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  • Baltimore Bullets (American basketball team)

    Washington Wizards, American professional basketball team based in Washington, D.C. The Wizards (then known as the Washington Bullets) made four trips to the National Basketball Association (NBA) finals in the 1970s and won an NBA championship in the 1977–78 season. Founded in 1961 as the Chicago

  • Baltimore clipper (ship)

    Baltimore clipper, small, fast sailing ship developed by Chesapeake Bay (U.S.) builders in the 18th century. Its speed made it valuable for use as a privateer, for conveying perishables, and in the slave trade, and its hull design gives it claim as an ancestor of the larger clipper ships of the

  • Baltimore Gun Club, The (novel by Verne)

    From the Earth to the Moon, novel by Jules Verne, published as De la Terre à la Lune (1865) and also published as The Baltimore Gun Club and The American Gun Club. Although the novel was subtitled Trajet direct en 97 heures 20 minutes (“Direct Passage in Ninety-seven Hours and Twenty Minutes”), the

  • Baltimore incident (United States-Chilean history)

    Itata and Baltimore incidents: Baltimore incidents, (1891), two serious occurrences involving the United States and Chile, the first taking place during and the second shortly after the Chilean civil war of 1891.

  • Baltimore Museum of Art (museum, Baltimore, Maryland, United States)

    museum: Protection of cultural property: The Baltimore Museum of Art, for example, sold several pieces in the 2010s to acquire work by previously underrepresented populations. During this time, however, the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, caused controversy when it announced that it would use proceeds from the sale of dozens of…

  • Baltimore of Baltimore, Cecilius Calvert, 2nd Baron (British statesman)

    American colonies: Founding of the middle colonies: His son, Cecilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore, almost immediately succeeded to the grant and resolved to establish a colony where his fellow Roman Catholics could find peace. Early in 1634 the first shipload of Roman Catholic settlers chose a site at St. Marys on a tributary of…

  • Baltimore of Baltimore, Charles Calvert, 3rd Baron (British statesman)

    Charles Calvert, 3rd Baron Baltimore, English statesman who was commissioned governor of the American colony of Maryland in 1661 and succeeded as proprietor of the colony in 1675. Like his grandfather George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore, Charles Calvert was a Roman Catholic, and anti-Catholic

  • Baltimore of Baltimore, George Calvert, 1st Baron (British statesman)

    George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore, English statesman who projected the founding of the North American province of Maryland, in an effort to find a sanctuary for practicing Roman Catholics. Calvert was educated at Trinity College, Oxford (B.A., 1597), and became secretary to Robert Cecil,

  • Baltimore oriole (bird)

    oriole: …the icterids is the well-known Baltimore oriole (I. galbula), which breeds in North America east of the Rockies; it is black, white, and golden orange. In western North America is the closely related Bullock’s oriole (I. bullockii). The orchard oriole (I. spurius), black and chestnut, occurs over the eastern United…

  • Baltimore Orioles (American baseball team, American League)

    Baltimore Orioles, American professional baseball team based in Baltimore, Maryland. Playing in the American League (AL), the Orioles won World Series titles in 1966, 1970, and 1983. The franchise that would become the Orioles was founded in 1894 as a minor league team based in Milwaukee,

  • Baltimore Orioles (American baseball team)

    New York Yankees, American professional baseball team based in the borough of the Bronx in New York City. One of the most famous and successful franchises in all of sports, the Yankees have won a record 27 World Series titles and 40 American League (AL) pennants. The franchise began in 1901 in

  • Baltimore Ravens (American football team)

    Baltimore Ravens, American professional gridiron football team based in Baltimore, Maryland, that plays in the American Football Conference (AFC) of the National Football League (NFL). A relatively young franchise, having played their first game in 1996, the Ravens nevertheless won Super Bowl

  • Baltimore Sun, The (American newspaper)

    The Baltimore Sun, morning newspaper published in Baltimore, long one of the most influential dailies in the United States. It was founded in Baltimore in 1837 by A.S. Abell as a four-page tabloid. Abell dedicated The Sun to printing the news without regard to its editors’ prejudices, and within a

  • Baltimore Zoo (zoo, Baltimore, Maryland, United States)

    Maryland Zoo, zoo in Baltimore, Md., that is the third oldest zoo in the United States (after the zoos in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Philadelphia, Pa., respectively). The site contains more than 1,500 mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians, encompassing nearly 200 species on more than 160 acres (65

  • Baltimore, Battle of (United States history [1814])

    Battle of Baltimore, (12–14 September 1814), land and sea battle of the War of 1812 that spurred the writing of the “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the U.S. national anthem. Following their occupation and burning of Washington, D.C., in August 1814, the British-led by Vice Admiral Alexander Cochrane,

  • Baltimore, Cecilius Calvert, 2nd Baron (British statesman)

    American colonies: Founding of the middle colonies: His son, Cecilius Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore, almost immediately succeeded to the grant and resolved to establish a colony where his fellow Roman Catholics could find peace. Early in 1634 the first shipload of Roman Catholic settlers chose a site at St. Marys on a tributary of…

  • Baltimore, Charles Calvert, 3rd Baron (British statesman)

    Charles Calvert, 3rd Baron Baltimore, English statesman who was commissioned governor of the American colony of Maryland in 1661 and succeeded as proprietor of the colony in 1675. Like his grandfather George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore, Charles Calvert was a Roman Catholic, and anti-Catholic

  • Baltimore, David (American virologist)

    David Baltimore, American virologist who shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1975 with Howard M. Temin and Renato Dulbecco. Working independently, Baltimore and Temin discovered reverse transcriptase, an enzyme that synthesizes DNA from RNA. Baltimore also conducted research that

  • Baltimore, George Calvert, 1st Baron (British statesman)

    George Calvert, 1st Baron Baltimore, English statesman who projected the founding of the North American province of Maryland, in an effort to find a sanctuary for practicing Roman Catholics. Calvert was educated at Trinity College, Oxford (B.A., 1597), and became secretary to Robert Cecil,

  • Baltimore, University of (university, Baltimore, Maryland, United States)

    University of Maryland: The University of Baltimore (1925) is an upper-division school that does not admit freshman or sophomore students. University of Maryland Baltimore County (1966) has an enrollment of about 10,000 students.

  • Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (airport, Maryland, United States)

    Washington, D.C.: Transportation: Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport is about 30 miles (48 km) north of Washington, near Baltimore.

  • Baltinglass, Richard Talbot, Viscount (Irish Jacobite)

    Richard Talbot, earl of Tyrconnell, Irish Jacobite, a leader in the war (1689–91) waged by Irish Roman Catholics against the Protestant king William III of England. The son of Sir William Talbot, a Roman Catholic lawyer and politician, Richard fought with the royalist forces in Ireland during the

  • Baltistan (region, Kashmir, Indian subcontinent, Asia)

    Baltistan, geographic region of Gilgit-Baltistan, in the Pakistani-administered sector of the Kashmir region, in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent. Drained by the Indus River and tributaries such as the Shyok River, Baltistan is situated on the high Ladakh Plateau and contains the

  • Baltit (Pakistan)

    Karimabad, town in the Northern Areas of the Pakistani-administered portion of the Kashmir region, in the northwestern part of the Indian subcontinent. Formerly a small principality under the hereditary ruler known as the Mir of Hunza, it joined with Pakistan in 1947. The town, situated on the west

  • Baltiysk (Russia)

    Baltiysk, city and port, Kaliningrad oblast (province), northwestern Russia. It lies at the entrance to the tip of the narrow peninsula separating Frisches Lagoon from the Baltic Sea. Originally the German East Prussian town of Pillau (1686–1946), Baltiysk is connected by canal to Kaliningrad and

  • Baltiyskoye More (sea, Europe)

    Baltic Sea, arm of the North Atlantic Ocean, extending northward from the latitude of southern Denmark almost to the Arctic Circle and separating the Scandinavian Peninsula from the rest of continental Europe. The largest expanse of brackish water in the world, the semienclosed and relatively

  • Balto (dog)

    Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race: …the dog teams, particularly to Balto, the lead dog of the team that finally reached Nome. In memory of the serum run’s principal musher, Leonhard Seppala, the Iditarod was originally called the Iditarod Trail Seppala Memorial Race. Today’s race commemorates both the serum run and Alaska’s frontier past, and it…

  • Balto-Slavic languages

    Balto-Slavic languages, hypothetical language group comprising the languages of the Baltic and Slavic subgroups of the Indo-European language family. Those scholars who accept the Balto-Slavic hypothesis attribute the large number of close similarities in the vocabulary, grammar, and sound systems

  • Baltoro Glacier (glacier, Asia)

    Himalayas: Drainage: …Karakoram Range, for example, the Baltoro Glacier moves about 6 feet (2 metres) per day, while others, such as the Khumbu, move only about 1 foot (30 cm) daily. Most of the Himalayan glaciers are in retreat, at least in part because of climate change.

  • Baltra Island (island, Ecuador)

    Baltra Island, one of the smaller of the Galápagos Islands, with an area of 8 square miles (21 square km). It lies in the eastern Pacific Ocean, about 600 miles (1,000 km) west of Ecuador. Before volcanic faulting occurred, the island was a part of Santa Cruz (Indefatigable) Island. During World W

  • Ba?tyckie, Morze (sea, Europe)

    Baltic Sea, arm of the North Atlantic Ocean, extending northward from the latitude of southern Denmark almost to the Arctic Circle and separating the Scandinavian Peninsula from the rest of continental Europe. The largest expanse of brackish water in the world, the semienclosed and relatively

  • Baltz, Lewis (American photographer)

    Lewis Baltz, American photographer (born Sept. 12, 1945, Newport Beach, Calif.—died Nov. 22, 2014, Paris, France), helped to define the New Topographics movement and was featured in the pivotal 1975 exhibition “New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape,” at the George Eastman House

  • Baltzell, Edward Digby (American sociologist)

    E. Digby Baltzell, U.S. sociologist who popularized the term WASP, an acronym for "white Anglo-Saxon Protestant"; though the term reportedly originated in 1957, not until 1964, when Baltzell used it in the highly influential The Protestant Establishment: Aristocracy & Caste in America, did it

  • Baluan Island (island, Papua New Guinea)

    Oceanic art and architecture: The Admiralty Islands: For example, the people on Baluan made bird-shaped bowls, ladles, and spatulas; on Lou, obsidian was carved into great hemispheric bowls; on Rambutyo figures and anthropomorphic lime spatulas were common; and the people on Pak made beds (used nowhere else in Melanesia) and slit gongs. Although the Matankor were neither…

  • Baluba (people)

    Luba, a Bantu-speaking cluster of peoples who inhabit a wide area extending throughout much of south-central Democratic Republic of the Congo. They numbered about 5,594,000 in the late 20th century. The name Luba applies to a variety of peoples who, though of different origins, speak closely

  • Baluch (people)

    Baloch, group of tribes speaking the Balochi language and estimated at about five million inhabitants in the province of Balochistān in Pakistan and also neighbouring areas of Iran and Afghanistan. In Pakistan the Baloch people are divided into two groups, the Sulaimani and the Makrani, separated

  • Balūchestān (region, Iran)

    Baluchistan, traditional region of southeastern Iran, the greater part of which is in Sīstān va Balūchestān ostān (province). With harsh physical and social conditions, the region is among the least developed in Iran. Precipitation, scarce and falling mostly in violent rainstorms, causes floods and

  • Balūchestān (province, Pakistan)

    Balochistan, westernmost province of Pakistan. It is bordered by Iran (west), by Afghanistan (northwest), by Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Punjab provinces (northeast and east), by Sindh province (southeast), and by the Arabian Sea (south). Although an indigenous population of the region passed through

  • Baluchi language

    Balochi language, one of the oldest living languages of the Indo-Iranian group of the Indo-European languages. A West Iranian language, Balochi is spoken by about five million people as a first or second language in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, India, and Baloch diaspora communities. Balochi is

  • Baluchi rug

    Baluchi rug, floor covering woven by the Baloch people living in Afghanistan and eastern Iran. The patterns in these rugs are highly varied, many consisting of repeated motifs, diagonally arranged across the field. Some present a maze of intricate latch-hooked forms. Prayer rugs, with a simple

  • Balūchistān (province, Pakistan)

    Balochistan, westernmost province of Pakistan. It is bordered by Iran (west), by Afghanistan (northwest), by Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Punjab provinces (northeast and east), by Sindh province (southeast), and by the Arabian Sea (south). Although an indigenous population of the region passed through

  • Baluchistan (region, Iran)

    Baluchistan, traditional region of southeastern Iran, the greater part of which is in Sīstān va Balūchestān ostān (province). With harsh physical and social conditions, the region is among the least developed in Iran. Precipitation, scarce and falling mostly in violent rainstorms, causes floods and

  • Balūchistān Plateau (plateau, Pakistan)

    Pakistan: The Balochistan plateau: The vast tableland of Balochistan contains a great variety of physical features. In the northeast a basin centred on the towns of Zhob and Loralai forms a trellis-patterned lobe that is surrounded on all sides by mountain ranges. To the east and southeast…

  • Baluchistan, University of (university, Quetta, Pakistan)

    Balochistan: The University of Balochistan was established in Quetta in 1970. The Balochi Academy and the Pashto Academy, also in Quetta, promote the preservation of traditional cultures. Area 134,051 square miles (347,190 square km). Pop. (2003 est.) 7,450,000.

  • Baluchitherium (fossil mammal genus)

    Indricotherium, genus of giant browsing perissodactyls found as fossils in Asian deposits of the Late Oligocene and Early Miocene epochs (30 million to 16.6 million years ago). Indricotherium, which was related to the modern rhinoceros but was hornless, was the largest land mammal that ever

  • Balue, Jean (French cardinal)

    Jean Balue, French cardinal, the treacherous minister of King Louis XI. Of humble parentage, Balue was first patronized by the bishop of Poitiers. In 1461 he became vicar-general of the bishop of Angers. His activity, cunning, and mastery of intrigue gained him the appreciation of Louis XI, who

  • Balurghat (India)

    Balurghat, city, northern West Bengal state, northeastern India. It is situated just east of the Atrai River, just north of the Bangladesh border. Balurghat was declared a municipality in 1951. The city is connected by road with Ingraj Bazar (Angrezabad) in West Bengal and with Dinajpur and

  • baluster (architecture)

    Baluster, one of a series of small posts supporting the coping or handrail of a parapet or railing. Colonnettes are shown as balusters in Assyrian palaces by contemporary bas-reliefs and are similarly used in many railings of the Gothic period. Although no Greek or Roman example of the baluster is

  • baluster jug

    metalwork: Middle Ages: …simple matter to distinguish between baluster jugs from London and pichets from Paris or between wine flagons from Switzerland and those made in the Low Countries, Burgundy, the Main regions of Franconia, southern Germany, and the Rhineland. The type of a baluster jug made in the region around Frankfurt-am-Oder and…

  • balustrade (architecture)

    Balustrade, low screen formed by railings of stone, wood, metal, glass, or other materials and designed to prevent falls from roofs, balconies, terraces, stairways, and other elevated architectural elements. The classic Renaissance balustrade consisted of a broad, molded handrail supported by a

  • Baluze, étienne (French scholar)

    étienne Baluze, French scholar, notable both as a historian and as the collector and publisher of documents and manuscripts. At the Collège St. Martial at Toulouse, he studied chiefly ecclesiastical history and canon law, becoming in 1654 secretary to the archbishop of Toulouse, who was a noted

  • Balwhidder, Glenalmond, and Glenlyon, John Murray, Viscount of (Scottish noble)

    John Murray, 2nd marquess and 1st duke of Atholl, a leading Scottish supporter of William and Mary and of the Hanoverian succession. Son of the 1st marquess of Atholl, he favoured the accession of William and Mary in 1689 but was unable, during his father’s absence, to prevent the majority of his

  • balwo (style of poetry)

    African literature: Somali: …by women, the heello, or balwo, made up of short love poems and popular on the radio, and the hees, popular poetry. Maxamed Cabdulle Xasan (Mohammed Abdullah Hassan) created poetry as a weapon, mainly in the oral tradition. Farah Nuur, Qamaan Bulhan, and Salaan Arrabey were also well-known poets. Abdillahi…

  • Baly (India)

    Bally, city, southeastern West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies on the west bank of the Hugli (Hooghly) River, opposite Baranagar, and is part of the Haora (Howrah) urban agglomeration as well as the larger Kolkata (Calcutta) metropolitan area. Bally was constituted a municipality in 1883.

  • Balyā ibn Malkān (Islamic mythology)

    Al-Khi?r, (Arabic: contraction of al-Kha?ir, “the Green One”) a legendary Islamic figure endowed with immortal life who became a popular saint, especially among sailors and Sufis (Muslim mystics). The cycle of myths and stories surrounding al-Khi?r originated in a vague narrative in the Qur?ān

  • Balykchy (Kyrgyzstan)

    Balykchy, town, capital of Ysyk-K?l oblasty (province), northeastern Kyrgyzstan. It is a port located on the western shore of Lake Ysyk (Issyk-Kul) and is linked to Frunze, about 87 miles (140 km) north-northwest. Balykchy’s economy centres on a food industry, including meat-packing and cereal

  • Balzac (sculpture by Rodin)

    Auguste Rodin: Discords and triumphs: …the Victor Hugo and the Balzac were even more serious.

  • Balzac, Honoré de (French author)

    Honoré de Balzac, French literary artist who produced a vast number of novels and short stories collectively called La Comédie humaine (The Human Comedy). He helped to establish the traditional form of the novel and is generally considered to be one of the greatest novelists of all time. Balzac’s

  • Balzac, Jean-Louis Guez de (French scholar and author)

    Jean-Louis Guez de Balzac, man of letters and critic, one of the original members of the Académie Fran?aise; he had a great influence on the development of Classical French prose. After studies in the Netherlands at Leiden (1615), some youthful adventures, and a period in Rome (1620–22), he hoped

  • Balzary, Michael (American musician)

    Damon Albarn: …the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ Flea on bass.

  • Bal?amī (Persian historian)

    Islamic arts: Belles lettres: …the late 10th century, when Bal?amī made an abridged translation of the vast Arabic historical chronicle by al-?abarī (died 923).

  • BAM (railway, Russia)

    Siberia: The Soviet period and after: The construction of the BAM (Baikal-Amur Magistral) railroad between Ust-Kut, on the Lena River, and Komsomolsk-na-Amure, on the Amur, a distance of 2,000 miles (3,200 km), was completed in 1980.

  • Bam (Iran)

    Bam, city in eastern Kermān province, Iran. The city, an agricultural centre situated on the Silk Road and long famed for its large fortress, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2004. Bam is located about 115 miles (185 km) southeast of the city of Kermān at an elevation of approximately

  • BAM (arts centre, New York City, New York, United States)

    Merce Cunningham: …mark Cunningham’s 90th birthday, the Brooklyn Academy of Music premiered his new and last work, Nearly Ninety, in April 2009. His career was the subject of the documentary Cunningham (2019).

  • bama (shrine)

    High place, Israelite or Canaanite open-air shrine usually erected on an elevated site. Prior to the conquest of Canaan (Palestine) by the Israelites in the 12th–11th century bc, the high places served as shrines of the Canaanite fertility deities, the Baals (Lords) and the Asherot (Semitic

  • bamah (shrine)

    High place, Israelite or Canaanite open-air shrine usually erected on an elevated site. Prior to the conquest of Canaan (Palestine) by the Israelites in the 12th–11th century bc, the high places served as shrines of the Canaanite fertility deities, the Baals (Lords) and the Asherot (Semitic

  • Bamako (national capital, Mali)

    Bamako, capital of Mali, located on the Niger River in the southwestern part of the country. When occupied for the French in 1880 by Captain Joseph-Simon Gallieni, Bamako was a settlement of a few hundred inhabitants, grouped in villages. It became the capital of the former colony of French Sudan

  • Bamako, University of (university, Bamako, Mali)

    Mali: Education: …the government—is offered by the University of Bamako (1993) and state colleges, which include teacher-training colleges, a college of administration, an engineering institute, an agricultural and veterinary science institute, and a medical school. Many of Mali’s university students study abroad, especially in France and Senegal. Other school reform has focused…

  • Bamana (people)

    Bambara, ethnolinguistic group of the upper Niger region of Mali whose language, Bambara (Bamana), belongs to the Mande branch of the Niger-Congo language family. The Bambara are to a great extent intermingled with other tribes, and there is no centralized organization. Each small district, made up

  • Bamana language

    Mande languages: …more than a million speakers: Bambara (which has four million), Malinke, Maninka, Mende, Dyula (which is used as a trade language by four million people in northern C?te d’Ivoire and western Burkina Faso), Soninke, and Susu. The smaller eastern group consists of 13 languages, only one of which, Dan, has…

  • Bamangwato (people)

    Botswana: Growth of Tswana states: …of those Kwena thenceforth called Ngwato settled farther north at Shoshong. By about 1795 a group of Ngwato, called the Tawana, had even founded a state as far northwest as Lake Ngami.

  • bamba (dance)

    Native American dance: Mexico and Mesoamerica: Contests of improvisations to la bamba, widely danced in the Mexican Gulf Coast area, also contribute to the merriment of the Veracruz huapango.

  • Bamba M’backe, Amadou (Senegalese poet)

    Islamic arts: General considerations: …member of Senegal’s literary community, Amadou Bamba M’backe, who founded the politically important group of the Murīdiyyah, wrote (quite apart from practical words of wisdom in his mother tongue) some 20,000 mystically tinged verses in Classical Arabic.

  • Bamba, Mount (mountain, Republic of the Congo)

    Mount Bamba, mountain (2,625 feet [800 metres]) in the Mayombé Massif, in the southwestern part of the Republic of the

  • Bambara (people)

    Bambara, ethnolinguistic group of the upper Niger region of Mali whose language, Bambara (Bamana), belongs to the Mande branch of the Niger-Congo language family. The Bambara are to a great extent intermingled with other tribes, and there is no centralized organization. Each small district, made up

  • Bambara groundnut (plant)

    Fabales: Ecological and economic importance: …family is Vigna subterranea (Bambara groundnut), a leguminous plant that develops underground fruits in the arid lands of Africa. Important too are the seeds of Bauhinia esculenta; they are gathered for the high-protein tubers and seeds. Vigna aconitifolia (moth bean) and V. umbellata (rice bean) are much used in…

  • Bambara language

    Mande languages: …more than a million speakers: Bambara (which has four million), Malinke, Maninka, Mende, Dyula (which is used as a trade language by four million people in northern C?te d’Ivoire and western Burkina Faso), Soninke, and Susu. The smaller eastern group consists of 13 languages, only one of which, Dan, has…

  • Bambara states (historical states, Africa)

    Bambara states, two separate West African states, one of which was based on the town of Ségou, between the Sénégal and Niger rivers, and the other on Kaarta, along the middle Niger (both in present-day Mali). According to tradition, the Segu kingdom was founded by two brothers, Barama Ngolo and

  • Bambara, Toni Cade (American author and civil-rights activist)

    Toni Cade Bambara, American writer, civil-rights activist, and teacher who wrote about the concerns of the African-American community. Reared by her mother in Harlem, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and Queens, N.Y., Bambara (a surname she adopted in 1970) was educated at Queens College (B.A., 1959). In 1961

  • Bambatana language

    Melanesian languages: …Mission in the Solomon Islands; Bambatana, a literary language used by the Methodists on Choiseul Island; Bugotu, a lingua franca on Santa Isabel (Ysabel Island); Tolai, a widely used missionary language in New Britain and New Ireland; Yabêm and Graged, lingua francas of the Lutheran Mission in the Madang region…

  • Bambatha (African chief)

    South Africa: Black, Coloured, and Indian political responses: …an armed rising led by Bambatha, a Zulu chief. At the end of this “reluctant rebellion,” between 3,000 and 4,000 blacks had been killed and many thousands imprisoned.

  • Bamberg (county, South Carolina, United States)

    Bamberg, county, south-central South Carolina, U.S. Bordered to the northeast by the South Fork Edisto River and to the southwest by the Salkehatchie River, it is also drained by the Little Salkehatchie River. The county is largely agricultural, with wetlands in the Coastal Plain. The Cathedral Bay

  • Bamberg (Germany)

    Bamberg, city, Bavaria Land (state), south-central Germany. It lies along the canalized Regnitz River, 2 miles (3 km) above the latter’s confluence with the Main River, north of Nürnberg. First mentioned in 902 as the seat of the ancestral castle of the Babenberg family, Bamberg became the seat of

  • Bamberg cathedral (cathedral, Bamberg, Germany)

    Bamberg: Bamberg’s imperial cathedral (1004–1237) contains many notable statues, the tombs of Henry II, his wife, Cunegund, and Pope Clement II, and a wooden altar carved by Veit Stoss. There are two bishops’ palaces: the Alte Residenz, or old palace (1571–76), which houses a local history museum, and…

  • Bamberger, Ludwig (German economist)

    Ludwig Bamberger, economist and publicist, a leading authority on currency problems in Germany. Originally a radical, he became a moderate liberal in Bismarck’s Germany. Born of Jewish parents, Bamberger was studying French law when the Revolutions of 1848 inspired his radicalism. He became a

  • Bambi (work by Salten)

    Bambi, novel by Felix Salten, published in 1923 as Bambi: Eine Lebensgeschichte aus dem Walde. The story is an enduring children’s classic as well as an allegory for adults. It is a realistic, although anthropomorphized, account of a deer from his birth to his final role as a wise and tough old

  • Bambi (American animated film [1942])

    Bambi, American animated film, released in 1942, that is considered a classic in the Disney canon for its lush hand-drawn animation and its sensitive affective narrative. The story chronicles the adventures of Bambi, a fawn whose father is revered as the Great Prince of the Forest. From birth Bambi

  • Bambi: A Life in the Woods (work by Salten)

    Bambi, novel by Felix Salten, published in 1923 as Bambi: Eine Lebensgeschichte aus dem Walde. The story is an enduring children’s classic as well as an allegory for adults. It is a realistic, although anthropomorphized, account of a deer from his birth to his final role as a wise and tough old

  • Bambi: Eine Lebensgeschichte aus dem Walde (work by Salten)

    Bambi, novel by Felix Salten, published in 1923 as Bambi: Eine Lebensgeschichte aus dem Walde. The story is an enduring children’s classic as well as an allegory for adults. It is a realistic, although anthropomorphized, account of a deer from his birth to his final role as a wise and tough old

  • Bambino Mexicano, El (Mexican baseball player)

    Héctor Espino, professional baseball player with the Mexican League (an affiliate with U.S. Minor League Baseball). Although virtually unknown in the United States, Espino is considered by many in Mexico to be the greatest native-born hitter of all time and is a national hero in that country.

  • Bambino, Curse of the (baseball history)

    Boston Red Sox: …and of the supposed “Curse of the Bambino” (“Bambino” was one of Ruth’s nicknames), cited by many Red Sox fans as the reason the team failed to win another World Series in the 20th century while the Yankees went on to become baseball’s most successful franchise. After losing Ruth…

  • Bambino, Il (Roman statue)

    Rome: The Capitoline: …is the home of “Il Bambino,” a wooden statue (originally a 15th-century statue; now a copy) of the Christ Child, who is called upon to save desperately ill children.

  • Bambino, the (American baseball player)

    Babe Ruth, American professional baseball player. Largely because of his home-run hitting between 1919 and 1935, Ruth became, and perhaps remains to this day, America’s most celebrated athlete. Part of the aura surrounding Ruth arose from his modest origins. Though the legend that he was an orphan

  • Bamboccianti (painting)

    Bamboccianti, group of painters working in Rome in the mid-17th century who were known for their relatively small, often anecdotal paintings of everyday life. The word derives from the nickname “Il Bamboccio” (“Large Baby”), applied to the physically malformed Dutch painter Pieter van Laer

  • Bamboccio (Dutch artist)

    Bamboccianti: …the physically malformed Dutch painter Pieter van Laer (1592/95–1642). Generally regarded as the originator of the style and its most important exponent, van Laer arrived in Rome from Haarlem about 1625 and was soon well known for paintings in which his Netherlandish interest in the picturesque was combined with the…

  • bamboo (plant)

    Bamboo, (subfamily Bambusoideae), subfamily of tall treelike grasses of the family Poaceae, comprising more than 115 genera and 1,400 species. Bamboos are distributed in tropical and subtropical to mild temperate regions, with the heaviest concentration and largest number of species in East and

  • Bamboo Annals (Chinese literature)

    Bamboo Annals, set of Chinese court records written on bamboo slips, from the state of Wei, one of the many small states into which China was divided during the Dong (Eastern) Zhou dynasty (770–256 bce). The state records were hidden in a tomb uncovered some 6 miles (10 km) southwest of the

  • bamboo bat (genus of mammals)

    bat: Locomotion: …as the bamboo bats (Tylonycteris), have specialized wrist and sole pads for moving along and roosting on the smooth surface of leaves or bamboo stalks. Bats are not known to swim in nature except, perhaps, by accident. When they do fall into water, however, they generally swim competently.

  • Bamboo Blonde, The (film by Mann [1946])

    Anthony Mann: The 1940s: film noirs: The Bamboo Blonde (1946) was a hybrid of a musical and a war movie about a bomber pilot who falls in love with a nightclub singer.

  • bamboo palm (plant)

    houseplant: Trees: The parlour palms and bamboo palms of the genus Chamaedorea have dainty fronds on slender stalks; they keep well even in fairly dark places. Similar in appearance is the areca palm (Chrysalidocarpus) with slender yellowish stems carrying feathery fronds in clusters. The pygmy date (Phoenix roebelenii), a compact palm…

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