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  • Barring poll tax in federal elections (United States Constitution)

    Twenty-fourth Amendment, amendment (1964) to the Constitution of the United States that prohibited the federal and state governments from imposing poll taxes before a citizen could participate in a federal election. It was proposed by the U.S. Congress on August 27, 1962, and was ratified by the

  • Barringer Meteorite Crater (crater, Arizona, United States)

    Meteor Crater, rimmed, bowl-shaped pit produced by a large meteorite in the rolling plain of the Canyon Diablo region, 19 miles (30 km) west of Winslow, Arizona, U.S. The crater is 4,000 feet (1,200 metres) in diameter and about 600 feet (180 metres) deep inside its rim, which rises nearly 200 feet

  • Barrington (Rhode Island, United States)

    Barrington, town (township), Bristol county, eastern Rhode Island, U.S. The town lies on the eastern shore of Narragansett Bay just southeast of East Providence and occupies two peninsulas separated by the Barrington River. As early as 1632, Plymouth settlers had established a trading post in the

  • Barrington Island (island, Pacific Ocean)

    Santa Fe Island, one of the Galápagos Islands, in the eastern Pacific Ocean, about 600 mi (965 km) west of Ecuador. Situated halfway between San Cristóbal and Santa Cruz islands, it is south of the vortex of the archipelago, is dotted with small volcanic cones, and has an area of 7 12 sq mi (19 sq

  • Barrington, George (Irish adventurer)

    George Barrington, Irish adventurer notorious for his activities as a pickpocket in England in the 1770s and ’80s; he was falsely said to be the author of several histories of Australia. Barrington’s father was a silversmith named Henry Waldron. About 1771 young Waldron joined a troupe of actors,

  • Barrington, Lydia (American war heroine)

    Lydia Barrington Darragh, American Revolutionary War heroine who is said to have saved General George Washington’s army from a British attack. Lydia Barrington married William Darragh, a teacher, in 1753. Shortly thereafter she immigrated with her husband to the American colonies, settling in

  • barrio (anthropology)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: Social and political organization: …group referred to as a calpulli by the Aztec and translated as barrio (“ward”) by the Spaniards. Questions about the structure and function of this level of Aztec organization have caused a great deal of debate among Meso-American specialists. It is clear, however, that it was a physical and territorial…

  • Barrio Norte (area, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    Buenos Aires: City neighbourhoods: On the other hand, Barrio Norte, north of Plaza de Mayo, is an upscale area built during Argentina’s Gilded Age (the late 19th century). It is sometimes referred to as a miniature Paris. The area, which also encompasses the neighbourhoods of Palermo, Recoleta, and Retiro, was constructed around the…

  • Barrio Obrero Industrial (district, Peru)

    San Martín de Porres, distrito (district), in the Lima-Callao metropolitan area, Peru. It lies on the north bank of the Rímac River. Among the oldest and best developed of Lima’s pueblos jóvenes (young towns), San Martín de Porres is primarily a working-class residential area. It contains numerous

  • Barrio Sur (area, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    Buenos Aires: City neighbourhoods: San Telmo, or Barrio Sur, south of the Plaza de Mayo, began to be restored and gentrified in the early 1990s after nearly a century of neglect and decay. By the later part of the decade the area had become trendy and bohemian. Its numerous…

  • Barrios, Eduardo (Chilean writer)

    Eduardo Barrios, Chilean writer best known for his psychological novels. Barrios was educated in Lima and at the Chilean Military Academy in Santiago. After working as a merchant, a rubber agent, and a prospector in several Latin American countries, he settled (1913) in Santiago, where he served as

  • Barrios, José María Reina (president of Guatemala)

    Justo Rufino Barrios: His nephew José María Reina Barrios was president of Guatemala from 1892 until his assassination in 1898.

  • Barrios, Justo Rufino (president of Guatemala)

    Justo Rufino Barrios, president of Guatemala (1873–85), who carried out liberal domestic policies by dictatorial means and persistently advocated Central American unity, to be imposed by force if diplomacy proved inadequate. Trained for the law, Barrios became Guatemalan army commander and the

  • Barrios, Violeta (president of Nicaragua)

    Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, Nicaraguan newspaper publisher and politician who served as president of Nicaragua from 1990 to 1997. She was Central America’s first woman president. Chamorro, who was born into a wealthy Nicaraguan family (her father was a cattle rancher), received much of her early

  • Barris, Charles Hirsch (American television producer and host)

    Chuck Barris, American television producer and host who created the iconic 1960s game shows The Dating Game and The Newlywed Game but was perhaps best remembered as the creator and host of the comic talent show The Gong Show, which originally aired from 1976 to 1978. Barris graduated (1953) from

  • Barris, Chuck (American television producer and host)

    Chuck Barris, American television producer and host who created the iconic 1960s game shows The Dating Game and The Newlywed Game but was perhaps best remembered as the creator and host of the comic talent show The Gong Show, which originally aired from 1976 to 1978. Barris graduated (1953) from

  • barrister (English law)

    Barrister, one of the two types of practicing lawyers in England and Wales, the other being the solicitor. In general, barristers engage in advocacy (trial work) and solicitors in office work, but there is a considerable overlap in their functions. The solicitor, for example, may appear as an

  • Barro Colorado (island, Panama)

    Albert Spear Hitchcock: …1946), for the designation of Barro Colorado Island in Panama as a permanent biological preserve.

  • Barro, Jo?o de (Brazilian composer)

    Braguinha, (Carlos Alberto Ferreira Braga; Jo?o de Barro), Brazilian composer (born March 29, 1907, Gávea, Rio de Janeiro, Braz.—died Dec. 24, 2006, Rio de Janeiro), was a prolific songwriter whose music was influential in Brazil’s bossa nova and tropicália movements of the 1950s and ’60s, and he w

  • Barrocio, Federico (Italian painter)

    Federico Barocci, leading painter of the central Italian school in the last decades of the 16th century and an important precursor of the Baroque style. Barocci studied in Urbino with Battista Franco, a follower of Michelangelo’s maniera. Although he made two visits to Rome—one in about 1550 to

  • Barroco de Indias (art)

    Latin American literature: The Barroco de Indias: In poetry, the Barroco de Indias begins with a gleeful acceptance of the manner originated by Luis de Góngora y Argote, the great Spanish Baroque poet, who had brought about a veritable revolution in poetic language. Góngora’s poetry is difficult, laden with…

  • Barrois (historical county, France)

    Barrois, ancient county, then duchy, on the western frontier of Lorraine, a territory of the Holy Roman Empire, of which Barrois was long a fiefdom or holding before being absorbed piecemeal by France. The centre and capital was the town that later came to be known as Bar-le-Duc, in the modern

  • Barrón Escandón (Mexico)

    Apizaco, city, central Tlaxcala estado (state), east-central Mexico. It lies at 7,900 feet (2,400 metres) above sea level in the cool Apizaco valley of the Sierra Madre Oriental. Formerly known as Barrón Escandón, the city is a commercial, manufacturing, and transportation centre. Corn (maize),

  • Barron lock

    lock: Development of modern types.: The Barron lock (see Figure 4) had two tumblers and the key had to raise each tumbler by a different amount before the bolts could be shot. This enormous advance in lock design remains the basic principle of all lever locks.

  • Barron River (river, Australia)

    Barron River, river in northeastern Queensland, Australia, rising near Herberton in the Hugh Nelson Range of the Eastern Highlands and flowing north across the Atherton Plateau past Mareeba and then east and south through the Barron Gorge to enter the Pacific Ocean at Trinity Bay, just north of

  • Barron’s Business and Financial Weekly (American publisher)

    Clarence W. Barron, financial editor and publisher who founded Barron’s Financial Weekly. In 1875 he joined the staff of the Boston Transcript, holding positions as a reporter and as financial editor. Aware of the need for daily financial news in bulletin form, he established the Boston News Bureau

  • Barron’s Financial Weekly (American business newspaper)

    Clarence W. Barron: …editor and publisher who founded Barron’s Financial Weekly.

  • Barron, Bebe (American composer)

    Forbidden Planet: Bebe Barron composed the first such score for a feature film. (Because of a dispute with the Musician’s Union, the Barrons were credited simply with “electronic tonalities.”) Designer Robert Kinoshita, who built Robby, also created the robot on the 1960s television series Lost in Space.

  • Barron, Clarence W. (American publisher)

    Clarence W. Barron, financial editor and publisher who founded Barron’s Financial Weekly. In 1875 he joined the staff of the Boston Transcript, holding positions as a reporter and as financial editor. Aware of the need for daily financial news in bulletin form, he established the Boston News Bureau

  • Barron, Clarence Walker (American publisher)

    Clarence W. Barron, financial editor and publisher who founded Barron’s Financial Weekly. In 1875 he joined the staff of the Boston Transcript, holding positions as a reporter and as financial editor. Aware of the need for daily financial news in bulletin form, he established the Boston News Bureau

  • Barron, Louis (American composer)

    Forbidden Planet: Pioneers of electronic music Louis and Bebe Barron composed the first such score for a feature film. (Because of a dispute with the Musician’s Union, the Barrons were credited simply with “electronic tonalities.”) Designer Robert Kinoshita, who built Robby, also created the robot on the 1960s television series Lost…

  • Barros Arana, Diego (Chilean historian)

    Diego Barros Arana, Chilean historian, educator, and diplomat best known for his Historia general de Chile, 16 vol. (1884–1902; “General History of Chile”). Barros Arana originally studied for a legal career but gave up the law to pursue his interests in history and literature. In 1859 the Chilean

  • Barros, Ademar de (Brazilian politician)

    S?o Paulo: The political mix: The bon vivant Adhemar de Barros, who was the state’s appointed chief executive during 1938–41, subsequently won elections for mayor and governor on the basis of such projects as the Anchieta and Anhanguera expressways, the massive Hospital das Clínicas, the electrification of the Sorocabana railroad, and the Vila…

  • Barros, Adhemar de (Brazilian politician)

    S?o Paulo: The political mix: The bon vivant Adhemar de Barros, who was the state’s appointed chief executive during 1938–41, subsequently won elections for mayor and governor on the basis of such projects as the Anchieta and Anhanguera expressways, the massive Hospital das Clínicas, the electrification of the Sorocabana railroad, and the Vila…

  • Barros, Cristóv?o de (Brazilian leader)

    Sergipe: …subdued by the firearms of Cristóv?o de Barros, who founded the city of S?o Cristóv?o, the first capital, in 1590. In 1820 Sergipe became an independent captaincy. It became a province of the empire in 1824 and a state of the Brazilian republic in 1889.

  • Barros, Edmundo de (Brazilian army officer)

    Igua?u Falls: In 1897 Edmundo de Barros, a Brazilian army officer, envisaged the establishment of a national park at Igua?u Falls. Following boundary rectifications between Brazil and Argentina, two separate national parks were established, one by each country—Igua?u National Park (1939) in Brazil and Iguazú National Park (1934) in…

  • Barros, Jo?o de (Portuguese historian)

    Jo?o de Barros, Portuguese historian and civil servant who wrote Décadas da ásia, 4 vol. (1552–1615), one of the first great accounts of European overseas exploration and colonization. Barros was educated in the household of the Portuguese heir-apparent and became a good classical scholar. His

  • Barros, Tierra de (region, Spain)

    Badajoz: …wider central plain is the Barros Plain, the largest cereal-, wine-, and oil-producing region of Extremadura; its main centre is Almendralejo. Other regions in the province produce wool, and livestock raising is important. Industry, primarily agricultural processing (tomatoes), is concentrated in Badajoz city, Mérida, Almendralejo, and Villanueva de la Serena.…

  • Barroso, José Manuel (prime minister of Portugal)

    José Manuel Barroso, Portuguese politician who served as prime minister of Portugal (2002–04) and president of the European Commission (2004–14). Barroso was born to parents who hailed from the region of Valpa?os, one of the poorer areas of Portugal. The difficulties of growing up under the

  • Barroso, José Manuel Dur?o (prime minister of Portugal)

    José Manuel Barroso, Portuguese politician who served as prime minister of Portugal (2002–04) and president of the European Commission (2004–14). Barroso was born to parents who hailed from the region of Valpa?os, one of the poorer areas of Portugal. The difficulties of growing up under the

  • Barrot, Camille-Hyacinthe-Odilon (French politician)

    Odilon Barrot, prominent liberal monarchist under the July Monarchy in France (1830–48) and a leader of the electoral reform movement of 1847. Barrot began his career in 1814 as a barrister in the Court of Cassation. After making his name as a defender of liberals, he was elected president of the

  • Barrot, Odilon (French politician)

    Odilon Barrot, prominent liberal monarchist under the July Monarchy in France (1830–48) and a leader of the electoral reform movement of 1847. Barrot began his career in 1814 as a barrister in the Court of Cassation. After making his name as a defender of liberals, he was elected president of the

  • barrow (burial mound)

    Barrow, in England, ancient burial place covered with a large mound of earth. In Scotland, Ireland, and Wales the equivalent term is cairn. Barrows were constructed in England from Neolithic (c. 4000 bc) until late pre-Christian (c. ad 600) times. Barrows of the Neolithic Period were long and

  • Barrow (town, Alaska, United States)

    permafrost: Effects of climate: At Barrow, Alaska, U.S., the mean annual air temperature is ?12 °C (10 °F), and the thickness is 400 metres. At Fairbanks, Alaska, in the discontinuous zone of permafrost in central Alaska, the mean annual air temperature is ?3 °C (27 °F), and the thickness is…

  • Barrow Canyon (submarine canyon, Arctic Ocean)

    Barrow Canyon, submarine canyon incised into the Arctic continental shelf off Alaska. From its head in the Chukchi Sea, about 95 miles (150 km) west of Point Barrow, in water depths of about 150 feet (45 metres), the canyon trends northeast along the coast and crosses into the Beaufort Sea, north

  • Barrow Island (island, Western Australia, Australia)

    Barrow Island, Australian island in the Indian Ocean, 30 miles (50 km) off the northwest coast of Western Australia and 10 miles (16 km) southwest of the Montebello Islands. Measuring 12 by 5 miles (19 by 8 km), it has an area of 78 square miles (202 square km). It is geologically an extension of

  • Barrow’s goldeneye (bird)

    goldeneye: …the major breeding areas of Barrow’s goldeneye (B. islandica) are in northwestern North America and Iceland. Both winter mainly in northern coastal waters. Although prized as game birds because of their wariness, they are not highly desired for the table. Both species are about 46 cm (18 inches) long and…

  • Barrow, Clyde (American criminal)

    Bonnie and Clyde: Barrow had been a criminal long before he met Parker in January 1930. After 20 months in prison in 1930–32, he teamed up with Parker, and the two began a crime spree that lasted 21 months. Often working with confederates—including Barrow’s brother Buck and Buck’s…

  • Barrow, Dame Ruth Nita (governor-general of Barbados)

    Dame Nita Barrow, Barbadian public health official and diplomat (born Nov. 15, 1916, St. Lucy, Barbados—died Dec. 19, 1995, Bridgetown, Barbados), capped a long and distinguished career with her appointment in 1990 as the first woman governor-general of Barbados. Barrow, who was the sister of the c

  • Barrow, Dean (prime minister of Belize)

    Belize: Independence: The UDP, now led by Dean Barrow, triumphed in the 2008 general elections, and Barrow became the country’s first black prime minister. His party promised to end crime and government corruption and to create an elected Senate. Although a democratic tradition has been established in Belize, the country has struggled…

  • Barrow, Errol (prime minister of Barbados)

    Barbados: Barbados since independence: In 1968 Errol Barrow, who served as prime minister in 1966–76 and 1986–87, helped form the Caribbean Free Trade Association, which became the Caribbean Community and Common Market (Caricom) in 1973. The island has also established close ties with countries elsewhere in the developing world.

  • Barrow, Geoff (British musician)

    Portishead: ), producer Geoff Barrow (b. Dec. 9, 1971, Walton-in-Gordano, North Somerset, Eng.), and guitarist Adrian Utley (b. April 27, 1957, Northampton, Northamptonshire, Eng.).

  • Barrow, Henry (English religious leader)

    Henry Barrow, lawyer and early Congregationalist martyr who challenged the established Anglican church by supporting the formation of separate and independent churches in England. After leading a dissolute life as a student at the University of Cambridge, he was converted through the chance hearing

  • Barrow, Isaac (English mathematician)

    Isaac Barrow, English classical scholar, theologian, and mathematician who was the teacher of Isaac Newton. He developed a method of determining tangents that closely approached the methods of calculus, and he first recognized that what became known as the processes of integration and

  • Barrow, John D. (British astrophysicist)

    John D. Barrow, British astrophysicist who received the 2006 Templeton Prize for Progress Toward Research or Discoveries About Spiritual Realities. Barrow earned a doctorate (1977) in astrophysics at the University of Oxford, and he taught at Oxford, the University of California, Berkeley, and the

  • Barrow, John David (British astrophysicist)

    John D. Barrow, British astrophysicist who received the 2006 Templeton Prize for Progress Toward Research or Discoveries About Spiritual Realities. Barrow earned a doctorate (1977) in astrophysics at the University of Oxford, and he taught at Oxford, the University of California, Berkeley, and the

  • Barrow, Joseph Louis (American boxer)

    Joe Louis, American boxer who was world heavyweight champion from June 22, 1937, when he knocked out James J. Braddock in eight rounds in Chicago, until March 1, 1949, when he briefly retired. During his reign, the longest in the history of any weight division, he successfully defended his title 25

  • Barrow, River (river, Ireland)

    River Barrow, river rising in the Slieve Bloom mountain range in the centre of Ireland and flowing for about 120 miles (190 km) to Waterford harbour in the southeast, where it joins the Rivers Nore and Suir. From its upper mountain course in counties Laoighis and Offaly, it flows east across bogs

  • Barrow, Willie T. (American civil- rights activist)

    Willie T. Barrow, (Willie Beatrice Taplin), American civil rights activist (born Dec. 7, 1924, Burton, Texas—died March 12, 2015, Chicago, Ill.), devoted her life to championing the rights of African Americans and working to improve their circumstances, both on the front lines of public

  • Barrow-in-Furness (England, United Kingdom)

    Barrow-in-Furness, port town and borough (district), administrative county of Cumbria, historic county of Lancashire, northwestern England. It lies on the seaward side of the Furness peninsula between the estuary of the River Duddon and Morecambe Bay. A narrow channel of the Irish Sea, now bridged,

  • Barrow-in-Furness (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Barrow-in-Furness: borough (district), administrative county of Cumbria, historic county of Lancashire, northwestern England. It lies on the seaward side of the Furness peninsula between the estuary of the River Duddon and Morecambe Bay. A narrow channel of the Irish Sea, now bridged, lies between the mainland…

  • Barry (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Barry, port town, Vale of Glamorgan county, historic county of Glamorgan (Morgannwg), southern Wales. It is situated on the Bristol Channel, just west of where the channel is met by the mouth of the River Severn estuary, and is the administrative centre of Vale of Glamorgan county. Barry has

  • Barry Goldwater on conservatism

    Two years before he challenged Lyndon B. Johnson in the 1964 U.S. presidential election, Senator Barry Goldwater engaged in a debate with a fellow senator, Jacob K. Javits, in the pages of The Great Ideas Today, a Britannica publication.“Does America’s best hope for the future lie in political

  • Barry Lyndon (film by Kubrick [1975])

    Stanley Kubrick: Films of the 1970s: …passed in the preparation of Barry Lyndon (1975), which Kubrick adapted himself from William Makepeace Thackeray’s novel of the same name. Ryan O’Neal starred as the title character, an 18th-century Irish rogue who narrates his story in voice-over. Kubrick’s obsessive insistence on filming with natural lighting of the period (including…

  • Barry Lyndon (historical novel by Thackeray)

    Barry Lyndon, historical novel by William Makepeace Thackeray, first published in Fraser’s Magazine in 1844 as The Luck of Barry Lyndon: A Romance of the Last Century. The book was published in two volumes in 1852–53, and it was revised (“with admissions”) as The Memoirs of Barry Lyndon, Esq. in

  • Barry, Brent (American basketball player)

    Rick Barry: …also played professional basketball, including Brent, who was a member of two championship-winning San Antonio Spurs teams, making the Barrys the second father-son duo to capture NBA titles (preceded by Matt Guokas, Sr., and Matt Guokas, Jr., and followed by Bill Walton and Luke Walton). Barry was inducted into the…

  • Barry, Brian (British political philosopher)

    Brian Barry, British political philosopher (born Aug. 7, 1936, London, Eng.—died March 10, 2009, London), was a principal figure in the development of analytical political philosophy, which he sought to apply to fundamental moral issues. Barry was educated at Taunton’s School, Southampton, and

  • Barry, Gene (American actor)

    Gene Barry, (Eugene Klass), American actor (born June 14, 1919, New York, N.Y.—died Dec. 9, 2009, Woodland Hills, Calif.), glamorized the role of the lawman as the debonair star of the television series Bat Masterson (1958–61), in which he sported a derby hat and clobbered villains in the old West

  • Barry, James (Irish painter)

    James Barry, Irish-born artist whose major work, The Progress of Human Culture, is a series of six monumental paintings of historical and allegorical subjects done for the Great Room of the Royal Society of Arts, London. Largely a self-taught artist, Barry in 1763 attracted the patronage of his

  • Barry, Jeanne Bécu, comtesse du (mistress of Louis XV of France)

    Jeanne Bécu, countess du Barry, last of the mistresses of the French king Louis XV (reigned 1715–74). Although she exercised little political influence at the French court, her unpopularity contributed to the decline of the prestige of the crown in the early 1770s. She was born Marie-Jeanne Bécu,

  • Barry, Jeff (American songwriter)

    The Brill Building: Assembly-Line Pop: Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil, Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich, and Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman were to rock and roll what Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart and George and Ira Gershwin were to Tin Pan Alley. The difference was that the writers of Brill Building pop understood the teenage…

  • Barry, John (British composer and conductor)

    John Barry, (John Barry Prendergast), British composer (born Nov. 3, 1933, York, Eng.—died Jan. 30, 2011, Oyster Bay, Long Island, N.Y.), provided the musical scores for more than 100 motion pictures and television programs, notably 11 movies featuring Ian Fleming’s iconic spy James Bond—From

  • Barry, John (British production designer and art director)
  • Barry, John (United States naval officer)

    John Barry, American naval officer who won significant maritime victories during the American Revolution (1775–83). Because he trained so many young officers who later became celebrated in the nation’s history, he was often called the “Father of the Navy.” A merchant shipmaster out of Philadelphia

  • Barry, Marie-Jeanne Bécu, comtesse du (mistress of Louis XV of France)

    Jeanne Bécu, countess du Barry, last of the mistresses of the French king Louis XV (reigned 1715–74). Although she exercised little political influence at the French court, her unpopularity contributed to the decline of the prestige of the crown in the early 1770s. She was born Marie-Jeanne Bécu,

  • Barry, Marion (American activist and politician)

    Marion Barry, American civil rights activist and politician who served four terms as mayor of Washington, D.C. Barry received a bachelor’s degree from LeMoyne College (1958) and a master’s degree from Fisk University (1960). He was a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

  • Barry, Marion Shepilov, Jr. (American activist and politician)

    Marion Barry, American civil rights activist and politician who served four terms as mayor of Washington, D.C. Barry received a bachelor’s degree from LeMoyne College (1958) and a master’s degree from Fisk University (1960). He was a founding member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

  • Barry, Miranda (British surgeon)

    dress: Rebellion: …not allowed to become doctors, Miranda Barry dressed as a man and obtained a degree in medicine at the University of Edinburgh. She then became an army surgeon and ended her career as inspector general of military hospitals in Canada in 1857, after serving in the Crimean War.

  • Barry, Philip (American dramatist)

    Philip Barry, American dramatist best known for his comedies of life and manners among the socially privileged. Barry was educated at Yale and in 1919 entered George Pierce Baker’s Workshop 47 at Harvard. His A Punch for Judy was produced by the workshop in 1920. You and I, also written while Barry

  • Barry, Phillips (American collector)

    ballad: Theories: …forward by the American collector Phillips Barry (1880–1937) and the scholar G.H. Gerould (1877–1953), the ballad is conceded to be an individual composition originally. This fact is considered of little importance because the singer is not expressing himself individually, but serving as the deputy of the public voice, and because…

  • Barry, Richard Francis Dennis, III (American basketball player)

    Rick Barry, American professional basketball player who was one of the most prolific scorers and accurate free throw shooters in the sport’s history. In his 14 seasons playing in both the National Basketball Association (NBA) and the American Basketball Association (ABA), he was a first-team

  • Barry, Rick (American basketball player)

    Rick Barry, American professional basketball player who was one of the most prolific scorers and accurate free throw shooters in the sport’s history. In his 14 seasons playing in both the National Basketball Association (NBA) and the American Basketball Association (ABA), he was a first-team

  • Barry, Sir Charles (British architect)

    Sir Charles Barry, one of the architects of the Gothic Revival in England and chief architect of the British Houses of Parliament. The son of a stationer, Barry was articled to a firm of surveyors and architects until 1817, when he set out on a three-year tour of France, Greece, Italy, Egypt,

  • Barrymore family (American theatrical family)

    Barrymore family, U.S. theatrical family. Maurice Barrymore (orig. Herbert Blythe; 1847/49–1905) made his stage debut in London before moving to New York City (1875), where he adopted Barrymore as his stage name. He joined Augustin Daly’s company and in 1876 married Georgiana Drew, of the

  • Barrymore, Drew (American actress, producer, and director)

    Drew Barrymore, American actress, producer, and director who transitioned from child star to leading lady and was especially known for her work in romantic comedies. Barrymore comes from a long line famous actors, most notably her grandfather John Barrymore and his siblings Lionel and Ethel. She

  • Barrymore, Drew Blythe (American actress, producer, and director)

    Drew Barrymore, American actress, producer, and director who transitioned from child star to leading lady and was especially known for her work in romantic comedies. Barrymore comes from a long line famous actors, most notably her grandfather John Barrymore and his siblings Lionel and Ethel. She

  • Barrymore, Ethel (American actress)

    Ethel Barrymore, American stage and film actress whose distinctive style, voice, and wit made her the “first lady” of the American theatre. The daughter of the actors Maurice and Georgiana Drew Barrymore, Ethel made her professional debut in New York City in 1894 in a company headed by her

  • Barrymore, Georgiana (American actress)

    Georgiana Barrymore, actress and, with Maurice Barrymore, founder of the famous stage and screen family Barrymore, which occupied a preeminent position in American theatre in the first half of the 20th century. Georgiana Drew was the daughter of John Drew and Louisa Lane Drew, both distinguished

  • Barrymore, John (American actor)

    John Barrymore, American actor, called “The Great Profile,” who is remembered both for his film and stage roles as a debonair leading man and for his interpretations of William Shakespeare’s Richard III and Hamlet. (See Barrymore reading from Henry VI, Part 3.) John was born into a theatrical

  • Barrymore, John Blythe, Jr. (American actor)

    John Drew Barrymore, American actor (born June 4, 1932, Beverly Hills, Calif.—died Nov. 29, 2004, Los Angeles, Calif.), was a fourth-generation member of one of the most famous American theatrical families—and the father of actress Drew Barrymore—but lifestyle and substance-abuse difficulties p

  • Barrymore, John Drew (American actor)

    John Drew Barrymore, American actor (born June 4, 1932, Beverly Hills, Calif.—died Nov. 29, 2004, Los Angeles, Calif.), was a fourth-generation member of one of the most famous American theatrical families—and the father of actress Drew Barrymore—but lifestyle and substance-abuse difficulties p

  • Barrymore, Lionel (American actor)

    Lionel Barrymore, American stage, film, and radio actor who forged a career as one of the most important character actors of the early 20th century. Perhaps the least flamboyant member of the Barrymore acting family, he was best known to modern audiences for his performance as Mr. Potter in the

  • Barrymore, Maurice (Indian-born British actor)

    Maurice Barrymore, Indian-born British actor and sometime playwright, founder—with his wife, Georgiana Barrymore—of the renowned Barrymore theatrical family. Herbert Blythe’s father was a surveyor for the British East India Company, and the boy was sent back to England for education at Harrow and

  • bars (game)

    Prisoner’s base, children’s game in which players of one team seek to tag and imprison players of the other team who venture out of their home territory, or base. Under the name of barres, this game is mentioned in 14th-century French writings and may have been one of the most popular games in

  • Bars Fight (poem by Terry)

    Lucy Terry: …only surviving work, the poem “Bars Fight” (1746), is the earliest existing poem by an African American. It was transmitted orally for more than 100 years, first appearing in print in 1855. Consisting of 28 lines in irregular iambic tetrameter, the poem commemorates white settlers who were killed in an…

  • Barsac (district, France)

    Bordeaux wine: Sauternes and Barsac: The natural sweet wines, fruity with enduring rich flavour, of this district are usually considered among the world’s finest. To achieve their quality the grapes are left until overripe on the vines before harvesting, thus producing the ripeness known as pourriture noble, which leaves…

  • Barsbay (Mamlūk sultan)

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