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  • Dooyeweerd, Herman (Dutch philosopher)

    pessimism: …Brunner, and the Dutch neo-Calvinists Herman Dooyeweerd and D.H.T. Vollenhoven). Perhaps the most uncompromisingly pessimistic system ever developed is that of the existentialist philosopher Martin Heidegger, for whom death, nothingness, and anxiety were central topics of interest and for whom the highest possible act of human freedom was a coming…

  • dopa (chemical compound)

    dopamine: …intermediate compound from dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) during the metabolism of the amino acid tyrosine. It is the precursor of the hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine. Dopamine also functions as a neurotransmitter—primarily by inhibiting the transmission of nerve impulses—in the substantia nigra, basal ganglia, and

  • dopamine (chemical compound)

    Dopamine, a nitrogen-containing organic compound formed as an intermediate compound from dihydroxyphenylalanine (dopa) during the metabolism of the amino acid tyrosine. It is the precursor of the hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine. Dopamine also functions as a neurotransmitter—primarily by

  • dopamine receptor 3 (gene)

    essential tremor: …in a gene known as DRD3 (dopamine receptor 3; formerly designated ETM1, or essential tremor 1). The DRD3 gene encodes a protein called dopamine receptor D3. This receptor binds dopamine, a neurotransmitter that normally inhibits the transmission of nerve impulses in the brain, thereby

  • dopamine-receptor agonist (drug)

    antiparkinson drug: Dopamine-receptor agonists: Dopamine-receptor agonists work by binding to dopamine receptors on dopaminergic neurons (the neurons that normally synthesize and use dopamine) in the neurotransmitter’s absence. Stimulation of the receptors increases dopaminergic activity in the brain, thereby lessening the severity of parkinsonism symptoms. Examples of dopamine-receptor…

  • dopaminergic receptor (biology)

    nervous system: Dopamine: There are two types of dopaminergic receptors, called the D1 and the D2. The former catalyzes the synthesis of cAMP, and the latter inhibits its synthesis. These reactions then regulate calcium and potassium channels in the postsynaptic membrane. Dopaminergic receptors also exist on the presynaptic membrane. The neurotransmitter is terminated…

  • dopant (electronics)

    Dopant, any impurity deliberately added to a semiconductor for the purpose of modifying its electrical conductivity. The most commonly used elemental semiconductors are silicon and germanium, which form crystalline lattices in which each atom shares one electron with each of its four nearest

  • doped fullerene (chemical compound)

    superconductivity: Thermal properties of superconductors: …only carbon is present) or fullerides (if doped). They have superconducting transition temperatures higher than those of the classic superconductors. It is not yet known whether these compounds are fundamentally similar to the cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  • D?pfner, Mathias (German businessman)

    Mathias D?pfner, German businessman who served as chairman and CEO (2002– ) of the German newspaper and magazine publisher Axel Springer Verlag AG. D?pfner studied musicology and theatrical arts before he joined the staff of the daily Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (1982). Later he worked in public

  • doping (drug abuse)

    anabolic steroid: Anabolic steroids are commonly abused by human athletes to build muscle and improve strength. The drugs are also used in livestock to augment muscle mass, and they are sometimes given to racehorses to increase stamina and heighten performance. The use of anabolic steroids is either forbidden or closely controlled…

  • doping (electronics)

    Dopant, any impurity deliberately added to a semiconductor for the purpose of modifying its electrical conductivity. The most commonly used elemental semiconductors are silicon and germanium, which form crystalline lattices in which each atom shares one electron with each of its four nearest

  • Doppelfrieskrug (pottery)

    pottery: Stoneware: The Doppelfrieskrüge were jugs with two molded friezes (usually portraying classical subjects) around the middle. They and the tankards were made in Raeren brownware by Jan Emens, surnamed Mennicken, in the last quarter of the 16th century. Emens also worked in the gray body that was…

  • doppelg?nger (folklore)

    Doppelg?nger, (German: “double goer”), in German folklore, a wraith or apparition of a living person, as distinguished from a ghost. The concept of the existence of a spirit double, an exact but usually invisible replica of every man, bird, or beast, is an ancient and widespread belief. To meet

  • Doppelleben (work by Benn)

    Gottfried Benn: …richly reflected in the autobiography Doppelleben (1950; “Double Life”). A broad selection of his poetry and prose in English translation was published under the title Primal Vision (1961).

  • Doppelmonarchie (historical empire, Europe)

    Austria-Hungary, the Habsburg empire from the constitutional Compromise (Ausgleich) of 1867 between Austria and Hungary until the empire’s collapse in 1918. A brief treatment of the history of Austria-Hungary follows. For full treatment, see Austria: Austria-Hungary, 1867–1918. The empire of

  • Doppler effect (physics)

    Doppler effect, the apparent difference between the frequency at which sound or light waves leave a source and that at which they reach an observer, caused by relative motion of the observer and the wave source. This phenomenon is used in astronomical measurements, in M?ssbauer effect studies, and

  • Doppler frequency shift (radar technology)

    radar: Postwar progress: The Doppler frequency shift also has been used in Doppler-navigation radar to measure the velocity of the aircraft carrying the radar system. The extraction of the Doppler shift in weather radars, moreover, allows the identification of severe storms and dangerous wind shear not possible by other…

  • Doppler radar, pulse (radar technology)

    radar: Doppler frequency and target velocity: …indication (MTI) radar or a pulse Doppler radar, depending on the particular parameters of the signal waveform.

  • Doppler spectroscopy (astronomy)

    Geoffrey Marcy: …American astronomer whose use of Doppler shifts to detect extrasolar planets led to the discovery of several hundred planetary bodies in multiple star systems.

  • Doppler weather radar (radar technology)

    radar: Doppler weather radar: For many years radar has been used to provide information about the intensity and extent of rain and other forms of precipitation. This application of radar is well known in the United States from the familiar television weather reports of precipitation observed…

  • Doppler, Christian (Austrian physicist)

    Christian Doppler, Austrian physicist who first described how the observed frequency of light and sound waves is affected by the relative motion of the source and the detector. This phenomenon became known as the Doppler effect. Educated at the Polytechnical Institute in Vienna, Doppler became

  • Doppler-limited spectroscopy (spectra analysis)

    spectroscopy: Doppler-limited spectroscopy: With the exception of specially designed molecular-beam spectrometers, the line width of a molecular absorption transition is limited by the Doppler effect. The resolution of conventional spectrometers, with the exception of a few very expensive Fourier-transform instruments, is generally limited to a level…

  • Dor (Israel)

    Dor, modern settlement and ancient port in northwestern Israel, on the Mediterranean coast, south of Haifa. Ancient Dor was a strategic site on the Via Maris, the historic road that ran largely along the Palestine coast. Ruins found at the site date back to the Late Bronze Age (1500–1200 bc), and

  • Dor fortress (fort, Aligarh, India)

    Aligarh: Another fort, the Dor fortress (1524), now in ruins, lies at the city’s centre; its site is occupied by an 18th-century mosque. The city contains tombs of Muslim saints. Wheat, barley, and other crops are grown in the surrounding area. Pop. (2001) 669,087; (2011) 874,408.

  • Dor, Plain of (plain, Israel)

    Plain of Sharon: …River and Mount Carmel, the Plain of ?Atlit, or the Plain of Dor.

  • Dora (Israel)

    Dor, modern settlement and ancient port in northwestern Israel, on the Mediterranean coast, south of Haifa. Ancient Dor was a strategic site on the Via Maris, the historic road that ran largely along the Palestine coast. Ruins found at the site date back to the Late Bronze Age (1500–1200 bc), and

  • Dora and the Lost City of Gold (film by Bobin [2019])

    Benicio Del Toro: …fox in the family film Dora and the Lost City of Gold (2019).

  • dorab wolf herring (fish species)

    Wolf herring, (Chirocentrus dorab), species of fish belonging to the family Chirocentridae (order Clupeiformes). It is exclusively marine in habitat, occurring in the Indian Ocean and in the western Pacific to Japan and eastern Australia. In contrast to other herrings, which feed on plankton, wolf

  • Dorade (yacht)

    Olin James Stephens II: …and navigator of the yacht Dorade, the winner of the 1931 Transatlantic and Fastnet races, and who was codesigner and relief helmsman of the J-class Ranger, the winner of the America’s Cup in 1937.

  • Doradidae (fish)

    ostariophysan: Annotated classification: Family Doradidae (thorny catfishes) Overlapping plates cover sides of body. Intestinal modifications for aerial respiration. Aquarium fishes. Generally small, to more than 1 metre (3 feet). South America. About 30 genera, about 72 species. Family Auchenipteridae (driftwood catfishes) Internal insemination. Fresh and brackish water, Panama and South…

  • dorado (fish)

    dolphin: …and game fish called the common dolphin (C. hippuras) is known in Hawaiian as mahimahi and sometimes in Spanish as the dorado. Reaching a length of about 1.5 metres (5 feet) and a weight of about 30 kg (66 pounds), the common dolphin has a blunt head, a tapered body,…

  • Dorado (constellation)

    Dorado, (Spanish: “Golden”) constellation in the southern sky at about 5 hours right ascension and 60° south in declination. Its brightest star is Alpha Doradus, with a magnitude of 3.2. This constellation contains more than half of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a satellite of the Milky Way

  • dorado (fish, Salminus species)

    Dorado, (Salminus maxillosus), powerful game fish of the characin family, Characidae, found in South American rivers. The dorado is golden, with red fins and with lengthwise rows of dots on its body, and superficially resembles a salmon. It reaches a length of about 1 m (39 inches) and a weight of

  • Dorāh Pass (mountain pass, Asia)

    Hindu Kush: Physiography: …in the east to the Dorāh (Do Rāh) Pass (14,940 feet [4,554 metres]) not far from Mount Tirich Mir; the central Hindu Kush, which then continues to the Shebar (Shībar) Pass (9,800 feet [2,987 metres]) to the northwest of Kabul; and the western Hindu Kush, also known as the Bābā…

  • Doran Ann (American actress)

    Rebel Without a Cause: Cast: Assorted Referencesdiscussed in biography

  • Dorat, Jean (French humanist)

    Jean Dorat, French humanist, a brilliant Hellenist, one of the poets of the Pléiade, and their mentor for many years. Dorat belonged to a noble family; after studying at the Collège de Limoges, he became tutor to the pages of Francis I. He tutored Jean-Antoine de Ba?f, whose father he succeeded as

  • Dorati, Antal (American conductor)

    Antal Dorati, Hungarian-born American conductor notable for his promotion of 20th-century music, particularly that of Béla Bartók. The son of musicians, he entered at age 14 the Liszt Academy in Budapest, where he studied with Bartók, Zoltán Kodály, and Leo Weiner. He read philosophy at Vienna

  • Dorazio, Piero (Italian artist)

    Piero Dorazio, Italian artist (born June 29, 1927, Rome, Italy—died May 17, 2005, Perugia, Italy), created abstract paintings known for their bold colours and geometric patterns. At age 20 Dorazio cofounded the abstract artists group Forma 1 and earned a scholarship to study for a year at the é

  • D?rben Oirat (Mongol confederation)

    Kalmyk: …a confederation known as the D?rben Oirat (“Four Allies,” from which the name Oirat is derived); at times they were allies, at times enemies, of the eastern Mongols. Part of the western Mongols remained in their homeland, northern Xinjiang, or Dzungaria, and western Mongolia. Part of the Oirat confederation, including…

  • dorcas gazelle (mammal)

    gazelle: Asian gazelles: bilkis; now extinct), and the dorcas gazelle (G. dorcas). The dorcas gazelle also ranges into North Africa. The range of the goitred gazelle extends across the Asian deserts to China, though its population is greatly reduced in numbers. A sixth Asian gazelle, the Indian gazelle or chinkara (G. bennetti), survives…

  • Dorcasiidae (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: …(Strophocheilidae) or southwestern Africa (Dorcasiidae). Order Sigmurethra Ureter originates near anterior margin of kidney, follows backward to posterior end, then reflexes forward along hindgut to open alongside anus; position greatly altered in sluglike forms; about 18,000 species. Suborder Holopodopes A group of 4

  • Dorchester (England, United Kingdom)

    Dorchester, town (parish), West Dorset district, administrative and historic county of Dorset, southwestern England, on the River Frome. Dorchester is the county town (seat) of Dorset. The ancient town (then known as Durnovaria) was a sizable Roman British centre, and many remains of the period

  • Dorchester (county, Maryland, United States)

    Dorchester, county, southeastern Maryland, U.S., bounded by the Choptank River to the north, Delaware to the east, the Nanticoke River to the southeast, and Chesapeake Bay to the south and west. It consists of a low-lying, marshy peninsula that extends into the bay and includes Barren, Bloodsworth,

  • Dorchester (county, South Carolina, United States)

    Dorchester, county, southern South Carolina, U.S. The Edisto River forms the southwestern boundary, and the county is also drained by the Ashley River. Dorchester county lies in the flat Coastal Plain, and much of it consists of woodlands and swamps. Francis Beidler Forest is the largest remaining

  • Dorchester (Massachusetts, United States)

    Massachusetts Bay Colony: Charlestown, Dorchester, Medford, Watertown, Roxbury, and Lynn.

  • Dorchester of Dorchester, Guy Carleton, 1st Baron (British statesman)

    Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester, soldier-statesman who, as governor of Quebec before and during the American Revolutionary War, succeeded in reconciling the British and French and in repulsing the invasion attempts of Continental forces. Carleton was commissioned an ensign in the British army in

  • Dorchester, Guy Carleton, 1st Baron (British statesman)

    Guy Carleton, 1st Baron Dorchester, soldier-statesman who, as governor of Quebec before and during the American Revolutionary War, succeeded in reconciling the British and French and in repulsing the invasion attempts of Continental forces. Carleton was commissioned an ensign in the British army in

  • Dorcopsulus (marsupial)

    wallaby: The dwarf wallaby is the smallest member of the genus and the smallest known member of the kangaroo family. Its length is about 46 cm (18 inches) from nose to tail, and it weighs about 1.6 kg (3.5 pounds).

  • Dordogne (department, France)

    Aquitaine: Geography: In Dordogne many visitors travel to the valley of Vézère, one of the earliest known cradles of human habitation. Caves at Les Eyzies-de-Tayac and Lascaux contain some of the world’s best prehistoric drawings and paintings. Dordogne also has about 1,000 chateaus and a number of picturesque…

  • Dordogne River (river, France)

    Dordogne River, river in southwestern France, rising in the Massif Central and flowing west for 293 mi (472 km) to Bec d’Ambès, north of Bordeaux, where it unites with the Garonne to form the Gironde Estuary; its drainage basin is about 9,300 sq mi (24,000 sq km). Its headwaters, rising at a height

  • Dordrecht (Netherlands)

    Dordrecht, gemeente (municipality), southwestern Netherlands, at the divergence of the Merwede, Noord, Oude Maas (Old Meuse), and Dordtse Kil rivers. Founded in 1008, it was the residence of the counts of Holland until 1203 and was first chartered in 1220. It was fortified in 1271, and, although

  • Dordrecht, Synod of (Netherlands church assembly)

    Synod of Dort, assembly of the Reformed Church of the Netherlands that met at Dort (in full Dordrecht) from Nov. 13, 1618, to May 9, 1619. The synod tried to settle disputes concerning Arminianism. In 1610 the Dutch followers of Jacobus Arminius presented to the States General a Remonstrance in

  • Dordt (Netherlands)

    Dordrecht, gemeente (municipality), southwestern Netherlands, at the divergence of the Merwede, Noord, Oude Maas (Old Meuse), and Dordtse Kil rivers. Founded in 1008, it was the residence of the counts of Holland until 1203 and was first chartered in 1220. It was fortified in 1271, and, although

  • doré (alloy)

    silver processing: From copper concentrates: The metal recovered, called doré, generally contains 0.5 to 5 percent gold, 0.1 to 1 percent platinum metals, and the balance silver. This metal is cast to form anodes and electrolyzed in a solution of silver-copper nitrate. Two different electrorefining techniques are employed, the Moebius and Thum Balbach systems.…

  • Doré, Gustave (French illustrator)

    Gustave Doré, French printmaker, one of the most prolific and successful book illustrators of the late 19th century, whose exuberant and bizarre fantasy created vast dreamlike scenes widely emulated by Romantic academicians. In 1847 he went to Paris, and from 1848 to 1851 he produced weekly

  • Doré, Jean-Marie (Guinean politician)

    Guinea: Independence: Jean-Marie Doré took office as interim prime minister on January 26, 2010, and established a transitional administration the next month.

  • Doré, Paul-Gustave (French illustrator)

    Gustave Doré, French printmaker, one of the most prolific and successful book illustrators of the late 19th century, whose exuberant and bizarre fantasy created vast dreamlike scenes widely emulated by Romantic academicians. In 1847 he went to Paris, and from 1848 to 1851 he produced weekly

  • Doren, Carl Clinton Van (American critic)

    Carl Van Doren, U.S. author and teacher whose writings range through surveys of literature to novels, biography, and criticism. Educated at Columbia University (Ph.D., 1911), Van Doren taught there until 1930. In that period he was one of a group of academicians who helped to establish American

  • Doren, Mark Van (American writer)

    Mark Van Doren, American poet, writer, and eminent teacher. He upheld the writing of verse in traditional forms throughout a lengthy period of experiment in poetry. As a teacher at Columbia University for 39 years (1920–59), he exercised a profound influence on generations of students. Van Doren

  • Dorestad (ancient city, Netherlands)

    history of the Low Countries: Decline of the Frankish empire: (Dorestad, for example, was destroyed four times between 834 and 837.) Churches and monasteries, with their rich treasures, were the principal targets for the Vikings, who soon took to spending the winter in the Low Countries. In order to ward off the danger, attempts were…

  • Dorfman, Ariel (Chilean author)

    Ariel Dorfman, Chilean American author and human rights activist whose plays and novels engage with the vibrant politically engaged Latin American literary tradition of Pablo Neruda and Gabriel García Márquez. Dorfman’s family moved from Argentina to the United States while he was still an infant

  • Dorfman, David (American choreographer)

    Kyle Abraham: In 2007 choreographer David Dorfman, a summer instructor at TSA, invited Abraham to join the David Dorfman Dance troupe.

  • Dorfmeister, Michaela (Austrian athlete)

    Olympic Games: Turin, Italy, 2006: …women’s downhill and super-G by Michaela Dorfmeister, and by the disappointing performance of the American team led by World Cup champion Bode Miller, who was entered in five events but earned no Olympic medals. Michael Greis of Germany won three gold medals in biathlon events, but his success was overshadowed…

  • Dorgan, Thomas Aloysius (American journalist and cartoonist)

    Thomas Aloysius Dorgan, American journalist, boxing authority, and cartoonist credited with inventing a variety of colourful American slang expressions. At an early age Dorgan became a cartoonist and comic artist for the San Francisco Bulletin. In 1902 he moved to William Randolph Hearst’s New York

  • Dorgi Yamun (Chinese history)

    Kangxi: Early life: …a Neiwufu (Dorgi Yamun), or Office of Household. The Thirteen Offices, all organized solely by Chinese eunuchs, had been the abomination of the Manchus ever since they had been introduced by the late emperor, to handle affairs of the imperial household, patterned after an elaborate model that had existed under…

  • Dorgon (Chinese ruler)

    Dorgon, prince of the Manchu people of Manchuria (present-day Northeast China) who played a major part in founding the Qing (Manchu) dynasty in China. He was the first regent for the first Qing emperor, Shunzhi. Dorgon was the 14th of the 16 sons of Nurhachi, founder of the Manchu state, who in

  • Dorham, Kenny (American musician)

    Kenny Dorham, black American jazz trumpeter, a pioneer of bebop noted for the beauty of his tone and for his lyricism. Dorham began playing trumpet in high school, attended Wiley College (Marshall, Texas), and was on a U.S. Army boxing team in 1942. In 1945–48 he played in a series of big bands,

  • Dorham, McKinley Howard (American musician)

    Kenny Dorham, black American jazz trumpeter, a pioneer of bebop noted for the beauty of his tone and for his lyricism. Dorham began playing trumpet in high school, attended Wiley College (Marshall, Texas), and was on a U.S. Army boxing team in 1942. In 1945–48 he played in a series of big bands,

  • Doria family (Italian family)

    Doria Family, leading family in the political, military, and economic life of Genoa, from the 12th century onward. Apparently of feudal origin, from Liguria and Provence, the Dorias first appeared in Genoese records early in the 12th century. Ansaldo Doria was elected consul of the commune of

  • Doria, Jo?o (Brazilian politician)

    S?o Paulo: From metropolis to megametropolis: In the 2016 mayoral election, Jo?o Doria of the PSDB defeated Haddad to take over the city’s top office.

  • Doria, Andrea (Genoese statesman)

    Andrea Doria, Genoese statesman, condottiere (mercenary commander), and admiral who was the foremost naval leader of his time. A member of an ancient aristocratic Genoese family, Doria was orphaned at an early age and became a soldier of fortune. He first served Pope Innocent VIII (reigned 1484–92)

  • Doria, Ansaldo (Italian politician)

    Doria Family: Ansaldo Doria was elected consul of the commune of Genoa in 1134 and took part in several embassies and military expeditions. His son Simone served six consulships between 1175 and 1188, and one of Simone’s sons, Andrea, married into Sardinia’s ruling family, the Torres, launching…

  • Doria, Domenico (Italian cartographer)

    Doria Family: Domenico Doria, traveler and cartographer, was appointed in 1285 by the Mongols as their ambassador to Europe.

  • Doria, Giacomo (Italian naturalist and explorer)

    Giacomo Doria, Italian naturalist and explorer who in 1867 founded the civic museum of natural history in Genoa and conducted important research in systematic zoology. Doria’s first major expedition was to Persia, in 1862. After that, he accompanied the naturalist Odoardo Beccari to Borneo, where

  • Doria, Giovanni (Italian admiral)

    Doria Family: Giovanni Andrea (1539–1606), Andrea’s grandnephew, was his lieutenant and heir, serving as Genoese admiral against the Turks in the War of Cyprus (1570–71). He took part victoriously in the Battle of Lepanto (1571), which ended the threat of Turkish supremacy in the eastern Mediterranean.

  • Doria, Oberto (Italian politician)

    Doria Family: In 1270 Andrea’s grandson Oberto Doria (died 1295) and Oberto Spinola, member of another great Genoese family, inaugurated a series of two-man governments headed by their families, with dictatorial powers as captains of the people. Ruling for 15 years during what has been termed the golden age of the…

  • Doria, Paganino (Italian admiral)

    Niccolò Pisani: …Genoese, defeating the distinguished admiral Paganino Doria (1352). A year later, surprising the Genoese fleet, he sank 33 enemy galleys and took 4,500 prisoners, who were later executed. In November 1354, however, Doria surprised him at Portolungo, near Greece. The Genoese admiral’s audacity and tactical skill enabled him to capture…

  • Doria, Paolo Mattia (Italian scientist)

    Italy: Political thought and early attempts at reform: Paolo Mattia Doria (1662?–1746) and the Medinaceli Academy in Naples also employed historical inquiry to seek remedies for society’s ills. Doria revived the idea of a Platonic republicanism of philosophic magistrates, in which an anti-Enlightenment Catholicism would become a kind of civil religion. In Naples…

  • Doria, Simone (Italian politician)

    Doria Family: His son Simone served six consulships between 1175 and 1188, and one of Simone’s sons, Andrea, married into Sardinia’s ruling family, the Torres, launching Doria fortunes in that island. By this time the Dorias had long been leaders of the Ghibelline (imperial) political faction.

  • Dorian (people)

    Dorian, any member of a major division of the ancient Greek people, distinguished by a well-marked dialect and by their subdivision, within all their communities, into the “tribes” (phylai) of Hylleis, Pamphyloi, and Dymanes. These three tribes were apparently quite separate in origin from the four

  • Dorian invasion (Greek history)

    ancient Greek civilization: The post-Mycenaean period and Lefkandi: …of these was the “Dorian invasion,” which the Greeks called, or connected with, the legendary “return of the descendants of Heracles.” Although much about that invasion is problematic—it left little or no archaeological trace at the point in time where tradition puts it—the problems are of no concern here.…

  • Dorian mode (music)

    Dorian mode, in music, first of the eight medieval church modes. See church

  • Dorian, Hurricane (storm [2019])

    The Bahamas: Independence: …were on The Bahamas when Hurricane Dorian, a category 5 hurricane, devastated Abaco, other islands and cays of the Abacos group, and Grand Bahama Island. Minnis called the event “one of the greatest national crises in our country’s history.”

  • Doric dialect (dialect)

    Doric dialect, a dialect of Ancient Greek that in Mycenaean times was spoken by seminomadic Greeks living around the Pindus Mountains. After the Dorian migrations near the end of the 2nd millennium bc, Doric-speaking Greeks were found in the northwest of Greece as well as throughout the P

  • Doric frieze

    ornament: The Doric frieze is a good case: its origin as an imitation of the effect of alternating beam ends and shuttered openings in archaic wood construction remained evident, but it came to be treated as a decorative sheath without reference to the actual structural forms behind.…

  • Doric order (architecture)

    Doric order, one of the orders of classical architecture, characterized by a simple and austere column and capital. See

  • doridacean nudibranch (gastropod)

    nudibranch: atlanticus) and the doridacean nudibranchs such as Doris and Glossodoris. See gastropod.

  • Dorididae (gastropod)

    nudibranch: atlanticus) and the doridacean nudibranchs such as Doris and Glossodoris. See gastropod.

  • Dorion, Sir Antoine-Aimé (Canadian statesman)

    Sir Antoine-Aimé Dorion, statesman and jurist who was joint premier of the Province of Canada (as the attorney general of Canada East) with George Brown in August 1858 and with John Sandfield Macdonald in 1863–64. Dorion was called to the bar in 1842 and was made Queen’s Counsel in 1863. He entered

  • Doriot, Jacques (French politician)

    France: The Vichy government: The real pro-fascists, such as Jacques Doriot and Marcel Déat, who wanted a system modeled frankly on those of Hitler and Mussolini, soon left Vichy and settled in Paris, where they accepted German subsidies and intrigued against Pétain.

  • Doris (ancient district, Greece)

    Doris, the alleged mother country of the Dorian conquerors of the Peloponnese. It was a small district in central Greece, lying between Mounts Oeta (modern Oiti) and Parnassus and consisting of a narrow valley nowhere exceeding 4 miles (6 km) in breadth, with only four small townships. Doris had

  • DORIS (collider)

    DESY: The Double Ring Storage Facility (DORIS), completed 10 years later, was designed to collide beams of electrons and positrons at energies of 3.5 GeV per beam (upgraded to 5 GeV per beam in 1978). Now in its third version as DORIS III, this machine is no…

  • Doris Day Animal League (American animal advocacy group)

    Doris Day: …member and president of the Doris Day Animal League, a lobbying organization for laws regulating the treatment of animals.

  • Doris Day Show, The (American television program)

    Doris Day: …to 1973 she starred in The Doris Day Show, a weekly television series.

  • Dorje-ling (India)

    Darjiling, city, extreme northern West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies about 305 miles (490 km) north of Kolkata (Calcutta), at an elevation of about 7,000 feet (2,100 metres) above sea level. Darjiling is situated on a long, narrow mountain ridge of the Sikkim Himalayas that descends

  • Dorking (England, United Kingdom)

    Dorking, town, Mole Valley district, administrative and historic county of Surrey, southeastern England, southwest of London. It is situated in the valley of the River Mole, between the escarpment of the chalk hills of the North Downs and the wooded heights of Leith Hill. The town is the district

  • Dorléac, Catherine (French actress)

    Catherine Deneuve, French actress noted for her archetypal Gallic beauty as well as for her roles in films by some of the world’s greatest directors. Deneuve was the third of four daughters born to the French actors Maurice Dorléac and Renée Deneuve. She landed a small role in the 1957 film Les

  • dormancy (biology)

    Dormancy, state of reduced metabolic activity adopted by many organisms under conditions of environmental stress or, often, as in winter, when such stressful conditions are likely to appear. There are few environments in which organisms are not subject to some kind of stress. Some animals migrate

  • dormant account (banking)

    Switzerland: Recent developments: …during the 1990s about “dormant accounts”—assets left by Jews in Swiss banks during the Nazi era but never returned—a controversy that challenged Switzerland’s image of itself and resulted in a settlement between two large commercial banks and Jewish plaintiffs in which the banks agreed to pay international Jewish organizations…

  • Dormen Theatre (theatre, Istanbul, Turkey)

    Islamic arts: Turkey: The Dormen Theatre was founded in Istanbul in 1955 by Haldun Dormen; in the 1971 World Theatre season in London the company performed A Tale of Istanbul, a comedy that included elements of folklore, a puppet show, singing, and a belly dance. The Dormen Theatre also…

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