelage of Baldwin’s children and obtained the support of the German emperor Henry IV, while Richilde,…

  • Baldwin VII (count of Flanders)

    Charles: …Robert II, and his cousin, Baldwin VII, counts of Flanders. Baldwin died of a wound received in battle in 1119 and, having no issue, left by will the succession to his countship to Charles. Charles did not secure his heritage without a civil war, but he was speedily victorious and…

  • Baldwin, Alec (American actor)

    Alec Baldwin, American actor of great versatility who was especially known for his portrayal of roguish characters. Baldwin was the second of six children, and his three brothers—Stephen, William, and Daniel—also pursued acting careers. Initially interested in law, he enrolled at George Washington

  • Baldwin, Alexander Rae III (American actor)

    Alec Baldwin, American actor of great versatility who was especially known for his portrayal of roguish characters. Baldwin was the second of six children, and his three brothers—Stephen, William, and Daniel—also pursued acting careers. Initially interested in law, he enrolled at George Washington

  • Baldwin, Casey (Canadian engineer)

    Aerial Experiment Association: (“Casey”) Baldwin and J.A.D. McCurdy, a pair of engineers from the University of Toronto; Glenn Hammond Curtiss, a motorcycle builder from Hammondsport, N.Y., who served as the AEA propulsion expert; and Thomas E. Selfridge, an officer in the U.S. Army.

  • Baldwin, F. W. (Canadian engineer)

    Aerial Experiment Association: (“Casey”) Baldwin and J.A.D. McCurdy, a pair of engineers from the University of Toronto; Glenn Hammond Curtiss, a motorcycle builder from Hammondsport, N.Y., who served as the AEA propulsion expert; and Thomas E. Selfridge, an officer in the U.S. Army.

  • Baldwin, Faith (American author)

    Faith Baldwin, American author, one of the most successful writers of light fiction in the 20th century, whose works targeted an audience of middle-class women. Faith Baldwin attended private academies and finishing schools, and in 1914–16 she lived in Dresden, Germany. She married Hugh H. Cuthrell

  • Baldwin, Frank Stephen (American inventor)

    Frank Stephen Baldwin, inventor best-known for his development of the Monroe calculator. His first calculator, the arithmometer (patented 1875), could add, subtract, multiply, and divide. Economic conditions, however, prevented its immediate manufacture. The Baldwin computing engine (1890) was

  • Baldwin, Henry (United States jurist)

    Henry Baldwin, associate justice of the United States Supreme Court (1830–44). Baldwin graduated with honours from Yale University in 1797 and studied law, subsequently opening his practice in Pittsburgh. He was elected to the first of three terms to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1816. He

  • Baldwin, James (American author)

    James Baldwin, American essayist, novelist, and playwright whose eloquence and passion on the subject of race in America made him an important voice, particularly in the late 1950s and early 1960s, in the United States and, later, through much of western Europe. The eldest of nine children, he grew

  • Baldwin, James Arthur (American author)

    James Baldwin, American essayist, novelist, and playwright whose eloquence and passion on the subject of race in America made him an important voice, particularly in the late 1950s and early 1960s, in the United States and, later, through much of western Europe. The eldest of nine children, he grew

  • Baldwin, James Mark (American philosopher and psychologist)

    James Mark Baldwin, philosopher and theoretical psychologist who exerted influence on American psychology during its formative period in the 1890s. Concerned with the relation of Darwinian evolution to psychology, he favoured the study of individual differences, stressed the importance of theory

  • Baldwin, Jason (American murder suspect)

    West Memphis Three: ), Jason Baldwin (b. April 11, 1977, West Memphis, Arkansas, U.S.), and Jessie Misskelley, Jr. (b. July 10, 1975).

  • Baldwin, John (British musician)

    Led Zeppelin: …1948, West Bromwich, West Midlands), John Paul Jones (original name John Baldwin; b. January 3, 1946, Sidcup, Kent), and John Bonham (b. May 31, 1948, Redditch, Hereford and Worcester—d. September 25, 1980, Windsor, Berkshire).

  • Baldwin, John Wesley (American historian)

    John Wesley Baldwin, American historian (born July 13, 1929, Chicago, Ill.—died Feb. 8, 2015, Towson, Md.), was a foremost authority in the study of medieval France; his 10 scholarly books on the subject were regarded in France as classics. Baldwin’s most-admired works include Masters, Princes, and

  • Baldwin, Matthias William (American manufacturer)

    Matthias William Baldwin, manufacturer whose significant improvements of the steam locomotive included a steam-tight metal joint that permitted his engines to use steam at double the pressure of others. Originally trained as a jeweler but experienced in industrial design and manufacture, Baldwin

  • Baldwin, Robert (Canadian statesman)

    Robert Baldwin, statesman who was joint leader with Louis-Hippolyte LaFontaine (as the attorneys general of Canada West and East, respectively) of the first and second Reform administrations in the Province of Canada, which established the principle of responsible, or cabinet, government in Canada.

  • Baldwin, Roger Nash (American activist)

    Roger Nash Baldwin, American civil-rights activist, cofounder of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Born into an aristocratic Massachusetts family, Baldwin attended Harvard University (B.A., 1904; M.A., 1905). He then taught sociology at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. (1906–09),

  • Baldwin, Stanley (prime minister of United Kingdom)

    Stanley Baldwin, British Conservative politician, three times prime minister between 1923 and 1937; he headed the government during the General Strike of 1926, the Ethiopian crisis of 1935, and the abdication crisis of 1936. A relative of the author Rudyard Kipling and the painter Sir Edward

  • Baldwin, Tammy (United States senator)

    Tammy Baldwin, American politician who was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 2012 and began representing Wisconsin in that body the following year; she was the first openly gay senator. Baldwin previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1999–2013). Baldwin was raised by her

  • Baldwin, William (American musician)

    the Beach Boys: …22, 1948, Newcastle, Pennsylvania) and Bruce Johnston (original name William Baldwin; b. June 24, 1944, Chicago, Illinois). Initially perceived as a potent pop act—celebrants of the surfing and hot rod culture of the Los Angeles Basin during the 1960s—the Beach Boys and lead singer-bassist-producer Brian Wilson later gained greater respect…

  • Baldy Mountain (mountain, Arizona, United States)

    Baldy Mountain, summit (11,403 feet [3,476 metres]) in the White Mountains, Apache county, eastern Arizona, U.S. Springs on the mountain’s northern slope form the headwaters of the Little Colorado River. Also called Dzil Ligai (Apache: “Mountain of White Rock”), Baldy is located within a 7,000-acre

  • Baldy Mountain (mountain, Manitoba, Canada)

    Baldy Mountain, highest peak in Manitoba, Can., in the southeastern part of Duck Mountain Provincial Park, 36 miles (58 km) northwest of Dauphin. At 2,730 feet (832 metres) above sea level, it is also the highest peak in the 350-mile- (560-km-) long Manitoba Escarpment. An observation tower at the

  • Baldy Peak (mountain, New Mexico, United States)

    Colfax: …range, topped by 12,441-foot (3,782-metre) Baldy Peak, and the Sangre de Cristo range, which rises to more than 10,000 feet (3,000 metres) and includes the Carson National Forest. Between the two mountain ranges is Eagle Nest Lake, the county’s largest body of water. Cimarron Canyon State Park, Vietnam Veterans Chapel,…

  • Baldy, Mount (mountain, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: …Santa Catalina and San Clemente; Mount San Antonio, familiarly known as Mount Baldy or Old Baldy, 10,046 feet (3,062 metres) high; more than 900 square miles (2,330 square km) of desert; and 75 miles (120 km) of seacoast.

  • Baldy, Old (mountain, California, United States)

    Los Angeles: …Santa Catalina and San Clemente; Mount San Antonio, familiarly known as Mount Baldy or Old Baldy, 10,046 feet (3,062 metres) high; more than 900 square miles (2,330 square km) of desert; and 75 miles (120 km) of seacoast.

  • Bale (Switzerland)

    Basel, capital of the Halbkanton (demicanton) of Basel-Stadt (with which it is virtually coextensive), northern Switzerland. It lies along the Rhine River, at the mouths of the Birs and Wiese rivers, where the French, German, and Swiss borders meet, at the entrance to the Swiss Rhineland. It was

  • bale monkey (primate)

    vervet: … and the southern Congo, the bale monkey (C. djamdjamensis) of the Bale Mountains of Ethiopia, the vervet (C. pygerythrus) of eastern and southern Africa, the green monkey (C. sabaeus) of West Africa, and the tantalus monkey (C. tantalus) of central Africa. Vervet monkeys are closely related to guenons and were…

  • Bale Mountains (mountains, Ethiopia)

    Bale Mountains, mountain chain in southern Ethiopia. It rises above 11,000 feet (3,350 metres) near Goba. The Bale Mountain region, including Bale Mountains National Park, is known for its numerous endemic species. Among these are the rare and endangered Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis), which is

  • Bale, Christian (Welsh actor)

    Christian Bale, Welsh-born English actor who was known for his portrayal of complex psychologically tormented characters. Bale made his big-screen debut, with little formal training as an actor, at age 13 in Empire of the Sun (1987). He received an overwhelming amount of attention for his role, and

  • Bale, Christian Charles Philip (Welsh actor)

    Christian Bale, Welsh-born English actor who was known for his portrayal of complex psychologically tormented characters. Bale made his big-screen debut, with little formal training as an actor, at age 13 in Empire of the Sun (1987). He received an overwhelming amount of attention for his role, and

  • Bale, John (English bishop and author)

    John Bale, bishop, Protestant controversialist, and dramatist whose Kynge Johan is asserted to have been the first English history play. He is notable for his part in the religious strife of the 16th century and for his antiquarian studies, including the first rudimentary history of English

  • Bale-Campagne (Halbkanton, Switzerland)

    Basel-Landschaft, Halbkanton (demicanton), northern Switzerland, traversed by the Jura Mountains and drained by the Ergolz and Birs rivers. It was formed in 1833 by the division of Basel canton into two half cantons, or demicantons, and its early history is linked with Basel (q.v.) city. Its

  • Bale-Ville (Halbkanton, Switzerland)

    Basel-Stadt, Halbkanton (demicanton), northern Switzerland, consisting of the city of Basel (q.v.) and two small villages north of the Rhine. Occupying an area of 14 square miles (37 square km), it was formed in 1833 by the division of Basel canton into two half cantons, or demicantons. Its present

  • Balearic Basin (basin, Mediterranean Sea)

    Mediterranean Sea: Natural divisions: The Algerian (sometimes called the Algero-Proven?al or Balearic) Basin, east of the Alborán Basin, is west of Sardinia and Corsica, extending from off the coast of Algeria to off the coast of France. These two basins together constitute the western basin. The Tyrrhenian Basin, that part…

  • Balearic Beat

    Britain’s rave culture and the sound that powered it were the product of a cornucopia of influences that came together in the late 1980s: the pulse of Chicago house music and the garage music of New York City, the semiconductor technology of northern California and the drug technology of southern

  • Balearic Beat (music)

    Balearic Beat: Britain’s rave culture and the sound that powered it were the product of a cornucopia of influences that came together in the late 1980s: the pulse of Chicago house music and the garage music of New York City, the semiconductor technology of northern California and…

  • Balearic Islands (region and province, Spain)

    Balearic Islands, archipelago in the western Mediterranean Sea and a comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Spain coextensive with the Spanish provincia (province) of the same name. The archipelago lies 50 to 190 miles (80 to 300 km) east of the Spanish mainland. There are two groups of

  • Balearic shearwater (bird)

    shearwater: auricularis) and the Balearic shearwater (P. mauretanicus), both also 33 cm in length, are classified as critically endangered in the IUCN Red List. Townshend’s shearwater faces the greatest threat of extinction of all shearwaters, because it breeds in a single location, Socorro Island, where many individuals are preyed…

  • Balearica pavonina (bird)

    crane: …Europe, and Central Asia; the crowned crane (Balearica pavonina [regulorum]), over nearly all of Africa; and the wattled crane (Bugeranus carunculatus), in eastern and southern Africa.

  • Balearis Major (island, Spain)

    Majorca, island, Balearic Islands provincia (province) and comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), Spain. Majorca is the largest of the Balearic Islands, which lie in the western Mediterranean Sea. It contains two mountainous regions, each about 50 miles (80 km) in length and occupying the

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