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  • Barbara (French musician)

    Barbara (Monique Serf), French singer and composer who specialized in singing the songs of Jacques Brel and Georges Brassens in Belgium before she found stardom in France singing many of her own compositions, notably "L’Aigle noir" ("Black Eagle"), "Ma plus belle histoire d’amour, c’est vous" (

  • Barbara (syllogistic)

    history of logic: Aristotle: … in the form known as Barbara (on this terminology, see below Syllogisms).

  • Barbara Allen (ballad)

    folk music: Transmission and variation: …of the English ballad “Barbara Allen,” found 198 versions of the story sung in the English-speaking world, accompanied by tunes belonging to three tune families. (Accompanying this article are audio recordings of five renditions of “Barbara Allen” from collections at the Library of Congress.)

  • Barbara Frietchie (poem by Whittier)

    Frederick: …John Greenleaf Whittier’s poem “Barbara Frietchie.” Inc. 1817. Pop. (2000) 52,767; Bethesda-Rockville-Frederick Metro Division, 1,068,618; (2010) 65,239; Bethesda-Rockville-Frederick Metro Division, 1,205,162.

  • Barbara, Saint (Christian martyr)

    St. Barbara, ; feast day December 4), legendary virgin martyr of the early church. Venerated as one of the 14 Auxiliary Saints (Holy Helpers), she is invoked in thunderstorms and is the patron saint of artillerymen and miners. Because Barbara’s authenticity is highly questionable and her legend is

  • Barbarea (plant)

    Winter cress, (genus Barbarea), genus of about 20 species of weedy herbs of the mustard family (Brassicaceae), native to the north temperate region. Most species are biennials or perennials and have yellow or white four-petaled flowers and deeply lobed leaves. Some winter cresses are cultivated as

  • Barbarea verna (plant)

    cress: Upland cress (Barbarea verna), a hardy biennial native to Europe, is a coarse, often weedy plant rarely cultivated. The closely related winter cress, or yellow rocket (B. vulgaris), is a common weed, conspicuous in fields for its bright yellow spring flowers. Bitter cress, cuckoo flower,…

  • Barbarea vulgaris (plant)

    cress: …closely related winter cress, or yellow rocket (B. vulgaris), is a common weed, conspicuous in fields for its bright yellow spring flowers. Bitter cress, cuckoo flower, or meadow cress (Cardamine pratensis), of the Northern Hemisphere, grows in damp meadows and in bog gardens. It is low-growing, with pinnately divided leaves…

  • Barbarella (film by Vadim [1968])

    Dino De Laurentiis: Romeo and Juliet (1968) and Barbarella (1968).

  • Barbarelli, Giorgio (Italian painter)

    Giorgione, extremely influential Italian painter who was one of the initiators of a High Renaissance style in Venetian art. His qualities of mood and mystery were epitomized in The Tempest (c. 1505), an evocative pastoral scene, which was among the first of its genre in Venetian painting. Nothing

  • barbari (people)

    Barbarian, word derived from the Greek bárbaros, used among the early Greeks to describe all foreigners, including the Romans. The word is probably onomatopoeic in origin, the “bar bar” sound representing the perception by Greeks of languages other than their own. Bárbaros soon assumed a deeply

  • Barbari (syllogistic)

    history of logic: Syllogisms: *Barbari, *Celaront.

  • Barbari, Iacopo de’ (Italian painter)

    Jacopo de’ Barbari, Venetian painter and engraver influenced by Antonello da Messina. Barbari probably painted the first signed and dated (1504) pure still life (a dead partridge, gauntlets, and arrow pinned against a wall). Until c. 1500 he remained in Venice. A large engraved panorama of the city

  • Barbari, Jacopo de’ (Italian painter)

    Jacopo de’ Barbari, Venetian painter and engraver influenced by Antonello da Messina. Barbari probably painted the first signed and dated (1504) pure still life (a dead partridge, gauntlets, and arrow pinned against a wall). Until c. 1500 he remained in Venice. A large engraved panorama of the city

  • barbarian (people)

    Barbarian, word derived from the Greek bárbaros, used among the early Greeks to describe all foreigners, including the Romans. The word is probably onomatopoeic in origin, the “bar bar” sound representing the perception by Greeks of languages other than their own. Bárbaros soon assumed a deeply

  • Barbarian in the Garden (work by Herbert)

    Zbigniew Herbert: …as Barbarzyńca w ogrodzie (1962; Barbarian in the Garden). From 1975 to 1992, he lived mostly in western Europe, although during that time he returned to Poland for the five years from 1981 to 1986. Then, from 1992 until his death, he made his home in Poland.

  • barbarian invasions (European history)

    Athens: Hellenistic and Roman times: …of the threat of a barbarian invasion, but when that invasion came, in 267 ce, the walls were of no avail. The Heruli, a Germanic people from northern Europe, easily captured Athens, and, though the historian P. Herennius Dexippus rallied 2,000 men on the city outskirts, they could only resort…

  • Barbarian Invasions, The (film by Arcand [2003])

    Denys Arcand: …notably Les Invasions barbares (2003; The Barbarian Invasions), embodied his intellectual curiosity and passion for politics, art, and life.

  • barbarian law (Germanic law)

    Anglo-Saxon law: …the so-called barbarian laws (leges barbarorum) of continental Europe, it made up the body of law called Germanic law. Anglo-Saxon law was written in the vernacular and was relatively free of the Roman influence found in continental laws that were written in Latin. Roman influence on Anglo-Saxon law was…

  • Barbarian Odes, The (work by Carducci)

    Giosuè Carducci: …Lyrics) and Odi barbare (1877; The Barbarian Odes) contain the best of Carducci’s poetry: the evocations of the Maremma landscape and the memories of childhood; the lament for the loss of his only son; the representation of great historical events; and the ambitious attempts to recall the glory of Roman…

  • Barbarians (poetry by Dunn)

    Douglas Dunn: Barbarians (1979) is a highly political volume that attacks the sovereignty of the propertied class and Oxbridge intellectuals while arguing for the robustness of “barbarian” working-class culture. Although most critics generally admired the work, they had greater praise for St. Kilda’s Parliament (1981), noting Dunn’s…

  • Barbaro, Daniele (Italian scholar)

    Andrea Palladio: Visits to Rome and work in Vicenza: …collaborated with the classical scholar Daniele Barbaro in reconstructing Roman buildings for the plates of Vitruvius’ influential architectural treatise (written after 26 bce) De architectura (On Architecture). The new edition was published in Venice in 1556.

  • Barbaro, Villa (house, Maser, Italy)

    Andrea Palladio: Visits to Rome and work in Vicenza: …the house, as at the Villa Barbaro (c. 1555–59) at Maser, which Palladio designed for his friend the scholar Daniele Barbaro. This villa retains the contemporary fresco interiors painted by the Venetian master Paolo Veronese (c. 1528–88) and is one of the few interiors to survive from Palladio’s day.

  • Barbarorum, Leges (Germanic law)

    Anglo-Saxon law: …the so-called barbarian laws (leges barbarorum) of continental Europe, it made up the body of law called Germanic law. Anglo-Saxon law was written in the vernacular and was relatively free of the Roman influence found in continental laws that were written in Latin. Roman influence on Anglo-Saxon law was…

  • Barbarossa (Ottoman admiral)

    Barbarossa, (Italian: “Redbeard”) Barbary pirate and later admiral of the Ottoman fleet, by whose initiative Algeria and Tunisia became part of the Ottoman Empire. For three centuries after his death, Mediterranean coastal towns and villages were ravaged by his pirate successors. Khi?r was one of

  • Barbarossa, Frederick (Holy Roman emperor)

    Frederick I, duke of Swabia (as Frederick III, 1147–90) and German king and Holy Roman emperor (1152–90), who challenged papal authority and sought to establish German predominance in western Europe. He engaged in a long struggle with the cities of northern Italy (1154–83), sending six major

  • Barbarossa, Operation (European history)

    Operation Barbarossa, during World War II, code name for the German invasion of the Soviet Union, which was launched on June 22, 1941. The failure of German troops to defeat Soviet forces in the campaign signaled a crucial turning point in the war. Although Adolf Hitler had congratulated himself on

  • Barbary (breed of horse)

    Barb, native horse breed of the Barbary states of North Africa. It is related to, and probably an offshoot of, the Arabian horse but is larger, with a lower placed tail, and has hair at the fetlock (above and behind the hoof). The coat colour is usually bay or brown. Like the Arabian, it is noted

  • Barbary (historical region, Africa)

    Barbary, former designation for the coastal region of North Africa bounded by Egypt (east), by the Atlantic (west), by the Sahara (south), and by the Mediterranean Sea (north), and now comprising Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya. The name originates from that of the Berbers, the oldest known

  • Barbary ape (primate)

    Barbary macaque, (Macaca sylvanus), tailless ground-dwelling monkey that lives in groups in the upland forests of Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, and Gibraltar. The Barbary macaque is about 60 cm (24 inches) long and has light yellowish brown fur and a bald pale pink face. Adult males weigh about 16 kg

  • Barbary Coast (film by Hawks [1935])

    Howard Hawks: Films of the mid-1930s: Barbary Coast (1935), also written by Hecht and MacArthur, followed but was an unremarkable period romance. Ceiling Zero (1936), an adaptation of a play by former pilot Frank Wead, was better. It starred Cagney as an indomitable airmail pilot and Pat O’Brien as his hard-boiled…

  • Barbary fig (plant)

    Morocco: Plant and animal life: …jujube tree, esparto grass, and Barbary fig (introduced from the Americas by way of Spain in the 16th century) cover vast areas. There is little natural vegetation in the desert areas east of the mountains, although the date palm, introduced to Morocco at a very early period, is extensively cultivated…

  • Barbary ground squirrel (rodent)

    ground squirrel: Nontropical ground squirrels: The Barbary ground squirrel (Atlantoxerus getulus) lives in rocky habitats from sea level to 4,000 metres (13,000 feet) in the Atlas Mountains of northwestern Africa, and the four species of African ground squirrels (genus Xerus) inhabit savannas and rocky deserts in northern, eastern, and southern Africa.…

  • Barbary lion (mammal)

    lion: Distribution: …number of subspecies—such as the Barbary lion (Panthera leo leo) of North Africa, the cave lion (P. leo spelaea) of Europe, the American lion (P. leo atrox) of North and Central America, and the Asiatic lion (P. leo persica) of the Middle East and

  • Barbary macaque (primate)

    Barbary macaque, (Macaca sylvanus), tailless ground-dwelling monkey that lives in groups in the upland forests of Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco, and Gibraltar. The Barbary macaque is about 60 cm (24 inches) long and has light yellowish brown fur and a bald pale pink face. Adult males weigh about 16 kg

  • Barbary pirate

    Barbary pirate, any of the Muslim pirates operating from the coast of North Africa, at their most powerful during the 17th century but still active until the 19th century. Captains, who formed a class in Algiers and Tunis, commanded cruisers outfitted by wealthy backers, who then received 10

  • Barbary sheep (mammal)

    Aoudad, (Ammotragus lervia), North African goatlike mammal of the family Bovidae (order Artiodactyla). This species has been inappropriately called a sheep, although recent genetic information reveals that it is much more closely related to wild goats. The aoudad stands about 102 cm (40 inches) at

  • Barbary Shore (novel by Mailer)

    Norman Mailer: His second novel, Barbary Shore (1951), and The Deer Park (1955) were greeted with critical hostility and mixed reviews, respectively. His next important work was a long essay, The White Negro (1957), a sympathetic study of a marginal social type—the “hipster.”

  • Barbary shrike (bird)

    shrike: erythrogaster) and the Barbary shrike (L. barbarus).

  • Barbary States (historical region, Africa)

    Barbary, former designation for the coastal region of North Africa bounded by Egypt (east), by the Atlantic (west), by the Sahara (south), and by the Mediterranean Sea (north), and now comprising Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya. The name originates from that of the Berbers, the oldest known

  • Barbary Tongue (sandspit, Africa)

    Sénégal River: Physiography and hydrology: …of a long sandspit, the Barbary Tongue (Langue de Barbarie). Saint-Louis lies in the river’s estuary, which extends for about 10 miles (16 km) to the river’s mouth.

  • Barbarzyńca w ogrodzie (work by Herbert)

    Zbigniew Herbert: …as Barbarzyńca w ogrodzie (1962; Barbarian in the Garden). From 1975 to 1992, he lived mostly in western Europe, although during that time he returned to Poland for the five years from 1981 to 1986. Then, from 1992 until his death, he made his home in Poland.

  • Barbasetti, Luigi (Italian fencing master)

    Luigi Barbasetti, Italian fencing master, much respected in both Italy and Hungary. A student of the great Italian sabre teacher Giuseppe Radaelli, Barbasetti in many ways outstripped his master. His unique insight into fencing helped guide the sport into the 20th century. Barbasetti began his

  • Barbastella (mammal)

    Barbastelle, (genus Barbastella), either of two bats of the vesper bat family, Vespertilionidae, found in Europe and North Africa (B. barbastellus) and in the Middle East and Asia (B. leucomelas). Barbastelles have short, wide ears that are joined on the forehead. Their fur is long and dark, with

  • Barbastella barbastellus (mammal)

    Barbastelle, (genus Barbastella), either of two bats of the vesper bat family, Vespertilionidae, found in Europe and North Africa (B. barbastellus) and in the Middle East and Asia (B. leucomelas). Barbastelles have short, wide ears that are joined on the forehead. Their fur is long and dark, with

  • Barbastella leucomelas (mammal)

    Barbastelle, (genus Barbastella), either of two bats of the vesper bat family, Vespertilionidae, found in Europe and North Africa (B. barbastellus) and in the Middle East and Asia (B. leucomelas). Barbastelles have short, wide ears that are joined on the forehead. Their fur is long and dark, with

  • barbastelle (mammal)

    Barbastelle, (genus Barbastella), either of two bats of the vesper bat family, Vespertilionidae, found in Europe and North Africa (B. barbastellus) and in the Middle East and Asia (B. leucomelas). Barbastelles have short, wide ears that are joined on the forehead. Their fur is long and dark, with

  • barbat (musical instrument)

    stringed instrument: Plucked lutes: …Persia, where, as the short-necked barbat, it influenced the music of Afghanistan and Turkistan on its way to China, Korea, and Japan. The skin-bellied lute, in China the sanxian, can be traced in China only to the 13th century; from there it was taken to the Ryukyu Islands and thence…

  • Barbatia (bivalve genus)

    ark shell: …of the genera Arca and Barbatia, live attached by a byssus (a tuft of horny threads secreted by a gland on the foot) in rock and coral crevices. Other species, particularly of the genus Anadara, live shallowly buried in sands and silts. Some species, such as the western African Anadara…

  • Barbauld, Anna Laetitia (British author and editor)

    Anna Laetitia Barbauld, British writer, poet, and editor whose best writings are on political and social themes. Her poetry belongs essentially in the tradition of 18th-century meditative verse. The only daughter of John Aikin, she lived from the age of 15 to 30 in Warrington, Lancashire, where her

  • barbe de capucin (cultivated herb)

    chicory: One method of forcing produces barbe de capucin, the loose blanched leaves much esteemed by the French as a winter salad. Another method produces witloef, or witloof, the tighter heads or crowns preferred in Belgium and elsewhere. Throughout Europe the roots are stored to produce leaves for salads during winter.

  • Barbé-Marbois, Fran?ois, marquis de (French statesman)

    Fran?ois, marquis de Barbé-Marbois, French statesman who in 1803 negotiated the Louisiana Purchase by the United States. After serving as a diplomat in Germany and with the American colonists, Barbé-Marbois was an intendant of Santo Domingo (1785–89). Returning to France, he became a deputy in the

  • Barbeau Peak (mountain, Nunavut, Canada)

    Ellesmere Island: …northerly point of Canada, and Barbeau Peak, at an elevation of 8,583 feet (2,616 metres), is the highest point in Nunavut. Settlements, all quite small, include Eureka, Grise Ford (Aujuittuq), and Alert, a weather station and military outpost that is the northernmost community in North America. Petroleum deposits have been…

  • barbecue (cooking)

    Barbecue, an outdoor meal, usually a form of social entertainment, at which meats, fish, or fowl, along with vegetables, are roasted over a wood or charcoal fire. The term also denotes the grill or stone-lined pit for cooking such a meal, or the food itself, particularly the strips of meat. The

  • barbed wire

    Barbed wire, fence wire usually consisting of two longitudinal wires twisted together to form cable and having wire barbs wound around either or both of the cable wires at regular intervals. The varieties of barbed wire are numerous, with cables being single or double, round, half-round, or flat

  • Barbegal (France)

    waterwheel: …was the grain mill at Barbegal, near Arles, France, which had 16 cascaded overshot wheels, each 7 feet (2 metres) in diameter, with wooden gearing. It is estimated that this mill could meet the needs of a population of 80,000.

  • Barbeitos, Arlindo (Angolan poet)

    Arlindo Barbeitos, Angolan poet, many of whose works, written in Portuguese, portray in a subtle manner the struggle of his people for independence as well as the essential harmony between man and nature. From 1965 to 1969 Barbeitos studied in West Germany. He returned home to teach at several

  • Barbeitos, Arlindo do Carmo Pires (Angolan poet)

    Arlindo Barbeitos, Angolan poet, many of whose works, written in Portuguese, portray in a subtle manner the struggle of his people for independence as well as the essential harmony between man and nature. From 1965 to 1969 Barbeitos studied in West Germany. He returned home to teach at several

  • barbel (fish anatomy)

    barb: …one or more pairs of barbels (slender, fleshy protuberances) near the mouth and often have large, shining scales. The species vary widely in size; certain barbs are only about 2.5–5 cm (1–2 inches) long, while the mahseer (q.v.) of India may be 2 m (6.5 feet) long. Several species are…

  • barbel (fish species)

    barb: The barbel (B. barbus) of central and western European rivers is a slender, rather elongate fish with a thick-lipped, crescent-shaped mouth and four barbels, which it uses to search out fish, mollusks, and other food along the river bottom. The barbel is greenish and usually attains…

  • barbel (fish)

    Barb, (genus Barbus), any of numerous freshwater fishes belonging to a genus in the carp family, Cyprinidae. The barbs are native to Europe, Africa, and Asia. The members of this genus typically have one or more pairs of barbels (slender, fleshy protuberances) near the mouth and often have large,

  • barbell (weight)

    weightlifting: Equipment: …modern competitive lifting is the barbell, a steel bar or rod to which cast-iron or steel disk weights are attached at each end on a revolving sleeve. The range of weights added is 25, 20, 15, 10, 5, 2.5, and 1.25 kg (55, 44, 33, 22, 11, 5.5, and 2.75…

  • Barbella, Thomas Rocco (American boxer)

    Rocky Graziano, American boxer and world middleweight champion (1947–48). In his youth Graziano was close friends with future fighter Jake La Motta, and both troubled youths attended the same juvenile reform school. Graziano was drafted during World War II, but he later deserted from the U.S. Army

  • Barbellion, Wilhelm Nero Pilate (British author)

    Bruce Frederick Cummings, English author who wrote The Journal of a Disappointed Man (1919), extracts from diaries that he had kept between 1903 and 1917. The book was immediately acclaimed upon publication, a few months before Cummings’ death, not only for providing a vivid insight into his

  • Barbelo (Gnosticism)

    gnosticism: Adversus haereses: … (eternal entity or age) named Barbelo and an unnameable Father, perhaps to be understood as female and male aspects, respectively, of the highest god. In any event, the Father and Barbelo generate a divine family of entities, each of which is a mythic personification of a divine faculty or attribute:…

  • barbelthroat carpet shark (shark)

    carpet shark: …throat of the aptly named barbelthroat carpet shark (Cirrhoscyllium expolitum).

  • barber

    Barber, a person whose primary activities in the 20th century are trimming and styling the hair of men, shaving them, and shaping their beards, sideburns, and moustaches. Barbers, or hairdressers, often provide shampooing, manicuring, hair dying, permanent waves, and shoe polishing within their

  • Barber of Bagdad, The (opera by Cornelius)

    Peter Cornelius: …Der Barbier von Bagdad (The Barber of Bagdad).

  • Barber of Seville, The (opera by Paisiello)

    Giovanni Paisiello: …Il Barbiere di Siviglia (1782; The Barber of Seville), which some consider his masterpiece, on a libretto by Giuseppe Petrosellini, after Beaumarchais’s comedy Le Barbier de Séville.

  • Barber of Seville, The (play by Beaumarchais)

    The Barber of Seville, four-act farcical drama by Pierre-Augustin Beaumarchais, performed and published in 1775 as Le Barbier de Séville; ou, la precaution inutile (“The Barber of Seville; or, The Useless Precaution”). It was the basis of the 1816 opera Il barbiere di Siviglia by Gioachino Rossini,

  • Barber of Seville, The (opera by Rossini)

    The Barber of Seville, comic opera in two acts by Italian composer Gioachino Rossini (libretto in Italian by Cesare Sterbini) that was first performed under the title Almaviva o sia l’inutile precauzione (Almaviva; or, The Useless Precaution) at the Teatro Argentina in Rome on February 20, 1816.

  • barber paradox

    foundations of mathematics: Set theoretic beginnings: …to be known as the barber paradox: A barber states that he shaves all who do not shave themselves. Who shaves the barber? Any answer contradicts the barber’s statement. To avoid these contradictions Russell introduced the concept of types, a hierarchy (not necessarily linear) of elements and sets such that…

  • barber shop quartet singing (music)

    Barbershop quartet singing, typically all-male or all-female popular choral form characterized by a capella singing, with three voices harmonizing to the melody of a fourth voice. The emphasis is on close, carefully arranged harmony, synchronization of word sounds, and the use of such devices as

  • Barber, Alice (American illustrator)

    Alice Barber Stephens, American illustrator whose work appeared regularly in the most popular books and magazines of her day. Alice Barber grew up in New Jersey and in Philadelphia. She began drawing at an early age, and in 1870, while still attending public school, she began taking classes at the

  • Barber, Bernard (American sociologist)

    drug use: The functions of psychotropic drugs: The remarks of American sociologist Bernard Barber are poignant in this regard:

  • Barber, Bill (Canadian hockey player)

    Philadelphia Flyers: …Valuable Player Bobby Clarke, winger Bill Barber, and Dave (“the Hammer”) Schultz—a rough-and-tumble winger who became the most notable enforcer on the team—Philadelphia won two Stanley Cups during this period (1974 and 1975), and the team’s bruising style of play ushered in a new era in the NHL during which…

  • Barber, John (British inventor)

    gas-turbine engine: Origins: …a system was issued to John Barber of England in 1791. Barber’s design called for separate reciprocating compressors whose output air was directed through a fuel-fired combustion chamber. The hot jet was then played through nozzles onto an impulse wheel. The power produced was to be sufficient to drive both…

  • Barber, Miller (American golfer)

    Miller Barber , (Miller Westford Barber, Jr.), American golfer (born March 31, 1931, Shreveport, La.—died June 11, 2013, Scottsdale, Ariz.), set the all-time record for playing in the most professional tournaments, with a total of 1,297 PGA Tour and Senior Tour (later the Champions Tour) starts

  • Barber, Miller Westford, Jr. (American golfer)

    Miller Barber , (Miller Westford Barber, Jr.), American golfer (born March 31, 1931, Shreveport, La.—died June 11, 2013, Scottsdale, Ariz.), set the all-time record for playing in the most professional tournaments, with a total of 1,297 PGA Tour and Senior Tour (later the Champions Tour) starts

  • Barber, Patricia (American musician)

    Patricia Barber, American jazz musician who achieved international acclaim in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Barber, the daughter of two musicians, began taking classical piano lessons at age six. She grew up in Illinois and Iowa, majored in classical music and psychology at the University of

  • Barber, Red (American broadcaster)

    Red Barber, American baseball broadcaster, who was the homespun radio and television announcer for the Cincinnati Reds (1934–39), Brooklyn Dodgers (1939–53), and New York Yankees (1954–66) professional baseball teams. Known for his integrity, Barber left the Dodgers after he was urged to make his

  • Barber, Ronde (American football player)

    Tampa Bay Buccaneers: …defensive backs John Lynch and Ronde Barber. The Bucs made four postseason appearances in the five seasons between 1997 and 2001, but the offensively limited team scored fewer than 10 points in each of its four playoff losses in that span, and Dungy was fired in early 2002 despite his…

  • Barber, Samuel (American composer)

    Samuel Barber, American composer who is considered one of the most expressive representatives of the lyric and Romantic trends in 20th-century classical music. Barber studied the piano from an early age and soon began to compose. In 1924 he entered the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia,

  • Barber, Walter Lanier (American broadcaster)

    Red Barber, American baseball broadcaster, who was the homespun radio and television announcer for the Cincinnati Reds (1934–39), Brooklyn Dodgers (1939–53), and New York Yankees (1954–66) professional baseball teams. Known for his integrity, Barber left the Dodgers after he was urged to make his

  • Barbera, Joseph (American animator)

    Joseph Roland Barbera, American motion-picture animator (born March 24, 1911, New York, N.Y.—died Dec. 18, 2006, Los Angeles, Calif.), collaborated for more than half a century with William Hanna, and the two created some of the most beloved characters on the big and small screen, including Tom (

  • Barbera, Joseph Roland (American animator)

    Joseph Roland Barbera, American motion-picture animator (born March 24, 1911, New York, N.Y.—died Dec. 18, 2006, Los Angeles, Calif.), collaborated for more than half a century with William Hanna, and the two created some of the most beloved characters on the big and small screen, including Tom (

  • Barbere, John (Scottish author)

    John Barbour, author of a Scottish national epic known as The Bruce, the first major work of Scottish literature. Records show that Barbour became archdeacon of Aberdeen while still a young man and in 1357 was granted a safe conduct by Edward III of England to study at Oxford. That same year he

  • Barberi, Domenico, Blessed (Italian mystic)

    Blessed Domenico Barberi, mystic and Passionist who worked as a missionary in England. Born a peasant and raised without any formal education, Barberi entered the Passionist order as a lay brother and was ordained a priest in 1818. In 1821, when he had finished his studies, he became lecturer in

  • Barberini family (Roman family)

    Barberini Family, an aristocratic Roman family, originally of Barberino in the Else valley; they later settled first in Florence and then in Rome, where they became wealthy and powerful. Antonio Barberini defended Florence in 1530 and then went to Rome, to which in 1555 he summoned his nephew

  • Barberini vase (ancient Roman vase)

    Portland Vase, Roman vase (1st century ad) of dark blue glass decorated with white figures, the finest surviving Roman example of cameo glass. Originally owned by the Barberini family (and sometimes called the Barberini Vase), it came into the possession of the duchess of Portland in the 18th

  • Barberini, Antonio (Roman aristocrat)

    Barberini Family: Antonio Barberini defended Florence in 1530 and then went to Rome, to which in 1555 he summoned his nephew Francesco (1528–1600), the real founder of the Barberini dynasty. Francesco and his brother Raffaelo accumulated the riches and trade advantages that became the base of the…

  • Barberini, Francesco (Roman aristocrat)

    Barberini Family: …1555 he summoned his nephew Francesco (1528–1600), the real founder of the Barberini dynasty. Francesco and his brother Raffaelo accumulated the riches and trade advantages that became the base of the Barberini power. Francesco (1597–1679) was the first cardinal nominated by his uncle Pope Urban VIII (October 1623). The second…

  • Barberini, Francesco (Roman cardinal)

    Barberini Family: …the real founder of the Barberini dynasty. Francesco and his brother Raffaelo accumulated the riches and trade advantages that became the base of the Barberini power. Francesco (1597–1679) was the first cardinal nominated by his uncle Pope Urban VIII (October 1623). The second family member Urban named cardinal was his…

  • Barberini, Maffeo (pope)

    Urban VIII, pope from 1623 to 1644. The son of an aristocratic Florentine family, Barberini filled many distinguished church appointments. He served as papal legate in France (1601) and was simultaneously appointed (1604) archbishop of Nazareth and nuncio to Paris. Pope Paul V made him cardinal in

  • Barberini, Palazzo (palace, Rome, Italy)

    Rome: The Viminal and Quirinal: The Palazzo Barberini farther up the Quirinal, constructed during 1629–33 on the site of the old Palazzo Sforza, was occupied by the Barberini family until 1949. Part of the collection of the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica (National Gallery of Ancient Art) is housed here, the rest…

  • barberry (plant)

    Barberry, any of almost 500 species of thorny evergreen or deciduous shrubs constituting the genus Berberis of the family Berberidaceae, mostly native to the North Temperate Zone, particularly Asia. Species of Oregon grape, previously included in Berberis but now assigned to the genus Mahonia, are

  • barberry family (plant)

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