You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • bellbine (plant)

    bindweed: Bellbine, or hedge bindweed (Calystegia sepium), native to Eurasia and North America, bears arrow-shaped leaves and white to pink 5-cm (2-inch) flowers. This twining perennial grows from creeping underground stems and is common in hedges and woods and along roadsides. Its range tends to coincide…

  • bellbird (bird genus)

    shrike: Bell-shrikes or bellbirds, members of the African genus Laniarius, also of the bush-shrike group, often have names imitative of the males’ notes: boubou and gonolek. They are about 20 cm (8 inches) long, plain-coloured, often with a slash of white on the wings. All black…

  • bellbird (bird)

    Bellbird, any of several unrelated birds from various locations around the world that are named for their ringing voices. Four bellbird species live in Central and South America and constitute the genus Procnias, although only one, the white bellbird (P. alba), has a call that can actually be

  • Bellboy, The (film by Lewis [1960])

    Jerry Lewis: …his own films, beginning with The Bellboy (1960). Many of his pictures employed the formula of loose strings of gags and routines centred on Lewis’s bungling character in a new job, such as the title character in The Bellboy, a Hollywood messenger in The Errand Boy (1961), and a handyman…

  • Bellcore OC-48 (optical cable)

    telecommunications media: Optical fibre channels: For example, the standard Bellcore OC-48 optical cable, used for trunking of digitized data, voice, and video signals, operates at a transmission rate of up to 2.4 gigabits (2.4 billion binary digits) per second per fibre. This is a rate sufficient to transmit the text in all the volumes…

  • Belle Assemblée, La (British magazine)

    history of publishing: Women’s magazines: …in a women’s periodical; and La Belle Assemblée (1806), which encouraged its readers to unburden themselves in its correspondence columns. These three merged in 1832, the first instance of what was to become a common occurrence, but ceased publication in 1847. Later women’s magazines included The Ladies’ Pocket Magazine (1824–40),…

  • Belle Cordière, La (French poet)

    Louise Labé, French poet, the daughter of a rope maker (cordier). Labé was a member of the 16th-century Lyon school of humanist poets dominated by Maurice Scève. Her wit, charm, accomplishments, and the freedom she enjoyed provoked unverifiable legends, such as those claiming she rode to war, was

  • Belle Dame sans merci, La (work by Chartier)

    Alain Chartier: They include La Belle Dame sans merci, Le Lay de paix (“The Lay of Peace”), and Le Bréviaire des nobles, the first of which, a tale of unrequited love, is the best known and was translated into English in the 15th century.

  • Belle Dame sans merci, La (work by Keats)

    La Belle Dame sans merci, poem by John Keats, first published in the May 10, 1820, issue of the Indicator. The poem, whose title means “The Beautiful Lady Without Pity,” describes the encounter between a knight and a mysterious elfin beauty who ultimately abandons him. It is written in the style of

  • Belle Dame sans mercy, La (work by Chartier)

    Alain Chartier: They include La Belle Dame sans merci, Le Lay de paix (“The Lay of Peace”), and Le Bréviaire des nobles, the first of which, a tale of unrequited love, is the best known and was translated into English in the 15th century.

  • Belle de jour (film by Bu?uel [1967])

    Belle de jour, (French: “Beauty of the Day”) French film drama, released in 1967, that was director Luis Bu?uel’s most commercial film and one of the most erotic movies of the 1960s, though largely devoid of nudity. Catherine Deneuve played Séverine, a beautiful, wealthy, sheltered new bride in a

  • Belle Epoque (film by Trueba [1992])
  • Belle et la bête, La (film by Cocteau [1946])

    Jean Cocteau: Filmmaking in the 1940s: …also as a director in La Belle et la bête, a fantasy based on the children’s tale, and Orphée (1949), a re-creation of the themes of poetry and death that he had dealt with in his play.

  • Belle Fourche (South Dakota, United States)

    Belle Fourche, city, seat (1894) of Butte county, western South Dakota, U.S. It lies at the confluence of the Redwater and Belle Fourche rivers, near the Wyoming border, about 60 miles (100 km) northwest of Rapid City. The geographic centre of the United States (including Alaska and Hawaii) is some

  • Belle Glade (Florida, United States)

    Belle Glade, city, Palm Beach county, south-central Florida, U.S., about 40 miles (65 km) west of West Palm Beach, near the southeastern shores of Lake Okeechobee. The area was originally inhabited by Calusa and later by Seminole Indians. A settlement was built there in 1925 and was originally

  • Belle Hélène, La (French operetta)

    French literature: Drama: La Belle Hélène (1864; Fair Helen), in which a frivolous pastiche of Classical legend is spiced by an acute satire on the manners, morals, and values of the court of Napoleon III, was the nearest thing to political satire that the French stage could boast for 20 years.

  • Belle Isle Park (park, Detroit, Michigan, United States)

    Detroit: Cultural life: Belle Isle Park, in the Detroit River, has a botanical garden, a children’s zoo, and an aquarium. The city’s professional sports teams include the Pistons of the National Basketball Association (NBA), the Tigers of Major League Baseball’s American League, the Lions of the National Football…

  • Belle Isle, Strait of (strait, Canada)

    Strait of Belle Isle, northern entrance from the Atlantic Ocean to the Gulf of St. Lawrence, eastern Canada. The strait, 90 mi (145 km) long, 10 to 17 mi wide, and lying between Newfoundland (east) and Labrador (west), is the most direct route from the St. Lawrence Seaway and Great Lakes ports to

  • Belle Laurette, La (American actress)

    Laurette Taylor, American actress who was perhaps best known for her roles in plays written by her second husband, J. Hartley Manners. Most notable was her comedic performance in Peg O’ My Heart (1912). Under the name La Belle Laurette, Taylor made her childhood stage debut in Lynn, Massachusetts.

  • Belle Noiseuse, La (film by Rivette [1991])

    Jacques Rivette: Rivette’s most critically acclaimed work, La Belle Noiseuse (1991; “The Beautiful Troublemaker”), was nominated for five César Awards as well as the Palme d’Or at the 1991 Cannes film festival, where it was given the jury Grand Prize. His other films include the highly surreal Céline et Julie vont en…

  • Belle of the Nineties (film by McCarey [1934])

    Leo McCarey: Feature films: …and with Mae West on Belle of the Nineties (1934), which was West’s final film before her screen image was tamed by the onset of the Production Code.

  • Belle Point (Arkansas, United States)

    Fort Smith, city, northern district seat (1852) of Sebastian county, western Arkansas, U.S., on the Arkansas River at the Oklahoma state line. An army fort named for General Thomas A. Smith was established on the site (known as Belle Point to early French explorers) in 1817 but remained operational

  • Belle Sauvage, La (work by Pullman)

    Philip Pullman: In 2017 Pullman released La Belle Sauvage, the first of three planned installments in his The Book of Dust series. It continues the story of Lyra, chronicling her life both before and after His Dark Materials. However, rather than describing it as a prequel or sequel, Pullman claimed that…

  • Belle Verrière, La (window, Chartres, France)

    stained glass: 12th century: …Canterbury or like the well-known Virgin and Child known as La Belle Verrière at Chartres. The most important feature of the 12th century, however, was the development of the narrative window, consisting of a series of medallions painted with pictorial subjects. This type of window was, so far as is…

  • Belle, David (parkour practitioner)

    parkour: His son David Belle is generally credited as being the father of parkour.

  • Belle, étienne de la (Italian printmaker)

    Stefano della Bella, Baroque printmaker noted for his engravings of military events, in the manner of Jacques Callot. Stefano was initially apprenticed to a goldsmith but turned to engraving, studying under Remigio Cantagallina. Through Lorenzo de’ Medici he was enabled to spend three years in

  • Belle, Raymond (firefighter)

    parkour: …during the 1940s and ’50s, Raymond Belle received instruction on Hébert’s methods while in the military, and he subsequently used that training to become an elite firefighter. He was known for his acrobatic athleticism and ability to safely and quickly move along ledges, to scale buildings without using a ladder,…

  • Belle-?le-en-Mer (island, France)

    Belle-?le-en-Mer, island off the south coast of Brittany, western France, 8 miles (13 km) southwest of Presqu’?le de Quiberon and administratively part of Morbihan département, Bretagne région. As an outpost of the mainland ports of Saint-Nazaire and Lorient, a citadel on the island was

  • Belle-Isle, Charles Fouquet, duc de, duc de Gisors (French marshal)

    Charles Fouquet, duke de Belle-Isle, marshal of France and statesman chiefly important for his role in involving France in the War of the Austrian Succession. A grandson of the notorious Nicolas Fouquet, finance minister under Louis XIV, Belle-Isle joined the army as a youth and fought in the War

  • Belle-Isle, Charles-Louis-Auguste Fouquet, duc de, duc de Gisors (French marshal)

    Charles Fouquet, duke de Belle-Isle, marshal of France and statesman chiefly important for his role in involving France in the War of the Austrian Succession. A grandson of the notorious Nicolas Fouquet, finance minister under Louis XIV, Belle-Isle joined the army as a youth and fought in the War

  • Belleau Wood, Battle of (World War I [1918])

    Battle of Belleau Wood, (1–26 June 1918), Allied victory, and the first major engagement of the U.S. army in World War I, that greatly boosted morale amid the German’s Spring Offensive. The struggle for Belleau Wood announced to the Germans that the U.S. armed forces had arrived on the Western

  • Belleau, Rémy (French poet)

    Rémy Belleau, Renaissance scholar and poet who wrote highly polished portraits known as miniatures. He was a member of the group called La Pléiade, a literary circle that sought to enrich French literature by reviving classical tradition. A contemporary of the poet Pierre de Ronsard at the Collège

  • Bellecombe, Guillaume Leonard de (French colonial administrator)
  • Bellecour (French playwright)

    Bellecour, playwright who also was one of the leading comic actors of the Comédie-Fran?aise (q.v.). The son of a portraitist, he was a painter in his youth, while concurrently appearing in various amateur theatrical productions. His success on stage caused him to set aside painting and become an

  • Bellecour, Madame (French actress)

    Madame Bellecour, French actress noted for her performances in works of Molière and Regnard. The daughter of an aged artillery captain of noble ancestry, Rose-Perrine left home at the age of 13 and took up with an itinerant comedian called Beauménard. She decided to adopt both his name and his

  • Belledonne Massif (mountain, France)

    mountain: The western segment of the system: …several crystalline massifs, including the Belledonne and Mont Blanc massifs in France and the Aare (or Aar) and Gotthard massifs in Switzerland. Moreover, with the elevation of the Alps above the Po plain of northern Italy, a southward overthrusting has carried the southern part of the Alps back onto the…

  • Belleek ware

    Belleek ware, porcelain from the factory at Belleek, in Fermanagh, Ire. (now Northern Ireland). Extensive local deposits of white feldspar and Cornish china clay and the use of skilled labour from England contributed to the early success of this factory, established by David McBinney and Robert

  • Bellefleur (work by Oates)

    American literature: New fictional modes: … (1971) and Gothic fantasy in Bellefleur (1980) before returning in works such as Marya (1986) to the bleak blue-collar world of her youth in upstate New York. Among her later works was Blonde: A Novel (2000), a fictional biography of Marilyn Monroe. While Mailer and Oates refused to surrender the…

  • Bellefontaine (Ohio, United States)

    Bellefontaine, city, seat (1820) of Logan county, west central Ohio, U.S., about 45 miles (70 km) northwest of Columbus. The site was once occupied by a Shawnee village called Blue Jacket’s Town (for a Shawnee chief who was one of the tribal leaders at the Battle of Fallen Timbers [1794]). The

  • Bellême, Robert of (Norman magnate and soldier)

    Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shropshire or Shrewsbury, Norman magnate, soldier, and outstanding military architect, who for a time was the most powerful vassal of the English crown under the second and third Norman kings, William II Rufus (died 1100) and Henry I. His contemporary reputation for

  • Bellenden Ker Range (massif, Queensland, Australia)

    Bellenden Ker Range, granitic massif, in the Eastern Highlands, northeastern Queensland, Australia, extending for 40 mi (65 km) along the coast northeast from Nerada to Gordonvale, just south of Cairns. Bounded by the Mulgrave River (east), the Innisfail Downs (south), and the Atherton Plateau

  • Bellenden, John (Scottish writer)

    John Bellenden, Scottish writer whose translation of Hector Boece’s Scotorum historiae had a profound influence on Scottish national feeling. Educated at the universities of St. Andrews (Scotland) and Paris, he was in the service of James V as clerk of accounts from the King’s earliest years and at

  • Bellerophon (fossil gastropod)

    Bellerophon, extinct genus of gastropods (snails) found as fossils in rocks from the Ordovician Period (488 million to 444 million years ago) to the Triassic Period (251 million to 200 million years ago). Bellerophon is characteristic of the bellerophontids, a large group of snails. The shell of

  • Bellerophon (Greek mythology)

    Bellerophon, hero in Greek legend. In the Iliad he was the son of Glaucus, who was the son of Sisyphus of Ephyre (traditionally Corinth). The wife of King Proetus of Argos—named Anteia (in Homer’s telling) or Stheneboea (in the works of Hesiod and later writers)—loved Bellerophon; when he rejected

  • Bellerophontes (Greek mythology)

    Bellerophon, hero in Greek legend. In the Iliad he was the son of Glaucus, who was the son of Sisyphus of Ephyre (traditionally Corinth). The wife of King Proetus of Argos—named Anteia (in Homer’s telling) or Stheneboea (in the works of Hesiod and later writers)—loved Bellerophon; when he rejected

  • Belles Heures (work by Limbourg brothers)

    Limbourg brothers: The Belles Heures (c. 1405–09) is the sole book to have been illustrated by the brothers alone (though other artists provided the calligraphy and all of the borders but that for The Annunciation). It shows the influence of the Italianate elements present in the illuminations of…

  • belles lettres (literature)

    Belles lettres, literature that is an end in itself and is not practical or purely informative. The term can refer generally to poetry, fiction, drama, etc., or more specifically to light, entertaining, sophisticated literature. It is also often used to refer to literary studies, particularly

  • Belles-Soeurs, Les (play by Tremblay)

    Canadian literature: The Quiet Revolution: …Tremblay revolutionized Quebec theatre with Les Belles-Soeurs (“The Sisters-in-Law”; Eng. trans. Les Belles-Soeurs), which was first read at the Centre d’Essai des Auteurs Dramatiques (Centre for Dramatic Authors), established in 1965 to give a forum to Quebec playwrights. The “new Quebec theatre” ushered in by Tremblay was characterized by experimental…

  • Belleuse, Albert-Ernest Carrier de (French sculptor)

    Albert Carrier-Belleuse, notable French sculptor who, in his time, was famous for the wide range of his work—from sober monuments to domestic ornaments (torchères and tabletop elements). He won critical acclaim and state patronage for such monuments as his marble Messiah of 1867 and triggered

  • Belleville (Ontario, Canada)

    Belleville, city, seat (1792) of Hastings county, southeastern Ontario, Canada, situated on the Bay of Quinte, an inlet of Lake Ontario, at the mouth of the Moira River. The site was first visited by the French explorer Samuel de Champlain in 1615; it was settled after 1776 by loyalists from the

  • Belleville (Illinois, United States)

    Belleville, city, seat (1814) of St. Clair county, southwestern Illinois, U.S. It lies east of the Mississippi River, about 16 miles (26 km) from St. Louis, Missouri. Located on bluffs forming the eastern rim of a floodplain along the Mississippi River, it was founded by George Blair of France in

  • Belleville (section, Paris, France)

    Paris: The Buttes: …19th arrondissement is known as Belleville, a formerly independent village that stretches south into the 20th arrondissement. The 20th also is home to the Ménilmontant neighbourhood and Père-Lachaise Cemetery—the site of the Federalists’ Wall (Mur des Fédérés), against which the last of the fighters of the Commune of Paris were…

  • Bellevue (Nebraska, United States)

    Bellevue, city, Sarpy county, eastern Nebraska, U.S., on the Missouri River, immediately south of Omaha. The Lewis and Clark Expedition visited the area in 1804. Established in 1822 as a fur-trading post, Bellevue is named from the French for “beautiful view.” It is the state’s oldest continuous

  • Bellevue (Washington, United States)

    Bellevue, city, King county, western Washington, U.S., on the eastern shore of Lake Washington, there bridged to Seattle. The city developed as a primarily residential part of the Puget Sound urban area but now has a bustling commercial aspect as well. Numerous retail trade centres, office

  • Bellevue Hospital (hospital, New York City, New York, United States)

    Louisa Lee Schuyler: …to her particular local interest, Bellevue Hospital. The most tangible result of that interest was the establishment of the Bellevue Training School for Nurses, which opened in 1873.

  • bellezza dell’universo, La (work by Monti)

    Italian literature: Romanticism: …yet he achieved greatness in La bellezza dell’universo (1781; “The Beauty of the Universe”), in the lyrics inspired by domestic affections, and in a translation of the Iliad, a masterpiece of Neoclassical beauty.

  • bellflower (plant)

    Bellflower, (genus Campanula), any of around 420 annual, perennial, and biennial herbs that compose the genus Campanula (family Campanulaceae). Bellflowers have characteristically bell-shaped, usually blue flowers, and many are cultivated as garden ornamentals. They are native mainly to northern

  • bellflower family (plant family)

    Campanulaceae, the bellflower family, containing 84 genera and about 2,400 species of mostly herbaceous (nonwoody) plants, many with showy, blue, bell-like flowers. The plants are mainly important as garden ornamentals. They are mostly native to cool, temperate areas but also occur on mountains in

  • Belli, Carlos Germán (Peruvian author)

    Carlos Germán Belli, Peruvian poet noted for his unique blend of precise classical expression and contemporary themes. The son of Italian immigrants, Belli was educated at the National University of San Marcos in Lima, where he earned a doctorate in literature. He spent many years transcribing

  • Belli, Giuseppe Gioacchino (Italian poet)

    Giuseppe Gioacchino Belli, poet whose satirical sonnets present a vivid picture of life in papal Rome in the early 19th century. After an unhappy childhood Belli was a clerical worker until, in 1816, marriage to a rich widow enabled him to devote much time to poetry. His conservative political

  • Belli, Melvin (American lawyer)

    Melvin Mouron Belli, U.S. lawyer (born July 29, 1907, Sonora, Calif.—died July 9, 1996, San Francisco, Calif.), was renowned for his flamboyant presentations in court and was dubbed the "King of Torts" because of the large awards he gained for clients involved in personal-injury cases. Belli was e

  • Belli, Melvin Mouron (American lawyer)

    Melvin Mouron Belli, U.S. lawyer (born July 29, 1907, Sonora, Calif.—died July 9, 1996, San Francisco, Calif.), was renowned for his flamboyant presentations in court and was dubbed the "King of Torts" because of the large awards he gained for clients involved in personal-injury cases. Belli was e

  • Belli, Pierino (Italian jurist and soldier)

    Pierino Belli, Piedmontese soldier, jurist, and an authority on the law of war who is considered one of the founders of modern international law. After serving as commander in chief of the army of the Holy Roman Empire in Piedmont, Belli was appointed (1560) a councillor of state by Emmanuel

  • bellicose termite (insect)

    instinct: Instinct as behaviour: …is the nest of the bellicose termite (named for the ferociousness of its soldier caste). These insects cultivate fungus gardens within the nest, which serve to process the dead wood upon which they feed. But the fungi generate heat and also affect the air quality by absorbing oxygen and releasing…

  • belligerency (international law)

    Belligerency, the condition of being in fact engaged in war. A nation is deemed a belligerent even when resorting to war in order to withstand or punish an aggressor. A declaration of war is not necessary to create a state of belligerency. For example, the United States and the People’s Republic

  • Belling, Rudolph (German sculptor)

    Western sculpture: Conservative reaction (1920s): Rudolph Belling abandoned the mechanization that had characterized his “Head” (1925) in favour of musculature and individual identity in his statue of “Max Schmeling” of 1929. Matisse’s reclining nudes and the “Back” series of 1929 show less violently worked surfaces and more massive and obvious…

  • Bellingham (Washington, United States)

    Bellingham, city, seat (1854) of Whatcom county, northwestern Washington, U.S. Located 18 miles (29 km) south of the Canadian border, it is situated along Bellingham Bay (named in 1792 by Captain George Vancouver for Sir William Bellingham) on the northern edge of Puget Sound. The site was settled

  • Bellingshausen Sea (sea, Antarctica)

    Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen: …for whom was named the Bellingshausen Sea, an area of the Antarctic waters.

  • Bellingshausen, Fabian Gottlieb von (Russian explorer)

    Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen, Russian explorer who led the second expedition to circumnavigate Antarctica (1819–21) and for whom was named the Bellingshausen Sea, an area of the Antarctic waters. Bellingshausen entered the Russian navy at age 10 and was an admiral and the governor of

  • Bellini (Brazilian association football player)

    Bellini, (Hilderaldo Luiz Bellini), Brazilian association football (soccer) player (born June 7, 1930, Itapira, S?o Paulo state, Braz.—died March 20, 2014, S?o Paulo, Braz.), was a solid defensive centre half for Brazil and the captain of the national team in 1958 when Brazil won its first FIFA

  • Bellini, duct of (anatomy)

    Renal collecting tubule, any of the long narrow tubes in the kidney that concentrate and transport urine from the nephrons, the chief functioning units of the kidneys, to larger ducts that connect with the renal calyces, cavities in which urine gathers until it flows through the renal pelvis and

  • Bellini, Gentile (Italian painter)

    Gentile Bellini, Italian painter, member of the founding family of the Venetian school of Renaissance painting, best known for his portraiture and his scenes of Venice. Gentile was trained by his father, Jacopo Bellini, a painter who introduced Renaissance concerns and motifs into Venice. At the

  • Bellini, Giovanni (Italian painter)

    Giovanni Bellini, Italian painter who, in his work, reflected the increasing interest of the Venetian artistic milieu in the stylistic innovations and concerns of the Renaissance. Although the paintings for the hall of the Great Council in Venice, considered his greatest works, were destroyed by

  • Bellini, Hilderaldo Luiz (Brazilian association football player)

    Bellini, (Hilderaldo Luiz Bellini), Brazilian association football (soccer) player (born June 7, 1930, Itapira, S?o Paulo state, Braz.—died March 20, 2014, S?o Paulo, Braz.), was a solid defensive centre half for Brazil and the captain of the national team in 1958 when Brazil won its first FIFA

  • Bellini, Jacopo (Italian painter)

    Jacopo Bellini, painter who introduced the principles of Florentine early Renaissance art into Venice. He was trained under the Umbrian artist Gentile da Fabriano, and in 1423 he had accompanied his master to Florence. There the progress made in fidelity to nature and in mastery of classic grace by

  • Bellini, Lorenzo (Italian physician and anatomist)

    Lorenzo Bellini, physician and anatomist who described the collecting, or excretory, tubules of the kidney, known as Bellini’s ducts (tubules). In Exercitatio anatomica de structura et usu renum (1662; “Anatomical Exercise on the Structure and Function of the Kidney”), published when he was a

  • Bellini, Vincenzo (Italian composer)

    Vincenzo Bellini, Italian operatic composer with a gift for creating vocal melody at once pure in style and sensuous in expression. His influence is reflected not only in later operatic compositions, including the early works of Richard Wagner, but also in the instrumental music of Chopin and

  • Bellinsgauzen, Faddey Faddeyevich (Russian explorer)

    Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen, Russian explorer who led the second expedition to circumnavigate Antarctica (1819–21) and for whom was named the Bellingshausen Sea, an area of the Antarctic waters. Bellingshausen entered the Russian navy at age 10 and was an admiral and the governor of

  • Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    Bellinzona, capital of Ticino canton, southern Switzerland, on the Ticino River, at the junction of roads to the St. Gotthard, Lukmanier, and San Bernardino passes, east of Locarno. Possibly of Roman origin, it was first mentioned in ad 590 and played a considerable part in the early history of

  • Belliolum (plant genus)

    Canellales: Distribution and abundance: …where it is abundant), and Belliolum (in New Caledonia and the Solomon Islands).

  • Bellis (plant genus)

    daisy: Members of the genus Bellis are perennials that have solitary flower heads borne on long stalks; the disk flowers are yellow, the ray flowers white or purple. The English daisy, B. perennis, is often used as a bedding plant. It has numerous spoon-shaped, slightly hairy leaves near its base…

  • Bellis perennis (plant)

    daisy: The English daisy, B. perennis, is often used as a bedding plant. It has numerous spoon-shaped, slightly hairy leaves near its base that form a rosette. The plant has leafless flower stalks and hairy bracts (leaflike structures) below the flower heads. Some varieties of the English…

  • Bellis, Erik (musician)

    the Mekons: Sarah Corina, Lu Edmonds, and Rico Bell (byname of Erik Bellis).

  • BellKor’s Pragmatic Chaos (international technology team)

    Netflix: …the prize was awarded to BellKor’s Pragmatic Chaos, a team made up of seven mathematicians, computer scientists, and engineers from the United States, Canada, Austria, and Israel.

  • Bellman, Carl Michael (Swedish poet and musician)

    Carl Michael Bellman, outstanding poet-musician of 18th-century Sweden, whose songs have remained popular in Scandinavia, though he is little known elsewhere. The son of a wealthy civil servant, he studied at Uppsala University and entered the government service, but his salary and a stipend from

  • Bello (Colombia)

    Bello, city, northwestern Colombia, on the Río Porce between the Cordilleras (mountains) Occidental and Central of the Andes at 4,905 feet (1,495 metres) above sea level. Formerly a commercial and manufacturing centre for a fertile agricultural region, Bello is now part of the industrial complex

  • Bello, Andrés (Venezuelan-born Chilean poet and scholar)

    Andrés Bello, poet and scholar, regarded as the intellectual father of South America. His early reading in the classics, particularly Virgil, influenced his style and theories. At the University of Venezuela in Caracas he studied philosophy, jurisprudence, and medicine. Acquaintanceship with the

  • Bello, Muhammadu (Nigeria author)

    African literature: Hausa: …year later the bureau published Muhammadu Bello’s Gandoki, in which its hero, Gandoki, struggles against the British colonial regime. Bello does in Gandoki what many writers were doing in other parts of Africa during this period: he experiments with form and content. His novel blends the Hausa oral tradition and…

  • Bello, Sir Ahmadu (Nigerian premier)

    Sokoto: The assassination of Sir Ahmadu Bello, the sardauna of Sokoto, in a military coup (1966) led by Igbo (Ibo) tribesmen provoked massacres of Igbos in the north and was a factor leading to the Nigerian civil war (1967–70). Sokoto state still contains Sokoto, one of the most senior…

  • Belloc, Hilaire (British author)

    Hilaire Belloc, French-born poet, historian, and essayist who was among the most versatile English writers of the first quarter of the 20th century. He is most remembered for his light verse, particularly for children, and for the lucidity and easy grace of his essays, which could be delightfully

  • Belloc, Joseph-Hilaire-Pierre-René (British author)

    Hilaire Belloc, French-born poet, historian, and essayist who was among the most versatile English writers of the first quarter of the 20th century. He is most remembered for his light verse, particularly for children, and for the lucidity and easy grace of his essays, which could be delightfully

  • Belloc, Marie Adelaide (British novelist)

    Marie Adelaide Lowndes, English novelist and playwright best known for murder mysteries that were often based on actual murder cases. The sister of the poet and essayist Hilaire Belloc, she received little formal education, but, because of the prominence of her family in intellectual circles, she

  • Bellocchio, Marco (Italian director)

    history of the motion picture: Italy: …Francesco Rosi (Salvatore Giuliano, 1962), Marco Bellocchio (La Cina è vicina [China Is Near], 1967), Marco Ferreri (La Grande Bouffe [Blow-Out], 1973), Ettore Scola (Una giornata speciale [A Special Day], 1977), Paolo Taviani and Vittorio Taviani (Padre padrone [Father and Master], 1977), Franco Brusati (Dimenticare Venezia [To Forget Venice], 1979),

  • Bellocq’s Ophelia (poetry by Tretheway)
  • Bellomont, earl of (colonial governor of New York)

    William Kidd: …he tried to persuade the earl of Bellomont, then colonial governor of New York, of his innocence. Bellomont, however, sent him to England for trial, and he was found guilty (May 8 and 9, 1701) of the murder of Moore and on five indictments of piracy. Important evidence concerning two…

  • Bellona (Roman goddess)

    Bellona, in Roman religion, goddess of war, identified with the Greek Enyo. Sometimes known as the sister or wife of Mars, she has also been identified with his female cult partner Nerio. Her temple at Rome stood in the Campus Martius, outside the city’s gates near the Circus Flaminius and the

  • Bellona, Temple of (ancient site, Rome, Italy)

    fetial: …land in front of the Temple of Bellona in Rome; by a legal fiction, that land was treated as belonging to the enemy. Thus the ritual limitations were overcome by such legal fictions, and the state entered into any wars that were seen to be to its advantage.

  • Bellonci, Goffredo (Italian writer)
  • Bellonci, Maria (Italian writer)
  • Bellori, Giovanni Pietro (Italian historian)

    art criticism: Art criticism in the 17th century: Programmatic theory: Art historian Giovanni Pietro Bellori similarly challenged Le Brun’s elevation of Classicism. In Le vite de’ pittori, scultori, et architetti moderni (1672; “The Lives of Modern Painters, Sculptors, and Architects”), he celebrates the rationality and Classicism of Raphael’s art, but he also argues that the irrationality and…

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载