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  • dogwood (plant)

    Dogwood, any of the shrubs, trees, or herbs of the genus Cornus, in the dogwood family (Cornaceae), native to Europe, eastern Asia, and North America. The bunchberry (C. canadensis) is a creeping perennial herb. Flowering dogwood (C. florida), a North American species, is widely grown as an

  • dogwood anthracnose (plant disease)

    anthracnose: …of the disease, known as dogwood anthracnose, was identified in North America. Unlike other forms of anthracnose, it thrives in cool climates. Dogwood anthracnose first appeared in the Pacific Northwest and soon spread to the eastern United States, eventually resulting in severe losses to natural stands of dogwoods in mountainous…

  • dogwood family (plant family)

    Cornales: Cornaceae: Cornaceae, the dogwood family, is the largest family in the order, though it has just two genera—Cornus (65 species) and Alangium (20 species). Cornus is noted for its woody ornamental species native to both coasts of North America and to East Asia. Cornus florida…

  • dogwood order (plant order)

    Cornales, dogwood order of flowering plants, comprising six families and more than 590 species. Cornales is the basalmost order of the core asterid clade (organisms with a single common ancestor), or sympetalous lineage of flowering plants, in the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group III (APG III) botanical

  • Doh (Finno-Ugric deity)

    Finno-Ugric religion: Creation, cosmography, and cosmology: …medicine man with psychic abilities) Doh glides above the primeval sea among the water birds, asks the red-throated loon to dive for earth from the bottom of the sea, and with the earth makes an island. A rarer, but apparently ancient, myth is found among the Mansi: the god of…

  • Doha (national capital, Qatar)

    Doha, city, capital of Qatar, located on the east coast of the Qatar Peninsula in the Persian Gulf. More than two-fifths of Qatar’s population lives within the city’s limits. Situated on a shallow bay indented about 3 miles (5 km), Doha has long been a locally important port. Because of offshore

  • Dōhachi family (Japanese potters)

    pottery: Edo period (1603–1867): …plant motives, and of the Dōhachi family, famous for their overglaze decoration, are much sought after in Japan.

  • Doheny, Edward L. (American businessman)

    Los Angeles: Manufacturing: When Edward L. Doheny discovered oil under a private residence in 1892, he set off an oil-drilling spree that made Los Angeles one of the world’s major petroleum fields. Oil fostered industrialism. After the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, some of that city’s manufacturers moved their operations…

  • Doherty brothers (English tennis players)

    Doherty brothers, English tennis players who dominated the sport from 1897 to 1906. As a team, Laurie Doherty (in full Hugh Lawrence Doherty; b. Oct. 8, 1875, London, Eng.—d. Aug. 21, 1919, Broadstairs, Kent) and Reggie Doherty (in full Reginald Frank Doherty; b. Oct. 14, 1872, London, Eng.—d. Dec.

  • Doherty, Dennis (Canadian singer-songwriter)

    Denny Doherty, (Dennis Doherty), Canadian singer (born Nov. 29, 1940 , Halifax, N.S.—died Jan. 19, 2007 , Mississauga, Ont.), with John Phillips, Michelle Phillips, and (“Mama”) Cass Elliot, was a member of the original Mamas and the Papas vocal quartet, whose intricate harmonies brought them to

  • Doherty, Denny (Canadian singer-songwriter)

    Denny Doherty, (Dennis Doherty), Canadian singer (born Nov. 29, 1940 , Halifax, N.S.—died Jan. 19, 2007 , Mississauga, Ont.), with John Phillips, Michelle Phillips, and (“Mama”) Cass Elliot, was a member of the original Mamas and the Papas vocal quartet, whose intricate harmonies brought them to

  • Doherty, Henry L. (American businessman)

    Henry L. Doherty, American businessman and utilities expert who formed the holding company Cities Service Company in 1910. Doherty’s first job came at age 12 with the Columbus Gas Co. in Ohio. By the time he was 20, he had become chief engineer. Because of his knowledge of gas operations, Doherty

  • Doherty, Henry Latham (American businessman)

    Henry L. Doherty, American businessman and utilities expert who formed the holding company Cities Service Company in 1910. Doherty’s first job came at age 12 with the Columbus Gas Co. in Ohio. By the time he was 20, he had become chief engineer. Because of his knowledge of gas operations, Doherty

  • Doherty, Hugh Lawrence (English tennis player)

    Doherty brothers: Laurie held the Wimbledon record for most men’s titles altogether, with 13 between 1897 and 1905, winning British singles from 1902 to 1906. Reggie took Wimbledon singles from 1897 to 1900. The Dohertys also won the U.S. doubles championships in 1902 and 1903, and Laurie…

  • Doherty, Laurie (English tennis player)

    Doherty brothers: Laurie held the Wimbledon record for most men’s titles altogether, with 13 between 1897 and 1905, winning British singles from 1902 to 1906. Reggie took Wimbledon singles from 1897 to 1900. The Dohertys also won the U.S. doubles championships in 1902 and 1903, and Laurie…

  • Doherty, Pete (British musician)

    Kate Moss: …using drugs with her then-boyfriend Pete Doherty, a British musician. The ensuing scandal resulted in a number of her contracts being terminated. By the following year, however, after a stint in rehab, Moss was again one of the industry’s top-earning models.

  • Doherty, Peter C. (Australian scientist)

    Peter C. Doherty, Australian immunologist and pathologist who, with Rolf Zinkernagel of Switzerland, received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1996 for their discovery of how the body’s immune system distinguishes virus-infected cells from normal cells. Doherty earned bachelor’s (1962)

  • Doherty, Reggie (English tennis player)

    Doherty brothers: Reggie took Wimbledon singles from 1897 to 1900. The Dohertys also won the U.S. doubles championships in 1902 and 1903, and Laurie was the first foreigner to win the U.S. singles, in 1903.

  • Doherty, Reginald Frank (English tennis player)

    Doherty brothers: Reggie took Wimbledon singles from 1897 to 1900. The Dohertys also won the U.S. doubles championships in 1902 and 1903, and Laurie was the first foreigner to win the U.S. singles, in 1903.

  • Dohlok tinsi (film by Wong Kar-Wai [1995])

    Wong Kar-Wai: …next film, Dohlok tinsi (1995; Fallen Angels), is also structured as two stories. In the first, a dispatcher for the Triad loves the hit man she employs but almost never meets. In the second, a mute man falls for a woman obsessed with her ex-boyfriend. Fallen Angels, with its many…

  • Dohm, Christian Wilhelm von (German composer)

    Moses Mendelssohn: …conflict arose when his friend Christian Wilhelm von Dohm agreed to compose a petition for the Jews of Alsace, who originally had sought Mendelssohn’s personal intervention for their emancipation. Dohm’s über die bürgerliche Verbesserung der Juden (1781; “On the Civil Improvement of the Jews”) pleaded for emancipation but, paradoxically, added…

  • Dohnányi, Christoph von (German conductor)

    Cleveland Orchestra: (1970–72), Lorin Maazel (1972–82), Christoph von Dohnányi (1984–2002), and Franz Welser-M?st (2002– ).

  • Dohnányi, Ern? (Hungarian composer)

    Ernst von Dohnányi, Hungarian composer, pianist, and conductor, principally known for his Variations on a Nursery Song for piano and orchestra. Dohnányi studied in Budapest at the Royal Academy of Music, where his first symphony was performed in 1897. As a pianist he traveled widely and established

  • Dohnányi, Ernst von (Hungarian composer)

    Ernst von Dohnányi, Hungarian composer, pianist, and conductor, principally known for his Variations on a Nursery Song for piano and orchestra. Dohnányi studied in Budapest at the Royal Academy of Music, where his first symphony was performed in 1897. As a pianist he traveled widely and established

  • Dohrn, Bernardine (American activist)

    Weather Underground: …the SDS, was led by Bernardine Dohrn, James Mellen, and Mark Rudd and advocated street fighting as a method for weakening U.S. imperialism. At the SDS national convention in June 1969, the Third World Marxists presented a position paper titled “You Don’t Need a Weatherman to Know Which Way the…

  • Dohuk (Iraq)

    Dahūk, city, capital of Dahūk mu?āfa?ah (governorate), northern Iraq, lying near the northern end of the Tigris River valley. The area in which it is situated is unsuitable for cultivation but is good for fruit orchards and pasturage. Dahūk has a fruit-canning plant and a textile mill. It was a

  • DOI (United States government)

    U.S. Department of the Interior, executive division of the U.S. federal government responsible for most of the country’s federally owned lands and natural resources, as well as reservation communities for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Created in 1849, it encompasses the Bureau of Indian

  • Doi Inthanon (mountain, Thailand)

    Mount Inthanon, mountain in northwestern Thailand that is the country’s highest peak (8,481 feet [2,585 m]). It lies southwest of Chiang Mai, in a spur of the Danen Range between the Chaem (west) and Ping (east)

  • Doi Suthep (mountain, Thailand)

    Mount Suthep, mountain peak of northwestern Thailand, overlooking the city of Chiang Mai and rising to 5,528 feet (1,685 metres). Mount Suthep is the site of the royal resort palace and of a temple complex, Wat Phra That Doi Suthep. The mountain and temple complex are included within Mount

  • Doi Takako (Japanese politician)

    Doi Takako, Japanese politician, educator, and head (1986–91) of the Japan Socialist Party (JSP; in 1991–96 called the Social Democratic Party of Japan [SDPJ], later simplified to Social Democratic Party). She was the first woman ever to head a political party in Japan. Doi attended Dōshisha

  • Doi, Takeo (Japanese psychiatrist)

    Takeo Doi, Japanese psychiatrist (born March 17, 1920, Tokyo, Japan—died July 5, 2009, Tokyo), broke ground with his best-selling book Amae no kōzō (1971; The Anatomy of Dependence, 1973), as perhaps the first Japanese expert to analyze the Japanese idea of amae (“indulgent dependency”) and the

  • Doinel, Antoine (fictional character)

    Jean-Pierre Léaud: …to play the misunderstood adolescent Antoine Doinel in Fran?ois Truffaut’s first feature-length film, Les Quatre Cents Coups (1959; The 400 Blows). Léaud appeared in four more Truffaut films which traced Doinel’s progress through physical maturity, courtship, marriage, fatherhood, and finally divorce: L’Amour à vingt ans (1962; Love at Twenty), Baisers…

  • Doing Things With Texts (work by Abrams)

    M.H. Abrams: …these and related subjects in Doing Things with Texts (1989). He was the general editor (1962–2000) of The Norton Anthology of English Literature before ceding the position to American scholar Stephen Greenblatt for the eighth edition, published in 2005. The Fourth Dimension of a Poem, and Other Essays (2012)—the title…

  • Doiran, Lake (lake, southern Europe)

    North Macedonia: Drainage: …of this basin drain into Lake Doiran (Macedonian: Dojran) and into the Aegean via the Strumica and Struma rivers. The remainder of North Macedonia drains northward via the Crni Drim River toward the Adriatic Sea.

  • Doire (Northern Ireland, United Kingdom)

    Londonderry, city and former district (1973–2015), now in Derry City and Strabane district, northwestern Northern Ireland. It is Northern Ireland’s second most populous city. Long part of the former County Londonderry, the old city and adjacent urban and rural areas were administratively merged in

  • Doisneau, Robert (French photographer)

    Robert Doisneau, French photographer noted for his poetic approach to street photography. As a young man Doisneau attended the école Estienne in Paris to learn the crafts involved in the book trade, but he always claimed that the streets of the working class neighbourhood of Gentilly provided his

  • Doisy, Edward Adelbert (American biochemist)

    Edward Adelbert Doisy, American biochemist who shared the 1943 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine with Henrik Dam for his isolation and synthesis of the antihemorrhagic vitamin K (1939), used in medicine and surgery. Doisy earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of Illinois

  • DOJ (United States government)

    U.S. Department of Justice, executive division of the U.S. federal government responsible for law enforcement. Headed by the U.S. attorney general, it investigates and prosecutes cases under federal antitrust, civil-rights, criminal, tax, and environmental laws. It controls the Federal Bureau of

  • Dōji kun (work by Kaibara)

    Kaibara Ekken: In his Dōji kun (“Instructions for Children”), Kaibara tells parents to severely discipline their children, who must blindly and respectfully accept all that parents tell them, whether it is right or wrong. To Kaibara is usually attributed Onna daigaku (“The Great Learning for Women”), long considered the…

  • Dojran, Lake (lake, southern Europe)

    North Macedonia: Drainage: …of this basin drain into Lake Doiran (Macedonian: Dojran) and into the Aegean via the Strumica and Struma rivers. The remainder of North Macedonia drains northward via the Crni Drim River toward the Adriatic Sea.

  • Doke, Clement (South African scholar)

    Bantu languages: …descriptive work carried out by Clement Doke and the Department of Bantu Studies at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa, in the period 1923–53. A monumental four-volume classification of Bantu languages, Comparative Bantu (1967–71), which was written by Malcolm Guthrie, has become the standard reference book used by most scholars—including…

  • Dokfa nai meuman (film by Weerasethakul [2000])

    Apichatpong Weerasethakul: …was Dokfa nai meuman (2000; Mysterious Object at Noon). Its structure was based on Exquisite Corpse, a parlour game adapted by the Surrealists in the early 20th century in which each player contributed to the making of a sentence without knowing what preceding players had written. For Mysterious Object Weerasethakul…

  • dokimasia (ancient Greece)

    archon: …to undergo an examination (dokimasia) by the Boule and the law courts of birth qualifications, physical fitness, treatment of parents, and military activity; at the end of their term, they underwent an examination (euthyna) of their conduct, especially financial, while in office. Membership was originally open only to nobles…

  • Dokkōsai (Japanese scholar)

    Hayashi Razan: …as chief official scholar; and Dokkōsai, Hayashi’s fourth son (also called Morikatsu), was also employed by the shogunate. During their father’s lifetime they collaborated with him in compiling histories; and after his death they assembled the Hayashi Razan bunshū (“Collected Works of Hayashi Razan”) and the Razan Sensei shishū (“Master…

  • Dokō Toshio (Japanese businessman)

    Dokō Toshio, Japanese businessman who was instrumental in revitalizing Japanese manufacturing after World War II, notably with the Toshiba Corporation and as chairman of Keidanren (1974–80), one of Japan’s main business organizations. After graduating from Tokyo Technical Higher School (1920;

  • Doktor Bürgers Ende (novel by Carossa)

    Hans Carossa: His first novel, Doktor Bürgers Ende (1913; “The End of Doctor Bürger”; revised and republished in 1930 as Die Schicksale Doktor Bürgers, “The Fortunes of Doctor Bürger”), in which a young doctor, driven to despair by the suffering around him, commits suicide when he fails to save the…

  • Doktor Faust (opera by Busoni)

    Ferruccio Busoni: …work was the unfinished opera Doktor Faust, based not on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s work but on earlier versions of the Faust legend. It was completed by his pupil Philipp Jarnach and performed in Dresden in 1925. Two other short operas, Arlecchino and Turandot, composed at Zürich, attempted to revive…

  • Doktor Faustus: Das Leben des deutschen Tonsetzers Adrian Leverkühn, erz?hlt von einem Freunde (novel by Mann)

    Doctor Faustus, novel by German writer Thomas Mann, published in 1947. It is a reworking of the Faust legend in the form of a biography of a fictional 20th-century composer. Doctor Faustus is the story of the rise and fall of Adrian Leverkühn, and it is told through the eyes of his friend, Serenus

  • Doktor und Apotheker (opera by Ditters von Dittersdorf)

    Carl Ditters von Dittersdorf: …several operas, three of which, Doktor und Apotheker (1786; “Doctor and Apothecary”), Hieronymus Knicker (1789), and Das rote K?ppchen (1790; “The Little Red Hood”), had great success. Doktor und Apotheker, in particular, became one of the classic examples of the German singspiel. He also wrote a large quantity of instrumental…

  • Doktorns pojk’? (work by Anckarsvard)

    children's literature: National and modern literature: , Doctor’s Boy, 1965) is a quietly moving tale of small-town life in the horse-and-buggy days. The Sandbergs, Inger and Lasse, have advanced the Beskow tradition in a series of lovely picture books. Fantasy has been well served by Lindgren, Edith Unnerstad, Holmberg, Hellsing, and others.…

  • Dokuchayev, Vasily Vasilyevich (Russian ecologist)

    Vasily Vasilyevich Dokuchayev, Russian geomorphologist and early soil scientist. In 1872 Dokuchayev became curator of geology at the University of St. Petersburg; in 1879 he joined the geology faculty and instituted the first course in Quaternary geology taught at a university. From 1892 to 1895 he

  • Dōkyō (Japanese Buddhist priest)

    Dōkyō, Japanese Buddhist priest who attempted to usurp the Japanese imperial throne. In 761 Dōkyō won the confidence of the former empress Kōken (who had occupied the throne from 749 to 758) and, according to some accounts, became her lover. With the empress’s aid he began to exercise a dominant

  • Dōkyō (Japanese religion)

    Dōkyō, (from Chinese Tao-chiao, “Teaching of the Way”), popular or religious Taoism, as distinguished from philosophical Taoism, as introduced into Japan from China. It was the source of many widespread Japanese folk beliefs and practices of divination and magic, some of which persist into modern

  • D?kyu (mountain, South Korea)

    Sobaek Mountains: … (2,437 ft), Songni (3,468 ft), D?kyu (5,276 ft), and Baegun (4,190 ft), are watersheds for southern South Korea. Chiri-san (6,283 ft), on its southwestern branch, is a national park.

  • DOL (United States government)

    U.S. Department of Labor, executive division of the U.S. federal government responsible for enforcing labour statutes and promoting the general welfare of U.S. wage earners. Established in 1913, it controls the Employment Standards Administration, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration,

  • Dolabella, Publius Cornelius (Roman official)

    Gaius Cassius Longinus: …a large army and defeated Publius Cornelius Dolabella, to whom the province had been assigned by the Senate. When in 43 the Caesarian leaders Mark Antony, Octavian (later the emperor Augustus), and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus formed the Second Triumvirate, Cassius and his fellow conspirator, Brutus, combined their armies, crossed the…

  • Dolayatra (Hindu festival)

    Holi: In the Dolayatra (“Swing Festival”), images of the gods are placed on decorated platforms and are swung to the accompaniment of cycles of songs sung only in the spring season. In many locales, celebrants kindle an early morning bonfire that represents the burning of the demoness Holika…

  • Dolby noise-reduction system (recording)

    sound recording: The audiotape: …most prevalent of which is Dolby noise reduction. In the Dolby system the higher-frequency components of a sound wave are amplified before the signal is impressed on the tape so that their amplitudes are well above the amplitude of the tape hiss. On playback, the high frequencies are attenuated after…

  • Dolby, Ray (American audio engineer and inventor)

    Ray Milton Dolby, American audio engineer and inventor (born Jan. 18, 1933, Portland, Ore.—died Sept. 12, 2013, San Francisco, Calif.), revolutionized the way that music listeners and filmgoers perceived sound. He began his career while still a teenager, working for the California-based Ampex Corp.

  • Dolby, Ray Milton (American audio engineer and inventor)

    Ray Milton Dolby, American audio engineer and inventor (born Jan. 18, 1933, Portland, Ore.—died Sept. 12, 2013, San Francisco, Calif.), revolutionized the way that music listeners and filmgoers perceived sound. He began his career while still a teenager, working for the California-based Ampex Corp.

  • dolce stil novo (Italian literature)

    Dolce stil nuovo, the style of a group of 13th–14th-century Italian poets, mostly Florentines, whose vernacular sonnets, canzones, and ballate celebrate a spiritual and idealized view of love and womanhood in a way that is sincere, delicate, and musical. The Bolognese poet Guido Guinizelli is

  • dolce stil nuovo (Italian literature)

    Dolce stil nuovo, the style of a group of 13th–14th-century Italian poets, mostly Florentines, whose vernacular sonnets, canzones, and ballate celebrate a spiritual and idealized view of love and womanhood in a way that is sincere, delicate, and musical. The Bolognese poet Guido Guinizelli is

  • Dolce Vita, La (film by Fellini [1960])

    La Dolce Vita, (Italian: “The Sweet Life”) Italian film, released in 1960, that was widely hailed as one of the most important ever made and the first of several acclaimed collaborations between director Federico Fellini and actor Marcello Mastroianni, who came to represent the director’s alter

  • Dolchstoss im Rücken (German historical legend)

    World War I: The Armistice: …“stab in the back” (Dolchstoss im Rücken). This legend’s theme was that the German Army was “undefeated in the field” (unbesiegt im Felde) and had been “stabbed in the back”—i.e., had been denied support at the crucial moment by a weary and defeatist civilian population and their leaders. This…

  • Dolci, Carlo (Italian painter)

    Carlo Dolci, Italian painter, one of the last representatives of the Florentine school of Baroque painting, whose mainly devotional works are characterized by their oversweet and languid piety. Dolci studied with a minor local painter and at an extremely early age showed a talent for portrait

  • Dolci, Giovanni dei (Italian architect)

    Vatican palace: Under commission from Sixtus IV, Giovanni dei Dolci built the Sistine Chapel. He also remodelled and decorated the Vatican Library. The rooms remodelled by Alexander VI are called the Borgia Apartments. Under Julius II, Bramante completed the north facade, two of the so-called logge (to which Raphael added a third).…

  • Dolcino, Fra (Italian religious leader)

    Apostolic: Thereafter, under the leadership of Fra Dolcino, the sect became openly heterodox and anticlerical. Its power was finally broken when Dolcino was burned as a heretic in 1307.

  • doldrums (meteorology)

    Doldrums, equatorial regions of light ocean currents and winds within the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), a belt of converging winds and rising air encircling Earth near the Equator. The northeast and southeast trade winds meet there; this meeting causes air uplift and often produces

  • Dole (France)

    Dole, town, Jura département, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté région, eastern France. The town lies along the Doubs River and the Rhine-Rh?ne Canal, southeast of Dijon. It was called Dolla under the Romans. It was the seat of the dukes of Burgundy in medieval times and was the capital (1332–1674) of

  • D?le (France)

    Dole, town, Jura département, Bourgogne-Franche-Comté région, eastern France. The town lies along the Doubs River and the Rhine-Rh?ne Canal, southeast of Dijon. It was called Dolla under the Romans. It was the seat of the dukes of Burgundy in medieval times and was the capital (1332–1674) of

  • Dole (Honduran company)

    Honduras: Agriculture, forestry, and fishing: …Company and United Brands) and Dole (formerly Standard Fruit and Steamship Company and Castle & Cooke)—hold a disproportionate amount of the country’s agricultural land and produce a substantial part of the national income by growing the majority of the country’s banana crop. Important export crops other than bananas include coffee…

  • Dole Aseptic Canning System (food processing)

    food preservation: Aseptic processing: …later became known as the Dole Aseptic Canning System. This system involved the sterilization of liquid foods by rapidly heating them in tubular heat exchangers, followed by holding and cooling steps. The cans and lids were sterilized with superheated steam, and the sterilized containers were filled with the sterile liquid…

  • Dole Corporation (American firm)

    Lanai: …it was purchased by the Dole Corporation for use as a pineapple plantation. It was once the largest pineapple plantation in the United States. In 1961 Castle & Cooke, Inc., after merging with Dole, took over the management of Lanai and, with 98 percent ownership of the island, established luxury…

  • Dole, Bob (United States senator)

    Bob Dole, American politician who served in the U.S. Senate (1969–96) and who was the Republican Party’s nominee for president in 1996 but lost to Bill Clinton. Dole was born into a working-class family and left the University of Kansas to serve in the army during World War II. He became a second

  • Dole, Elizabeth (United States senator)

    Elizabeth Dole, U.S. senator and candidate for the 2000 Republican presidential nomination. Dole worked under six different presidents, and her career included many “firsts” for women. She was the first female secretary of transportation; the first female executive of the American Red Cross since

  • D?le, La (mountain, Switzerland)

    Jura Mountains: …France, and Mount Tendre and La D?le, both more than 5,500 feet (1,680 m), in Switzerland. Toward the northeast and along the outer ridges of the arc, the elevations of the crests are lower.

  • Dole, Liddy (United States senator)

    Elizabeth Dole, U.S. senator and candidate for the 2000 Republican presidential nomination. Dole worked under six different presidents, and her career included many “firsts” for women. She was the first female secretary of transportation; the first female executive of the American Red Cross since

  • Dole, Mary Elizabeth Alexander (United States senator)

    Elizabeth Dole, U.S. senator and candidate for the 2000 Republican presidential nomination. Dole worked under six different presidents, and her career included many “firsts” for women. She was the first female secretary of transportation; the first female executive of the American Red Cross since

  • Dole, Robert Joseph (United States senator)

    Bob Dole, American politician who served in the U.S. Senate (1969–96) and who was the Republican Party’s nominee for president in 1996 but lost to Bill Clinton. Dole was born into a working-class family and left the University of Kansas to serve in the army during World War II. He became a second

  • Dole, Sanford Ballard (president of the Republic of Hawaii)

    Sanford Ballard Dole, first president of the Republic of Hawaii (1894–1900), and first governor of the Territory of Hawaii (1900–03) after it was annexed by the United States. The son of American Protestant missionaries, Dole spent two years in the United States (1866–68) studying at Williams

  • Dole, Vincent Paul (American physician)

    Vincent Paul Dole, American physician (born May 18, 1913, Chicago, Ill.—died Aug. 1, 2006, New York, N.Y.), conducted important studies in nephrology (the effect of salt in the diet of kidney patients) and metabolic medicine (research in obesity) but was best remembered for his groundbreaking t

  • Dolemite Is My Name (film by Brewer [2019])

    Eddie Murphy: In the biopic Dolemite Is My Name (2019), he played comedian and actor Rudy Ray Moore, who was a blaxploitation star in the 1970s. In 2015 Murphy received the Kennedy Center’s Mark Twain Prize for American Humor.

  • D?len (Norwegian periodical)

    Norwegian literature: National Romanticism: …Vinje, founder of the periodical D?len (“The Dalesman”), who adopted Nynorsk as his literary language.

  • Dolenz, George Michael (American musician and actor)

    the Monkees: The members were Micky Dolenz (byname of George Michael Dolenz; b. March 8, 1945, Los Angeles, California, U.S.), Davy Jones (byname of David Jones; b. December 30, 1945, Manchester, England—February 29, 2012, Stuart, Florida), Mike Nesmith (byname of Robert Michael Nesmith; b. December 30, 1942, Houston, Texas, U.S.),…

  • Dolenz, Micky (American musician and actor)

    the Monkees: The members were Micky Dolenz (byname of George Michael Dolenz; b. March 8, 1945, Los Angeles, California, U.S.), Davy Jones (byname of David Jones; b. December 30, 1945, Manchester, England—February 29, 2012, Stuart, Florida), Mike Nesmith (byname of Robert Michael Nesmith; b. December 30, 1942, Houston, Texas, U.S.),…

  • dolerite (rock)

    Diabase, fine- to medium-grained, dark gray to black intrusive igneous rock. It is extremely hard and tough and is commonly quarried for crushed stone, under the name of trap. Although not popular, it makes an excellent monumental stone and is one of the dark-coloured rocks commercially known as

  • Dolet, étienne (French scholar and printer)

    étienne Dolet, French humanist, scholar, and printer whose Commentarii linguae Latinae contributed notably to Latin scholarship. He is often described as “the first martyr of the Renaissance.” After studying at Paris and the universities of Padua and Venice, Dolet settled in Toulouse, France. His

  • Dolfin, Dionisio (Italian noble)

    Giovanni Battista Tiepolo: Early life: The decoration was commissioned by Dionisio Dolfin, the patriarch of the town of Aquileia, and Tiepolo probably began work with the ceiling above the main staircase, depicting the Fall of the Rebelling Angels in vigorous, dramatic forms; in the gallery, within the Baroque perspective framings of Mengozzi Colonna, his faithful…

  • Dolgan (people)

    Dolgan, Turkic-speaking people constituting the basic population of the Taymyr autonomous okrug, which is far above the Arctic Circle in north-central Russia. They numbered about 6,000 in the late 20th century. The Dolgan migrated to the area from the southwest, presumably in the 18th century. The

  • Dolgano-Nenets (former district, Russia)

    Taymyr, former autonomous okrug (district), north-central Siberian Russia. In 2007 Taymyr was subsumed under Krasnoyarsk kray (territory). It lies on the hilly Taymyr Peninsula, the most northerly part of the Eurasian continent, and extends south to the northern edge of the Central Siberian

  • Dolge, Alfred (American businessman)

    autoharp: …patent was later acquired by Alfred Dolge (1848–1922), a New York City piano-equipment manufacturer. Dolge distributed the instrument throughout the United States through door-to-door and mail-order sales. However, the instrument known by musicians as the autoharp (and distributed by Dolge) is identical to Gütter’s original Akkordzither; Zimmerman’s patented autoharp was…

  • Dolgellau (Wales, United Kingdom)

    Merioneth: …that Glendower’s parliaments sat at Dolgellau.

  • Dolgopolsky, Aron (Israeli linguist)

    Nostratic hypothesis: …by the Russian-born Israeli linguist Aron Dolgopolsky. A quite different reconstruction of many of the same languages was proposed by the American Allan Bomhard.

  • Dolgoprudny (Russia)

    Dolgoprudny, city, Moscow oblast (province), western Russia. It is situated north of Moscow, where the Savyolovo railway crosses the Moscow Canal, linking the capital with the Volga River. Dolgoprudny appeared in the first Soviet five-year plans as a centre for airship construction. It now has

  • Dolgoprundnyj (Russia)

    Dolgoprudny, city, Moscow oblast (province), western Russia. It is situated north of Moscow, where the Savyolovo railway crosses the Moscow Canal, linking the capital with the Volga River. Dolgoprudny appeared in the first Soviet five-year plans as a centre for airship construction. It now has

  • Dolgorukov family (Russian family)

    Dolgoruky family, Russian princely family who claimed descent from Rurik, the semilegendary founder of the first Russian state. The Dolgorukys produced well-known statesmen, military leaders, and men of letters. Yury Alekseyevich Dolgoruky (d. 1682) was a high-ranking nobleman and military

  • Dolgoruky family (Russian family)

    Dolgoruky family, Russian princely family who claimed descent from Rurik, the semilegendary founder of the first Russian state. The Dolgorukys produced well-known statesmen, military leaders, and men of letters. Yury Alekseyevich Dolgoruky (d. 1682) was a high-ranking nobleman and military

  • Dolgoruky, Grigory Fyodorovich (Russian statesman)

    Dolgoruky family: Grigory Fyodorovich Dolgoruky (1656–1723) was ambassador to Poland (1701–21) and helped conclude a treaty of alliance with Poland (1701) and the Narva Alliance (1704).

  • Dolgoruky, Ivan Alekseyevich (Russian statesman)

    Russia: Peter I’s successors (1725–62): …influence of his chamberlain, Prince Ivan Alekseyevich Dolgoruky, whose family obtained a dominant position in the Supreme Privy Council and brought about the disgrace and exile of Menshikov. It looked as if the Dolgorukys would rule in fact because Peter II was to wed the chamberlain’s sister, but Peter’s sudden…

  • Dolgoruky, Ivan Mikhaylovich (Russian noble)

    Dolgoruky family: Ivan Mikhaylovich Dolgoruky (1764–1823), vice-governor of Penza (1791–97) and governor of Vladimir (1802–12), wrote lyric poetry, comedies, and reminiscences that characterized the culture, the upbringing, and the education of children of the nobility.

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