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  • Burnside Bridge (American Civil War landmark)

    Battle of Antietam: The battle for Burnside Bridge: Burnside, on the southern end of the Union lines, had received his orders late and acted on them later still. The battle was over on the Confederate right before Burnside fired a shot, and Lee was able to shift nearly all of his…

  • Burnside problem (mathematics)

    Burnside problem, in group theory (a branch of modern algebra), problem of determining if a finitely generated periodic group with each element of finite order must necessarily be a finite group. The problem was formulated by the English mathematician William Burnside in 1902. A finitely generated

  • Burnside problem (mathematics)

    Burnside problem, in group theory (a branch of modern algebra), problem of determining if a finitely generated periodic group with each element of finite order must necessarily be a finite group. The problem was formulated by the English mathematician William Burnside in 1902. A finitely generated

  • Burnside, Ambrose Everett (United States general)

    Ambrose Everett Burnside, Union general in the American Civil War and originator in the United States of the fashion of side whiskers (later known as sideburns). Burnside, a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y. (1847), resigned his commission in 1853 and for the next five years

  • Burnside, R. L. (American musician)

    R.L. Burnside, American blues musician (born Nov. 21/23, 1926, Harmontown, Miss.—died Sept. 1, 2005, Memphis, Tenn.), became widely known in the 1990s for his spare, raw style of Mississippi Delta blues. Burnside spent most of his life working as a farmer and fisherman and playing the blues in l

  • Burnside, Robert Lee (American musician)

    R.L. Burnside, American blues musician (born Nov. 21/23, 1926, Harmontown, Miss.—died Sept. 1, 2005, Memphis, Tenn.), became widely known in the 1990s for his spare, raw style of Mississippi Delta blues. Burnside spent most of his life working as a farmer and fisherman and playing the blues in l

  • Burnside, William (English mathematician)

    Burnside problem: …formulated by the English mathematician William Burnside in 1902.

  • burnsides (whisker style)

    dress: The 19th century: …clean-shaven, were called burnsides or sideburns, after the U.S. Civil War general Ambrose Burnside. Other popular beard styles included the imperial, a small goatee named for Napoleon III, and the side-whiskers and drooping mustache known as the Franz Joseph in honour of the head of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. After 1880…

  • Burnt by the Sun (film by Mikhalkov [1994])
  • Burnt Njáll (Icelandic literature)

    Njáls saga, one of the longest and generally considered the finest of the 13th-century Icelanders’ sagas. It presents the most comprehensive picture of Icelandic life in the heroic age and has a wide range of complex characters. The work has two heroes—Gunnar (Gunther) and Njáll. Gunnar is a

  • Burnt Norton (poem by Eliot)

    Burnt Norton, poem by T.S. Eliot, the first of the four poems that make up The Four Quartets. “Burnt Norton” was published in Collected Poems 1909–1935 (1936); it then appeared in pamphlet form in 1941 and was published with the remaining three poems of the The Four Quartets in 1943. It is a

  • Burnt Orange Heresy, The (film by Capotondi [2020])

    Donald Sutherland: His later films included The Burnt Orange Heresy (2019), about an art heist.

  • burnt topaz (mineral)

    topaz: …topaz” is often known as Brazilian ruby, as is the very rare, natural red topaz. Cut topazes of large size are known, and it is said that the great “Braganza diamond” of Portugal is probably a topaz.

  • Burnt-Out Case, A (novel by Greene)

    A Burnt-Out Case, novel by Graham Greene, published in 1961, that examines the possibility of redemption. The story opens as Querry, a European who has lost the ability to connect with emotion or spirituality, arrives at a church-run leprosarium in the Belgian Congo (now the Democratic Republic of

  • Burnum, Burnum (Australian activist)

    Burnum Burnum, Australian Aboriginal political activist who often conducted his battle for Aboriginal rights by performing flamboyant stunts; his best-known one involved claiming England for Aborigines by planting an Aboriginal flag atop the white cliffs of Dover (b. January 1936--d. Aug. 17,

  • Bürolandschaft (interior design)

    interior design: Space planning: …office design is known as office landscape (from the German word Bürolandschaft). Above, in Modes of composition, it was noted that the appearance of a “landscaped” space might seem chaotic. Actually, however, the system was developed in the 1960s by a German team of planning and management consultants who made…

  • burp gun (weapon)

    small arm: The submachine gun: …way with the MP38 and MP40. Known to the Allies as “burp guns,” these weapons operated at 450 to 550 rounds per minute, the optimal rate for controlled fire. Also, they were fed by a box magazine, which did not jam as often as a drum, and had a wire…

  • burp gun (weapon)

    small arm: The submachine gun: …led the way with the MP38 and MP40. Known to the Allies as “burp guns,” these weapons operated at 450 to 550 rounds per minute, the optimal rate for controlled fire. Also, they were fed by a box magazine, which did not jam as often as a drum, and had…

  • Burpee, W. Atlee (American seedsman)

    W. Atlee Burpee, American seedsman who founded the world’s largest mail-order seed company. After completing two years at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Burpee borrowed $1,000 from his mother and set up a mail-order poultry business with a partner in 1876. Two years later he struck

  • Burpee, Washington Atlee (American seedsman)

    W. Atlee Burpee, American seedsman who founded the world’s largest mail-order seed company. After completing two years at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Burpee borrowed $1,000 from his mother and set up a mail-order poultry business with a partner in 1876. Two years later he struck

  • burqa (clothing)

    Pakistan: Daily life and social customs: …communities, women sometimes wear the burqa, a full-length garment that may or may not cover the face. In earlier generations, the fez hat was popular among Muslim men, but more often the woolen, boat-shaped Karakul hat (popularized by Mohammed Ali Jinnah) is associated with Pakistan; however, many other hat styles…

  • Burqān, Al- (oil field, Kuwait)

    petroleum: Iraq, Kuwait, and Iran: …basin, including Kuwait’s field at Al-Burqān, which was discovered in 1938. Al-Burqān is the world’s second largest oil field, having originally contained 75 billion barrels of recoverable oil. Iraq possesses a significant potential for additional oil discoveries, primarily in its southwestern geographic region, where an estimated 45–100 billion barrels of…

  • burr oak (tree)

    Bur oak, (Quercus macrocarpa), North American timber tree belonging to the white oak group of the genus Quercus in the beech family (Fagaceae), distributed primarily throughout the central United States. Often 25 metres (80 feet) tall, the tree may reach 50 metres. Its leaves, about 25 centimetres

  • Burr, Aaron (vice president of United States)

    Aaron Burr, third vice president of the United States (1801–05), who killed his political rival, Alexander Hamilton, in a duel (1804) and whose turbulent political career ended with his arrest for treason in 1807. Burr, the son of Aaron Burr, Sr., and Esther Edwards, came from a prominent New

  • Burr, Aaron, Jr. (vice president of United States)

    Aaron Burr, third vice president of the United States (1801–05), who killed his political rival, Alexander Hamilton, in a duel (1804) and whose turbulent political career ended with his arrest for treason in 1807. Burr, the son of Aaron Burr, Sr., and Esther Edwards, came from a prominent New

  • Burr, Raymond (American actor)

    Raymond William Stacey Burr, U.S. actor (born May 21, 1917, New Westminster, B.C.—died Sept. 12, 1993, near Healdsburg, Calif.), created formidable and enduring television characters, including the legendary criminal lawyer "Perry Mason" (1957-66) and the wheelchair-confined San Francisco d

  • Burr, Richard (United States senator)

    Richard Burr, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 2004 and began representing North Carolina the following year. He previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1995–2005). While still a child, Burr—who was an indirect relative of Aaron Burr, the

  • Burr, Richard Mauze (United States senator)

    Richard Burr, American politician who was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 2004 and began representing North Carolina the following year. He previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1995–2005). While still a child, Burr—who was an indirect relative of Aaron Burr, the

  • Burr, Theodore (American engineer)

    covered bridge: …successful type was designed by Theodore Burr, of Torrington, Conn., combining a Palladio truss with an arch. Numerous Town and Burr designs remained standing throughout North America into the late 20th century, some dating back to the early 19th century.

  • Burr–Hamilton duel (duel, Weehawken, New Jersey, United States [1804])

    Burr-Hamilton duel, duel fought between U.S. Vice Pres. Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, former first secretary of the U.S. Treasury, on July 11, 1804, in Weehawken, New Jersey, that resulted in the death of Hamilton the following day. The two men had long been political rivals, but the immediate

  • Burra group (geology)

    Australia: The Precambrian: The early Adelaidean Callanna and Burra groups are confined to troughs faulted down into basement. A sheet of sedimentary deposits at the base of the Callanna group was cut by faults into rift valleys that filled with basic volcanic rocks and evaporitic sediment and carbonate rock. The succeeding Burra group…

  • Burragorang, Lake (lake, New South Wales, Australia)

    Lake Burragorang, major reservoir for Sydney, east-central New South Wales, Australia. The lake fills the Burragorang Valley, a gorge carved by the Coxs and Wollondilly rivers, which merge there to form the Warragamba, a tributary of the Hawkesbury. With a surface area of about 34 square miles (88

  • Burramyidae (marsupial family)

    marsupial: Classification: Family Burramyidae (pygmy possums) 5 species in 2 genera. Primarily arboreal, mouse- to squirrel-sized. Family Vombatidae (wombats) 3 species in 2 genera. Related to the koala (family Phascolarctidae). Family Acrobatidae

  • Burrard Inlet (inlet, Canada)

    Burrard Inlet, eastern arm of the Strait of Georgia, extending 23 miles (37 km) in an easterly direction into southeastern British Columbia, Canada. It varies from 1 to 4 miles in width and forms Vancouver Harbour, one of the best natural harbours on the Pacific coast of North America. Vancouver

  • Burray (island, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Orkney Islands: The small islands of Burray and South Ronaldsay, to the south of East Mainland, are now joined to it by causeways constructed during World War II to prevent enemy submarines from entering the naval base at Scapa Flow. The second largest of the Orkney Islands, Hoy, lies south of…

  • burreed (plant)

    reed: Bur reed (Sparganium) and reed mace (Typha) are plants of other families.

  • Burren (region, Ireland)

    Clare: The Burren is a distinctive region of almost horizontal limestone slabs and little vegetation; along the coast is a limestone pavement area. The vegetation of the Burren comprises an unusual mixture of north and south European and alpine plants. The Burren plateau has a stony, desertlike…

  • Burri, Alberto (Italian painter)

    Alberto Burri, Italian artist known for his adventurous use of new materials. Burri was trained as a physician and began to paint only in 1944, while in a prisoner-of-war camp in Texas. About 1946 he moved to Rome and began to paint seriously. His early works—rags splashed in red paint to simulate

  • Burri, René (Swiss photographer)

    René Burri, Swiss photographer (born April 9, 1933, Zürich, Switz.—died Oct. 20, 2014, Zürich), captured a wide range of historical events in the second half of the 20th century, including the lead-up to the Vietnam War in the early 1960s and the 1967 Six-Day War in the Middle East, as well as

  • Burris, Roland (American politician)

    Roland Burris, American Democratic politician who was the first African American elected to statewide office in Illinois. His appointment as U.S. senator (2009–10) to fill the seat vacated by Pres. Barack Obama made him the fourth African American to serve in the Senate since Reconstruction. Burris

  • Burris, Roland Wallace (American politician)

    Roland Burris, American Democratic politician who was the first African American elected to statewide office in Illinois. His appointment as U.S. senator (2009–10) to fill the seat vacated by Pres. Barack Obama made him the fourth African American to serve in the Senate since Reconstruction. Burris

  • burrito (food)

    tortilla: …and meat or cheese form burritos. Sopes, chalupas, quesadillas, and panuchos are all formed of tortilla dough molded into various shapes to hold a savoury filling.

  • Burrium (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Usk, town, present and historic county of Monmouthshire, southeastern Wales. It lies along the River Usk, 20 miles (32 km) from its Bristol Channel mouth. The town was settled first by Celts and then by Romans, who called it Burrium. A Norman castle was built in the 12th century but was partially

  • burro (mammal)

    Donkey, (Equus asinus), domestic ass belonging to the horse family, Equidae, and descended from the African wild ass (Equus africanus; see ass). It is known to have been used as a beast of burden since 4000 bce. The average donkey stands 101.6 cm (40 inches) at the shoulder, but different breeds

  • burro-fat (plant)

    Burro-fat, (species Cleome isomeris), shrub or small tree of the Cleome genus (of the family Cleomaceae, which is closely related to the mustard family, Brassicaceae), native to southwestern North America, with showy spikes of yellow flowers and gray-green foliage. Burro-fat, up to 3 metres (10

  • Burroughs Adding Machine Company (American company)

    William Seward Burroughs: In 1905 the Burroughs Adding Machine Company was organized in Michigan as successor to the American Arithmometer Company.

  • Burroughs Corporation (American company)

    William Seward Burroughs: In 1905 the Burroughs Adding Machine Company was organized in Michigan as successor to the American Arithmometer Company.

  • Burroughs, Edgar Rice (American novelist)

    Edgar Rice Burroughs, American novelist whose Tarzan stories created a folk hero known around the world. Burroughs, the son of a wealthy businessman, was educated at private schools in Chicago, at the prestigious Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts (from which he was expelled), and at

  • Burroughs, George (American minister and colonist)

    Salem witch trials: The trials: George Burroughs, who had served as a minister in Salem Village from 1680 to 1683, was summoned from his new home in Maine and accused of being the witches’ ringleader. He too was convicted and, along with four others, was hanged on August 19. As…

  • Burroughs, John (American essayist)

    John Burroughs, American essayist and naturalist who lived and wrote after the manner of Henry David Thoreau, studying and celebrating nature. In his earlier years Burroughs worked as a teacher and a farmer and for nine years as a clerk in the Treasury Department, Washington, D.C. In 1867 he paid

  • Burroughs, William S. (American writer)

    William S. Burroughs, American writer of experimental novels that evoke, in deliberately erratic prose, a nightmarish, sometimes wildly humorous world. His sexual explicitness (he was an avowed and outspoken homosexual) and the frankness with which he dealt with his experiences as a drug addict won

  • Burroughs, William Seward (American writer)

    William S. Burroughs, American writer of experimental novels that evoke, in deliberately erratic prose, a nightmarish, sometimes wildly humorous world. His sexual explicitness (he was an avowed and outspoken homosexual) and the frankness with which he dealt with his experiences as a drug addict won

  • Burroughs, William Seward (American inventor)

    William Seward Burroughs, American inventor of the first recording adding machine and pioneer of its manufacture. After a brief education Burroughs supported himself from the age of 15. In 1881 he began working in his father’s shop in St. Louis, Missouri, constructing models for castings and

  • Burroughs, William Seward (American writer)

    William S. Burroughs, American writer of experimental novels that evoke, in deliberately erratic prose, a nightmarish, sometimes wildly humorous world. His sexual explicitness (he was an avowed and outspoken homosexual) and the frankness with which he dealt with his experiences as a drug addict won

  • burrower bug (insect)

    Burrower bug, (family Cydnidae), any of some 750 species of insects (order Heteroptera) that burrow underground around clumps of grass, in sandy places, or beneath ground litter. These insects may be up to 7 mm (0.3 inch) long. Their oval bodies are brown or black, and there are spines on the

  • burrowing (zoology)

    Burrowing, locomotion of a type found in both terrestrial and aquatic animal groups. Some fossorial animals dig short permanent burrows in which they live; others tunnel extensively and nearly continuously. In relatively soft substrates, such as soil, burrowers tend to be limbless (lizards, snakes)

  • burrowing asp (reptile)

    Burrowing asp, (genus Atractaspis), any of 19 species of venomous, secretive snakes, also known as mole vipers and stiletto snakes, of tropical Africa and the Middle East. They belong to the family Atractaspididae, a group distinct from vipers and elapids. Atractaspidids are characterized by a

  • burrowing barnacle (crustacean)

    barnacle: Burrowing barnacles (order Acrothoracica, about 30 species) are small, unisexual forms that lack shells and have fewer than six pairs of cirri. They burrow into hard limy material, such as clam shells and coral. Trypetesa is found only inside snail shells occupied by hermit crabs.

  • burrowing nematode (animal)

    plant disease: Nematode diseases: The burrowing nematode (Radopholus similis) is a serious endoparasite in tropical and subtropical areas, where it attacks citrus (causing spreading decline), banana, avocado, tomato, black pepper, abaca, and more than 200 important crops, trees, and ornamentals, causing severe losses.

  • burrowing owl (bird)

    Burrowing owl, (Speotyto cunicularia), small owl of the family Strigidae (order Strigiformes) that inhabits prairie lands of the Western Hemisphere from southwestern Canada to Tierra del Fuego. Burrowing owls live in holes abandoned by other animals. They eat mainly insects and small rodents. They

  • burrowing parrot (bird)

    conure: …(to 50 cm [20 inches]) Patagonian conure, or burrowing parrot, Cyanoliseus patagonus, nests colonially in cliff holes in temperate regions of Chile and Argentina.

  • burrowing python (snake)

    python: The so-called earth, or burrowing, python (Calabaria reinhardtii or Charina reinhardtii) of West Africa appears to be a member of the boa family (Boidae).

  • burrowing rat kangaroo (marsupial)

    rat kangaroo: … rat kangaroo, or boodie (B. lesueur), which has a thicker, non-crested tail, is the only member of the kangaroo group to dig burrows. It was formerly widespread in South and Western Australia but is today restricted to a few offshore islands. The Northern bettong (B. tropica) has pale gray…

  • burrowing toad (amphibian)

    Anura: Annotated classification: Family Rhinophrynidae (burrowing toad) Oligocene (33.9 million–23.03 million years ago) to present; 8 presacral vertebrae; ribs absent; coccyx free, with 2 articulating surfaces; tongue free and protrusible; body robust; burrowing; aquatic larvae present; Mexico and Central America; 1 species; adult length to about 7 cm (3 inches).…

  • burrowing water beetle (insect)

    coleopteran: Annotated classification: Family Noteridae (burrowing water beetles) Similar to Dytiscidae; small; larvae burrow. Family Rhysodidae (wrinkled bark beetles) Small, slender, brownish beetles; about 350 species, mostly tropical. Sometimes considered a subgroup (tribe Rhysodini) of family Carabidae. Family

  • Burrows, Eva (Australian religious leader)

    Eva Burrows, (Evangeline Evelyn Burrows), Australian religious leader (born Sept. 15, 1929, Tighes Hill, N.S.W., Australia—died March 20, 2015, Melbourne, Australia), devoted her life to the Salvation Army, rising to general (1986–93) as the religious and charitable organization’s first woman world

  • Burrows, Evangeline Evelyn (Australian religious leader)

    Eva Burrows, (Evangeline Evelyn Burrows), Australian religious leader (born Sept. 15, 1929, Tighes Hill, N.S.W., Australia—died March 20, 2015, Melbourne, Australia), devoted her life to the Salvation Army, rising to general (1986–93) as the religious and charitable organization’s first woman world

  • Burrows, Ronald Montagu (British archaeologist)

    Ronald Montagu Burrows, British archaeologist whose excavations (1895–96) in western Greece, at Pílos (ancient Pylos, on the Coryphasium promontory) and the nearby island of Sfaktiría (Sphacteria), were important in verifying Thucydides’ historical accuracy. As professor of Greek at University

  • Burrunan dolphin (mammal)

    bottlenose dolphin: The southern Australian bottlenose dolphin (T. australis), or Burrunan dolphin, which frequents the waters off Australia’s southern and southeastern shores, has the smallest geographic range.

  • Burrus of Ephesus (Ephesian deacon)

    St. Ignatius of Antioch: Journey to Rome: At his request the deacon Burrus of Ephesus was allowed to stay with him. Ignatius also wrote to Rome, urging his fellow Christians there not to prevent his martyrdom by intercession on his behalf and commending to their charity Syrian Christians who had arrived there ahead of him.

  • Burrus, Sextus Afranius (Roman prefect)

    Sextus Afranius Burrus, praetorian prefect (51–62) and, with Seneca, the chief adviser of the Roman emperor Nero (reigned 54–68). Burrus came from Vasio (now Vaison, France). After brief service in the army, he held posts in the households of Livia (the widow of the emperor Augustus) and the

  • Bursa (Turkey)

    Bursa, city, northwestern Turkey. It is situated along the northern foothills of Ulu Da? (the ancient Mysian Olympus). Probably founded by a Bithynian king in the 3rd century bce, it prospered during Byzantine times after the emperor Justinian I (reigned 527–565 ce) built a palace there. The city

  • bursa (anatomy)

    Bursa, within the mammalian body, any small pouch or sac between tendons, muscles, or skin and bony prominences at points of friction or stress. The bursas are classified by type as adventitious, subcutaneous, or synovial. Adventitious, or accidental, bursas arise in soft tissues as a result of

  • bursa of Fabricius (anatomy)

    bird: Muscles and organs: …outpocketing of the cloaca, the bursa of Fabricius, controls antibody-mediated immunity in young birds. The bursa regresses with age, and thus its presence or absence may be used to determine age.

  • Bursa, Süleyman of (Turkish poet)

    Süleyman ?elebi, one of the most famous early poets of Anatolia. Süleyman appears to have been the son of an Ottoman minister, Ahmed Pa?a, who served in the court of Sultan Murad I. Süleyman became a leader of the Khalwatīyah dervish order and then imam (religious leader) to the court of the O

  • bursae (anatomy)

    Bursa, within the mammalian body, any small pouch or sac between tendons, muscles, or skin and bony prominences at points of friction or stress. The bursas are classified by type as adventitious, subcutaneous, or synovial. Adventitious, or accidental, bursas arise in soft tissues as a result of

  • bursal synovitis (inflammation)

    Bursitis, inflammation of a synovial bursa, the lubricating sac located around joints or between tendons and muscles or bones. Bursitis may be caused by infection or injury, by arthritis or gout, by calcium deposition along a tendon or joint, or by minor, usually repetitive irritation. Bursitis

  • bursas (anatomy)

    Bursa, within the mammalian body, any small pouch or sac between tendons, muscles, or skin and bony prominences at points of friction or stress. The bursas are classified by type as adventitious, subcutaneous, or synovial. Adventitious, or accidental, bursas arise in soft tissues as a result of

  • Burschenschaft (German student organization)

    Burschenschaft, (German: “Youth Association”), student organization at the German universities that started as an expression of the new nationalism prevalent in post-Napoleonic Europe. The first Burschenschaft was founded in 1815 at the University of Jena, and the movement spread all over Germany.

  • Bursera (plant genus)

    Sapindales: Distribution and abundance: Bursera (50 species) is found in tropical America, with its centre of diversity in Mexico.

  • Bursera simaruba (plant)

    tree: Tree bark: …smooth, copper-coloured covering of the gumbo-limbo (Bursera simaruba) to the thick, soft, spongy bark of the punk, or cajeput, tree (Melaleuca leucadendron). Other types of bark include the commercial cork of the cork oak (Quercus suber) and the rugged, fissured outer coat of many other oaks; the flaking, patchy-coloured barks…

  • Burseraceae (plant family)

    Burseraceae, family of flowering plants in the order Sapindales, composed of about 16 genera of resinous trees and shrubs. They are native primarily to tropical America, but a few species occur in Africa and Asia. Members of the family have leaves that alternate along the stem and are composed of

  • bursicon (biochemistry)

    hormone: Neurohormones: …the thoracotropic hormone and called bursicon acts directly on the adult cuticle (skin) of arthropods to stimulate darkening and hardening processes. Bursicon has a molecular weight of about 30,000. The brain of insects also produces a third neurohormone, which has a hyperglycemic (increase in level of blood glucose) effect in…

  • Bursidae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: shells (Cassidae), tun shells (Doliidae), frog shells (Bursidae), triton shells (Cymatiidae), and fig shells (Ficidae); frog and triton shells often live in rocky areas; most species large in size. Suborder Neogastropoda (Stenoglossa) Carnivorous or scavengers with rachiglossate (with 3 denticles) or taxoglossate (with 2 denticles) radula; shell

  • bursitis (inflammation)

    Bursitis, inflammation of a synovial bursa, the lubricating sac located around joints or between tendons and muscles or bones. Bursitis may be caused by infection or injury, by arthritis or gout, by calcium deposition along a tendon or joint, or by minor, usually repetitive irritation. Bursitis

  • burst (meteorology)

    surge: …monsoon currents is called a burst, or surge, of the monsoon.

  • Burst of Light, A (essay by Lorde)

    Audre Lorde: Lorde’s volume A Burst of Light (1988), which further detailed her struggle with cancer, won a National Book Award in 1989. She also wrote the novel Zami: A New Spelling of My Name (1982), noted for its clear, evocative imagery and its treatment of a mother-daughter relationship.…

  • burster (astronomy)

    X-ray source: In objects known as bursters, a neutron star’s magnetic field suspends the gas until the accumulated weight crushes the field temporarily and the falling gas emits a sudden burst of X rays. A transient occurs in stellar pairs in which the orbit is elongated and gas is only transferred…

  • bursting charge (military technology)

    ammunition: …as cartridge case, fuze, and bursting charge are frequently included.

  • bursting test (materials testing)

    papermaking: Strength and durability: …paper and paperboard is the bursting test, or Mullen test. It is defined as the hydrostatic pressure (caused by liquids at rest) necessary to cause rupture in a circular area of a given diameter. Other strength tests for which standard methods exist are tearing strength and folding endurance.

  • Burstyn, Ellen (American actress)

    Ellen Burstyn , American actress who was known for her understated charm and versatility. Gillooly was raised in Detroit, though she attended St. Mary’s Academy in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, for several years in the late 1930s. Both her mother and her stepfather were physically and verbally abusive,

  • Burt, David (premier of Bermuda)

    Bermuda: History: At age 38, David Burt became the youngest person ever to take on the role of premier.

  • Burt, Donald Graham (American production designer)
  • Burt, Sir Cyril (British psychologist)

    Sir Cyril Burt, British psychologist known for his development of factor analysis in psychological testing and for his studies of the effect of heredity on intelligence and behaviour. Burt studied at the universities of Oxford and Würzburg before becoming in 1913 the first educational psychologist

  • Burt, Sir Cyril Lodowic (British psychologist)

    Sir Cyril Burt, British psychologist known for his development of factor analysis in psychological testing and for his studies of the effect of heredity on intelligence and behaviour. Burt studied at the universities of Oxford and Würzburg before becoming in 1913 the first educational psychologist

  • Burt, T. S. (British officer)

    Khajuraho: …1838 a British army captain, T.S. Burt, came upon information that led him to the rediscovery of the complex of temples in the jungle in Khajuraho.

  • Burton upon Trent (England, United Kingdom)

    Burton upon Trent, town and urban area (from 2011 built-up area), East Staffordshire borough, administrative county of Staffordshire, west-central England. It is situated mainly on the west bank of the River Trent and on the Grand Trunk (Trent and Mersey) Canal. Most of the town belongs to the

  • Burton’s snake-lizard (reptile)

    flap-footed lizard: Burton’s snake-lizard (Lialis burtonis) is one of the larger flap-footed lizards, reaching about 29 cm (11 inches) in body length with an even longer tail. It is found throughout most of Australia and dwells on the ground in leaf litter and other surface debris. L.…

  • Burton, Beryl (British cyclist)

    Beryl Burton, British cyclist (born May 12, 1937, Leeds, Eng.—died May 5, 1996, Yorkshire, Eng.), dominated British women’s cycling from the late 1950s to the early ’80s. She won more than 100 titles, including several in which she competed against men. She became interested in cycling at the age o

  • Burton, Brian (American musician and record producer)

    Red Hot Chili Peppers: longtime producer Rick Rubin for Danger Mouse (Brian Burton) for its 11th studio album, The Getaway (2016). In 2012 the Red Hot Chili Peppers were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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