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  • Bukovyna (region, Europe)

    Bukovina, eastern European territory consisting of a segment of the northeastern Carpathian Mountains and the adjoining plain, divided in modern times (after 1947) between Romania and Ukraine. Settled by both Ukrainians (Ruthenians) and Romanians (Moldavians), the region became an integral part of

  • Bukowina (region, Europe)

    Bukovina, eastern European territory consisting of a segment of the northeastern Carpathian Mountains and the adjoining plain, divided in modern times (after 1947) between Romania and Ukraine. Settled by both Ukrainians (Ruthenians) and Romanians (Moldavians), the region became an integral part of

  • Bukowski, Charles (American writer)

    Charles Bukowski, American author noted for his use of violent images and graphic language in poetry and fiction that depict survival in a corrupt, blighted society. Bukowski lived most of his life in Los Angeles. He briefly attended Los Angeles City College (1939–41) and worked at menial jobs

  • Bukowski, Henry Charles, Jr. (American writer)

    Charles Bukowski, American author noted for his use of violent images and graphic language in poetry and fiction that depict survival in a corrupt, blighted society. Bukowski lived most of his life in Los Angeles. He briefly attended Los Angeles City College (1939–41) and worked at menial jobs

  • Bukuru (Nigeria)

    Bukuru, town, Plateau state, central Nigeria, located on the Jos Plateau. It lies along a branch railway from Jos town (8 miles [13 km] north-northeast), and it is a major tin- and columbite-mining centre on one of the highest parts (more than 4,000 feet [1,200 metres]) of the plateau. The Bauchi

  • Buladelah-Taree Holiday Song Cycle, The (poetry by Murray)

    Les Murray: The poem “The Buladelah-Taree Holiday Song Cycle,” in the collection Ethnic Radio (1977), reflects his identification with Australia’s Aboriginals; it uses Aboriginal narrative style to describe vacationing Australians. The Boys Who Stole the Funeral (1979) is a sequence of 140 sonnets about a pair of boys who…

  • Bulak (district, Cairo, Egypt)

    Būlāq, northwestern district of Cairo, Egypt. Situated on the Nile River, Būlāq was a major port suburb before the city of Cairo expanded to engulf it. Būlāq had been an island until the westward recession of the Nile revealed it in the mid-14th century. It was Cairo’s main port by 1560, and it

  • Bulala (people)

    Chad: Ethnic groups: …surrounding the Hadjeray are the Bulala, Kuka, and the Midogo, who are sedentary peoples. In the eastern region of Ouadda? live the Maba, among whom the Kado once formed an aristocracy. They constitute a nucleus surrounded by a host of other groups who, while possessing their own languages, nevertheless constitute…

  • Buland Darwaza (gate, Fatehpur Sikri, India)

    Akbar period architecture: …a massive gateway called the Buland Darwaza (Victory Gate), gives a feeling of immense strength and height, an impression emphasized by the steepness of the flight of steps by which it is approached.

  • Bulandshahr (India)

    Bulandshahr, city, western Uttar Pradesh state, northern India. It lies about 40 miles (65 km) southeast of Delhi, on the Kali River. The city was formerly called Baran. Its present name, which means “Elevated Town,” refers to its location on high ground. The area passed from a Hindu raja to Ma?mūd

  • Būlāq (district, Cairo, Egypt)

    Būlāq, northwestern district of Cairo, Egypt. Situated on the Nile River, Būlāq was a major port suburb before the city of Cairo expanded to engulf it. Būlāq had been an island until the westward recession of the Nile revealed it in the mid-14th century. It was Cairo’s main port by 1560, and it

  • Bulatov, Erik (Russian artist)

    Russia: The 20th century: Ilya Kabakov, Mikhail Shemyakin, and Erik Bulatov. They employed techniques as varied as primitivism, hyperrealism, grotesque, and abstraction, but they shared a common distaste for the canons of Socialist Realism. Bland, monumental housing projects dominated the architectural production of the postwar period; later in the century such structures were increasingly…

  • Bulavin, Kondraty Afanasyevich (Russian rebel)

    Russian Empire: Internal disturbances: …deserters, and conscripted labourers under Kondraty Bulavin, a Cossack ataman (hetman), rose up in arms against the boyars and chiefs, foreigners and tax collectors, and the official church. Between 1704–06 and 1720–25 hungry peasants rioted against conscription and taxation. The secret police and punitive military expeditions stamped out all opposition…

  • Bulawayan Group (geological feature, Africa)

    Precambrian: Age and occurrence of greenstone-granite belts: Africa; the Sebakwian, Belingwean, and Bulawayan-Shamvaian belts of Zimbabwe; the Yellowknife belts in the Slave province of Canada; the Abitibi, Wawa, Wabigoon, and Quetico belts of the Superior province of Canada; the Dharwar belts in India; and the Warrawoona and Yilgarn belts in Australia.

  • Bulawayo (Zimbabwe)

    Bulawayo, second largest city in Zimbabwe and the chief city of Matabeleland (i.e., the Ndebele-dominated western third of the country). The city lies along the Matsheumlope River in the southwestern part of the country, 4,405 feet (1,341 metres) above sea level in undulating savanna terrain. The

  • bulb (plant anatomy)

    Bulb, in botany, a modified stem that is the resting stage of certain seed plants, particularly perennial monocotyledons. A bulb consists of a relatively large, usually globe-shaped, underground bud with membraneous or fleshy overlapping leaves arising from a short stem. A bulb’s fleshy

  • bulb division (horticulture)

    propagation: Asexual propagation.: Methods of asexual propagation include bulb division, layering, cutting, and grafting. Bulbs and other underground rootlike structures, such as tubers and corms, may be divided as they mature. The sections are then placed in a moist medium to root. In layering, the stem of a large plant is notched and…

  • bulb rot (plant disease)

    Basal rot, widespread plant disease caused by a variety of fungi and bacteria that can infect all flower and crop bulbs. Shoots fail to emerge or are stunted, leaves are yellow to reddish or purplish, and they later wilt and die. Roots, usually few, are discoloured and decayed. The rot often starts

  • Bulba (dance)

    Igor Moiseyev: His Bulba so effectively re-created the folklore of Belorussia that it was adopted as that region’s national dance. After 1955 the ensemble toured France, England, Egypt, Japan, and the United States; it continued to perform into the early 21st century.

  • bulbar conjunctiva (anatomy)

    human eye: The conjunctiva: …the eyeball is called the bulbar conjunctiva. Between the bulbar and the palpebral conjunctiva there are two loose, redundant portions forming recesses that project back toward the equator of the globe. These recesses are called the upper and lower fornices, or conjunctival sacs; it is the looseness of the conjunctiva…

  • bulbar nerve (anatomy)

    nervous system disease: Bulbar nerves: (In this context, the term bulbar refers to the medulla oblongata, which looks like a swelling, or bulb, at the top of the spinal cord.) Damage to the 9th through 12th cranial nerves, the bulbar nerves, causes impairment of swallowing and speech and…

  • bulbar nucleus (anatomy)

    speech disorder: Shaking palsy: …a neurologic disease damages the bulbar nuclei (in the brain stem) of the nerves innervating the organs for speech, the effect of bulbar dysarthria is heard. In severe cases, the voice may be reduced to a faint grunting, while articulation deteriorates into mumbling or total muteness. Chorea, another neural disorder…

  • bulbar polio (disease)

    polio: The course of the disease: In bulbar polio the virus attacks the brainstem, and the nerve centres that control swallowing and talking are damaged. Secretions collect in the throat and may lead to suffocation by blocking the airway. Some 5 to 10 percent of persons afflicted with paralytic polio die, usually…

  • bulbel (plant anatomy)

    Bulbil, in botany, tiny secondary bulb that forms in the angle between a leaf and stem or in place of flowers on certain plants. Bulbils, called offsets when full-sized, fall or are removed and planted to produce new plants. They are especially common among such plants as onions and

  • bulberin nut (plant)

    macadamia: Cultivation: …member of the genus, the bulberin nut (M. jansenii), is an endangered species.

  • bulbil (plant anatomy)

    Bulbil, in botany, tiny secondary bulb that forms in the angle between a leaf and stem or in place of flowers on certain plants. Bulbils, called offsets when full-sized, fall or are removed and planted to produce new plants. They are especially common among such plants as onions and

  • bulblet (plant anatomy)

    Bulbil, in botany, tiny secondary bulb that forms in the angle between a leaf and stem or in place of flowers on certain plants. Bulbils, called offsets when full-sized, fall or are removed and planted to produce new plants. They are especially common among such plants as onions and

  • bulbo-tuber (plant anatomy)

    Corm, vertical, fleshy, underground stem that acts as a food-storage structure in certain seed plants. It bears membranous or scaly leaves and buds, and, unlike in bulbs, these do not appear as visible rings when the corm is cut in half. Corms have a fibrous covering known as a tunic, and the roots

  • bulbocavernosus muscle

    Bulbocavernosus muscle, a muscle of the perineum, the area between the anus and the genitals. In the male, it surrounds the bulb (the enlarged inner end of the structure that surrounds the urethra) of the penis and can be contracted to expel the last drops of urine or semen. In the female it is d

  • bulbocavernous gland (anatomy)

    Bulbourethral gland, either of two pea-shaped glands in the male, located beneath the prostate gland at the beginning of the internal portion of the penis; they add fluids to semen during the process of ejaculation (q.v.). The glands, which measure only about 1 cm (0.4 inch) in diameter, have d

  • Bulbophyllum (plant genus)

    Bulbophyllum, one of the largest genera of orchids (family Orchidaceae), composed of more than 2,000 species of flowering plants. The genus is found in warm climates throughout Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Some species are of horticultural interest for their unusual flowers but are considered

  • Bulbophyllum nocturnum (plant)

    orchid: Natural history: For example, the flowers of B. nocturnum, the only orchid known to flower exclusively at night, are thought to attract fly pollinators by mimicking fungi in both shape and scent. Nocturnal flies are then attracted and act as effective pollinators.

  • bulbospongiosus

    Bulbocavernosus muscle, a muscle of the perineum, the area between the anus and the genitals. In the male, it surrounds the bulb (the enlarged inner end of the structure that surrounds the urethra) of the penis and can be contracted to expel the last drops of urine or semen. In the female it is d

  • bulbourethral gland (anatomy)

    Bulbourethral gland, either of two pea-shaped glands in the male, located beneath the prostate gland at the beginning of the internal portion of the penis; they add fluids to semen during the process of ejaculation (q.v.). The glands, which measure only about 1 cm (0.4 inch) in diameter, have d

  • bulbul (bird)

    Bulbul, any of about 140 species of birds of the family Pycnonotidae (order Passeriformes) of Africa and Asia, including some called greenbuls and brownbuls. Members range in size from 14 to 28 cm (5.5 to 11 inches) long. They are active, noisy, plain-coloured birds that sometimes damage orchards.

  • bulbus aortae (anatomy)

    prenatal development: Heart: The bulbus is absorbed into the right ventricle, and its continuation (the truncus) subdivides lengthwise, forming the aorta and the pulmonary artery. The right horn of the sinus venosus is absorbed into the right atrium, together with the superior and inferior venae cavae, which originally drained…

  • bulbus cordis (anatomy)

    prenatal development: Heart: The bulbus is absorbed into the right ventricle, and its continuation (the truncus) subdivides lengthwise, forming the aorta and the pulmonary artery. The right horn of the sinus venosus is absorbed into the right atrium, together with the superior and inferior venae cavae, which originally drained…

  • Buldana (India)

    Buldana, town, north-central Maharashtra state, western India. It is situated in the Buldana-Yeotmal plateau area of the Deccan on the Penganga River at an elevation of 2,119 feet (646 metres). Buldana’s climate is considerably cooler than that of most of the other communities of the Berar region.

  • Buldhana (India)

    Buldana, town, north-central Maharashtra state, western India. It is situated in the Buldana-Yeotmal plateau area of the Deccan on the Penganga River at an elevation of 2,119 feet (646 metres). Buldana’s climate is considerably cooler than that of most of the other communities of the Berar region.

  • Buldur (Turkey)

    Burdur, city, southwestern Turkey. It is located near the eastern shore of Lake Burdur. Called Polydorion in the Middle Ages, it fell to the Seljuq Turks in the 12th century and came under Ottoman domination in the 15th. Its size and economy expanded after World War II. Industries include textiles,

  • Bulembu (mountain, Eswatini)

    Eswatini: Relief and soils: …are the summit massifs of Bulembu (6,108 feet [1,862 metres]) and Ngwenya (5,997 feet [1,828 metres]) in the extreme west. Known to the Swazi as Inkangala (a cold, treeless place), the Highveld was the last part of the country to be settled. Its deeper-weathered red to yellow acid soils have…

  • Bulembu (Eswatini)

    Havelock, town on the northwest border of Swaziland. Located in the Highveld, it is the site of one of the world’s largest asbestos mines. Operations began in the 1930s, and asbestos was Swaziland’s economic mainstay until the 1950s, when agricultural products began to play an equally important

  • Bulfinch, Charles (American architect)

    Charles Bulfinch, first American professional architect, who gained fame chiefly as a designer of government buildings. After studying at Harvard University (1778–81), Bulfinch toured Europe (1785–87) and, on the advice of Thomas Jefferson, whom he met in Paris, visited many of the major

  • Bulgakov, Macarius (Russian Orthodox metropolitan)

    Macarius Bulgakov, Russian Orthodox metropolitan (archbishop) of Moscow and internationally recognized theologian and historian. The son of a country priest, Bulgakov took the name Macarius on becoming a monk. After studying at the Ecclesiastical Academy of Kiev, he joined the faculty and taught

  • Bulgakov, Mikhail (Russian author)

    Mikhail Bulgakov, Soviet playwright, novelist, and short-story writer best known for his humour and penetrating satire. Beginning his adult life as a doctor, Bulgakov gave up medicine for writing. His first major work was the novel Belaya gvardiya (The White Guard), serialized in 1925 but never

  • Bulgakov, Mikhail Afanasyevich (Russian author)

    Mikhail Bulgakov, Soviet playwright, novelist, and short-story writer best known for his humour and penetrating satire. Beginning his adult life as a doctor, Bulgakov gave up medicine for writing. His first major work was the novel Belaya gvardiya (The White Guard), serialized in 1925 but never

  • Bulgakov, Mikhail Petrovich (Russian Orthodox metropolitan)

    Macarius Bulgakov, Russian Orthodox metropolitan (archbishop) of Moscow and internationally recognized theologian and historian. The son of a country priest, Bulgakov took the name Macarius on becoming a monk. After studying at the Ecclesiastical Academy of Kiev, he joined the faculty and taught

  • Bulgakov, Sergey Nikolayevich (Russian economist and theologian)

    Sergey Nikolayevich Bulgakov, economist and Russian Orthodox theologian who brought to its fullest development the philosophical system called sophiology, which centred on problems of the creation of the world and stressed the unity of all things. Bulgakov began his clerical training at the

  • Bulganin, Nikolay Aleksandrovich (premier of Soviet Union)

    Nikolay Aleksandrovich Bulganin, statesman and industrial and economic administrator who was premier of the Soviet Union from 1955 to 1958. Bulganin began his career as a Cheka (Bolshevik secret police) officer in 1918. Later, as manager of Moscow’s leading electrical-equipment factory, he earned a

  • Bulgar (people)

    Bulgar, member of a people known in eastern European history during the Middle Ages. A branch of this people was one of the primary three ethnic ancestors of modern Bulgarians (the other two were Thracians and Slavs). Although many scholars, including linguists, had posited that the Bulgars were

  • Bulgar (Russia)

    Bolgary, ancient city and capital of the medieval state of Bolgariya Volga-Kama. The ruins of medieval Bolgary are near the present village of Bolgary, Tatarstan republic, in western Russia. Archaeological excavations on the site of the city began in 1870. The earliest settlement on the site of

  • Bulgaria

    Bulgaria, country occupying the eastern portion of the Balkan Peninsula in southeastern Europe. Founded in the 7th century, Bulgaria is one of the oldest states on the European continent. It is intersected by historically important routes from northern and eastern Europe to the Mediterranean basin

  • Bulgaria, flag of

    horizontally striped white-green-red national flag. Its width-to-length ratio is unspecified.In the 14th century the coat of arms of Tsar Ivan Shishman, the most powerful Bulgarian ruler, was a lion represented in gold on a red shield. This design was incorporated in some early Bulgarian

  • Bulgaria, history of

    Bulgaria: History: Evidence of human habitation in the area of Bulgaria dates from sometime within the Middle Paleolithic Period (Old Stone Age; 100,000 to 40,000 bce). Agricultural communities, though, appeared in the Neolithic Period (New Stone Age), and in the Bronze Age the lands…

  • Bulgaria, Republic of

    Bulgaria, country occupying the eastern portion of the Balkan Peninsula in southeastern Europe. Founded in the 7th century, Bulgaria is one of the oldest states on the European continent. It is intersected by historically important routes from northern and eastern Europe to the Mediterranean basin

  • Bulgarian (people)

    Bulgar, member of a people known in eastern European history during the Middle Ages. A branch of this people was one of the primary three ethnic ancestors of modern Bulgarians (the other two were Thracians and Slavs). Although many scholars, including linguists, had posited that the Bulgars were

  • Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (institution, Sofia, Bulgaria)

    Sofia: …institutions in Sofia are the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, the Academy of Agricultural Sciences, and the University of Sofia (1888), the oldest establishment of higher learning in Bulgaria. The city also contains the Cyril and Methodius National Library, the Ivan Vazov National Theatre and Opera House, an astronomical observatory, and…

  • Bulgarian Agrarian National Union (political party, Bulgaria)

    Bulgarian Agrarian National Union, Bulgarian political party founded under the name Bulgarian Agrarian Union in 1899. The party controlled the government between 1919 and 1923 and introduced extensive land reforms. Originally a professional organization, it became a peasants’ political party by

  • Bulgarian Agrarian Union (political party, Bulgaria)

    Bulgarian Agrarian National Union, Bulgarian political party founded under the name Bulgarian Agrarian Union in 1899. The party controlled the government between 1919 and 1923 and introduced extensive land reforms. Originally a professional organization, it became a peasants’ political party by

  • Bulgarian alphabet

    Cyrillic alphabet: Cyrillic alphabets—Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, and Serbian—have been modified somewhat from the original, generally by the loss of some superfluous letters. Modern Russian has 32 letters (33, with inclusion of the soft sign—which is not, strictly speaking, a letter), Bulgarian 30, Serbian 30, and Ukrainian 32 (33). Modern Russian…

  • Bulgarian Catholic Church

    Bulgarian Catholic Church, an Eastern Catholic church of the Byzantine rite, in communion with Rome since 1859. Christians since 864, the Bulgarians were conquered by the Byzantines early in the 11th century and followed Constantinople (now Istanbul) in the break with Rome (1054). In 1767, after

  • Bulgarian Communist Party (political party, Bulgaria)

    Bulgaria: Communist uprising: The Bulgarian communists, who had declared their neutrality when the coup occurred, were chastised by Moscow and directed to prepare an armed revolt against the Tsankov regime. The communists’ September Uprising was ruthlessly suppressed and provided Tsankov with a pretext for outlawing the Bulgarian Communist Party…

  • Bulgarian Horrors (European history)

    Bulgarian Horrors, atrocities committed by the forces of the Ottoman Empire in subduing the Bulgarian rebellion of 1876; the name was given currency by the British statesman W.E. Gladstone. Publicity given to the atrocities, especially in Gladstone’s pamphlet “The Bulgarian Horrors and the

  • Bulgarian language

    Bulgarian language, Bulgarian alphabetThe Bulgarian Cyrillic alphabet.South Slavic language written in the Cyrillic alphabet and spoken in Bulgaria and parts of Greece, Romania, Moldova, and Ukraine. Together with Macedonian, to which it is most closely related, Bulgarian contrasts sharply with the

  • Bulgarian Legion (Bulgarian military organization)

    Georgi Sava Rakovski: He organized a “Bulgarian Legion” of volunteers in Belgrade and later in Bucharest that was intended to form the core of a future Bulgarian army. The legion supported the Serbs against the Ottoman Empire in the skirmishes of 1862.

  • Bulgarian literature

    Bulgarian literature, body of writings in the Bulgarian language. Its origin is closely linked to Christianization of the Slavs beginning with Khan (Tsar) Boris I’s adoption in 864 of the Eastern Orthodox rather than Latin faith for his court and people. This political decision, combined with

  • Bulgarian National Bank

    Ivan Evstatiev Geshov: …statesman and founder of the Bulgarian National Bank. He was prime minister from March 1911 to July 1913.

  • Bulgarian National Television

    Bulgaria: Media and publishing: Bulgarian National Television produces a variety of programming, including news coverage and documentaries, sports broadcasts, and programs focusing on arts and education or aimed at children and youths or at visiting tourists. Since the end of 1989, mass media, including printed matter, have not been…

  • Bulgarian Orthodox Church

    Bulgarian Orthodox Church, one of the national churches of the Eastern Orthodox communion. Christianity was introduced to Bulgaria in 864 by Khan (Tsar) Boris I with an archbishop appointed from Constantinople. In Macedonia, the city of Ohrid (now in North Macedonia) became an active mission

  • Bulgarian Revolutionary Central Committee (Bulgarian organization)

    Vasil Levski: …with Lyuben Karavelov, organized the Bulgarian Revolutionary Central Committee, which established a network of agents (called apostles) in Bulgaria. In 1872, during one of his secret missions to Bulgaria, Levski was caught by the Turks, and he was later hanged.

  • Bulgarian rhythm (music)

    Aksak, (Turkish: “limping”) an important pattern in the rhythmic structure of folk and vernacular traditional music of the Middle East, particularly Turkey, Iran, and Afghanistan, and of the Balkans. It is characterized by combinations of unequal beats, such as 2 + 3 and their extensions,

  • Bulgarian Social Democratic Party (political party, Bulgaria)

    Bulgaria: Communist uprising: The Bulgarian communists, who had declared their neutrality when the coup occurred, were chastised by Moscow and directed to prepare an armed revolt against the Tsankov regime. The communists’ September Uprising was ruthlessly suppressed and provided Tsankov with a pretext for outlawing the Bulgarian Communist Party…

  • Bulgarian Socialist Party (political party, Bulgaria)

    Bulgaria: Communist uprising: The Bulgarian communists, who had declared their neutrality when the coup occurred, were chastised by Moscow and directed to prepare an armed revolt against the Tsankov regime. The communists’ September Uprising was ruthlessly suppressed and provided Tsankov with a pretext for outlawing the Bulgarian Communist Party…

  • Bulgarian State Radio and Television Female Vocal Choir (Bulgarian music group)

    Bulgaria: The arts: In the 1990s the Bulgarian State Radio and Television Female Vocal Choir achieved international stardom for the recording Le Mystère des voix bulgares, a collection of folk tunes sung a cappella in a style marked by strong dissonances and lack of vibrato.

  • Bulgaris, Eugenius (Greek theologian)

    Eugenius Bulgaris, Greek Orthodox theologian and liberal arts scholar who disseminated Western thought throughout the Eastern Orthodox world and contributed to the development of Modern Greek language and literature. Having studied philosophy and theology at the University of Padua, Italy, a centre

  • B?lgariya, Republika

    Bulgaria, country occupying the eastern portion of the Balkan Peninsula in southeastern Europe. Founded in the 7th century, Bulgaria is one of the oldest states on the European continent. It is intersected by historically important routes from northern and eastern Europe to the Mediterranean basin

  • Bulgarska Komunisticheska Partiya (political party, Bulgaria)

    Bulgaria: Communist uprising: The Bulgarian communists, who had declared their neutrality when the coup occurred, were chastised by Moscow and directed to prepare an armed revolt against the Tsankov regime. The communists’ September Uprising was ruthlessly suppressed and provided Tsankov with a pretext for outlawing the Bulgarian Communist Party…

  • Bulgarski ezik

    Bulgarian language, Bulgarian alphabetThe Bulgarian Cyrillic alphabet.South Slavic language written in the Cyrillic alphabet and spoken in Bulgaria and parts of Greece, Romania, Moldova, and Ukraine. Together with Macedonian, to which it is most closely related, Bulgarian contrasts sharply with the

  • Bulgarski Zemedelski Naroden Suyuz (political party, Bulgaria)

    Bulgarian Agrarian National Union, Bulgarian political party founded under the name Bulgarian Agrarian Union in 1899. The party controlled the government between 1919 and 1923 and introduced extensive land reforms. Originally a professional organization, it became a peasants’ political party by

  • Bulgarus (Italian jurist)

    Bulgarus, jurist, most renowned of the famous “four doctors” of the law school at the University of Bologna, where the medieval study of Roman law, as codified (6th century ad) under the Byzantine emperor Justinian I, reached its peak. Although popular tradition claims that all four

  • Bulge, Battle of the (World War II)

    Battle of the Bulge, (December 16, 1944–January 16, 1945), the last major German offensive on the Western Front during World War II—an unsuccessful attempt to push the Allies back from German home territory. The name Battle of the Bulge was appropriated from Winston Churchill’s optimistic

  • bulge, central (astronomy)

    Milky Way Galaxy: The central bulge: Surrounding the nucleus is an extended bulge of stars that is nearly spherical in shape and that consists primarily of Population II stars, though they are comparatively rich in heavy elements. (For an explanation of Population II stars, see Stars and stellar populations.)…

  • bulge, nuclear (astronomy)

    Milky Way Galaxy: The central bulge: Surrounding the nucleus is an extended bulge of stars that is nearly spherical in shape and that consists primarily of Population II stars, though they are comparatively rich in heavy elements. (For an explanation of Population II stars, see Stars and stellar populations.)…

  • Bulger, James Joseph, Jr. (American crime boss)

    Whitey Bulger, American crime boss who, as head of the Boston-area Winter Hill Gang, was a leading figure in organized crime from the late 1960s to the mid-1990s. For more than a decade, until his capture in June 2011, he was listed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) as one of its 10

  • Bulger, Whitey (American crime boss)

    Whitey Bulger, American crime boss who, as head of the Boston-area Winter Hill Gang, was a leading figure in organized crime from the late 1960s to the mid-1990s. For more than a decade, until his capture in June 2011, he was listed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) as one of its 10

  • bulging (canning)

    food preservation: Quality of canned foods: Any bulging of the ends of a can may indicate a deterioration in quality due to mechanical, chemical, or physical factors. This bulging may lead to swelling and possible explosion of the can.

  • bulging (geology)

    Bulging, in geology, mass movement of rock material caused by loading by natural or artificial means of soft rock strata that crop out in valley walls. Such material is squeezed out and deformed; it flows as a plastic, and the disturbance may extend down tens of metres. Folds and small faults may

  • bulgur (food)

    Bulgur, cereal food made of wheat groats that have been parboiled, dried, and ground. Commercial bulgur is usually made from durum wheat, though other wheat species can be used. Bulgur has a nutty flavour and can be served as a side dish, similar to rice or couscous, and is often used in baked

  • bulgur wheat (food)

    Bulgur, cereal food made of wheat groats that have been parboiled, dried, and ground. Commercial bulgur is usually made from durum wheat, though other wheat species can be used. Bulgur has a nutty flavour and can be served as a side dish, similar to rice or couscous, and is often used in baked

  • Bulgya, Aleksandr Aleksandrovich (Russian author)

    Aleksandr Aleksandrovich Fadeyev, Russian novelist who was a leading exponent and theoretician of proletarian literature and a high Communist Party functionary influential in literary politics. Fadeyev passed his youth in the Ural Mountains and in eastern Siberia, receiving his schooling in

  • bulhan (mammal)

    Pakistan: Plant and animal life: …itself is home to the Indus river dolphin, a freshwater dolphin whose habitat has been severely stressed by hunting, pollution, and the creation of dams and barrages. At least two types of sea turtles, the green and olive ridley, nest on the Makran coast.

  • Buli style (African sculpture)

    Buli style, African wood sculpture made by the Luba peoples (Baluba) of Congo (Kinshasa). Because the carvings—which were made in the village of Buli (now in Katanga province)—are almost identical to each other and differ from other Luba carvings, they were originally presumed to have been the work

  • bulimia (eating disorder)

    Bulimia nervosa, eating disorder characterized by binge eating followed by inappropriate attempts to compensate for the binge, such as self-induced vomiting or the excessive use of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas. In other cases, the binge eating is followed by excessive exercise or fasting. The

  • bulimia nervosa (eating disorder)

    Bulimia nervosa, eating disorder characterized by binge eating followed by inappropriate attempts to compensate for the binge, such as self-induced vomiting or the excessive use of laxatives, diuretics, or enemas. In other cases, the binge eating is followed by excessive exercise or fasting. The

  • Bulimulacea (gastropod superfamily)

    gastropod: Classification: Superfamily Bulimulacea Large, often arboreal snails of Melanesia and Neotropica (Bulimulidae); long, cylindrical snails of West Indies and Central America (Urocoptidae). Suborder Aulacopoda A group of 3 superfamilies. Superfamily Succineacea

  • Bulimulidae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: …of Melanesia and Neotropica (Bulimulidae); long, cylindrical snails of West Indies and Central America (Urocoptidae). Suborder Aulacopoda A group of 3 superfamilies. Superfamily Succineacea A problematic group including amber snails (Succineidae), which

  • bulk density (geology)

    rock: Density: The bulk density of a rock is ρB = WG/VB, where WG is the weight of grains (sedimentary rocks) or crystals (igneous and metamorphic rocks) and natural cements, if any, and VB is the total volume of the grains or crystals plus the void (pore) space.…

  • bulk freight

    railroad: Intermodal freight vehicles and systems: …of the railroad as a bulk long-distance hauler is married to the superior efficiency and flexibility of highway transport for shorter-distance collection and delivery of individual consignments. Intermodal transportation also makes use of rail for the long haul accessible and viable to a manufacturer that is not directly rail-served and…

  • bulk laxative (drug)

    Laxative, any drug used in the treatment of constipation to promote the evacuation of feces. Laxatives produce their effect by several mechanisms. The four main types of laxatives include: saline purgatives, fecal softeners, contact purgatives, and bulk laxatives. Saline purgatives are salts

  • bulk matter (physics)

    cluster: …atoms, ions, or molecules of bulk matter; because of the manner in which they are prepared, clusters remain as tiny particles at least during the course of an experiment. There are clusters held together by van der Waals forces, by ionic forces, by covalent bonds, and by metallic bonds. Despite…

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