You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Brown, Raymond Edward (American theologian)

    Raymond Edward Brown, American theologian (born May 22, 1928, New York, N.Y.—died Aug. 8, 1998, Redwood City, Calif.), was a highly regarded Roman Catholic biblical scholar. His rigorous examination of the Gospels resulted in the publication of such works as the two-volume The Gospel According to J

  • Brown, Raymond Matthews (American musician)

    Ray Brown, American string bassist and one of the greatest of all jazz virtuosos. Brown first made his mark at age 19 when he went to New York City to join Dizzy Gillespie’s band at a time when the modern jazz revolution, spearheaded by saxophonist Charlie Parker, was just getting under way. Brown

  • Brown, Rita Mae (American author)

    American literature: New fictional modes: …Fear of Flying (1974), and Rita Mae Brown, who explored lesbian life in Rubyfruit Jungle (1973). Other significant works of fiction by women in the 1970s included Ann Beattie’s account of the post-1960s generation in Chilly Scenes of Winter (1976) and many short stories, Gail Godwin’s highly civilized The Odd…

  • Brown, Robert (Scottish botanist)

    Robert Brown, Scottish botanist best known for his descriptions of cell nuclei and of the continuous motion of minute particles in solution, which came to be called Brownian motion. In addition, he recognized the fundamental distinction between gymnosperms (conifers and their allies) and

  • Brown, Robert (British actor)

    Englische Kom?dianten: …Europe was that led by Robert Brown, formerly a member of Worcester’s Men. Brown’s actors performed at Leiden in 1591 and by the following year had attracted the patronage of the playwright-duke Heinrich Julius of Brunswick. Several of the duke’s subsequent dramas are thought to contain plot elements from some…

  • Brown, Robert Hanbury (British astronomer)

    Robert Hanbury Brown, British astronomer and writer noted for his design, development, and use of the intensity interferometer. Brown graduated from the University of London in 1935. During and after World War II he worked with Robert Alexander Watson-Watt and then E.G. Bowen to develop radar and

  • Brown, Robert James (Australian politician)

    Bob Brown, Australian politician who served as a member of the Australian Senate (1996–2012) and as leader of the Australian Greens (2005–12). Brown was raised in rural New South Wales, and he attended school in Sydney, earning a medical degree from the University of Sydney in 1968. After

  • Brown, Roger (American artist and collector)

    Roger Brown, American artist and collector who was associated with the Chicago Imagists and was known for his bright, flat, and seemingly simple compositions that show an ominous, sometimes satirical, perspective on contemporary life and American culture and politics. Brown was raised in Opelika,

  • Brown, Ron (American politician)

    Ron Brown, American politician, the first African American to be chairman (1989–93) of a major U.S. political party and the first to be appointed secretary of commerce (1993–96). Brown’s father managed the Hotel Theresa in Harlem, which was frequented by celebrities, politicians, and the black

  • Brown, Ronald Harmon (American politician)

    Ron Brown, American politician, the first African American to be chairman (1989–93) of a major U.S. political party and the first to be appointed secretary of commerce (1993–96). Brown’s father managed the Hotel Theresa in Harlem, which was frequented by celebrities, politicians, and the black

  • Brown, Roosevelt (American athlete)

    Roosevelt Brown, American football player (born Oct. 20, 1932, Charlottesville, Va.—died June 9, 2004, Columbus, N.J.), manned the left-tackle position on the offensive line for the New York Giants and was instrumental in helping the team win one National Football League title and six division t

  • Brown, Roy Abbott, Jr. (Canadian-born American automobile designer)

    Roy Abbott Brown, Jr., Canadian-born American automobile designer (born Oct. 30, 1916, Hamilton, Ont.—died Feb. 24, 2013, Ann Arbor, Mich.), created the bold design for the high-concept Ford Edsel, which featured innovative styling for the exterior (a lavish chrome-encrusted vertical grille,

  • Brown, Roy, Jr. (Canadian-born American automobile designer)

    Roy Abbott Brown, Jr., Canadian-born American automobile designer (born Oct. 30, 1916, Hamilton, Ont.—died Feb. 24, 2013, Ann Arbor, Mich.), created the bold design for the high-concept Ford Edsel, which featured innovative styling for the exterior (a lavish chrome-encrusted vertical grille,

  • Brown, Ruth (American singer and actress)

    Ruth Brown, American singer and actress, who earned the sobriquet “Miss Rhythm” while dominating the rhythm-and-blues charts throughout the 1950s. Her success helped establish Atlantic Records (“The House That Ruth Built”) as the era’s premier rhythm-and-blues label. The oldest of seven children,

  • Brown, Ruth Winifred (American librarian and activist)

    Ruth Winifred Brown, American librarian and activist, who was dismissed from her job at an Oklahoma library for her civil rights activities in 1950. Brown began her career as a librarian in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, in 1919. She became the president of the Oklahoma Library Association in 1931 and was

  • Brown, Scott (United States senator)

    Jeanne Shaheen: …2014 against former Massachusetts senator Scott Brown, who had moved to New Hampshire to challenge her.

  • Brown, Sherrod (United States senator)

    Sherrod Brown, American politician who was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 2006 and began representing Ohio the following year. Brown grew up in Mansfield, Ohio, where he was active in the Boy Scouts, eventually becoming an Eagle Scout. He attended Yale University, receiving a

  • Brown, Sherrod Campbell (United States senator)

    Sherrod Brown, American politician who was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 2006 and began representing Ohio the following year. Brown grew up in Mansfield, Ohio, where he was active in the Boy Scouts, eventually becoming an Eagle Scout. He attended Yale University, receiving a

  • Brown, Sir Arthur Whitten (British aviator)

    Sir Arthur Whitten Brown, British aviator who, with Capt. John W. Alcock, made the first nonstop airplane crossing of the Atlantic. Brown was trained as an engineer and became a pilot in the Royal Air Force during World War I. As navigator to Alcock he made the record crossing of the Atlantic in a

  • Brown, Sir John (British manufacturer)

    Sir John Brown, British armour-plate manufacturer who developed rolled-steel plates for naval warships. Brown began as an apprentice to a cutlery firm. In 1848 he invented the conical steel spring buffer for railway cars. In 1856 he established the Atlas ironworks in Sheffield, which produced

  • Brown, Sterling (American educator, literary critic and poet)

    Sterling Brown, influential African-American teacher, literary critic, and poet whose poetry was rooted in folklore sources and black dialect. The son of a professor at Howard University, Washington, D.C., Brown was educated at Williams College, Williamstown, Mass. (A.B., 1922), and Harvard

  • Brown, Sterling Allen (American educator, literary critic and poet)

    Sterling Brown, influential African-American teacher, literary critic, and poet whose poetry was rooted in folklore sources and black dialect. The son of a professor at Howard University, Washington, D.C., Brown was educated at Williams College, Williamstown, Mass. (A.B., 1922), and Harvard

  • Brown, Thomas (British author)

    Tom Brown, British satirist best known for his reputedly extemporaneous translation of Martial’s 33rd epigram beginning “Non amo te, Sabidi . . . .” Brown entered Christ Church, Oxford, in 1678, but the irregularity of his life there brought him before Dr. John Fell, dean of Christ Church, who

  • Brown, Thomas (British physician and philosopher)

    Thomas Brown, British metaphysician whose work marks a turning point in the history of the common-sense school of philosophy. Between 1792 and 1803 Brown studied philosophy, law, and medicine at the University of Edinburgh, where he met the philosopher Dugald Stewart and the founders of the

  • Brown, Tina (English American magazine editor)

    Tina Brown, English American magazine editor and writer whose exacting sensibilities and prescient understanding of popular culture were credited with revitalizing the sales of such publications as Vanity Fair and The New Yorker. She applied her media acumen to the online realm as editor of The

  • Brown, Tom (British author)

    Tom Brown, British satirist best known for his reputedly extemporaneous translation of Martial’s 33rd epigram beginning “Non amo te, Sabidi . . . .” Brown entered Christ Church, Oxford, in 1678, but the irregularity of his life there brought him before Dr. John Fell, dean of Christ Church, who

  • Brown, Tony (American activist, television producer, writer, educator and filmmaker)

    Tony Brown, American activist, television producer, writer, educator, and filmmaker who hosted Tony Brown’s Journal (1968–2008; original name Black Journal until 1977), the longest-running black news program in television history. Brown was the son of Royal Brown and Catherine Davis Brown.

  • Brown, Trisha (American choreographer)

    Trisha Brown, American dancer and choreographer whose avant-garde and postmodernist work explores and experiments in pure movement, with and without the accompaniments of music and traditional theatrical space. Brown studied modern dance at Mills College in Oakland, California (B.A., 1958). Her

  • Brown, Walter A. (American businessman)

    basketball: U.S. professional basketball: …1946 under the guidance of Walter A. Brown, president of the Boston Garden. Brown contended that professional basketball would succeed only if there were sufficient financial support to nurse the league over the early lean years, if the game emphasized skill instead of brawling, and if all players were restricted…

  • Brown, William (British explorer)

    Honolulu: …Island was entered by Captain William Brown in 1794. After 1820 Honolulu assumed first importance in the islands and flourished as a base for sandalwood traders and whalers. A Russian group arrived there in 1816, and the port was later occupied by the British (1843) and the French (1849) but…

  • Brown, William Alfred (Australian cricketer)

    Bill Brown, (William Alfred Brown), Australian cricketer (born July 31, 1912, Toowoomba, Queens., Australia—died March 16, 2008, Brisbane, Australia), was the last pre-World War II Australian Test player and one of the last of the Invincibles of captain Don Bradman’s 1948 touring side that was

  • Brown, William Anthony (American activist, television producer, writer, educator and filmmaker)

    Tony Brown, American activist, television producer, writer, educator, and filmmaker who hosted Tony Brown’s Journal (1968–2008; original name Black Journal until 1977), the longest-running black news program in television history. Brown was the son of Royal Brown and Catherine Davis Brown.

  • Brown, William Hill (American author)

    William Hill Brown, novelist and dramatist whose anonymously published The Power of Sympathy, or the Triumph of Nature Founded in Truth (1789) is considered the first American novel. An epistolary novel about tragic, incestuous love, it followed the sentimental style developed by Samuel Richardson;

  • Brown, William Wells (American writer)

    William Wells Brown, American writer who is considered to be the first African-American to publish a novel. He was also the first to have a play and a travel book published. Brown was born to a black slave mother and a white slaveholding father. He grew up near St. Louis, Mo., where he served

  • Brown, Willie (American musician)

    Robert Johnson: …of the Mississippi Delta blues Willie Brown, Charley Patton, and Son House—all of whom influenced his playing and none of whom was particularly impressed by his talent. They were dazzled by his musical ability, however, when he returned to town after spending as much as a year away. That time…

  • Brown, Willie (American politician)

    Willie Brown, American politician who was the first African American speaker of the California State Assembly, the longest-serving speaker of that body (1980–95), and mayor of San Francisco (1996–2004). Brown was born into poverty in rural Texas and moved to San Francisco after graduating from high

  • Brown, Willie Lewis, Jr. (American politician)

    Willie Brown, American politician who was the first African American speaker of the California State Assembly, the longest-serving speaker of that body (1980–95), and mayor of San Francisco (1996–2004). Brown was born into poverty in rural Texas and moved to San Francisco after graduating from high

  • brown-banded cockroach (insect)

    cockroach: The brown-banded cockroach (Supella longipalpa) resembles the German cockroach but is slightly smaller. The male has fully developed wings and is lighter in colour than the female, whose wings are short and nonfunctional. Both sexes have two light-coloured bands across the back. The adult life span…

  • brown-breasted songlark (bird)

    songlark: …lively song; the 30-cm (12-inch) brown, or black-breasted, songlark (C. cruralis) lives in open country, utters creaky chuckling notes, and has a flight song, as larks do.

  • brown-eared woolly opossum (marsupial)

    woolly opossum: The brown-eared woolly opossum (Caluromys lanatus) occurs from Colombia and Venezuela to Paraguay. The bare-tailed woolly opossum (Caluromys philander) occurs throughout northern and eastern South America. All have large, nearly naked ears, a long prehensile tail, and either a median stripe on the face or bold…

  • brown-eared woolly possum (marsupial)

    woolly opossum: The brown-eared woolly opossum (Caluromys lanatus) occurs from Colombia and Venezuela to Paraguay. The bare-tailed woolly opossum (Caluromys philander) occurs throughout northern and eastern South America. All have large, nearly naked ears, a long prehensile tail, and either a median stripe on the face or bold…

  • brown-headed cowbird (bird)

    community ecology: Ecotones: …parasitism of bird nests by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) is particularly frequent in ecotones between mature forests and earlier successional patches. Cowbirds lay their eggs in the nests of other birds and are active mainly in early successional patches. Forest birds whose nests are deep within the interior of mature…

  • brown-headed spider monkey (primate)

    spider monkey: …endangered, and two of these—the brown-headed spider monkey (A. fusciceps), which is found from eastern Panama through northwestern Ecuador, and the variegated, or brown, spider monkey (A. hybridus), which inhabits northeastern Colombia and northwestern Venezuela—are listed as critically endangered. Spider monkeys are widely hunted for food by local people. Consequently,…

  • brown-hooded cockroach (insect)

    cockroach: The brown-hooded cockroach (Cryptocercus punctulatus) digests wood with the aid of certain protozoans in its digestive tract.

  • Brown-Séquard, Charles-édouard (French physiologist)

    Charles-édouard Brown-Séquard, French physiologist and neurologist, a pioneer endocrinologist and neurophysiologist who was among the first to work out the physiology of the spinal cord. After graduating in medicine from the University of Paris in 1846, Brown-Séquard taught at Harvard University

  • brown-tail moth (insect)

    tachinid fly: …control the gypsy moth and brown-tail moth attacks more than 200 species of caterpillars. The means of entering the host has become highly evolved among tachinids. Certain tachinid flies attach eggs to their victim’s exoskeleton. When they hatch, the larvae burrow through the exoskeleton. Others deposit living larvae either directly…

  • brown-throated three-toed sloth (mammal)

    A Moving Habitat: …Central and South America (Bradypus variegatus) descends from the trees, where it lives among the branches. For this slow-moving mammal, the journey is a dangerous and laborious undertaking, but it is one of great importance to members of the community among and aboard the sloth. Once the sloth has…

  • brown-winged kingfisher (bird)

    kingfisher: …Sulawesi kingfisher (Ceyx fallax), the brown-winged kingfisher (Pelargopsis amauropterus), and some of the paradise kingfishers (Tanysiptera) of New Guinea.

  • Brownback, Sam (American politician)

    Sam Brownback, American Republican politician, who served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1995–96) and of the U.S. Senate (1996–2011) before becoming governor of Kansas (2011–18). He later served as ambassador-at-large for international religious freedom (2018– ) in the

  • Brownback, Samuel Dale (American politician)

    Sam Brownback, American Republican politician, who served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives (1995–96) and of the U.S. Senate (1996–2011) before becoming governor of Kansas (2011–18). He later served as ambassador-at-large for international religious freedom (2018– ) in the

  • brownbul (bird)

    Brownbul, any of certain bird species of the bulbul family. See

  • Browne of Madingley, Edmund John Phillip Browne, Baron (British businessman)

    John Browne, Lord Browne of Madingley, British businessman best known for his role as chief executive officer of British Petroleum (BP) from 1995 to 2007. During his tenure he was recognized for his efforts to make petroleum production a more environmentally conscious industry. At the suggestion of

  • Browne’s Vulgar Errors (work by Browne)

    Sir Thomas Browne: …his second and larger work, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, or, Enquiries into Very many received Tenets, and commonly presumed truths (1646), often known as Browne’s Vulgar Errors. In it he tried to correct many popular beliefs and superstitions. In 1658 he published his third book, two treatises on antiquarian subjects, Hydriotaphia, Urne-Buriall,…

  • Browne, Charles Farrar (American humorist)

    Artemus Ward, one of the most popular 19th-century American humorists, whose lecture techniques exercised much influence on such humorists as Mark Twain. Starting as a printer’s apprentice, Browne went to Boston to work as a compositor for The Carpet-Bag, a humour magazine. In 1860, after several

  • Browne, E. Martin (British director and producer)

    E. Martin Browne, British theatrical director and producer who was a major influence on poetic and religious drama and, for more than 25 years, the director chosen by T.S. Eliot for his plays. It was as director of the religious spectacle called The Rock that Browne proposed Eliot as author and

  • Browne, Edmund John Phillip (British businessman)

    John Browne, Lord Browne of Madingley, British businessman best known for his role as chief executive officer of British Petroleum (BP) from 1995 to 2007. During his tenure he was recognized for his efforts to make petroleum production a more environmentally conscious industry. At the suggestion of

  • Browne, Elliott Martin (British director and producer)

    E. Martin Browne, British theatrical director and producer who was a major influence on poetic and religious drama and, for more than 25 years, the director chosen by T.S. Eliot for his plays. It was as director of the religious spectacle called The Rock that Browne proposed Eliot as author and

  • Browne, Felicia Dorothea (English poet)

    Felicia Dorothea Hemans, English poet who owed the immense popularity of her poems to a talent for treating Romantic themes—nature, the picturesque, childhood innocence, travels abroad, liberty, the heroic—with an easy and engaging fluency. Poems (1808), written when she was between 8 and 13, was

  • Browne, Gaston (prime minister of Antigua and Barbuda)

    Antigua and Barbuda: History: …the ALP regained power under Gaston Browne. Browne and the ALP then retained power in early elections held in March 2018.

  • Browne, Hablot Knight (British artist)

    Hablot Knight Browne, British artist, preeminent as an interpreter and illustrator of Dickens’ characters. Browne was early apprenticed to the engraver William Finden, in whose studio his only artistic education was obtained. At the age of 19 he abandoned engraving in favour of other artistic work,

  • Browne, Jackson (American musician)

    Jackson Browne, German-born American singer, songwriter, pianist, and guitarist who helped define the singer-songwriter movement of the 1970s. Born in Germany to a musical family with deep roots in southern California, Browne grew up in Los Angeles and Orange county. His interest in music led to

  • Browne, John, Lord Browne of Madingley (British businessman)

    John Browne, Lord Browne of Madingley, British businessman best known for his role as chief executive officer of British Petroleum (BP) from 1995 to 2007. During his tenure he was recognized for his efforts to make petroleum production a more environmentally conscious industry. At the suggestion of

  • Browne, Malcolm Wilde (American photojournalist)

    Malcolm Wilde Browne, American photojournalist (born April 17, 1931, New York, N.Y.—died Aug. 27, 2012, Hanover, N.H.), captured one of the most shocking images of the Vietnam War on June 11, 1963, when he photographed a Buddhist monk setting himself on fire in a Saigon street as a protest against

  • Browne, Maximilian Ulysses, Reichsgraf (Austrian field marshal)

    Maximilian Ulysses, Reichsgraf Browne, field marshal, one of Austria’s ablest commanders during the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–48) and the Seven Years’ War (1756–63), who nevertheless suffered defeat by Frederick II the Great of Prussia. A Habsburg subject of Irish ancestry, Browne

  • Browne, Robert (English actor)

    Western theatre: German theatre: Robert Browne’s company was the first, arriving in Frankfurt in 1592. In a country where local theatre was weighed down by excessive moralizing, these actors made an immediate impact through their robustness and vivid professionalism. Their repertoire consisted mainly of pirated versions of Elizabethan tragedies…

  • Browne, Robert (English church leader)

    Robert Browne, Puritan Congregationalist church leader, one of the original proponents of the Separatist, or Free Church, movement among Nonconformists that demanded separation from the Church of England and freedom from state control. His Separatist followers became known as Brownists. Educated at

  • Browne, Roscoe Lee (American actor)

    Roscoe Lee Browne, American character actor (born May 2, 1925 , Woodbury, N.J.—died April 11, 2007, Los Angeles, Calif.), had a regal bearing and a sonorous voice that he used to memorable effect in a string of films; in Broadway plays, notably August Wilson’s Two Trains Running (1992), for which

  • Browne, Sir Thomas (English author)

    Sir Thomas Browne, English physician and author, best known for his book of reflections, Religio Medici. After studying at Winchester and Oxford, Browne probably was an assistant to a doctor near Oxford. After taking his M.D. at Leiden in 1633, he practiced at Shibden Hall near Halifax, in

  • Browne, Thom (American fashion designer)

    Thom Browne, American fashion designer known for his reconceptualization of the classic men’s suit. He became widely recognized for his womenswear after U.S. first lady Michelle Obama wore one of his designs to the 2013 presidential inauguration. Browne studied business at the University of Notre

  • Browne, Thomas Alexander (Australian writer)

    Rolf Boldrewood, romantic novelist best known for his Robbery Under Arms (1888) and A Miner’s Right (1890), both exciting and realistic portrayals of pioneer life in Australia. Taken to Australia as a small child, Boldrewood was educated there and then operated a large farm in Victoria for some

  • Browne, William (English poet)

    William Browne, English poet, author of Britannia’s Pastorals (1613–16) and other pastoral and miscellaneous verse. Browne studied at the University of Oxford and entered the Inner Temple in 1611. Between 1616 and 1621 he lived in France. In 1623 he became tutor to Robert Dormer, the future Earl of

  • Browne, William George (British explorer)

    William George Browne, British traveler in Central Africa and the Middle East and the first European to describe Darfur, a Muslim sultanate of Billād al-Sūdān, now part of Sudan. Browne was forcibly detained in Darfur (1793–96) and published his account of the event in Travels in Africa, Egypt and

  • Brownell, Herbert, Jr. (United States public official)

    Operation Wetback: Attorney General Herbert Brownell, Jr., and vetted by Pres. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Operation Wetback arose at least partly in response to a portion of the American public that had become angry at the widespread corruption among employers of sharecroppers and growers along the Mexican border and at…

  • Brownell, W. C. (American critic)

    W.C. Brownell, critic who sought to expand the scope of American literary criticism as Matthew Arnold had for British. After graduating from Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts, in 1871, Brownell joined the New York World, becoming city editor in a year. After serving on The Nation from 1879 to

  • Brownell, William Crary (American critic)

    W.C. Brownell, critic who sought to expand the scope of American literary criticism as Matthew Arnold had for British. After graduating from Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts, in 1871, Brownell joined the New York World, becoming city editor in a year. After serving on The Nation from 1879 to

  • Brownian motion (physics)

    Brownian motion, any of various physical phenomena in which some quantity is constantly undergoing small, random fluctuations. It was named for the Scottish botanist Robert Brown, the first to study such fluctuations (1827). If a number of particles subject to Brownian motion are present in a given

  • Brownian motion process (mathematics)

    probability theory: Brownian motion process: …is the Brownian motion or Wiener process. It was first discussed by Louis Bachelier (1900), who was interested in modeling fluctuations in prices in financial markets, and by Albert Einstein (1905), who gave a mathematical model for the irregular motion of colloidal particles first observed by the Scottish botanist Robert…

  • Brownian movement (physics)

    Brownian motion, any of various physical phenomena in which some quantity is constantly undergoing small, random fluctuations. It was named for the Scottish botanist Robert Brown, the first to study such fluctuations (1827). If a number of particles subject to Brownian motion are present in a given

  • Brownie (camera)

    Eastman Kodak Company: …1900 Eastman introduced the less-expensive Brownie, a simple box camera with a removable film container, so that the whole unit no longer needed to be sent back to the plant.

  • brownie (English folklore)

    Brownie, in English and Scottish folklore, a small, industrious fairy or hobgoblin believed to inhabit houses and barns. Rarely seen, he was often heard at night, cleaning and doing housework; he also sometimes mischievously disarranged rooms. He would ride for the midwife, and in Cornwall he

  • Brownies (scouting)

    Girl Guides and Girl Scouts: …school grades: Daisy (grades K–1), Brownie (2–3), Junior (4–5), Cadette (6–8), Senior (9–10), and Ambassador (11–12). Adults are also permitted to join the Girl Scouts as mentors, volunteers, or troop leaders.

  • Browning automatic rifle (weapon)

    Browning automatic rifle (BAR), automatic rifle produced in the United States starting in 1918 and widely used in other countries as a light machine gun. The BAR is a gas-operated rifle invented by John M. Browning (1855–1926), an American gun designer. It has been chambered for various ammunition,

  • Browning Version, The (film by Asquith [1951])

    Michael Redgrave: …Dead of Night (1945) and The Browning Version (1951). One of Redgrave’s most highly acclaimed roles was as Orin Mannon in Eugene O’Neill’s Mourning Becomes Electra (1947). Other of his films include The Importance of Being Earnest (1952), Goodbye Mr. Chips (1969), and Nicholas and Alexandra (1971). Redgrave, who originally…

  • Browning, Charles Albert (American director)

    Tod Browning, American director who specialized in films of the grotesque and macabre. A cult director because of his association with fabled silent star Lon Chaney and his proclivity for outré fantasy and horror pictures, Browning made a handful of sound pictures as well as almost 40 silent

  • Browning, Don (American religious scholar)

    communitarianism: Cultural relativism and the global community: …the American scholar of religion Don Browning, there are some substantive universal values, such as human rights and the integrity of the global climate, that can provide a foundation for particularistic, communal ones.

  • Browning, Edmond (American clergyman)

    Edmond Browning, (Edmond Lee Browning), American clergyman (born March 11, 1929, Corpus Christi, Texas—died July 11, 2016, Dee, Ore.), as presiding bishop (1986–97) of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, exhibited a strong commitment to inclusiveness and social justice. In 1989 he

  • Browning, Edmond Lee (American clergyman)

    Edmond Browning, (Edmond Lee Browning), American clergyman (born March 11, 1929, Corpus Christi, Texas—died July 11, 2016, Dee, Ore.), as presiding bishop (1986–97) of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America, exhibited a strong commitment to inclusiveness and social justice. In 1989 he

  • Browning, Elizabeth Barrett (English poet)

    Elizabeth Barrett Browning, English poet whose reputation rests chiefly upon her love poems, Sonnets from the Portuguese and Aurora Leigh, the latter now considered an early feminist text. Her husband was Robert Browning. Elizabeth was the eldest child of Edward Barrett Moulton (later Edward

  • Browning, John Moses (American gun designer)

    John Moses Browning, American designer of small arms and automatic weapons, best known for his commercial contributions to the Colt, Remington, and Winchester firms and for his military contributions to the U.S. and Allied armed forces. Inventive as a child, Browning made his first gun at the age

  • Browning, Kurt (Canadian figure skater)

    figure skating: Recent trends and changes: Canadian Kurt Browning, the first person to complete a quadruple jump, landed a quad toe loop at the 1988 World Championships in Budapest. Elvis Stojko, also a Canadian, holds two records with respect to the quad; he was the first to land a quad in combination…

  • Browning, Lady Daphne (British writer)

    Daphne du Maurier, English novelist and playwright, daughter of actor-manager Sir Gerald du Maurier, best known for her novel Rebecca (1938). Du Maurier’s first novel, The Loving Spirit (1931), was followed by many successful, usually romantic tales set on the wild coast of Cornwall, where she came

  • Browning, Robert (British poet)

    Robert Browning, major English poet of the Victorian age, noted for his mastery of dramatic monologue and psychological portraiture. His most noted work was The Ring and the Book (1868–69), the story of a Roman murder trial in 12 books. The son of a clerk in the Bank of England in London, Browning

  • Browning, Tod (American director)

    Tod Browning, American director who specialized in films of the grotesque and macabre. A cult director because of his association with fabled silent star Lon Chaney and his proclivity for outré fantasy and horror pictures, Browning made a handful of sound pictures as well as almost 40 silent

  • Brownlow, Kevin (British filmmaker)

    It Happened Here: …of some seven years by Kevin Brownlow and Andrew Mollo, who were the movie’s directors, producers, and writers. Both were teenagers when they began working on the movie. Operating on a shoestring budget—the film reportedly cost approximately $20,000—Brownlow and Mollo used mostly amateur actors and were forced to forgo shooting…

  • Brownlow, William G. (American journalist and politician)

    William G. Brownlow, editor of the last pro-Union newspaper in the antebellum South of the United States who served as governor of Tennessee during the early years of Reconstruction. As a young child, Brownlow migrated with his family from Virginia to eastern Tennessee. He was orphaned at age 11,

  • Brownlow, William Gannaway (American journalist and politician)

    William G. Brownlow, editor of the last pro-Union newspaper in the antebellum South of the United States who served as governor of Tennessee during the early years of Reconstruction. As a young child, Brownlow migrated with his family from Virginia to eastern Tennessee. He was orphaned at age 11,

  • Browns (American baseball team)

    St. Louis Cardinals, American professional baseball team established in 1882 that plays in the National League (NL). Based in St. Louis, Missouri, the Cardinals have won 11 World Series titles and 23 league pennants. Second only to the New York Yankees in World Series championships, St. Louis is

  • Browns (American baseball team, American League)

    Baltimore Orioles, American professional baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland. Playing in the American League (AL), the Orioles won World Series titles in 1966, 1970, and 1983. The franchise that would become the Orioles was founded in 1894 as a minor league team based in Milwaukee,

  • Brownshirts (Nazi organization)

    SA, in the German Nazi Party, a paramilitary organization whose methods of violent intimidation played a key role in Adolf Hitler’s rise to power. The SA was founded in Munich by Hitler in 1921 out of various roughneck elements that had attached themselves to the fledgling Nazi movement. It drew

  • Brownson, Orestes Augustus (American writer)

    Orestes Augustus Brownson, American writer on theological, philosophical, scientific, and sociological subjects. Self-educated and originally a Presbyterian, Brownson subsequently became a Universalist minister (1826–31); a Unitarian minister (1832); pastor of his own religious organization, the

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载