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  • Burton, Charles Robert (British explorer)

    Charles Robert Burton, British explorer (born Dec. 13, 1942, Cape Town, S.Af.—died July 15, 2002, Framfield, East Sussex, Eng.), was part of the first team to circumnavigate the globe from pole to pole along the Greenwich meridian. The Transglobe Expedition, led by Sir Ranulph Fiennes and funded b

  • Burton, Cliff (American musician)

    Metallica: …San Francisco, California), and bassist Cliff Burton (b. February 10, 1962, San Francisco—d. September 27, 1986, near Stockholm, Sweden). Jason Newsted (b. March 4, 1963, Battle Creek, Michigan) took over on bass after Burton was killed in a tour bus accident.

  • Burton, Harold H. (United States jurist)

    Harold H. Burton, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1945–58). Burton was the son of Alfred E. Burton, a dean and professor of civil engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Gertrude Hitz Burton. He graduated from Bowdoin College (where he also played

  • Burton, Harold Hitz (United States jurist)

    Harold H. Burton, associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1945–58). Burton was the son of Alfred E. Burton, a dean and professor of civil engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Gertrude Hitz Burton. He graduated from Bowdoin College (where he also played

  • Burton, Henry (English religious zealot)

    John Bastwick: ” Bastwick, William Prynne, and Henry Burton came under the lash of the Star Chamber court at the same time; they were all censured as turbulent and seditious persons and condemned to pay a fine of £5,000 each, to be set in the pillory, to lose their ears, and to…

  • Burton, Jack (American theatrical historian)

    theatre music: Stage musicals: …following comment in 1952 by Jack Burton, American theatre historian, on Oklahoma! (1943), an epoch-making musical by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein:

  • Burton, James (American musician)

    Rick Nelson: …with material, and his guitarist, James Burton—who later played with Elvis Presley—was one of early rock’s most-distinctive players. After topping the charts with “Poor Little Fool” (1958) and “Travelin’ Man” (1961), Nelson’s popularity waned in the mid-1960s.

  • Burton, Mary (American indentured servant)

    New York slave rebellion of 1741: …impaneled on April 21, and Mary Burton, a young indentured servant at Hughson’s tavern, was brought to testify before the jury. Under duress, Burton testified that three slaves—Caesar, Prince, and Cuffee—along with a contingent of poor white settlers, had plotted to burn the fort and the city and kill its…

  • Burton, Phil (American politician)

    Nancy Pelosi: Phil Burton. Burton died in 1983 and was succeeded by his wife, Sala, who, shortly before her death in 1987, urged Pelosi to run for the seat. She narrowly won a special election and was reelected in 1988 to a full term. Pelosi easily won…

  • Burton, Richard (Welsh actor)

    Richard Burton, Welsh stage and motion-picture actor noted for his portrayals of highly intelligent and articulate men who were world-weary, cynical, or self-destructive. Jenkins was the 12th of 13 children born to a Welsh coal miner. He studied acting under Philip Burton, a schoolteacher who

  • Burton, Robert (English author, scholar, and clergyman)

    Robert Burton, English scholar, writer, and Anglican clergyman whose Anatomy of Melancholy is a masterpiece of style and a valuable index to the philosophical and psychological ideas of the time. Burton was educated at Oxford, elected a student (life fellow) of Christ Church (one of the colleges of

  • Burton, Sarah (English fashion designer)

    Sarah Burton, English fashion designer who was creative director for the Alexander McQueen label (2010– ). Heard studied art at Manchester Polytechnic before attending London’s Central Saint Martin’s College of Art and Design. While still in school, she became an intern (1996) at the fashion studio

  • Burton, Sir Richard (British scholar and explorer)

    Sir Richard Burton, English scholar-explorer and Orientalist who was the first European to discover Lake Tanganyika and to penetrate hitherto-forbidden Muslim cities. He published 43 volumes on his explorations and almost 30 volumes of translations, including an unexpurgated translation of The

  • Burton, Sir Richard Francis (British scholar and explorer)

    Sir Richard Burton, English scholar-explorer and Orientalist who was the first European to discover Lake Tanganyika and to penetrate hitherto-forbidden Muslim cities. He published 43 volumes on his explorations and almost 30 volumes of translations, including an unexpurgated translation of The

  • Burton, Thomas DeCarlo (American singer, rapper, and songwriter)

    CeeLo Green, American singer, rapper, and songwriter known for his soulful voice and flamboyant persona, both as a solo performer and as part of the rap group Goodie Mob and the eclectic duo Gnarls Barkley. He was born Thomas Burton and grew up in Atlanta as the son of two ordained Baptist

  • Burton, Tim (American director)

    Tim Burton, American director known for his original, quirky style that frequently drew on elements of the fantastic and the macabre. Burton, who became interested in drawing and filmmaking while quite young, attended the California Institute of the Arts and later worked as an animator at Disney

  • Burton, Timothy William (American director)

    Tim Burton, American director known for his original, quirky style that frequently drew on elements of the fantastic and the macabre. Burton, who became interested in drawing and filmmaking while quite young, attended the California Institute of the Arts and later worked as an animator at Disney

  • Burton, Virginia Lee (American author)

    Virginia Lee Burton, American author and illustrator of children’s books, some considered classics and many still popular today. Burton grew up from the age of seven in Sonora, California. After graduating from high school she studied both dancing and drawing, and later she continued taking art

  • Burton, William (English potter)

    pottery: Pottery factories: He worked in association with William Burton of the Pilkington pottery in Manchester, which made experimental decorative ware of all kinds.

  • Burton, William Merriam (American chemist)

    William Merriam Burton, American chemist who developed a thermal cracking process for increasing the proportion of gasoline obtainable from petroleum. Burton began work as a chemist at the Standard Oil Co. (Indiana) refinery at Whiting, Indiana, in 1890, rising swiftly to serve as president from

  • burtoning (freight handling)

    ship: Ship-shore transfer: This scheme is known as burtoning.

  • Burtsev, Vladimir (Russian historian)

    Protocols of the Elders of Zion: …particularly by the Russian historian Vladimir Burtsev, revealed that the Protocols were forgeries compounded by officials of the Russian secret police out of the satire of Joly, a fantastic novel (Biarritz) by Hermann Goedsche (1868), and other sources.

  • Buru (island, Indonesia)

    Buru, island in the Moluccas, Maluku provinsi (“province”), Indonesia, administered from Ambon as part of Maluku Tengah kabupaten (regency). Buru lies 42 miles (68 km) west of the island of Seram across the Manipa Strait and is about 3,670 square miles (9,505 square km) in area. Mountainous and

  • Buruese language

    Austronesian languages: Central Malayo-Polynesian (CMP): …the island of Timor; and Buruese, spoken on the island of Buru in the central Moluccas.

  • Burūjird (Iran)

    Borūjerd, chief town, Borūjerd shahrestān (county), Lorestān ostān (province), western Iran. Borūjerd is situated 5,500 feet (1,700 metres) above sea level, below high mountains, in a wide, fertile valley. It is a flourishing regional centre on the main highway from the Persian Gulf and Khūzestān

  • Burullus, Bu?ayrat Al- (lake, Egypt)

    Nile River: Physiography: …Maryū?), Lake Edku (Bu?ayrat Idkū), Lake Burullus (Bu?ayrat Al-Burullus), and Lake Manzala (Bu?ayrat Al-Manzilah).

  • Burullus, Lake (lake, Egypt)

    Nile River: Physiography: …Maryū?), Lake Edku (Bu?ayrat Idkū), Lake Burullus (Bu?ayrat Al-Burullus), and Lake Manzala (Bu?ayrat Al-Manzilah).

  • Burun (people)

    African art: Sudan and South Sudan: …wall paintings and reliefs; the Burun, for example, paint animal murals reminiscent of rock paintings. The Nuba make mural paintings and fine pottery of clay or cow dung, sometimes embellished with finely painted geometric patterns. The southeast Nuba are particularly famous for the body painting of their young men. Artistic…

  • burundanga (drug)

    zombi: …influence of powerful drugs, including burundanga (a plant substance containing scopolamine; reportedly used by Colombian criminals) and drugs derived from poisonous toads and puffer fish. (See also zombie.)

  • Burundi

    Burundi, country in east-central Africa, south of the Equator. The landlocked country, a historic kingdom, is one of the few countries in Africa whose borders were not determined by colonial rulers. The vast majority of Burundi’s population is Hutu, traditionally a farming people. Power, however,

  • Burundi, Banque de la République du (bank, Burundi)

    Burundi: Finance, trade, and services: The Banque de la République du Burundi is the country’s central bank; it issues the Burundi franc, the national currency, and regulates the operation of national and foreign banks. Beginning in the 1980s, Burundi experienced a growing trade deficit and increasingly heavy dependence on foreign aid…

  • Burundi, flag of

    red and green national flag with a white saltire (diagonal cross) and a central white disk incorporating three large stars. Its width-to-length ratio is 3 to 5.The leading traditional symbol of Burundi was an ancient drum, Karyenda, which had a semidivine status. The mwami (“ruler”) alone could

  • Burundi, history of

    Burundi: History: This discussion focuses on Burundi from the 16th century. For a treatment of earlier periods and of the country in its regional context, see Central Africa, history of.

  • Burundi, Kingdom of (historical kingdom, East Africa)

    Kingdom of Burundi, traditional East African state, now the Republic of Burundi. At some time before the 17th century, the Tutsi, a pastoral people, established their dominance over the Hutu agriculturalists living in the area. During his reign (c. 1675–1705) the mwami (king) Ntare Rushatsi (Ntare

  • Burundi, Republic of

    Burundi, country in east-central Africa, south of the Equator. The landlocked country, a historic kingdom, is one of the few countries in Africa whose borders were not determined by colonial rulers. The vast majority of Burundi’s population is Hutu, traditionally a farming people. Power, however,

  • Burundi, Republika y’u

    Burundi, country in east-central Africa, south of the Equator. The landlocked country, a historic kingdom, is one of the few countries in Africa whose borders were not determined by colonial rulers. The vast majority of Burundi’s population is Hutu, traditionally a farming people. Power, however,

  • Burundi, République du

    Burundi, country in east-central Africa, south of the Equator. The landlocked country, a historic kingdom, is one of the few countries in Africa whose borders were not determined by colonial rulers. The vast majority of Burundi’s population is Hutu, traditionally a farming people. Power, however,

  • Burunduk Khan (Kazakh ruler)

    Kazakhstan: Kazakhstan to c. 1700 ce: Under Burunduk Khan (ruled 1488–1509) and Kasym Khan (1509–18), the Kazakhs were the masters of virtually the entire steppe region, reportedly able to bring 200,000 horsemen into the field and feared by all their neighbours. The prevailing view is that the rule of Kasym Khan marked…

  • Burunge (language)

    Cushitic languages: Morphology and grammar: In South Cushitic Burunge, for instance, “selectors” provide up to eight functional slots to mark grammatical categories such as clause type (e.g., conditional, concessive, subject focus, or relative), case (e.g., comitative, instrumental), oblique relative, oblique case focus, tense (e.g., preterite, habitual), sequence, and direction of action. For example,…

  • Burungi (people)

    Tanzania: Ethnic groups: …Mbugu, the Gorowa, and the Burungi have Cushitic origins. About 500 ce, iron-using Bantu agriculturalists arriving from the west and south started displacing or absorbing the San hunters and gatherers; at roughly the same time, Nilotic pastoralists entered the area from the southern Sudan.

  • Burungi language (language)

    Cushitic languages: Morphology and grammar: In South Cushitic Burunge, for instance, “selectors” provide up to eight functional slots to mark grammatical categories such as clause type (e.g., conditional, concessive, subject focus, or relative), case (e.g., comitative, instrumental), oblique relative, oblique case focus, tense (e.g., preterite, habitual), sequence, and direction of action. For example,…

  • Burushaki language

    Burushaski language, language spoken primarily in the Hunza, Nagar, and Yasin valleys of northern Pakistan. It is estimated to have some 90,000 speakers. Burushaski is a linguistic isolate, a language whose genetic relationship to other languages is not yet clear. In this respect it is like Basque,

  • Burushaski language

    Burushaski language, language spoken primarily in the Hunza, Nagar, and Yasin valleys of northern Pakistan. It is estimated to have some 90,000 speakers. Burushaski is a linguistic isolate, a language whose genetic relationship to other languages is not yet clear. In this respect it is like Basque,

  • Burushki language

    Burushaski language, language spoken primarily in the Hunza, Nagar, and Yasin valleys of northern Pakistan. It is estimated to have some 90,000 speakers. Burushaski is a linguistic isolate, a language whose genetic relationship to other languages is not yet clear. In this respect it is like Basque,

  • Burutu (Nigeria)

    Burutu, town and port in Delta state, southern Nigeria, built on two sides of the Forcados River, a channel of the Niger River delta, 20 miles (32 km) upstream from the Bight of Benin. It has served as a link between river transport and the sea since the Royal Niger Company established a base there

  • Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. (law case)

    Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc., legal case in which the U.S. Supreme Court held (5–4) on June 30, 2014, that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) of 1993 permits for-profit corporations that are closely held (e.g., owned by a family or family trust) to refuse, on religious grounds, to

  • Bury (metropolitan borough, England, United Kingdom)

    Bury: metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, historic county of Lancashire, England. The River Irwell flows through the borough, which stretches from Pennine moorland in the north to within 4 miles (6.5 km) of the centre of Manchester in the south. It is crossed by…

  • Bury (England, United Kingdom)

    Bury, town and metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, historic county of Lancashire, England. The River Irwell flows through the borough, which stretches from Pennine moorland in the north to within 4 miles (6.5 km) of the centre of Manchester in the south. It is crossed

  • Bury Saint Edmunds (England, United Kingdom)

    Bury Saint Edmunds, town (parish), St. Edmundsbury borough, administrative and historic county of Suffolk, eastern England, northwest of Ipswich on the River Lark. At Beodricesworth, as the town was first called, Sigebert, king of the East Angles, is said to have founded a monastery about 630; its

  • Bury Saint Edmunds Abbey (abbey, Bury Saint Edmunds, England, United Kingdom)

    Bury Saint Edmunds: …and Denmark, founded a Benedictine abbey at St. Edmund’s shrine in 1020. The shrine became a place of pilgrimage, and from it the town took its name in the 11th century. Bury St. Edmunds received a royal charter of incorporation in 1606. In the abbey church the barons swore (1214)…

  • Bury, J. B. (British scholar)

    J.B. Bury, British classical scholar and historian. The range of Bury’s scholarship was remarkable: he wrote about Greek, Roman, and Byzantine history; classical philology and literature; and the theory and philosophy of history. His works are considered to be among the finest illustrations of the

  • Bury, John (British set designer)

    John Bury, British set designer whose bold, stylized sets—which often incorporated such materials as metal, glass, and brick and featured dramatic architectural structures—were a radical departure from the painted, decorative sets that had characterized traditional British theatre. After serving in

  • Bury, John Bagnell (British scholar)

    J.B. Bury, British classical scholar and historian. The range of Bury’s scholarship was remarkable: he wrote about Greek, Roman, and Byzantine history; classical philology and literature; and the theory and philosophy of history. His works are considered to be among the finest illustrations of the

  • Bury, Richard de (English bishop, diplomat, and scholar)

    Richard de Bury, scholar, diplomat, and bishop of Durham, who was a noted English bibliophile. After studying at the University of Oxford, Richard joined a Benedictine monastery and became a tutor to the future Edward III of England. Having cultivated an interest in books at an early age, Richard

  • Buryat (people)

    Buryat, northernmost of the major Mongol peoples, living south and east of Lake Baikal. By the Treaty of Nerchinsk (1689) their land was ceded by China to the Russian Empire. The Buryat are related by language, history, habitat, and economic type to the Khalkha Mongols of Outer Mongolia, the

  • Buryat A.S.S.R. (republic, Russia)

    Buryatiya, republic of Russia in eastern Siberia. Buryatiya lies along the eastern side of Lake Baikal, with a panhandle bordering Mongolia and extending westward beyond the southern end of the lake. It was created in 1923 by the union of the Buryat-Mongol and Mongolo-Buryat autonomous oblasti

  • Buryat language

    Altaic languages: The Mongolian languages: Buryat and Kalmyk are also literary languages written in Cyrillic script. As the result of divergent spelling conventions and differences in vocabulary, written Khalkha and Buryat differ from one another much more than do the closely related spoken dialects on which they are based. That…

  • Buryatia (republic, Russia)

    Buryatiya, republic of Russia in eastern Siberia. Buryatiya lies along the eastern side of Lake Baikal, with a panhandle bordering Mongolia and extending westward beyond the southern end of the lake. It was created in 1923 by the union of the Buryat-Mongol and Mongolo-Buryat autonomous oblasti

  • Buryatiya (republic, Russia)

    Buryatiya, republic of Russia in eastern Siberia. Buryatiya lies along the eastern side of Lake Baikal, with a panhandle bordering Mongolia and extending westward beyond the southern end of the lake. It was created in 1923 by the union of the Buryat-Mongol and Mongolo-Buryat autonomous oblasti

  • burying beetle (insect)

    Carrion beetle, (family Silphidae), any of a group of beetles (insect order Coleoptera), most of which feed on the bodies of dead and decaying animals, thus playing a major role as decomposers. A few live in beehives as scavengers, and some eyeless ones live in caves and feed on bat droppings.

  • Burzahom (archaeological site, India)

    India: Neolithic agriculture in the Indus valley and Baluchistan: …same is the case at Burzahom in the Vale of Kashmir, where deep pit dwellings are associated with ground stone axes, bone tools, and gray burnished pottery. Evidence of the “aceramic Neolithic” stage is reported at Gufkral, another site in the Kashmir region, which has been dated by radiocarbon to…

  • Burzen-Mihr fire (Zoroastrianism)

    Zoroastrianism: Cultic places: Burzen-Mihr fires were connected, respectively, with the priests, the warriors, and the farmers. The Farnbag fire was at first in Khwārezm, until in the 6th century bce, according to tradition, Vishtāspa, Zarathustra’s protector, transported it to Kabulistan. Then Khosrow in the 6th century ce transported…

  • Burzoe (Persian physician)

    Khosrow I: Patron of culture.: …reign, and the famous physician Burzoe is supposed to have been sent to India by Khosrow to gather Sanskrit books of learning to be translated into the Middle Persian language. The game of chess reportedly was also brought by him from India. Astronomy and astrology flourished at the court of…

  • bus (military technology)

    rocket and missile system: Multiple warheads: The bus was essentially a final, guided stage of the missile (usually the fourth), that now had to be considered part of the missile’s payload. Since any bus capable of maneuvering would take up weight, MIRVed systems would have to carry warheads of lower yield. This…

  • bus (computer science)

    Compaq Computer Corporation: Setting PC standards: …computer, the PS/2, with a bus that was incompatible with the AT-bus design of earlier IBM PCs. (A computer bus is a set of conductors that enable information to be transmitted between computer components, such as printers, modems, and monitors.) Despite having made its fortune by being 100 percent IBM-compatible,…

  • bus (vehicle)

    Bus, any of a class of large, self-propelled, wheeled vehicles that are designed to carry passengers, generally on a fixed route. They were developed at the beginning of the 20th century to compete with streetcars by providing greater route flexibility. The bus was a natural outgrowth of the

  • bus network (communications)

    telecommunications network: Broadcast network: …nodes typically arranged in a bus, ring, or star topology, as shown in the figure. Nodes connected together in a wireless LAN may broadcast via radio or optical links. On a larger scale, many satellite radio systems are broadcast networks, since each Earth station within the system can typically hear…

  • Bus Stop (play by Inge)

    Bus Stop, romantic comedy in three acts by William Inge, performed and published in 1955. Bus Stop, set in a small town in Kansas, is an expansion of the one-act play People in the Wind. The story concerns the passengers of a cross-country bus who are stranded overnight by a blizzard and congregate

  • Bus Stop (film by Logan [1956])

    Joshua Logan: Films and plays of the 1940s and ’50s: …basis for Logan’s next film, Bus Stop (1956), in which the director coaxed from Marilyn Monroe what some critics believe to be one of her best performances while guiding Don Murray to an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor. Even better received was Sayonara (1957), a story of interracial…

  • bus topology (communications)

    telecommunications network: Broadcast network: …nodes typically arranged in a bus, ring, or star topology, as shown in the figure. Nodes connected together in a wireless LAN may broadcast via radio or optical links. On a larger scale, many satellite radio systems are broadcast networks, since each Earth station within the system can typically hear…

  • Busan (South Korea)

    Pusan, metropolitan city and port, South Korea, located at the southeast tip of the Korean peninsula. It is bordered to the north and west by South Ky?ngsang (South Gyeongsang) province (do); to the south and east lies the Korea Strait. During the Kory? dynasty (935–1392) it was named Pusanp’o

  • Busan, Battle of (Japanese-Korean history)

    Siege of Busanjin, (24 May 1592). In Japan’s Age of Warring States, Toyotomi Hideyoshi had reunited Japan by 1591, but in 1592 he ordered an invasion of Ming China to be carried out through Korea. The Koreans resisted, and a fierce war began. Busan, Korea’s most important port, was the first gain

  • Busani (people)

    Burkina Faso: Ethnic groups and languages: …the Samo, the Marka, the Busansi, and the Dyula. Other groups of Burkina Faso include the Hausa and the Tuareg, whose languages are classified as Afro-Asiatic, and the Fulani, whose language (Fula) is a Niger-Congo language of the

  • Busanjin, Siege of (Japanese-Korean history)

    Siege of Busanjin, (24 May 1592). In Japan’s Age of Warring States, Toyotomi Hideyoshi had reunited Japan by 1591, but in 1592 he ordered an invasion of Ming China to be carried out through Korea. The Koreans resisted, and a fierce war began. Busan, Korea’s most important port, was the first gain

  • busbar cost (energy)

    nuclear power: Economics: …industry is known as the levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, which is the cost of generating one kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity averaged over the lifetime of the power plant. The LCOE is also known as the “busbar cost,” as it represents the cost of the electricity up to the…

  • Busbeck, Ogier Ghiselin de (Flemish diplomat)

    Augier Ghislain de Busbecq, Flemish diplomat and man of letters who, as ambassador to Constantinople (now Istanbul), wrote informatively about Turkish life. Busbecq was the illegitimate son of the Seigneur de Busbecq and was later legitimated. He entered the service of Ferdinand I of Austria, who

  • Busbecq, Augier Ghislain de (Flemish diplomat)

    Augier Ghislain de Busbecq, Flemish diplomat and man of letters who, as ambassador to Constantinople (now Istanbul), wrote informatively about Turkish life. Busbecq was the illegitimate son of the Seigneur de Busbecq and was later legitimated. He entered the service of Ferdinand I of Austria, who

  • busby (headdress)

    hussar: It consisted of a busby, or a high, cylindrical cloth cap; a jacket with heavy braiding; and a dolman, or pelisse, a loose coat worn hanging from the left shoulder. Several hussar regiments of the British army were converted from light dragoons in the 19th century. The name survives…

  • Busby, Matt (British athlete and coach)

    Sir Matthew Busby, British football (soccer) player who achieved acclaim as manager (1945–71), director (1971–82), and president (1980) of the Manchester United football team. Busby enjoyed a fine career as a midfielder with Manchester City (1926–36) and Liverpool (1936–39), reaching the Football

  • Busby, Richard (British teacher)

    John Dryden: Youth and education: …classical education under the celebrated Richard Busby. His easy and lifelong familiarity with classical literature begun at Westminster later resulted in idiomatic English translations.

  • Busby, Sir Matthew (British athlete and coach)

    Sir Matthew Busby, British football (soccer) player who achieved acclaim as manager (1945–71), director (1971–82), and president (1980) of the Manchester United football team. Busby enjoyed a fine career as a midfielder with Manchester City (1926–36) and Liverpool (1936–39), reaching the Football

  • Buscaglia, Felice Leonardo (American author and lecturer)

    Leo Buscaglia, American guru to self-help aficionados who, by means of books, lectures, and recordings, was a tireless advocate of the power of love; he often reinforced his message by physically embracing members of his audiences (b. March 31, 1924, Los Angeles, Calif.--d. June 12, 1998, Lake

  • Buscaglia, Leo (American author and lecturer)

    Leo Buscaglia, American guru to self-help aficionados who, by means of books, lectures, and recordings, was a tireless advocate of the power of love; he often reinforced his message by physically embracing members of his audiences (b. March 31, 1924, Los Angeles, Calif.--d. June 12, 1998, Lake

  • Buscema, John (American comics artist)

    Thor: The Simonson era: …and Len Wein with artist John Buscema, carried on in much the same tradition as Kirby and Lee. Throughout the 1970s Thor rarely strayed far from the blueprint that had been established in the Silver Age. Buscema remained the principal artist during much of this time, combining peerless draftsmanship with…

  • Buscema, Sal (American artist)

    Guardians of the Galaxy: …writer Steve Gerber and artist Sal Buscema. In a story that takes place several years after the events of the original series, Captain America, the Fantastic Four’s Thing, and the Defenders are transported from the 20th century to aid the Guardians. Together they help drive the Badoon from Earth’s solar…

  • Busch Gardens Tampa Bay (zoo and amusement park, Tampa, Florida, United States)

    Busch Gardens Tampa Bay, privately owned zoo and amusement park opened in 1959 by Anheuser-Busch, Inc., in Tampa, Florida, U.S. The park’s theme is the continent of Africa. Some 2,700 animals are exhibited at the 335-acre (135-hectare) park. Busch Gardens began as a hospitality centre at the

  • Busch Memorial Stadium (stadium, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States)

    St. Louis Cardinals: …1966 the team moved into Busch Memorial Stadium (renamed Busch Stadium in 1982), which would serve as the franchise’s home until 2005. The team began to play in a new ballpark, also called Busch Stadium, in 2006. In 1970 the Cardinals traded away outfielder Curt Flood, who then sued Major…

  • Busch Series (auto racing championship)

    NASCAR: …two major national series: the Nationwide Series (founded in 1982 and called the Busch Series 1984–2007), in which race cars that differ somewhat in engine and body size from Cup cars are used, and the Camping World Truck Series (founded as the Super Truck Series in 1995 and called the…

  • Busch Stadium (stadium, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States)

    St. Louis Cardinals: …1966 the team moved into Busch Memorial Stadium (renamed Busch Stadium in 1982), which would serve as the franchise’s home until 2005. The team began to play in a new ballpark, also called Busch Stadium, in 2006. In 1970 the Cardinals traded away outfielder Curt Flood, who then sued Major…

  • Busch, Adolf (German violinist and conductor)

    Adolf Busch, German violinist and conductor. A protégé of Max Reger, he became concertmaster of the Vienna Konzertverein at 20 and founded the legendary Busch Quartet after World War I. Forbidden by the Nazis to perform with Rudolf Serkin, his Jewish son-in-law, he moved to Switzerland, then

  • Busch, Adolf Georg Wilhelm (German violinist and conductor)

    Adolf Busch, German violinist and conductor. A protégé of Max Reger, he became concertmaster of the Vienna Konzertverein at 20 and founded the legendary Busch Quartet after World War I. Forbidden by the Nazis to perform with Rudolf Serkin, his Jewish son-in-law, he moved to Switzerland, then

  • Busch, Adolphus (American brewer)

    Adolphus Busch, German-born American cofounder, with Eberhard Anheuser, of the firm later to be known as Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc., one of the largest breweries in the world. Busch was the youngest of 21 children born to Ulrich Busch, a wealthy dealer in wines and brewer’s supplies. Adolphus

  • Busch, August Anheuser, Jr. (American brewer)

    August Anheuser Busch, Jr., American beer baron, president (1946–75) of Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc., who built the company into the world’s largest brewery. In 1922 Busch was put to work sweeping floors and cleaning vats at the brewery cofounded by his grandfather Adolphus Busch, but by 1924 he

  • Busch, Ernst (German actor and singer)

    Ernst Busch, German actor and singer best known as the leading interpreter of roles created by the dramatist Bertolt Brecht. Busch came from a working-class family, joined the German Communist Party, and took up acting professionally when he lost his job with the Krupp manufacturing company. He

  • Busch, Frederick (American author and critic)

    Frederick Busch, American critic, editor, novelist, and short-story writer, whose work often examines aspects of family life from diverse points of view. Busch graduated from Muhlenberg College in 1962 and received an M.A. in 1967 from Columbia University. From 1966 to 2003 he taught at Colgate

  • Busch, Frederick Matthew (American author and critic)

    Frederick Busch, American critic, editor, novelist, and short-story writer, whose work often examines aspects of family life from diverse points of view. Busch graduated from Muhlenberg College in 1962 and received an M.A. in 1967 from Columbia University. From 1966 to 2003 he taught at Colgate

  • Busch, Germán (Bolivian leader)

    Bolivia: The Chaco War and military rule: …Toro in 1936–37 and Major Germán Busch in 1937–39, they tried to reform Bolivian society. During this so-called era of military socialism the Standard Oil Company holdings were confiscated, an important labour code was created, and an advanced, socially oriented constitution was written in 1938; yet little else was changed.

  • Busch, Gussie (American brewer)

    August Anheuser Busch, Jr., American beer baron, president (1946–75) of Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc., who built the company into the world’s largest brewery. In 1922 Busch was put to work sweeping floors and cleaning vats at the brewery cofounded by his grandfather Adolphus Busch, but by 1924 he

  • Busch, Kurt (American race car driver)
  • Busch, Wilhelm (German painter and poet)

    Wilhelm Busch, German painter and poet, best known for his drawings, which were accompanied by wise, satiric, doggerel verse. His Bilderbogen (pictorial broadsheets) can be considered precursors of the comic strip. In 1859, after study at academies in Düsseldorf, Antwerp, and Munich, Busch began to

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