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  • Benn, Tony (British politician)

    Tony Benn, British politician, member of the Labour Party, and, from the 1970s, unofficial leader of the party’s radical populist left. Though a fierce critic of the British class system, Benn came from a moneyed and privileged family himself. Both of his grandfathers had been members of

  • Benn, Wedgie (British politician)

    Tony Benn, British politician, member of the Labour Party, and, from the 1970s, unofficial leader of the party’s radical populist left. Though a fierce critic of the British class system, Benn came from a moneyed and privileged family himself. Both of his grandfathers had been members of

  • benne (plant)

    Sesame, (Sesamum indicum), erect annual plant of the family Pedaliaceae, grown since antiquity for its seeds, which are used as food and flavouring and from which a prized oil is extracted. Widely cultivated, the sesame plant is found in most of the tropical, subtropical, and southern temperate

  • Bennelong Point (area, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia)

    Sydney Opera House: …Opera House is situated on Bennelong Point (originally called Cattle Point), a promontory on the south side of the harbour just east of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. It was named for Bennelong, one of two Aborigines (the other man was named Colebee) who served as liaisons between Australia’s first British…

  • Bennet family (fictional characters)

    Bennet family, fictional characters in Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice (1813). Mr. Bennet is an intelligent but eccentric and sarcastic man who is fond of his two oldest daughters—especially his favourite, Elizabeth—but scorns the rest of the family. He does not care for society’s

  • Bennet, Henry (English statesman)

    Henry Bennet, 1st earl of Arlington, secretary of state under King Charles II of England from 1662 to 1674 and a leading member of Charles’s “Cabal” ministry. Besides directing foreign policy for 12 years, Arlington, by creating the nucleus of a “court party” (the future Tories) in the House of

  • Bennet, John (English composer)

    John Bennet, English composer known chiefly for his madrigals, which ranged from light and festive in character to serious and even solemn. Almost nothing is known about Bennet’s life, but the dedication in his 1599 book of madrigals suggests that he came from northwest England. In his madrigals

  • Bennet, Michael (United States senator)

    Michael Bennet, American politician and lawyer who was appointed as a Democrat to represent Colorado in the U.S. Senate in 2009 and was elected to that body the following year. He was born in New Delhi, where his father, Douglas Bennet, was working for the U.S. State Department, and the family

  • Bennet, Michael Farrand (United States senator)

    Michael Bennet, American politician and lawyer who was appointed as a Democrat to represent Colorado in the U.S. Senate in 2009 and was elected to that body the following year. He was born in New Delhi, where his father, Douglas Bennet, was working for the U.S. State Department, and the family

  • Bennett Dam (dam, British Columbia, Canada)

    Peace River: Bennett Dam (600 feet [190 m] high and 1.25 miles [2 km] long) near Hudson’s Hope, B.C., was completed, creating Williston Lake and providing the valley with hydroelectric power and flood control. The Peace is navigable from the town of Peace River, Alta., to the…

  • Bennett of Mickleham and of Calgary and Hopewell, Richard Bedford Bennett, Viscount (prime minister of Canada)

    Richard Bedford Bennett, statesman and prime minister of Canada (1930–35) during the Great Depression. Bennett graduated from Dalhousie University with a degree in law in 1893 and practiced in his native province of New Brunswick. In 1897 he moved westward and entered politics, serving in the

  • Bennett Trophy (automobile racing)

    automobile racing: Early history: …de France organized the first Bennett Trophy races in 1901, 1902, and 1903. The event was later held at the Circuit of Ireland (1903), the Taunus Rundstrecke in Germany (1904), and the Circuit d’Auvergne (1905). The unwillingness of French manufacturers to be limited to three cars led to their boycott…

  • Bennett’s chinchilla rat (rodent)

    chinchilla rat: Bennett’s chinchilla rat (A. bennetti) occupies scrub habitats in central Chile from near the coast up to 1,200 metres above sea level, occurring along with the degu (Octodon degus). The two animals are approximately the same size, and mothers and young of both species have…

  • Bennett, Alan (British playwright)

    Alan Bennett, British playwright who was best known for The Madness of George III (1991) and The History Boys (2004). His work fearlessly scrutinized the British class system, propriety, and England’s north-south cultural divide with results that were simultaneously chilling and hilarious. Bennett

  • Bennett, Arnold (British author)

    Arnold Bennett, British novelist, playwright, critic, and essayist whose major works form an important link between the English novel and the mainstream of European realism. Bennett’s father was a self-made man who had managed to qualify as a solicitor: the family atmosphere was one of sturdy

  • Bennett, Belle Harris (American church worker)

    Belle Harris Bennett, American church worker whose energetic efforts on behalf of Christian education and missions culminated in the granting of full lay status to women in the Southern Methodist Church. Bennett was educated privately in Kentucky and Ohio. She became a member of the Southern

  • Bennett, Belva Ann (American lawyer)

    Belva Ann Lockwood, American feminist and lawyer who was the first woman admitted to practice law before the U.S. Supreme Court. Belva Bennett attended country schools until she was 15 and then taught in them until her marriage in 1848 to Uriah H. McNall, who died in 1853. She then resumed teaching

  • Bennett, Bruce (American athlete and actor)

    Herman Brix, (Bruce Bennett), American athlete and actor (born May 19, 1906, Tacoma, Wash.—died Feb. 24, 2007, Santa Monica, Calif.), after winning the silver medal in shot put at the 1928 Olympic Games, went on to appear in more than 100 movies and dozens of television shows. He starred in the

  • Bennett, Constance (American actress)

    George Cukor: Early life and work: Constance Bennett starred as a waitress who rises to acting stardom while her alcoholic mentor plummets into disgrace. A Bill of Divorcement (1932) followed but was notable only as the film debut of Katharine Hepburn, with whom Cukor would collaborate nine more times.

  • Bennett, Edward H. (American urban planner)

    Daniel Burnham: Urban planner: …written with his young associate, Edward Bennett. Published by and written for the Commercial Club of Chicago, a private group of civic-minded business leaders who worked closely with Burnham on the report, the book is considered a landmark in urban planning history. It recognized the city in its context, not…

  • Bennett, Enoch Arnold (British author)

    Arnold Bennett, British novelist, playwright, critic, and essayist whose major works form an important link between the English novel and the mainstream of European realism. Bennett’s father was a self-made man who had managed to qualify as a solicitor: the family atmosphere was one of sturdy

  • Bennett, Estelle (American singer)

    Estelle Bennett, American pop singer (born July 22, 1941, New York, N.Y.—found dead Feb. 11, 2009, Englewood, N.J.), with her sister, Veronica (Ronnie) Bennett, and their cousin, Nedra Talley, formed the Ronettes, one of the premier pop girl singing groups of the early 1960s. After first gaining

  • Bennett, Floyd (American aviator)

    Floyd Bennett, American pioneer aviator who piloted the explorer Richard E. Byrd on the first successful flight over the North Pole on May 9, 1926. For this feat both Bennett and Byrd received the U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor. Floyd Bennett Airport in Brooklyn, N.Y., was named for him in 1931.

  • Bennett, Gwendolyn (American writer)

    Gwendolyn Bennett, African-American poet, essayist, short-story writer, and artist who was a vital figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Bennett, the daughter of teachers, grew up on a Nevada Indian reservation and in Washington, D.C., and Brooklyn, N.Y. She attended Columbia University and Pratt

  • Bennett, Isabel Harris (American church worker)

    Belle Harris Bennett, American church worker whose energetic efforts on behalf of Christian education and missions culminated in the granting of full lay status to women in the Southern Methodist Church. Bennett was educated privately in Kentucky and Ohio. She became a member of the Southern

  • Bennett, J. M. (Australian sergeant)

    Sir Keith Macpherson Smith and Sir Ross Macpherson Smith: Bennett and W.H. Shiers, as mechanics. They landed at Darwin, Northern Territory, on December 10. Afterward, the brothers were knighted and received a £10,000 prize.

  • Bennett, James (English potter)

    pottery: The United States: …was established in 1838 by James Bennett, an English potter. The first products made there were Rockingham and yellow-glazed ware. In the decade following the American Civil War, William Bloor, Isaac W. Knowles, and others introduced the production of whiteware. By the last decade of the 19th century, production had…

  • Bennett, James Gordon (American editor [1795-1872])

    James Gordon Bennett, Scottish-born American editor who shaped many of the methods of modern journalism. Bennett immigrated to America in the spring of 1819 and eventually settled in New York City, where he founded a school, gave lectures on political economy, and did subordinate work for the

  • Bennett, James Gordon, Jr. (American editor)

    New York Herald: Bennett’s son, James Gordon Bennett, Jr., became managing editor in 1866 and took over as editor the following year. The younger Bennett was also a gifted editor and promoter—it was he who sent Henry Morton Stanley to Africa to find the long-lost explorer and missionary David Livingstone—but…

  • Bennett, Jane (American educator and author)

    disenchantment: …theorists and philosophers such as Jane Bennett and Charles Taylor sought to question the very premises of Weber’s thesis that science serves only to disenchant the world and dispel spiritual feeling.

  • Bennett, Jay (American musician and songwriter)

    Jay Bennett, American musician and songwriter (born Nov. 15, 1963, Rolling Meadows, Ill.—found dead May 24, 2009, Urbana, Ill.), was best known for his role in shaping the sound of the alternative rock band Wilco. After recording with a number of bands, most notably the alternative rock quartet

  • Bennett, Jill (British actress)

    Jill Bennett, British actress noted for projecting emotional vulnerability and, alternatively, elegant comedy. The daughter of a rubber plantation owner in Malaya, Bennett attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London (1944–46). In 1949 she joined the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre at

  • Bennett, Joan (American actress)

    Joan Bennett, versatile American film actress. The daughter of actor Richard Bennett and sister of actresses Constance and Barbara Bennett, Joan Bennett began her film career at the age of 19. Among the most notable of her many roles during the 1930s were as a wisecracking waitress in Me and My Gal

  • Bennett, Joan Geraldine (American actress)

    Joan Bennett, versatile American film actress. The daughter of actor Richard Bennett and sister of actresses Constance and Barbara Bennett, Joan Bennett began her film career at the age of 19. Among the most notable of her many roles during the 1930s were as a wisecracking waitress in Me and My Gal

  • Bennett, Michael (American dancer and choreographer)

    Michael Bennett, American dancer, choreographer, and stage musical director. Bennett studied many styles of dance and began his career as a dancer in productions of West Side Story and Subways Are for Sleeping. His major contribution to the dance scene was as a choreographer-director of Broadway

  • Bennett, Nora Noel Jill (British actress)

    Jill Bennett, British actress noted for projecting emotional vulnerability and, alternatively, elegant comedy. The daughter of a rubber plantation owner in Malaya, Bennett attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London (1944–46). In 1949 she joined the Shakespeare Memorial Theatre at

  • Bennett, Richard Bedford (prime minister of Canada)

    Richard Bedford Bennett, statesman and prime minister of Canada (1930–35) during the Great Depression. Bennett graduated from Dalhousie University with a degree in law in 1893 and practiced in his native province of New Brunswick. In 1897 he moved westward and entered politics, serving in the

  • Bennett, Robert Russell (American composer, conductor, and orchestrator)

    Robert Russell Bennett, American composer, conductor, and Broadway orchestrator. He studied music in Berlin, London, and Paris. Beginning in the 1920s, he scored some 300 Broadway musicals over 40 years, including the works of Jerome Kern, Cole Porter, Richard Rodgers, Irving Berlin, George

  • Bennett, Ronnie (American singer)

    the Ronettes: …(byname of Veronica Bennett, later Ronnie Spector; b. August 10, 1943, New York, New York, U.S.) and Estelle Bennett (b. July 22, 1941, New York, New York—d. February 11, 2009, Englewood, New Jersey) with their cousin Nedra Talley (b. January 27, 1946, New York, New York). Their single “Be My…

  • Bennett, Roy (Zimbabwean politician)

    Morgan Tsvangirai: Prime minister in the unity government: After the jailing of Roy Bennett, a senior MDC official who was to be tried on charges that included terrorism and insurgency, in October 2009 Tsvangirai announced that the MDC would “disengage” from the unity government. Shortly after Tsvangirai’s announcement, Bennett was released on bail. The acrimonious nature of…

  • Bennett, Sir Richard Rodney (British composer)

    Sir Richard Rodney Bennett, prolific and highly versatile British composer and pianist known for his innovative approach to 12-tone and serial composition—particularly in his concert works. He also won acclaim for his film scores and was widely recognized for his solo and collaborative work as a

  • Bennett, Sir William Sterndale (British conductor)

    Sir William Sterndale Bennett, British pianist, composer, and conductor, a notable figure in the musical life of his time. In 1826 Bennett became a chorister at King’s College, Cambridge, and also entered the Royal Academy of Music to study violin, piano, and composition. In 1833 his first piano

  • Bennett, Tony (American singer)

    Tony Bennett, American popular singer known for his smooth voice and interpretive abilities with songs in a variety of genres. Bennett, the son of a grocer, spent his boyhood in Astoria, New York, studying singing and painting. At the behest of his vocal instructor, Bennett immersed himself in the

  • Bennett, Veronica (American singer)

    the Ronettes: …(byname of Veronica Bennett, later Ronnie Spector; b. August 10, 1943, New York, New York, U.S.) and Estelle Bennett (b. July 22, 1941, New York, New York—d. February 11, 2009, Englewood, New Jersey) with their cousin Nedra Talley (b. January 27, 1946, New York, New York). Their single “Be My…

  • Bennett, Willard Harrison (American physicist)

    Willard Harrison Bennett, American physicist who discovered (1934) the pinch effect, an electromagnetic process that may offer a way to magnetically confine a plasma at temperatures high enough for controlled nuclear fusion reactions to occur. Bennett attended the University of Wisconsin (M.Sc.,

  • Bennett-Coverley, Louise (Jamaican folklorist, poet, and radio and television personality)

    Louise Bennett-Coverley, (“Miss Lou”), Jamaican folklorist, poet, and radio and television personality (born Sept. 7, 1919, Kingston, Jam.—died July 26, 2006, Toronto, Ont.), was regarded by many as the “mother of Jamaican culture” for her efforts to popularize Jamaican patois and to celebrate t

  • Bennettitaceae (fossil plant family)

    Cycadeoidophyta: …two important families: Williamsoniaceae and Cycadeoidaceae (Bennettitaceae). Williamsonia, the best-known genus of its family, had a columnar trunk with frondlike leaves at branch tips; its fossil cones are not well defined. Williamsoniella, a related genus, was shrubby; fossil leaves placed in the genus Nilssoniopteris are believed to belong here. Cycadeoidea…

  • Bennettitales (fossil plant order)

    Jurassic Period: Plants: …sago palm) and the extinct cycadeoids are palmlike gymnosperms. They proliferated to such an extent that the Jurassic has been called the “Age of Cycads.” The conifers (cone-bearing plants such as modern pine trees) also made up a large part of Jurassic forests. Almost all modern conifers had originated by…

  • Bennettitophyta (fossil gymnosperm division)

    Cycadeoidophyta, an extinct division of plants with certain features in common with cycads (division Pinophyta) and grouped with them and the seed ferns (division Pteridospermophyta). Both the cycadeoids and the cycads dominated the vegetation in the Jurassic Period (199.6 million to 145.5 million

  • Benneville, George de (American religious leader)

    Universalism: …in the United States was George De Benneville (1703–93), who in 1741 migrated from Europe to Pennsylvania, where he preached and practiced medicine. The early Universalist movement was given its greatest impetus by the preaching of John Murray (1741–1815), who moved from England to colonial America in 1770. He propagated…

  • Bennigsen, Karl Wilhelm Rudolf von (German politician)

    Rudolf von Bennigsen, Hanoverian politician who combined liberalism with support for Prussian hegemony in a united Germany. After studying law at the University of G?ttingen, Bennigsen, the son of a Hanoverian major general, entered the civil service of Hanover but had to resign in 1856 in order to

  • Bennigsen, Leonty Leontyevich, Graf von (Russian general)

    Leonty Leontyevich, count von Bennigsen, general who played a prominent role in the Russian Army during the Napoleonic Wars. Having gained military experience while serving in the Hanoverian army (until 1764), Bennigsen joined the Russian Army in 1773 as a field officer and fought against the Turks

  • Bennigsen, Levin August Gottlieb Theophil von (Russian general)

    Leonty Leontyevich, count von Bennigsen, general who played a prominent role in the Russian Army during the Napoleonic Wars. Having gained military experience while serving in the Hanoverian army (until 1764), Bennigsen joined the Russian Army in 1773 as a field officer and fought against the Turks

  • Bennigsen, Rudolf von (German politician)

    Rudolf von Bennigsen, Hanoverian politician who combined liberalism with support for Prussian hegemony in a united Germany. After studying law at the University of G?ttingen, Bennigsen, the son of a Hanoverian major general, entered the civil service of Hanover but had to resign in 1856 in order to

  • Benning, Fort (fort, Georgia, United States)

    Columbus: Fort Benning (1918; named for Confederate General Henry L. Benning, a Columbus native), just to the south, is the site of the U.S. Army Infantry School and the National Infantry Museum. Columbus State University was opened in 1958. Blues singer Ma Rainey and novelist Carson…

  • Bennington (Vermont, United States)

    Bennington, town (township), one of the seats of Bennington county (the other is Manchester Village), in the southwest corner of Vermont, U.S., on the Walloomsac River between the Taconic Range and the Green Mountains. It includes the villages of Old Bennington, Bennington, and North Bennington.

  • Bennington (county, Vermont, United States)

    Bennington, county, southwestern Vermont, U.S., bordered by New York state to the west, Massachusetts to the south, and the Green Mountains to the east. The Taconic Mountains in the west are forested by hardwoods, hemlock, and white pine and are separated by a narrow valley from the Green Mountains

  • Bennington College (college, Bennington, Vermont, United States)

    Bennington College, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Bennington, Vt., U.S. Bennington is a liberal arts college comprising disciplines of literature and languages, social sciences, visual arts, music, dance, drama, and natural sciences and mathematics. In addition to

  • Bennington flag (historical United States flag)

    flag of the United States of America: The new Stars and Stripes formed part of the military colours carried on September 11, 1777, at the Battle of the Brandywine, perhaps its first such use.

  • Bennington Museum (museum, Bennington, Vermont, United States)

    Vermont: Cultural life: The Bennington Museum contains the oldest preserved Stars and Stripes carried in battle, a collection of the primitive-style paintings of Grandma Moses, and specimens produced by the large Bennington pottery industry. In Montpelier the Vermont Historical Society has created a museum inside a reconstructed Victorian landmark…

  • Bennington, Battle of (United States history [1777])

    Battle of Bennington, (August 16, 1777), in the American Revolution, victory by American militiamen defending colonial military stores in Bennington, Vermont, against a British raiding party. After capturing Fort Ticonderoga (see Siege of Fort Ticonderoga) in July 1777, the British commander,

  • Benno, Saint (German bishop)

    Saint Benno, ; canonized 1523; feast day June 16), bishop of Meissen. While a canon with the imperial collegiate church of Goslar, he was made bishop of Meissen in 1066. In the troubles between empire and papacy that followed, Benno took part against the emperor Henry IV, for which he was

  • Benny Goodman Story, The (film by Davies [1956])

    Steve Allen: …best-known screen performance was in The Benny Goodman Story (1955), in which Allen played the leading role of the legendary jazz clarinetist. A prolific author of more than 50 books, Allen wrote on such topics as politics, social criticism, music, and humour; he also wrote a series of mystery novels.…

  • Benny Goodman Trio (American music group)

    Lionel Hampton: Soon thereafter, the Benny Goodman Trio (Goodman, pianist Teddy Wilson, and drummer Gene Krupa) became a quartet with the addition of Hampton. As a member of the Goodman group for the next four years, Hampton made some of his most heralded recordings, taking memorable solos on such songs…

  • Benny’s Video (film by Haneke [1992])

    Michael Haneke: …trilogy, it was followed by Benny’s Video (1992), in which a movie-obsessed teenager commits a murder out of idle curiosity, and 71 Fragmente einer Chronologie des Zufalls (1994; 71 Fragments of a Chronology of Chance), a fractured mosaic of mundane moments that culminate in an incident of random violence. Although…

  • Benny, Jack (American comedian)

    Jack Benny, entertainer whose unusual comedic method and expert timing made him a legendary success in U.S. radio and television for more than 30 years. Benny Kubelsky was reared in Waukegan, Illinois, a small city north of Chicago, where his father operated a saloon and later a dry goods store. As

  • Benois Madonna, The (work by Leonardo da Vinci)

    Leonardo da Vinci: Painting and drawing: In the The Benois Madonna (1478–80) Leonardo succeeded in giving a traditional type of picture a new, unusually charming, and expressive mood by showing the child Jesus reaching, in a sweet and tender manner, for the flower in Mary’s hand. In the portrait Ginevra de’ Benci (c.…

  • Benois, Aleksandr Nikolayevich (Russian artist)

    Alexandre Benois, Russian theatre art director, painter, and ballet librettist who with Léon Bakst and Serge Diaghilev cofounded the influential magazine Mir iskusstva (“World of Art”), from which sprang the Diaghilev Ballets Russes. Benois aspired to achieve a synthesis of new western European

  • Benois, Alexandre (Russian artist)

    Alexandre Benois, Russian theatre art director, painter, and ballet librettist who with Léon Bakst and Serge Diaghilev cofounded the influential magazine Mir iskusstva (“World of Art”), from which sprang the Diaghilev Ballets Russes. Benois aspired to achieve a synthesis of new western European

  • Benoist, Michel (Jesuit priest)

    Chinese architecture: The Qing dynasty (1644–1911/12): …designed by the Jesuit priest Michel Benoist. Today the Yuanmingyuan has almost completely disappeared, as the foreign-style buildings were burned by the French and British in 1860. To replace it, the empress dowager Cixi greatly enlarged the new summer palace (Yiheyuan) along the shore of Kunming Lake to the north…

  • Beno?t de Sainte-Maure (French poet)

    Beno?t de Sainte-Maure, author of the Old French poem Roman de Troie. Beno?t’s poem, consisting of about 30,000 octosyllabic couplets, was probably written about 1160 and was dedicated to Eleanor of Aquitaine. A travesty of the story told in the Iliad, it is based on late Hellenistic romances by

  • Beno?t de Sainte-More (French poet)

    Beno?t de Sainte-Maure, author of the Old French poem Roman de Troie. Beno?t’s poem, consisting of about 30,000 octosyllabic couplets, was probably written about 1160 and was dedicated to Eleanor of Aquitaine. A travesty of the story told in the Iliad, it is based on late Hellenistic romances by

  • Benoit, Peter (Belgian composer)

    Peter Benoit, Belgian composer and teacher who was responsible for the modern renaissance of Flemish music. Benoit studied with Fran?ois-Joseph Fétis at the Brussels Conservatory and in 1857 won the Prix de Rome. He traveled in Germany and in 1861 went to France, where he conducted at the

  • Benoit, Peter Léonard Léopold (Belgian composer)

    Peter Benoit, Belgian composer and teacher who was responsible for the modern renaissance of Flemish music. Benoit studied with Fran?ois-Joseph Fétis at the Brussels Conservatory and in 1857 won the Prix de Rome. He traveled in Germany and in 1861 went to France, where he conducted at the

  • Benoni (South Africa)

    Benoni, town, Gauteng province, South Africa, east of Johannesburg. It is situated at 5,419 feet (1,652 m) above sea level and covers two sides of a valley that borders four lakes. Benoni was established as a mining camp after the local discovery of gold in 1887. The local mining chairman, Sir

  • Bénoué River (river, Africa)

    Benue River, river in western Africa, longest tributary of the Niger, about 673 miles (1,083 km) in length. It rises in northern Cameroon as the Bénoué at about 4,400 feet (1,340 m) and, in its first 150 miles (240 km), descends more than 2,000 feet (600 m) over many falls and rapids, the rest of

  • Bénouville (town, France)

    Bénouville, town, Normandy région, northwestern France. Located 2.4 miles (4 km) southwest of Ouistreham and 6 miles (10 km) northeast of Caen by road, it is situated at a road crossing of the Caen ship canal, which links those two cities. Early in the morning of D-Day (June 6, 1944), during the

  • Benozzo di Lese (Italian painter)

    Benozzo Gozzoli, early Italian Renaissance painter whose masterpiece, a fresco cycle in the chapel of the Medici-Riccardi Palace, Florence, reveals a new interest in nature (a careful study of realistic detail in landscape and the costumed figure) and in the representation of human features as

  • Benqi (China)

    Benxi, city, southeast-central Liaoning sheng (province), northeastern China. It is situated some 45 miles (75 km) southeast of Shenyang (Mukden) on the Taizi River. From the time of the Liao dynasty (907–1125), Benxi was the centre of a small-scale iron industry, and coal began to be mined in the

  • Bensalah, Abdelkader (Algerian politician)

    Algeria: Continued protests: …targets of the protests was Abdelkader Bensalah, the president of the legislature’s upper chamber, who was constitutionally designated to take over as interim president. Despite the protests, he became interim president on April 9. Salah continued his attempt to alleviate the ire of the protesters by cautiously managing the transition…

  • Bensch’s monias (bird)

    mesite: …a true rail), also called Bensch’s monias (Monias, or Mesoenas, benschi), inhabits brushland. All three species build platform nests low in bushes.

  • Bensch’s rail (bird)

    mesite: …a true rail), also called Bensch’s monias (Monias, or Mesoenas, benschi), inhabits brushland. All three species build platform nests low in bushes.

  • Bense, Max (German philosopher)

    computational aesthetics: History: In the 1950s German philosopher Max Bense and, independently, French engineer Abraham Moles combined Birkhoff’s work with American engineer Claude Shannon’s information theory to come up with a scientific means of attempting to understand aesthetics. The ideas of Bense, which he called information aesthetics, and Moles were influential on some…

  • Benserade, Isaac de (French author)

    Isaac de Benserade, minor French poet of the courts of Louis XIII and Louis XIV. Benserade began visiting the salon of the Marquise de Rambouillet, the literary centre of Paris, in 1634 and wrote a succession of romantic verses that won him a reputation culminating in the “sonnets controversy” of

  • benshi (Japanese theatre)

    history of the motion picture: Japan: …through the mediation of a benshi, a commentator who stood to the side of the screen and narrated the action for the audience in the manner of Kabuki theatre. The arrival of recorded sound liberated the Japanese cinema from its dependence on live narrators and was resisted by the benshi,…

  • Bensky, Larry (American journalist)

    Pacifica Radio: The 1960s through ’80s: In 1972 Larry Bensky’s live coverage of the Democratic and Republican national conventions was sent to two dozen community stations via telephone connections. By the early 1980s Pacifica was producing a daily national newscast. The production drew from correspondents around the world, including Israeli reporter Peretz Kidron,…

  • Benson, Al (American disc jockey)

    Al Benson: Critic and historian Nelson George called Al Benson, who worked at several Chicago radio stations beginning in the mid-1940s, one of the most influential black deejays of all time. While many of his African-American peers were indistinguishable from white deejays over the airwaves, Benson, who…

  • Benson, Allan L. (American politician)

    United States presidential election of 1916: Wilson’s New Freedom: …player, selected editor and writer Allan L. Benson of New York for president and fellow writer George Kirkpatrick of New Jersey for vice president. The Prohibition Party and Socialist Labor Party also put forth candidates.

  • Benson, E. F. (British writer)

    E.F. Benson, writer of fiction, reminiscences, and biographies, of which the best remembered are his arch, satirical novels and his urbane autobiographical studies of Edwardian and Georgian society. The son of E.W. Benson, an archbishop of Canterbury (1883–96), the young Benson was educated at

  • Benson, Edward Frederic (British writer)

    E.F. Benson, writer of fiction, reminiscences, and biographies, of which the best remembered are his arch, satirical novels and his urbane autobiographical studies of Edwardian and Georgian society. The son of E.W. Benson, an archbishop of Canterbury (1883–96), the young Benson was educated at

  • Benson, Edward White (archbishop of Canterbury)

    Edward White Benson, archbishop of Canterbury (1883–96), whose Lincoln Judgment (1890), a code of liturgical ritual, helped resolve the Church of England’s century-old dispute over proper forms of worship. After serving as assistant master at Rugby School, Warwickshire, from 1852 to 1858, Benson

  • Benson, Ezra Taft (American religious leader)

    Ezra Taft Benson, U.S. agronomist and religious leader (born Aug. 4, 1899, Whitney, Idaho—died May 30, 1994, Salt Lake City, Utah), as president (1985-94) of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, stressed the importance of the Book of Mormon, one of four volumes of church scripture, a

  • Benson, Frank W. (American artist)

    the Ten: Dewing, Joseph De Camp, Frank W. Benson, Willard Leroy Metcalf, Edmund Tarbell, Robert Reid, and E.E. Simmons. When Twachtman died in 1902, William Merritt Chase replaced him.

  • Benson, J. H. (American calligrapher)

    calligraphy: Revival of calligraphy (19th and 20th centuries): …La operina was translated by John Howard Benson as The First Writing Book. Benson wrote out his translation using both the layout and the writing style of the original; he included a facsimile of Arrighi’s work as well as notes on writing Arrighi’s italic.

  • Benson, Lee (American political historian)

    historiography: Political history: …systematic of these scholars was Lee Benson, author of an influential work that applied quantitative techniques to the study of Jacksonian democracy. “By 1984,” he predicted in 1966,

  • Benson, Mary (South African activist)

    Mary Benson, South African writer and antiapartheid activist (born Dec. 8, 1919, Pretoria, S.Af.—died June 20, 2000, London, Eng.), rejected her privileged upbringing as a white in South Africa to campaign against her country’s racial policies. She was a cofounder and secretary (1952–56) of the L

  • Benson, Mildred Augustine Wirt (American author)

    Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, American writer (born July 10, 1905, Ladora, Iowa—died May 28, 2002, Toledo, Ohio), as the original author of the Nancy Drew mysteries, abandoned the stereotypical view of the heroine then common and created a teenage female who was brainy, spirited, and i

  • Benson, Obie (American singer and songwriter)

    Obie Benson, (Renaldo Benson), American singer and songwriter (born June 14, 1936, Detroit, Mich.—died July 1, 2005, Detroit,), lent his powerful bass vocals to the legendary Motown group the Four Tops. Benson founded the group with Lawrence Payton, Abdul (“Duke”) Fakir, and Levi Stubbs in 1953. T

  • Benson, Renaldo (American singer and songwriter)

    Obie Benson, (Renaldo Benson), American singer and songwriter (born June 14, 1936, Detroit, Mich.—died July 1, 2005, Detroit,), lent his powerful bass vocals to the legendary Motown group the Four Tops. Benson founded the group with Lawrence Payton, Abdul (“Duke”) Fakir, and Levi Stubbs in 1953. T

  • Benson, Sir Frank (British actor)

    Sir Frank Benson, British actor-manager whose touring company and acting school were important influences on contemporary theatre. While at New College, Oxford, Benson produced Agamemnon, the first play to be performed there in the original Greek. In 1882 he made his first professional appearance

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