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  • Donnay, Maurice (French dramatist)

    Maurice Donnay, French playwright whose dramas deal with love and adultery, social problems, and the manners of his time. Donnay was born into a wealthy family and originally trained to be a civil engineer. His dramatic career began with monologues written for the literary cabaret Le Chat-Noir. He

  • Donnay, Maurice-Charles (French dramatist)

    Maurice Donnay, French playwright whose dramas deal with love and adultery, social problems, and the manners of his time. Donnay was born into a wealthy family and originally trained to be a civil engineer. His dramatic career began with monologues written for the literary cabaret Le Chat-Noir. He

  • Donne Triptych (triptycle by Memling)

    Hans Memling: …that for the triptych of The Virgin and Child with Saints and Donors (sometimes called the Donne Triptych because Memling’s patron was Sir John Donne). Once dated very early—about 1468—because it was believed that the patron commissioned the work while visiting Bruges for the wedding of Charles the Bold (duke…

  • Donne, Anne More (wife of John Donne)

    John Donne: Life and career: …and fell in love with Anne More, niece of Egerton’s second wife and the daughter of Sir George More, who was chancellor of the garter. Knowing there was no chance of obtaining Sir George’s blessing on their union, the two married secretly, probably in December 1601. For this offense Sir…

  • Donne, John (English poet)

    John Donne, leading English poet of the Metaphysical school and dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral, London (1621–31). Donne is often considered the greatest love poet in the English language. He is also noted for his religious verse and treatises and for his sermons, which rank among the best of the 17th

  • Donnelly, Ignatius (American writer and social reformer)

    Ignatius Donnelly, American novelist, orator, and social reformer, one of the leading advocates of the theory that Francis Bacon was the author of William Shakespeare’s plays. Donnelly grew up in Philadelphia, where he became a lawyer. In 1856 he moved to Minnesota, where, with another

  • Donnelly, Joe (United States senator)

    Joe Donnelly, American Democratic politician who represented Indiana in the U.S. Senate from 2013 to 2019. He previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives (2007–13). Donnelly was born in New York City and raised on Long Island. He attended the University of Notre Dame, receiving a

  • Donnelly, Joseph Simon (United States senator)

    Joe Donnelly, American Democratic politician who represented Indiana in the U.S. Senate from 2013 to 2019. He previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives (2007–13). Donnelly was born in New York City and raised on Long Island. He attended the University of Notre Dame, receiving a

  • Donnellys , The (plays by Reaney)

    James Crerar Reaney: …and experimental trilogy of plays, The Donnellys (1975–77), tells the story of an Irish immigrant family murdered in Lucan, Ont., in 1880. His Fourteen Barrels from Sea to Sea (1977) is a commentary on the production, reception, and countrywide tours of The Donnellys, written in the form of a travel…

  • Donner Lake (lake, California, United States)

    Donner party: Donner Lake and Donner Pass, California, are named for the party.

  • Donner party (American pioneer group)

    Donner party, group of American pioneers—named for the expedition’s captain, George Donner—who became stranded en route to California in late 1846. The party was trapped by exceptionally heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada, and, when food ran out, some members of the group reportedly resorted to

  • Donner Pass (pass, California, United States)

    Donner Pass, pass, in the Sierra Nevada of northern California, U.S., that is the most important transmontane route (rail and highway) connecting San Francisco with Reno, Nev. Rising to an elevation of more than 7,000 feet (2,100 metres), it lies 35 miles (55 km) west-southwest of Reno. During the

  • Donner, Clive Stanley (British director)

    Clive Stanley Donner, British film director (born Jan. 21, 1926, London, Eng.—died Sept. 6, 2010, London), established himself with The Caretaker (1963), an intense low-budget black-and-white adaptation of Harold Pinter’s play. The movie earned a Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival and marked

  • Donner, Georg Raphael (Austrian sculptor)

    Georg Raphael Donner, sculptor whose works marked the transition from the Baroque to the Neoclassical style. While studying for the priesthood in Heiligenkreutz, Donner met the sculptor Giovanni Giuliani and was encouraged to take up sculpture, working in Giuliani’s studio and later entering the

  • Donner, George (American pioneer)

    Donner party: …pioneers—named for the expedition’s captain, George Donner—who became stranded en route to California in late 1846. The party was trapped by exceptionally heavy snow in the Sierra Nevada, and, when food ran out, some members of the group reportedly resorted to cannibalism of those already dead. It was the worst…

  • Donner, Richard (American director)

    Richard Donner, American film director who emerged in the 1980s as one of Hollywood’s most reliable makers of action blockbusters, most notably the Lethal Weapon films. Donner acted in Off-Broadway productions before moving to California, where he began directing industrial films and television

  • Donnie Brasco (film by Newell [1997])

    Al Pacino: Academy Award and later films: …a thief (Robert De Niro); Donnie Brasco (1997), in which he starred as a low-level mobster who unknowingly befriends an FBI agent (Johnny Depp); and Oliver Stone’s Any Given Sunday (1999). Also in 1999 Pacino appeared opposite Russell Crowe in The Insider; based on real-life events, it examines tobacco companies…

  • Donnie Darko (film by Kelly [2001])

    Drew Barrymore: …in the sci-fi cult classic Donnie Darko (2001), which starred Jake Gyllenhaal as a troubled teenage boy who talks to an oversized rabbitlike creature. Barrymore’s other films included the comic thriller Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002), the environmentally themed drama Big Miracle (2012), and the romantic comedies 50 First…

  • Dono, Paolo di (Italian painter)

    Paolo Uccello, Florentine painter whose work attempted uniquely to reconcile two distinct artistic styles—the essentially decorative late Gothic and the new heroic style of the early Renaissance. Probably his most famous paintings are three panels representing the Battle of San Romano (c. 1456).

  • donor bond (chemistry)

    acid–base reaction: Reactions of Lewis acids: …bond is termed semipolar or coordinate, as in the reaction of boron trifluoride with ammonia:

  • donor portrait (Christian art)

    Hans Memling: …including a pendant with the donor’s portrait (as in the Madonna and Martin van Nieuwenhove). Many devotional diptychs (two-panel paintings) such as this were painted in 15th-century Flanders. They consist of a portrait of the “donor”—or patron—in one panel, reverently gazing at the Madonna and Child in the other. Such…

  • donor’s portrait (Christian art)

    Hans Memling: …including a pendant with the donor’s portrait (as in the Madonna and Martin van Nieuwenhove). Many devotional diptychs (two-panel paintings) such as this were painted in 15th-century Flanders. They consist of a portrait of the “donor”—or patron—in one panel, reverently gazing at the Madonna and Child in the other. Such…

  • Donoso, José (Chilean author)

    José Donoso, Chilean novelist and short-story writer who was important in the development of the Latin American new novel. He used dark surrealism, black comedy, and social satire to explore the lives of decaying aristocrats in a morally disintegrating society. After studying at the Pedagogical

  • Donostia (Spain)

    Donostia–San Sebastián, city, capital of Guipúzcoa provincia (province), northeastern Basque Country comunidad autónoma(autonomous community), north-central Spain. It is a fashionable seaside resort at the mouth of the canalized Urumea River on the Bay of Biscay, east of Bilbao and near the French

  • Donostia–San Sebastián (Spain)

    Donostia–San Sebastián, city, capital of Guipúzcoa provincia (province), northeastern Basque Country comunidad autónoma(autonomous community), north-central Spain. It is a fashionable seaside resort at the mouth of the canalized Urumea River on the Bay of Biscay, east of Bilbao and near the French

  • Donoughmore Commission (British commission)

    Donoughmore Commission, committee sent by the British government to Ceylon in 1927 to examine the Ceylonese constitution and to make recommendations for its revision. The commission’s recommendations, reluctantly accepted by Ceylonese political leaders, served as the basis for the new constitution

  • Donovan (Scottish singer-songwriter)

    Donovan, Scottish singer-songwriter who had consistent commercial success with his playful pop songs in the mid- to late 1960s. Looking and sounding like Bob Dylan, Donovan emerged in 1965 as a folksinger with “Catch the Wind.” As the musical landscape became more kaleidoscopic, Donovan adapted his

  • Donovan Affair, The (film by Capra [1929])

    Frank Capra: Early life and work: …was the comedic murder mystery The Donovan Affair (1929). Flight (also released in 1929) was notable for Capra’s insistence on staging and filming all of its aerial action without tricks or special effects.

  • Donovan body (bacilli)

    granuloma inguinale: Encapsulated bacilli called Donovan bodies (Calymmatobacterium granulomatis) occur in smears from the lesions or in biopsy material and are thought to be the cause of the disease. Granuloma inguinale is treated with streptomycin or with broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  • Donovan’s Reef (film by Ford [1963])

    John Wayne: …The Quiet Man (1952) and Donovan’s Reef (1963).

  • Donovan, Anne (American basketball player and coach)

    Anne Donovan, American basketball player who is often credited with revolutionizing the centre position in women’s basketball. She later had a successful coaching career. As a 6-foot 8-inch (2.03-metre) college freshman, Donovan faced high expectations when she entered Old Dominion University

  • Donovan, Art (American football player)

    Art Donovan, (Arthur James Donovan, Jr.), American football player (born June 5, 1924, Bronx, N.Y.—died Aug. 4, 2013, Baltimore, Md.), was a bruising defensive tackle for the NFL Baltimore Colts and was known as much for the humorous stories that he told about his experiences during his playing

  • Donovan, Arthur James, Jr. (American football player)

    Art Donovan, (Arthur James Donovan, Jr.), American football player (born June 5, 1924, Bronx, N.Y.—died Aug. 4, 2013, Baltimore, Md.), was a bruising defensive tackle for the NFL Baltimore Colts and was known as much for the humorous stories that he told about his experiences during his playing

  • Donovan, Landon (American soccer player)

    Landon Donovan, American professional football (soccer) player, widely regarded as the greatest American male player in the history of the sport. Donovan was a star player in high school in Redlands, California, and in 1998 he joined the U.S. national under-17 (U-17) team. His success in U-17 play

  • Donovan, P. (American athlete)

    weight throw: In 1914 P. Donovan (United States) set a world record for throwing the 56-pound weight for height with a distance of 5.17 metres (16.96 feet). By the second half of the 20th century, there no longer was any international competition in weight throwing, and performances did not…

  • Donovan, Terence Daniel (British photographer)

    Terence Daniel Donovan, British photographer who in the 1960s helped revolutionize fashion photography and redefine the relationship between photographer and model; he also directed more than 3,000 rock videos and television commercials (b. Sept. 14, 1936--d. Nov. 22,

  • Donovan, Wild Bill (United States diplomat and general)

    William J. Donovan, American lawyer, soldier, and diplomat who directed (1942–45) the U.S. Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War II. Donovan began the practice of law in Buffalo in 1907. In 1916 he served in the New York National Guard on the Mexican border and in World War I he was

  • Donovan, William J. (United States diplomat and general)

    William J. Donovan, American lawyer, soldier, and diplomat who directed (1942–45) the U.S. Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War II. Donovan began the practice of law in Buffalo in 1907. In 1916 he served in the New York National Guard on the Mexican border and in World War I he was

  • Donovan, William Joseph (United States diplomat and general)

    William J. Donovan, American lawyer, soldier, and diplomat who directed (1942–45) the U.S. Office of Strategic Services (OSS) during World War II. Donovan began the practice of law in Buffalo in 1907. In 1916 he served in the New York National Guard on the Mexican border and in World War I he was

  • Donovania granulomatis (bacillum)

    granuloma inguinale: …bacilli called Donovan bodies (Calymmatobacterium granulomatis) occur in smears from the lesions or in biopsy material and are thought to be the cause of the disease. Granuloma inguinale is treated with streptomycin or with broad-spectrum antibiotics.

  • Donskoy, Mark (Russian motion-picture writer and director)

    Mark Donskoy, motion-picture writer and director best known for a trilogy based on the autobiography of the Russian proletarian novelist Maxim Gorky. In 1926 Donskoy began his cinema career as a scriptwriter and assistant director. He soon became a director of lyrical and personal films that

  • Donskoy, Mark Semyonovich (Russian motion-picture writer and director)

    Mark Donskoy, motion-picture writer and director best known for a trilogy based on the autobiography of the Russian proletarian novelist Maxim Gorky. In 1926 Donskoy began his cinema career as a scriptwriter and assistant director. He soon became a director of lyrical and personal films that

  • Donus (pope)

    Donus, pope from 676 to 678. Elected (August 676) to succeed Adeodatus II, Donus ended a schism created by Archbishop Maurus of Ravenna (whose plan was to make Ravenna ecclesiastically independent) by receiving the obedience of Maurus’ successor Reparatus. Donus is said to have dispersed the M

  • donzel (noble)

    France: Rural society: …the designation of “squire” (or donzel, in the south) for those of noble birth awaiting or postponing the expensive dubbing (adoubement). At the upper extreme, a noble elite, the barons, achieved recognition in administration and law.

  • Donzoko (film by Kurosawa [1957])

    Kurosawa Akira: Films of the 1950s: Macbeth, and Donzoko (1957; The Lower Depths) was from Maxim Gorky’s drama: each of these films is skillfully Japanized. Throne of Blood, which reflects the style of the sets and acting of the Japanese Noh play and uses not a word of the original text, has been called the…

  • Doo-Bop (album by Davis)

    Miles Davis: Legacy: His final album, Doo-Bop (1992), was released posthumously.

  • doo-wop (music)

    Doo-wop, style of rhythm-and-blues and rock-and-roll vocal music popular in the 1950s and ’60s. The structure of doo-wop music generally featured a tenor lead vocalist singing the melody of the song with a trio or quartet singing background harmony. The term doo-wop is derived from the sounds made

  • Dooars (region, India)

    Duars, region of northeastern India, at the foot of the east-central Himalayas. It is divided by the Sankosh River into the Western and Eastern Duars. Both were ceded by Bhutan to the British at the end of the Bhutan War (1864–65). The Eastern Duars, in western Assam state, comprises a level plain

  • Doob, Leonard (psychologist)

    frustration-aggression hypothesis: Background and assumptions: Leonard Doob, Neal Miller, O.H. Mowrer, and Robert Sears—in an important monograph, Frustration and Aggression (1939), in which they integrated ideas and findings from several disciplines, especially sociology, anthropology, and psychology. Their work was notable for its eclectic use of

  • Doodia (plant genus)

    Blechnaceae: …species of Blechnum (deer fern), Doodia (hacksaw fern), and Woodwardia (chain fern) are cultivated as ornamentals in gardens, greenhouses, conservatories, and homes.

  • doodle (drawing)

    Doodle, absent-minded scrawl or scribble, usually executed in some unexpected place, such as the margin of a book or manuscript or a blotting pad when the doodler is preoccupied with some other activity, such as attending a meeting or lecture. The word is supposed to have gained currency because

  • doodlebug (military technology)

    V-1 missile, German jet-propelled missile of World War II, the forerunner of modern cruise missiles. More than 8,000 V-1s were launched against London from June 13, 1944, to March 29, 1945, with about 2,400 hitting the target area. A smaller number were fired against Belgium. The rockets were

  • doodlebug (insect)

    Antlion, (family Myrmeleontidae), any of a group of insects (order Neuroptera) that are named for the predatory nature of the larva, which trap ants and other small insects in pits dug into the ground. Antlions are found throughout the world, primarily in dry, sandy regions. The antlion larva digs

  • Doogie Howser, M.D. (American television program)

    Neil Patrick Harris: …as a teenaged physician in Doogie Howser, M.D. (1989–93).

  • Doohan, James Montgomery (American actor)

    James Montgomery Doohan, Canadian-born actor (born March 3, 1920, Vancouver, B.C.—died July 20, 2005, Redmond, Wash.), performed in character roles in hundreds of radio and television programs and in a number of movies before endearing himself to the TV-viewing public with his portrayal of the c

  • Dookie (album by Green Day)

    Green Day: …released Green Day’s major-label debut, Dookie, in 1994. The album carried the band’s catchy pop-punk sound and Armstrong’s apathetic lyrics into the mainstream, earning a Grammy Award for best alternative music performance and selling more than 15 million copies worldwide.

  • Dooley, Martin (fictional character)

    Finley Peter Dunne: …who created the homely philosopher Mr. Dooley.

  • Dooley, Mr. (fictional character)

    Finley Peter Dunne: …who created the homely philosopher Mr. Dooley.

  • Dooley, Thomas Anthony (American physician)

    Thomas Anthony Dooley, “jungle doctor” whose lectures and books recounted his efforts to supply medical aid to peoples of less developed countries, mainly in Southeast Asia. A graduate of St. Louis University medical school (M.D. 1953), he was serving with the U.S. Navy as a medical officer when

  • Doolin, Bill (American outlaw)

    Bill Doolin, Western outlaw who led a gang through robberies in Oklahoma and east Texas, 1892–95. A member of the Dalton brothers gang, he alone missed the bloody ambush of the Coffeyville, Kan., bank robbery (Oct. 5, 1892); his horse had pulled lame long before reaching town. Thereafter, he built

  • Doolin, William (American outlaw)

    Bill Doolin, Western outlaw who led a gang through robberies in Oklahoma and east Texas, 1892–95. A member of the Dalton brothers gang, he alone missed the bloody ambush of the Coffeyville, Kan., bank robbery (Oct. 5, 1892); his horse had pulled lame long before reaching town. Thereafter, he built

  • Doolittle (album by Pixies)

    Pixies: In 1989 the group released Doolittle, its most revered album, which built upon the Pixies’ existing formula and perfected the stop-and-start dynamics that would perhaps become its greatest legacy to later alternative bands, especially Nirvana. Bossanova, a surf music-inspired variation on the earlier albums, followed in 1990. By this time,…

  • Doolittle Raid (World War II)

    Doolittle Raid, (18 April 1942), a surprise attack on Tokyo, Japan, by U.S. bombers during World War II. Little damage resulted, but the raid was a boost to American morale at a low point in the war. The affront of the raid to Japanese national pride motivated Japan’s leaders to pursue offensive

  • Doolittle, Eliza (fictional character)

    Eliza Doolittle, fictional character, a Cockney flower girl who is transformed into a woman of poise and polish in George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion (performed 1913; filmed 1938; adapted as the stage musical My Fair Lady, 1956; filmed

  • Doolittle, Hilda (American poet)

    Hilda Doolittle, American poet, known initially as an Imagist. She was also a translator, novelist-playwright, and self-proclaimed “pagan mystic.” Doolittle’s father was an astronomer, and her mother was a pianist. She was reared in the strict Moravian tradition of her mother’s family. From her

  • Doolittle, James H. (United States general)

    James H. Doolittle, American aviator and army general who led an air raid on Tokyo and other Japanese cities four months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Doolittle was educated at Los Angeles Junior College (1914–16) and the University of California School of Mines (1916–17). As an army

  • Doolittle, James Harold (United States general)

    James H. Doolittle, American aviator and army general who led an air raid on Tokyo and other Japanese cities four months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Doolittle was educated at Los Angeles Junior College (1914–16) and the University of California School of Mines (1916–17). As an army

  • Doolittle, Jimmy (United States general)

    James H. Doolittle, American aviator and army general who led an air raid on Tokyo and other Japanese cities four months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Doolittle was educated at Los Angeles Junior College (1914–16) and the University of California School of Mines (1916–17). As an army

  • Doom (electronic game)

    Doom, first-person shooter electronic game released in December 1993 that changed the direction of almost every aspect of personal computer (PC) games, from graphics and networking technology to styles of play, notions of authorship, and public scrutiny of game content. The authors of Doom were a

  • Doom Patrol (comic book)

    Grant Morrison: …notably in Animal Man and Doom Patrol. He used Animal Man as a way to discuss animal rights, Doom Patrol as a forum to explore issues of madness and disability, and both to continue his postmodern decontructions of the superhero genre. However, it was in 1989, with Arkham Asylum (art…

  • Doomed Love (novel by Castelo Branco)

    Camilo Castelo Branco: …work, Amor de perdi??o (1862; Doomed Love), the story of a love thwarted by family opposition that eventually led the hero to crime and exile. It is the typical expression of the view of life with which Castelo Branco came to be identified—a view in which passion is the irresistible…

  • Doomes-day, or, The Great Day of the Lords Judgement (work by Stirling)

    William Alexander, 1st earl of Stirling: His last important poetical work, Doomes-day, or, The Great Day of the Lords Judgement (1614), caused King James to choose him to collaborate in translating the Psalms.

  • doomsday (mythological concept)

    Ragnar?k: …the Gods”), in Scandinavian mythology, the end of the world of gods and men. The Ragnar?k is fully described only in the Icelandic poem V?luspá (“Sibyl’s Prophecy”), probably of the late 10th century, and in the 13th-century Prose Edda of Snorri Sturluson (d. 1241), which largely follows the V?luspá. According…

  • Doomsday Defense (football history)

    Bob Lilly: …of the Dallas Cowboys’ “Doomsday Defense,” he helped the team win its first Super Bowl title (1972).

  • doomsday machine (nuclear device)

    Doomsday machine, hypothetical device that would automatically trigger the nuclear destruction of an aggressor country or the extinction of all life on Earth in the event of a nuclear attack on the country maintaining the device. The former type of device might automatically launch a large number

  • Doomsday Vault (agricultural project, Norway)

    Svalbard Global Seed Vault, secure facility built into the side of a mountain on Spitsbergen, the largest of the Svalbard islands (a Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic Ocean), that is intended to safeguard the seeds of the world’s food plants in the event of a global crisis. The site was chosen

  • Doon de Mayence (legendary hero)

    Doon De Mayence, hero baron of the medieval epic poems in Old French known as chansons de geste, which together form the core of the Charlemagne legends. Doon’s story is told in a chanson belonging to a cycle called Geste de Doon de Mayence. This cycle tells of Charlemagne’s rebellious barons and

  • Doone, Lorna (fictional character)

    Lorna Doone, fictional heroine of the historical romance Lorna Doone (1869) by R.D. Blackmore. The novel is set in 17th-century Exmoor, a remote area of Devon, England, and concerns a virtuous and somewhat mysterious young woman who has been raised by bandits who abducted her when she was

  • Doonesbury (comic strip by Trudeau)

    Doonesbury, American newspaper comic strip chronicling the lives of a large group of characters, mostly a set of college friends, over the years. Doonesbury’s humour has been noted for its explicitly political content. The strip’s namesake is Mike Doonesbury, who serves as an everyman for America’s

  • Doopgein Sheptoon (king of Bhutan)

    Bhutan: The emergence of Bhutan: La-Pha was succeeded by Doopgein Sheptoon, who consolidated Bhutan’s administrative organization through the appointment of regional penlops (governors of territories) and jungpens (governors of forts). Doopgein Sheptoon exercised both temporal and spiritual authority, but his successor confined himself to only the spiritual role and appointed a minister to exercise…

  • door (architecture)

    Door, barrier of wood, stone, metal, glass, paper, leaves, hides, or a combination of materials, installed to swing, fold, slide, or roll in order to close an opening to a room or building. Early doors, used throughout Mesopotamia and the ancient world, were merely hides or textiles. Doors of

  • Door gagan ki chhaon mein (film by Kumar [1964])

    Kishore Kumar: …also directed several productions, including Door gagan ki chhaon mein (1964) and Door ka rahi (1971). In contrast to the lighthearted films in which he typically participated as an actor, singer, or composer, the films that Kumar directed were often tragedies.

  • Door into the Dark (poetry by Heaney)

    English literature: Poetry: …of a Naturalist (1966) and Door into the Dark (1969)—that combines a tangible, tough, sensuous response to rural and agricultural life, reminiscent of that of Ted Hughes, with meditation about the relationship between the taciturn world of his parents and his own communicative calling as a poet. Since then, in…

  • Door ka rahi (film by Kumar [1971])

    Kishore Kumar: …ki chhaon mein (1964) and Door ka rahi (1971). In contrast to the lighthearted films in which he typically participated as an actor, singer, or composer, the films that Kumar directed were often tragedies.

  • Door of Life, The (work by Bagnold)

    Enid Bagnold: …Squire (1938; also published as The Door of Life), which conveys the mood of expectancy in a household awaiting the birth of a child, and The Loved and Envied (1951), a study of a woman facing the approach of old age. As a playwright, Bagnold achieved great success with The…

  • Door Peninsula (peninsula, Wisconsin, United States)

    Door Peninsula, area of land, eastern Wisconsin, U.S. Lying between Green Bay and Lake Michigan, Door Peninsula is about 80 miles (130 km) long and 25 miles (40 km) wide at its base and tapering northeastward. It is crossed southeast-northwest by a waterway at Sturgeon Bay. The peninsula includes

  • door-hinge (metalwork)

    metalwork: England: …are found with massive iron hinges, the bands worked in rich ornamental designs of scrollwork, varying from the plain hinge band, with crescent, to the most elaborate filling of the door. Examples exist at Skipwith and Stillingfleet in Yorkshire, many in the eastern counties, others in Gloucester, Somerset, and the…

  • door-to-door sale (business)

    marketing: Direct selling: …industry consisting of companies selling door-to-door, office-to-office, or at private-home sales meetings. The forerunners in the direct-selling industry include The Fuller Brush Company (brushes, brooms, etc.), Electrolux (vacuum cleaners), and Avon (cosmetics). In addition, Tupperware pioneered the home-sales approach, in which friends and neighbours gather in a home where Tupperware…

  • Doordarshan India (Indian broadcasting company)

    India: Media and publishing: …name Doordarshan, later changed to Doordarshan India (“Television India”). Television and educational programming are transmitted via the Indian National Satellite (INSAT) system. The country’s first Hindi-language cable channel, Zee TV, was established in 1992, and this was followed by other cable and satellite services.

  • Doorman, Karel (Dutch admiral)

    Karel Doorman, Dutch rear admiral who commanded a combined American, British, Dutch, and Australian naval force against a Japanese invasion fleet in the Java Sea during World War II. Intended to halt the Japanese naval invasion of the Netherlands East Indies, the Battle of the Java Sea ended in

  • Doorman, Karel Willem Frederik Marie (Dutch admiral)

    Karel Doorman, Dutch rear admiral who commanded a combined American, British, Dutch, and Australian naval force against a Japanese invasion fleet in the Java Sea during World War II. Intended to halt the Japanese naval invasion of the Netherlands East Indies, the Battle of the Java Sea ended in

  • Doornik (Belgium)

    Tournai, municipality, Wallonia Region, southwestern Belgium. It lies along the Schelde (Scheldt, or Escaut) River, northwest of Mons. Tournai has changed hands many times. As Turnacum, it was important in Roman times. Seized by the Salic Franks in the 5th century, it was the birthplace of the

  • Doors of Perception, The (work by Huxley)

    Aldous Huxley: …victims of demonic possession, and The Doors of Perception (1954), a book about Huxley’s experiences with the hallucinogenic drug mescaline. His last novel, Island (1962), is a utopian vision of a Pacific Ocean society.

  • Doors, The (American rock group)

    The Doors, American band that, with a string of hits in the late 1960s and early ’70s, was the creative vehicle for singer Jim Morrison, one of rock music’s mythic figures. The members were Morrison (in full James Douglas Morrison; b. December 8, 1943, Melbourne, Florida, U.S.—d. July 3, 1971,

  • Doors, The (film by Stone [1991])

    Oliver Stone: Kennedy, and The Doors, a stylish account of the rise and fall of the titular American rock band. In Heaven & Earth (1993), Stone approached the Vietnam War and its aftermath from the perspective of a young Vietnamese woman.

  • doorstop (furniture)

    Doorstop, usually decorative and invariably heavy object used to prevent doors from swinging shut. Doorstops came into use about 1775 following the introduction of the rising butt, a type of hinge designed to close a door automatically. Many stops took the form of famous persons, such as Napoleon,

  • Doorway God (pre-Inca figure)

    Huari: …on Huari pottery is the Doorway God, a stylized, anthropomorphic figure often represented in front view with a rectangular face and rayed headdress. This motif is also found at Tiwanaku. Huari architecture features large enclosures constructed of stone masonry. Monumental temple sculpture is naturalistic and depicts both male and female…

  • doosra (cricket)

    Muttiah Muralitharan: …of delivery, nicknamed the “doosra,” in which the ball turns away from a right-handed batsman, prompted still further allegations of throwing in 2004; however, in early 2005 the ICC modified the rules to allow Muralitharan’s unusual arm movement.

  • Dootson, F. W. (British scientist)

    gas: Thermal diffusion: …the aid of the chemist F.W. Dootson to verify it experimentally.

  • Dooxo Nugaaleed (river valley, Somalia)

    Nugaaleed Valley, river valley, northeastern Somalia. It is a shallow valley, long and broad, with an extensive network of seasonal watercourses. The valley’s principal watercourses, the Nugaaleed and the more westerly Dheere, fill briefly during and after rainstorms (April to June) and drain into

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