You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Barnard, Chester Irving (American sociologist)

    Chester Irving Barnard, American business executive, public administrator, and sociological theorist who studied the nature of corporate organization. Although he was not himself an academic, his first book, Functions of the Executive (1938), became an essential resource in the teaching of

  • Barnard, Christiaan (South African surgeon)

    Christiaan Barnard, South African surgeon who performed the first human heart transplant operation. As a resident surgeon at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (1953–56), Barnard was the first to show that intestinal atresia, a congenital gap in the small intestine, is caused by an insufficient

  • Barnard, Christiaan Neethling (South African surgeon)

    Christiaan Barnard, South African surgeon who performed the first human heart transplant operation. As a resident surgeon at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town (1953–56), Barnard was the first to show that intestinal atresia, a congenital gap in the small intestine, is caused by an insufficient

  • Barnard, Edward Emerson (American astronomer)

    Edward Emerson Barnard, astronomer who pioneered in celestial photography and who was the leading observational astronomer of his time. In 1889 he began to photograph the Milky Way with large-aperture lenses, revealing much new detail. He discovered 16 comets and Jupiter’s fifth satellite (1892).

  • Barnard, Frederick (American educator)

    Frederick Barnard, scientist, educator, and for nearly 25 years president of Columbia College (now Columbia University) in New York City, during which time Columbia was transformed from a small undergraduate institution for men into a major university. After graduating from Yale in 1828, Barnard

  • Barnard, Frederick Augustus Porter (American educator)

    Frederick Barnard, scientist, educator, and for nearly 25 years president of Columbia College (now Columbia University) in New York City, during which time Columbia was transformed from a small undergraduate institution for men into a major university. After graduating from Yale in 1828, Barnard

  • Barnard, George Grey (American sculptor and art collector)

    George Grey Barnard, sculptor and art collector whose private medieval and Gothic art collection was integral to the formation of the Cloisters of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. He is well known for his sculptures Love and Labor: The Unbroken Law and The Burden of Life: The Broken

  • Barnard, George N. (American photographer)

    George N. Barnard, American photographer who served as the official army photographer for Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman’s Military Division of the Mississippi during the American Civil War. Barnard began producing daguerreotype photographs in his 20s, opening his first studio in Oswego, N.Y., in

  • Barnard, George Norman (American photographer)

    George N. Barnard, American photographer who served as the official army photographer for Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman’s Military Division of the Mississippi during the American Civil War. Barnard began producing daguerreotype photographs in his 20s, opening his first studio in Oswego, N.Y., in

  • Barnard, Henry (American educator)

    Henry Barnard, educator, jurist, and the first U.S. commissioner of education (1867–70). With Horace Mann he shared early leadership in improving the U.S. educational system. Born into a wealthy family, Barnard graduated from Yale in 1830 and then studied law. As a Whig member of the Connecticut

  • Barnard, Kate (American politician)

    Kate Barnard, Oklahoma welfare leader and the first woman to hold statewide elective office in the United States. Barnard began her public career as an officer of the Provident Association, an Oklahoma benevolent organization. She soon became interested in such social legislation as compulsory

  • Barnard, Lady Anne (Scottish author)

    Lady Anne Barnard, author of the popular ballad “Auld Robin Gray” (1771). In 1763 she married Sir Andrew Barnard and accompanied him to the Cape of Good Hope when he became colonial secretary there in 1797. When the Cape was ceded to Holland (1802), they settled permanently in London. “Auld Robin

  • Barnard, Robert (British writer)

    Robert Barnard, British mystery writer (born Nov. 23, 1936, Burnham-on-Crouch, Essex, Eng.—died Sept. 19, 2013, Leeds, Eng.), penned more than 40 novels and numerous short stories, the majority of them in the so-called cozy traditional genre of detective fiction most often associated with Agatha

  • Barnardo, Thomas John (British social worker)

    Thomas John Barnardo, pioneer in social work who founded more than 90 homes for destitute children. Under his direction, the children were given care and instruction of high quality despite the then unusual policy of unlimited admittance. Barnardo’s father, of an exiled Spanish Protestant family,

  • barnase (enzyme)

    bacillus: … encoding an enzyme known as barnase in B. amyloliquefaciens is of interest in the development of genetically modified (GM) plants. Barnase combined with another protein synthesized by B. amyloliquefaciens known as barstar, forming the barnase-barstar gene system, was used to develop a line of non-self-fertilizing transgenic mustard (Brassica juncea) plants…

  • Barnato Walker, Diana (British pilot)

    Diana Barnato Walker, British pilot (born Jan. 15, 1918, London, Eng.—died April 28, 2008, Surrey, Eng.), as a prominent member of the Atagirls, the women’s branch of the World War II Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA), delivered some 250 Spitfires and other planes to Royal Air Force (RAF) squadrons,

  • Barnato, Barney (British financier)

    Barney Barnato, financier, diamond magnate, and gold baron who first rivaled and then later allied with Cecil Rhodes in struggling for control in the development of the Southern African mining industry. Barnett Isaacs was the son of a Jewish shopkeeper, Isaac Isaacs, in the East End of London. In

  • Barnaul (Russia)

    Barnaul, city and administrative centre, north-central Altay kray (territory), southern Siberia, Russia. It lies on the left bank of the Ob River at its confluence with the Barnaulka River. In 1738 a silver-refining works was established and the settlement became the hub of the Altay mining region.

  • Barnave, Antoine (French politician)

    Antoine Barnave, prominent political figure of the early French Revolutionary period whose oratorical skill and political incisiveness made him one of the most highly respected members of the National Assembly. Of an upper-bourgeois Protestant family, Barnave was privately trained in law. In 1789

  • Barnave, Antoine-Pierre-Joseph-Marie (French politician)

    Antoine Barnave, prominent political figure of the early French Revolutionary period whose oratorical skill and political incisiveness made him one of the most highly respected members of the National Assembly. Of an upper-bourgeois Protestant family, Barnave was privately trained in law. In 1789

  • Barnburners (United States history)

    Locofoco Party: …Locofocos were allied with the Barnburner Democrats, who eventually left the party over the slavery-extension issue.

  • Barnegat Lighthouse (lighthouse, Long Beach, New Jersey, United States)

    Long Beach: …(19 km) southward from historic Barnegat Lighthouse (rebuilt in 1858; 165 feet [50 metres] high and near the scene of more than 200 shipwrecks in sailing-ship days), the narrow island includes a string of resorts, notably Loveladies (where there is a Foundation of Arts and Sciences), Harvey Cedars (Long Beach’s…

  • Barnénès (archaeological site, France)

    archaeology: Excavation: At Barnénès, in north Brittany, a contractor building a road got his stone from a neighbouring prehistoric cairn (burial mound) and, in so doing, discovered and partially destroyed a number of prehistoric burial chambers. The French archaeologist P.-R. Giot was able to halt these depredations and…

  • Barnes Foundation (American organization)

    Barnes Foundation, foundation established by physician Albert C. Barnes in 1922 to “promote the advancement of education and appreciation of the fine arts.” The organization operates two main campuses in Pennsylvania. (The Barnes country house, Ker-Feal, is not open to the public.) The original

  • Barnes Taeuber, Irene (American sociologist)

    Conrad Taeuber and Irene Barnes Taeuber: After he married Irene Barnes, they collaborated on their work in the field of demography and on two publications considered standard works in the field.

  • Barnes, Albert (American clergyman and writer)

    Albert Barnes, U.S. Presbyterian clergyman and writer. Of Methodist parentage, he intended to study law but, while at Hamilton College, decided to enter the Presbyterian ministry. He attended Princeton Theological Seminary and became a pastor in Morristown, N.J. In 1830 he moved to the First

  • Barnes, Albert C. (American inventor and art collector)

    Albert C. Barnes, American inventor of the antiseptic Argyrol (a mild silver protein anti-infective compound for mucous membrane tissues) and noted art collector, whose collection is a part of the Barnes Foundation Galleries. Barnes grew up in poverty in South Philadelphia but managed to attend the

  • Barnes, Albert Coombs (American inventor and art collector)

    Albert C. Barnes, American inventor of the antiseptic Argyrol (a mild silver protein anti-infective compound for mucous membrane tissues) and noted art collector, whose collection is a part of the Barnes Foundation Galleries. Barnes grew up in poverty in South Philadelphia but managed to attend the

  • Barnes, Barnabe (English poet)

    Barnabe Barnes, Elizabethan poet, one of the Elizabethan sonneteers and the author of Parthenophil and Parthenophe. Barnes was the son of Richard Barnes, bishop of Durham. He entered Brasenose College, Oxford, in 1586 but took no degree; in 1591 he joined the expedition to Normandy led by the Earl

  • Barnes, Bucky (fictional character)

    Captain America: Origins in the Golden Age: …a kid sidekick—plucky regimental mascot Bucky Barnes—and embarks on a career of enthusiastic Nazi-bashing.

  • Barnes, Clive (American theatre and dance critic)

    Clive Barnes, British-born American theatre and dance critic (born May 13, 1927, London, Eng.—died Nov. 19, 2008, New York, N.Y.), championed critical dance coverage and made the stage medium accessible to a generation of theatregoers. Following graduation from the University of Oxford, where he

  • Barnes, Djuna (American author)

    Djuna Barnes, avant-garde American writer who was a well-known figure in the Parisian literary scene of the 1920s and ’30s. Initially educated privately by her father and grandmother, Barnes attended the Pratt Institute and the Art Students League and worked as an artist and journalist. From 1913

  • Barnes, Ernest Eugene, Jr. (American artist and football player)

    Ernie Barnes, (Ernest Eugene Barnes, Jr.), American artist and football player (born July 15, 1938, Durham, N.C.—died April 27, 2009, Los Angeles, Calif.), drew inspiration from his years (1960–64) as a football player for a series of professional teams (the New York Titans, the San Diego Chargers,

  • Barnes, Ernest William (British bishop)

    Ernest William Barnes, controversial Anglican bishop of Birmingham, a leader in the Church of England modernist movement. Barnes was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he subsequently became fellow, lecturer in mathematics, and tutor. He was ordained in 1903. By 1915, when he was made

  • Barnes, Ernie (American artist and football player)

    Ernie Barnes, (Ernest Eugene Barnes, Jr.), American artist and football player (born July 15, 1938, Durham, N.C.—died April 27, 2009, Los Angeles, Calif.), drew inspiration from his years (1960–64) as a football player for a series of professional teams (the New York Titans, the San Diego Chargers,

  • Barnes, Fred (American journalist)

    The Weekly Standard: …in 1995 by William Kristol, Fred Barnes, and John Podhoretz with financial backing from Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation. The Weekly Standard largely reflected the opinions and concerns of contemporary American neoconservatives, often featuring articles on such topics as religious liberty, government regulation, and tax cuts. Although it was not widely…

  • Barnes, George (American cinematographer)
  • Barnes, George Nicoll (British labour leader)

    George Nicoll Barnes, trade-union leader, socialist, a founder (1900) and chairman (1910) of the British Labour Party, and member of David Lloyd George’s coalition ministry during World War I. A clerk in a jute mill at the age of 11, Barnes later became an engineer and was assistant secretary

  • Barnes, Graham Alvin (British musician)

    Alvin Lee, (Graham Alvin Barnes), British musician (born Dec. 19, 1944, Nottingham, Eng.—died March 6, 2013, Spain), as the lead singer and guitarist with the blues-rock band Ten Years After, wowed the massive crowd at the Woodstock Music and Art Fair in August 1969 with his scorching 11-minute

  • Barnes, Irene (American sociologist)

    Conrad Taeuber and Irene Barnes Taeuber: After he married Irene Barnes, they collaborated on their work in the field of demography and on two publications considered standard works in the field.

  • Barnes, Jake (fictional character)

    Jake Barnes, fictional character, the narrator of Ernest Hemingway’s novel The Sun Also Rises (1926). An expatriate American living in Paris in the 1920s, Jake works as a newspaper correspondent. A wound suffered in the war has rendered him impotent and unable to consummate his love for Lady Brett

  • Barnes, Julian (British author and critic)

    Julian Barnes, British critic and author of inventive and intellectual novels about obsessed characters curious about the past. Barnes attended Magdalen College, Oxford (B.A., 1968), and began contributing reviews to the Times Literary Supplement in the 1970s while publishing thrillers under his

  • Barnes, Julian Patrick (British author and critic)

    Julian Barnes, British critic and author of inventive and intellectual novels about obsessed characters curious about the past. Barnes attended Magdalen College, Oxford (B.A., 1968), and began contributing reviews to the Times Literary Supplement in the 1970s while publishing thrillers under his

  • Barnes, Pancho (American aviator)

    Pancho Barnes, aviator and movie stunt pilot, one of the first American women to establish a reputation and a business in the field of aviation. Florence Lowe was reared in an atmosphere of wealth and privilege on an estate in San Marino, California. As the granddaughter of Thaddeus Lowe, who had

  • Barnes, Peter (British playwright and screenwriter)

    Peter Barnes, British playwright and screenwriter (born Jan. 10, 1931, London, Eng.—died July 1, 2004, London), was an imaginative, thoroughly unorthodox—and often underappreciated—writer best known for the satiric play The Ruling Class (1968), which he adapted for a 1972 film starring Peter O

  • Barnes, Robert (English clergyman)

    Robert Barnes, English Lutheran who was martyred after being used by King Henry VIII to gain support for his antipapal campaign in England. Barnes, a prior of the Austin Friars at Cambridge, was early influenced by reformist views and ruined a promising academic career when on Christmas Eve, 1525,

  • Barnes, Thomas (British journalist)

    Thomas Barnes, British journalist who as editor of The Times for many years established its reputation and founded a tradition of independent journalism. The son of a solicitor, Barnes was educated at Christ’s Hospital and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. After studying in the chambers of Joseph

  • Barnes, Tracy (American aeronaut)

    balloon flight: Modern hot-air balloons: American aeronaut Tracy Barnes adapted a venting system used in parachutes to make the most important advance in safety and control of hot-air balloons since the rip panel. Barnes’s parachute top has also been used in gas balloons. His novel three-corner basket and three-point suspension distinguish his…

  • Barnes, William (English poet)

    William Barnes, English dialect poet whose work gives a vivid picture of the life and labour of rural southwestern England and includes some moving expressions of loss and grief, such as “The Wife A-Lost” and “Woak Hill.” He was also a gifted philologist, and his linguistic theories as well as his

  • Barnet (borough, London, United Kingdom)

    Barnet, outer borough of London, England, on the northwestern perimeter of the metropolis. The borough lies mostly within the historic county of Middlesex, but many of its northern districts (including New Barnet and East Barnet) belong historically to Hertfordshire. The present borough was created

  • Barnet, Battle of (English history)

    Battle of Barnet, (April 14, 1471), in the English Wars of the Roses, a momentous victory for the Yorkist king Edward IV over his Lancastrian opponents, the adherents of Henry VI. It was fought around Hadley Green, now in East Barnet, just north of London, on Easter Day. Edward, in power since

  • Barnet, Charles Daly (American musician)

    Charlie Barnet, American band leader and saxophonist of the swing jazz era. Born into a wealthy family, Barnet rejected their urging that he become a corporate lawyer and instead turned to music. He led his first band at age 16, on a transatlantic liner, and eventually made 22 such crossings; he

  • Barnet, Charlie (American musician)

    Charlie Barnet, American band leader and saxophonist of the swing jazz era. Born into a wealthy family, Barnet rejected their urging that he become a corporate lawyer and instead turned to music. He led his first band at age 16, on a transatlantic liner, and eventually made 22 such crossings; he

  • Barnet, Miguel (Cuban writer)

    Miguel Barnet, novelist, poet, ethnographer, and expert on Afro-Cuban culture. Barnet came from a prominent Cuban family of Catalan descent. He spent part of his childhood in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S., and was fluent in English. Though not a member of the Communist Party, he remained in Cuba, faithful

  • Barnets ?rhundrede (work by Key)

    Ellen Key: Barnets ?rhundrade (1900; The Century of the Child, 1909) made her world famous. This book and numerous other publications concerning the issues of marriage, motherhood, and family life were translated into many languages. In 1903 she started lecture tours abroad, particularly in Germany. She also propagated her ideas…

  • Barnett Shale (shale basin, Texas, United States)

    shale gas: Shale gas resources of the United States: These include the Barnett Shale, around Dallas–Fort Worth, Texas; the Fayetteville Shale, mainly in northern Arkansas; the Woodford Shale, mainly in Oklahoma; and the Haynesville Shale, straddling the Texas-Louisiana state line. The Barnett Shale was the proving ground of horizontal drilling and fracking starting in the 1990s; more…

  • Barnett, Etta Moten (American actress and singer)

    Etta Moten, (Etta Moten Barnett), American actress and singer (born Nov. 5, 1901, Weimar, Texas—died Jan. 2, 2004, Chicago, Ill.), was best remembered for her powerful singing performances in two 1933 films—Gold Diggers of 1933, with her emotional rendition of “Remember My Forgotten Man,” and F

  • Barnett, Gary (American football coach)

    Gary Barnett, American collegiate gridiron football coach whose on-field successes were marred by off-field controversies. Barnett attended the University of Missouri at Columbia, where he played wide receiver on the football team; he earned a bachelor’s degree in 1969. He remained at Missouri,

  • Barnett, S. H. (American script writer, director, and producer)
  • Barnett, Samuel A. (British clergyman)

    Samuel A. Barnett, Anglican priest and social reformer who founded building programs and cultural centres (notably Toynbee Hall, 1884, which Barnett served as its first warden) in London’s impoverished East End. In his teaching and writings he advanced a doctrine of Christian socialism. Barnett

  • Barnett, Samuel Augustus (British clergyman)

    Samuel A. Barnett, Anglican priest and social reformer who founded building programs and cultural centres (notably Toynbee Hall, 1884, which Barnett served as its first warden) in London’s impoverished East End. In his teaching and writings he advanced a doctrine of Christian socialism. Barnett

  • Barneville, Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de, Countess d’Aulnoy (French author)

    Marie-Catherine Le Jumel de Barneville, countess d’Aulnoy, writer of fairy tales and of novels of court intrigue, whose personal intrigues were commensurate with those described in her books. Shortly after her marriage as a young girl in 1666, Marie d’Aulnoy conspired with her mother and their two

  • Barney’s Version (novel by Richler)

    Canadian literature: Fiction: …Gursky Was Here (1989), and Barney’s Version (1997) satirize the condition and hypocrisy of modern society through black humour.

  • Barney’s Version (film by Lewis [2010])

    Paul Giamatti: …character in the dark comedy Barney’s Version (2010), based on Mordecai Richler’s novel.

  • Barney, Matthew (American artist)

    Matthew Barney, American sculptor and video artist whose five-part Cremaster film cycle was praised for its inventiveness. Some art critics considered him one of the most significant artists of his generation. Following his graduation from Yale University in New Haven, Conn. (B.A., 1989), which he

  • Barney, Natalie (American-born literary figure)

    Natalie Barney, American-born literary figure and writer who was noted for her international salon, her friendships with several writers, and her unabashed lesbianism. Barney’s mother was Alice Pike Barney, a portrait painter, her father an industrialist. At age 21, she inherited a fortune and

  • Barney, Natalie Clifford (American-born literary figure)

    Natalie Barney, American-born literary figure and writer who was noted for her international salon, her friendships with several writers, and her unabashed lesbianism. Barney’s mother was Alice Pike Barney, a portrait painter, her father an industrialist. At age 21, she inherited a fortune and

  • Barney, Nora Stanton Blatch (American civil engineer and architect)

    Nora Stanton Blatch Barney, American civil engineer, architect, and suffragist whose professional and political activities built on her family’s tradition of women leaders. Nora Stanton Blatch was the daughter of Harriot Stanton Blatch and the granddaughter of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, both of whom

  • Barnhart, Clarence Lewis (American lexicographer)

    Clarence Lewis Barnhart, U.S. lexicographer and editor (born Dec. 30, 1900, near Plattsburg, Mo.—died Oct. 24, 1993, Peekskill, N.Y.), devoted his life to the compilation and revision of dictionaries and, together with educational psychologist Edward Lee Thorndike, was a pioneer in creating r

  • Barnī, ?iyā? al-Dīn (Muslim historian)

    ?iyā? al-Dīn Baranī, the first known Muslim to write a history of India. He resided for 17 years at Delhi as nadim (boon companion) of Sultan Mu?ammad ibn Tughluq. Using mainly hearsay evidence and his personal experiences at court, Baranī in 1357 wrote the Tārīkh-e Fīrūz Shāhī (“History of Fīrūz

  • Barnsley (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Barnsley: metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of South Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, northern England. The borough encompasses in addition to Barnsley a number of smaller towns, including Cudworth, Darton, Wombwell, and Penistone, and some open countryside, including a section of the Pennines.

  • Barnsley (England, United Kingdom)

    Barnsley, town and metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of South Yorkshire, historic county of Yorkshire, northern England. The borough encompasses in addition to Barnsley a number of smaller towns, including Cudworth, Darton, Wombwell, and Penistone, and some open countryside, including a

  • Barnsley family (English craftsmen)

    furniture: 19th century: …as Ernest Gimson and the Barnsley family who, working with a few assistants, produced small quantities of high-quality handmade furniture, the craftsmanship of which has never been rivalled. The example of Morris and his followers was so widely copied on the Continent that many people believe modern furniture design originated…

  • Barnstable (county, Massachusetts, United States)

    Barnstable, county, southeastern Massachusetts, U.S. It is bounded by Cape Cod Bay to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the east, Nantucket Sound to the south, Vineyard Sound to the southwest, and Buzzards Bay to the west. The county comprises the whole of Cape Cod and its satellite islands,

  • Barnstable (Massachusetts, United States)

    Barnstable, city, Barnstable county, southeastern Massachusetts, U.S. It is situated between Cape Cod Bay and Nantucket Sound, on the “biceps” of Cape Cod. It was settled in 1638 by farmers who were attracted to the site by salt hay found in the surrounding marshes, and in 1685 it was designated

  • Barnstable, Town of (Massachusetts, United States)

    Barnstable, city, Barnstable county, southeastern Massachusetts, U.S. It is situated between Cape Cod Bay and Nantucket Sound, on the “biceps” of Cape Cod. It was settled in 1638 by farmers who were attracted to the site by salt hay found in the surrounding marshes, and in 1685 it was designated

  • Barnstaple (England, United Kingdom)

    Barnstaple, town (parish), North Devon district, administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England. It lies on the north bank of the Taw estuary, about 10 miles (16 km) from the Bristol Channel, and is the administrative centre of the district. The Taw is spanned there by a

  • barnstorming (aviation)

    Stunt flying, the performance of aerial feats requiring great skill or daring. Stunt flying as a generic term may include barnstorming (see below), crazy flying (the performance of comedic aerial routines), or any spectacular or unusual flying feat performed for film or television cameras or for

  • Barnum & Bailey Circus

    Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus: Beginnings: Barnum & Bailey: On a parallel track, in the early 1870s, James A. Bailey became a partner in the circus of which James E. Cooper was the principal owner. From 1876 to 1878 Cooper, Bailey and Co.’s Great International Circus traveled abroad, from Australia to…

  • Barnum Effect (psychology)

    Barnum Effect, in psychology, the phenomenon that occurs when individuals believe that personality descriptions apply specifically to them (more so than to other people), despite the fact that the description is actually filled with information that applies to everyone. The effect means that people

  • Barnum, P. T. (American showman)

    P.T. Barnum, American showman who employed sensational forms of presentation and publicity to popularize such amusements as the public museum, the musical concert, and the three-ring circus. In partnership with James A. Bailey, he made the American circus a popular and gigantic spectacle, the

  • Barnum, Phineas Taylor (American showman)

    P.T. Barnum, American showman who employed sensational forms of presentation and publicity to popularize such amusements as the public museum, the musical concert, and the three-ring circus. In partnership with James A. Bailey, he made the American circus a popular and gigantic spectacle, the

  • Barnwell (county, South Carolina, United States)

    Barnwell, county, southern South Carolina, U.S. It consists of a low-lying region on the Coastal Plain bordered to the northeast by the South Fork Edisto River and to the southwest by the Savannah River border with Georgia. The county is also drained by the Salkehatchie River. Wetlands and pine

  • Barnwell, John (American colonist)

    Barnwell: …region of plantations named for John Barnwell, who early in the 18th century had led settlers in subduing a Tuscarora Indian uprising. In 1865, during the American Civil War, Federal troops occupied and set fire to the county seat, the town of Barnwell.

  • barnyard grass (plant)

    Barnyard grass, (Echinochloa crus-galli), coarse tufted grass of the family Poaceae, a noxious agricultural weed. Although native to tropical Asia, barnyard grass can be found throughout the world, thriving in moist cultivated and waste areas. In many areas outside its native range, however, it is

  • barnyard millet (plant)

    Barnyard grass, (Echinochloa crus-galli), coarse tufted grass of the family Poaceae, a noxious agricultural weed. Although native to tropical Asia, barnyard grass can be found throughout the world, thriving in moist cultivated and waste areas. In many areas outside its native range, however, it is

  • Baro (Nigeria)

    Baro, town and river port, Niger State, west central Nigeria, on the Niger River, 400 miles (650 km) from the sea. Originally a small village of the Nupe people, it was selected by the British as Nigeria’s link between rail and river transport; its solid bank—rare along the Lower Niger—could be

  • Baro River (river, East Africa)

    Ethiopia: Drainage: …Ethiopia), the Tekeze, and the Baro rivers. All three rivers flow west to the White Nile in South Sudan and Sudan. The second is the Rift Valley internal drainage system, composed of the Awash River, the Lakes Region, and the Omo River. The Awash flows northeast to the Denakil Plain…

  • baro-otitis (physiology)

    Ear squeeze, effects of a difference in pressure between the internal ear spaces and the external ear canal. These effects may include severe pain, inflammation, bleeding, and rupture of the eardrum membrane. Underwater divers and airplane pilots are sometimes affected. The middle ear, the cavity

  • Barocci, Federico (Italian painter)

    Federico Barocci, leading painter of the central Italian school in the last decades of the 16th century and an important precursor of the Baroque style. Barocci studied in Urbino with Battista Franco, a follower of Michelangelo’s maniera. Although he made two visits to Rome—one in about 1550 to

  • Baroccio, Federico (Italian painter)

    Federico Barocci, leading painter of the central Italian school in the last decades of the 16th century and an important precursor of the Baroque style. Barocci studied in Urbino with Battista Franco, a follower of Michelangelo’s maniera. Although he made two visits to Rome—one in about 1550 to

  • baroceptor (physiology)

    Bainbridge reflex: Special pressure sensors called baroreceptors (or venoatrial stretch receptors) located in the right atrium of the heart detect increases in the volume and pressure of blood returned to the heart. These receptors transmit information along the vagus nerve (10th cranial nerve) to the central nervous system. This response results…

  • barochory (botany)

    fruit: Other forms of dispersal: Barochory, the dispersal of seeds and fruits by gravity alone, is demonstrated by the heavy fruits of horse chestnut.

  • Barockscholastik (philosophy)

    Scholasticism: Enduring features: …Scholasticism of the Renaissance (called Barockscholastik) and the Neoscholasticism of the 19th and 20th centuries, both of which were primarily interested in the work of Aquinas.

  • baroclinic atmosphere (meteorology)

    climate: Extratropical cyclones: …(sometimes referred to as a baroclinic zone). Cyclone development is initiated as a disturbance along the front, which distorts the front into the wavelike configuration (B; wave appearance). As the pressure within the disturbance continues to decrease, the disturbance assumes the appearance of a cyclone and forces poleward and equatorward…

  • baroclinic field of mass (oceanography)

    ocean current: Pressure gradients: This is the baroclinic field of mass, which leads to currents that vary with depth. The horizontal pressure gradient in the ocean is a combination of these two mass fields.

  • baroclinic instability (meteorology)

    atmosphere: Extratropical cyclones: …and occluded stages are called baroclinically unstable waves. Extratropical storm development is referred to as cyclogenesis. Rapid extratropical cyclone development, called explosive cyclogenesis, is often associated with major winter storms and occurs when surface pressure falls by more than about 24 millibars per day. Theoretical analysis has shown that the…

  • baroclinically unstable waves (meteorology)

    atmosphere: Extratropical cyclones: …and occluded stages are called baroclinically unstable waves. Extratropical storm development is referred to as cyclogenesis. Rapid extratropical cyclone development, called explosive cyclogenesis, is often associated with major winter storms and occurs when surface pressure falls by more than about 24 millibars per day. Theoretical analysis has shown that the…

  • Baroco (syllogistic)

    history of logic: Syllogisms: Cesare, Camestres, Festino, Baroco,

  • Baroda (India)

    Vadodara, city, east-central Gujarat state, west-central India. It is located on the Vishvamitra River about 60 miles (100 km) southeast of Ahmadabad. The earliest record of the city is in a grant or charter of 812 ce that mentions it as Vadapadraka, a hamlet attached to the town of Ankottaka. In

Your preference has been recorded
Get a Premium membership for 30% off!
Save 30% with our Memorial Day Sale!
色色影院-色色影院app下载