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  • dragon tree (plant)

    Dracaena: Dragon trees, notably D. draco from the Canary Islands, can grow more than 18 metres (60 feet) tall and 6 metres (20 feet) wide. The trunk contains a red gum, called dragon’s blood, valued for its medicinal properties. A number of Dracaena species are listed…

  • dragon worm (nematode)

    Guinea worm, (Dracunculus medinensis), member of the phylum Nematoda. The guinea worm, a parasite of humans, is found in tropical regions of Asia and Africa and in the West Indies and tropical South America. A variety of other mammals are also parasitized by guinea worms. The disease caused by the

  • dragon’s blood (plant)

    burnet: …garden, or salad, burnet (Sanguisorba minor) and the great burnet (S. officinalis)—are eaten in salads or used as an ingredient in fines herbes, a mixture of herbs commonly used in French cuisine. The dried leaves are also used to make tea.

  • dragon’s blood (resin)

    Dragon’s blood, red resin obtained from the fruit of several palms of the genus Daemonorops and used in colouring varnishes and lacquers. Once valued as a medicine in Europe because of its astringent properties, dragon’s blood now is used as a varnish for violins and in photoengraving for

  • Dragon’s Mouths (channel, Caribbean Sea)

    Dragons Mouths, channel of the southeastern Caribbean Sea, between Point Pe?as (the eastern end of the Paria Peninsula in northeastern Venezuela) and the northwestern extremity of the island of Trinidad. The channel, about 12 miles (20 km) wide, is one of two separating Trinidad from mainland South

  • dragon’s tongue (plant)

    pipsissewa: …called striped pipsissewa, rheumatism root, dragon’s tongue, and spotted wintergreen, occurs in North America from Canada to the southern United States. The name pipsissewa derives from a Cree Indian word referring to the diuretic properties of the leaves when eaten.

  • dragon’s-mouth (plant)

    Dragon’s-mouth, (Arethusa bulbosa), species of terrestrial orchid (family Orchidaceae) found only in North American bogs. The plant is the only species in the genus Arethusa. The dragon’s-mouth orchid is a perennial plant with a small corm and a single grasslike leaf. It produces a solitary reddish

  • Dragón, Bocas del (channel, Caribbean Sea)

    Dragons Mouths, channel of the southeastern Caribbean Sea, between Point Pe?as (the eastern end of the Paria Peninsula in northeastern Venezuela) and the northwestern extremity of the island of Trinidad. The channel, about 12 miles (20 km) wide, is one of two separating Trinidad from mainland South

  • Dragon, Carmen (American composer)
  • dragonet (fish)

    Dragonet, any of about 40 species of marine fishes constituting the family Callionymidae (order Perciformes), found in warm temperate or tropical areas, particularly in the Indo-Pacific region. Dragonets characteristically have large and elongated fins, large, flattened heads, and small gills that

  • Dragonetti, Domenico (Italian musician)

    double bass: Beethoven’s friend Domenico Dragonetti and the conductor Serge Koussevitzky, both skilled bassists, composed concerti for the instrument.

  • dragonfish (fish)

    Dragonfish, any of about five species of small marine fishes comprising the family Pegasidae and the order Pegasiformes. Dragonfish are found in warm Indo-Pacific waters. They are small (to about 16 centimetres [6 12 inches] long), elongated fish encased in bony rings of armour. The armour is fused

  • dragonfly (insect)

    Dragonfly, (suborder Anisoptera), any of a group of roughly 3,000 species of aerial predatory insects most commonly found near freshwater habitats throughout most of the world. Damselflies (suborder Zygoptera) are sometimes also called dragonflies in that both are odonates (order Odonata).

  • dragonhead (plant)

    Dragonhead, (genus Dracocephalum), genus of about 70 species of plants in the mint family (Lamiaceae). Dragonheads are native to temperate Eurasia, with the exception of one species, the American dragonhead (Dracocephalum parviflorum), which is native to North America. Several species are grown as

  • Dragonheart (film by Cohen [1996])

    Sean Connery: Knight (1995), The Rock (1996), Dragonheart (1996), and Entrapment (1999). Connery officially retired from acting following his appearance in the film adaptation (2003) of the comic-book series The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, though he went on to perform various voice roles.

  • DragonLab (uncrewed space program)

    Dragon: Unmanned flights called DragonLab are planned that will not go to the ISS but will instead orbit Earth and conduct scientific experiments.

  • dragonnades (French history)

    Fran?ois-Michel Le Tellier, marquis de Louvois: Career as minister.: …tarnished by two acts: the dragonnades leading up to the revocation in 1685 of the Edict of Nantes, which had granted French Protestants certain liberties, and the destruction of the Palatinate. Historians have accused Louvois of originating the dragonnades, the quartering of troops in Protestant households with the intention of…

  • dragonroot (herb)

    Arisaema: The green dragon, or dragonroot (A. dracontium), with leaves up to 25 cm in length on petioles up to 90 cm (35 inches) long, has an 8-centimetre-long greenish spathe, with an erect hood, surrounding a spadix that extends beyond the spathe by several times its length.

  • Dragons Mouths (channel, Caribbean Sea)

    Dragons Mouths, channel of the southeastern Caribbean Sea, between Point Pe?as (the eastern end of the Paria Peninsula in northeastern Venezuela) and the northwestern extremity of the island of Trinidad. The channel, about 12 miles (20 km) wide, is one of two separating Trinidad from mainland South

  • dragoon (soldier)

    Dragoon, in late 16th-century Europe, a mounted soldier who fought as a light cavalryman on attack and as a dismounted infantryman on defense. The terms derived from his weapon, a species of carbine or short musket called the dragoon. Dragoons were organized not in squadrons but in companies, and

  • Dragoon, Operation (Europe-United States [1944])

    Normandy Invasion: The German counterattack and the Falaise pocket: …landed on the Riviera (Operation Dragoon), Hitler at last recognized the inevitable and gave permission for a withdrawal from Normandy. The only route of escape lay through a gap between the converging American and British spearheads at Falaise. The position was held by the recently arrived Polish 1st Armoured…

  • Drahi, Patrick (French Israeli entrepreneur)

    Sotheby's: …owned by the telecommunications entrepreneur Patrick Drahi. He planned to return Sotheby’s, which had been publicly traded on the New York Stock Exchange since 1988, to private ownership.

  • Drahomanov, Mikhail (Ukrainian writer)

    Russia: Russification policies: …Hrushevsky and the socialist writer Mikhail Drahomanov published their works; Ukrainian political literature was smuggled across the border. In the 1890s small illegal groups of Ukrainian democrats and socialists existed on Russian soil.

  • Drahomanov, Mykhaylo (Ukrainian writer)

    Russia: Russification policies: …Hrushevsky and the socialist writer Mikhail Drahomanov published their works; Ukrainian political literature was smuggled across the border. In the 1890s small illegal groups of Ukrainian democrats and socialists existed on Russian soil.

  • Drahomíra (Bohemian ruler)

    St. Ludmila: …the opposing party, particularly with Drahomíra, who, as regent, favoured the pagans. An ensuing feud between Ludmila and Drahomíra ended when agents entered Tetin Castle and strangled Ludmila, a deed that has traditionally been ascribed to Drahomíra’s instigation.

  • Drahoňovsky, Josef (Czech artist)

    glassware: Czechoslovakia, Austria, and Germany: …in Czech glass art was Josef Drahoňovsky, who was professor at the Prague School of Industrial Art. He was essentially a sculptor, and most of his glass designs were for sumptuously engraved glass of a monumental quality. His colleague in Prague, Jaroslav Horejc, designed for engraved work of a broadly…

  • drain (electronics)

    semiconductor device: Metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors: …and the other as the drain. The conductive channel is formed in a thin n-type layer supported by a high-resistivity semi-insulating (nonconducting) substrate. When a positive voltage is applied to the drain with respect to the source, electrons flow from the source to the drain. Hence, the source serves as…

  • drain current (electronics)

    semiconductor device: Metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors: …in Figure 7B, where the drain current ID is plotted against the drain voltage VD for various gate voltages. For a given gate voltage (e.g., VG = 0), the drain current initially increases linearly with drain voltage, indicating that the conductive channel acts as a constant resistor. As the drain…

  • drain tile (ceramics)

    brick and tile: Structural clay drainage products: Drain tile performs a service that ensures a higher yield in farm production of food throughout the world. Many farming areas are plagued with too much water at the wrong times. Drain tile reduces the water level during these times, thereby allowing the root growth…

  • drain voltage (electronics)

    semiconductor device: Metal-semiconductor field-effect transistors: … ID is plotted against the drain voltage VD for various gate voltages. For a given gate voltage (e.g., VG = 0), the drain current initially increases linearly with drain voltage, indicating that the conductive channel acts as a constant resistor. As the drain voltage increases, however, the cross-sectional area of…

  • drainage (agriculture)

    Drainage, in agriculture, the artificial removal of water from land; drainage is employed in the reclamation of wetlands, in the prevention of erosion, and as a concomitant of irrigation in the agriculture of arid regions. A brief treatment of drainage follows. For full treatment, see irrigation

  • drainage basin (geology)

    Drainage basin, area from which all precipitation flows to a single stream or set of streams. For example, the total area drained by the Mississippi River constitutes its drainage basin, whereas that part of the Mississippi River drained by the Ohio River is the Ohio’s drainage basin. The boundary

  • drainage composition, Horton’s laws of (hydrology)

    hydrosphere: Groundwaters and river runoff: …of two quite distinct mechanisms—specifically, Horton overland flow (named for American hydraulic engineer and hydrologist Robert E. Horton) and Dunne overland flow (named for British hydrologist Thomas Dunne).

  • drainage density (hydrology)

    valley: Origin and evolution: A useful measure is drainage density Dd, which relates the length of valleys (or streams) L to the area A in which they occur:

  • drainage net (hydrology)

    river: Drainage patterns: Distinctive patterns are acquired by stream networks in consequence of adjustment to geologic structure. In the early history of a network, and also when erosion is reactivated by earth movement or a fall in sea level, downcutting by trunk streams and extension of…

  • drainage pattern (hydrology)

    river: Drainage patterns: Distinctive patterns are acquired by stream networks in consequence of adjustment to geologic structure. In the early history of a network, and also when erosion is reactivated by earth movement or a fall in sea level, downcutting by trunk streams and extension of…

  • drainage system (sewage)

    airport: Drainage: Large airports are actually urban complexes in which high-population activity centres are closely associated with very extensive paved areas. Typically a large airport can, on a daily basis, handle more than 100,000 passengers and support a working population of more than 50,000 employees. The…

  • Drais de Sauerbrun, Karl von (German inventor)

    bicycle: Draisiennes, hobby-horses, and other velocipedes: …the draisienne, invented by Baron Karl von Drais de Sauerbrun of Germany. In 1817 he rode it for 14 km (9 miles), and the following year he exhibited it in Paris. Although von Drais called his device a Laufmaschine (“running machine”), draisienne and velocipede became more popular names. The machine…

  • draisienne (bicycle)

    bicycle: Draisiennes, hobby-horses, and other velocipedes: The first two-wheeled rider-propelled machine for which there is indisputable evidence was the draisienne, invented by Baron Karl von Drais de Sauerbrun of Germany. In 1817 he rode it for 14 km (9 miles), and the following year he exhibited…

  • Drake (Canadian rapper)

    Drake, (born Oct. 24, 1986, Toronto, Ont.), On Feb. 12, 2015, Canadian rap musician Drake announced via the microblogging service Twitter the surprise release of a 17-track mixtape-cum-album, If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late. Critics praised the album, which, like his previous releases, shot up

  • drake (insect)

    Mayfly, (order Ephemeroptera), any member of a group of insects known for their extremely short life spans and emergence in large numbers in the summer months. Other common names for the winged stages are shadfly, sandfly, dayfly, fishfly, and drake. The aquatic immature stage, called a nymph or

  • Drake equation (astronomy)

    Drake equation, equation that purports to yield the number N of technically advanced civilizations in the Milky Way Galaxy as a function of other astronomical, biological, and psychological factors. Formulated in large part by the U.S. astrophysicist Frank Drake, it was first discussed in 1961 at a

  • Drake Passage (waterway, South America)

    Drake Passage, deep waterway, 600 miles (1,000 km) wide, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific oceans between Cape Horn (the southernmost point of South America) and the South Shetland Islands, situated about 100 miles (160 km) north of the Antarctic Peninsula. The Drake Passage defines the zone of

  • Drake University (university, Des Moines, Iowa, United States)

    Drake University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Des Moines, Iowa, U.S. It consists of the colleges of arts and sciences, business and public administration, and pharmacy and health sciences and the schools of journalism and mass communication, law, and education. In

  • Drake, Alfred (American actor)

    Alfred Drake, American actor who breathed new life into musical theatre as the star of Broadway’s Oklahoma! (1943), which featured his rich baritone voice in renditions of “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning,” “People Will Say We’re in Love,” and “The Surrey with the Fringe on Top.” While a junior at

  • Drake, Arnold (American writer)

    Guardians of the Galaxy: …for Marvel Comics by writer Arnold Drake and artist Gene Colan. The group debuted in Marvel Super-Heroes no. 18 (January 1969).

  • Drake, Bill (American radio programmer)

    KHJ, “Boss Radio”: Its designer, Bill Drake, a Georgia-born deejay, liked to keep things simple. As a budding programming consultant, he proved himself at three California stations (in Fresno, Stockton, and San Diego), succeeding with his formula of more music, less talk, shorter jingles, and the strategic placement of news,…

  • Drake, Charles (American actor)

    Harvey: Sanderson (Charles Drake) determines that the apoplectic Veta, rather than her charming mild-mannered brother, is the one in need of help and has her forcibly committed. After discovering Sanderson’s mistake, the facility’s director, Dr. Chumley (Cecil Kellaway), releases Veta and attempts to track down Elwood. As…

  • Drake, Charlie (British comedian and actor)

    Charlie Drake, (Charles Edward Springall), British comedian and actor (born June 19, 1925, Elephant and Castle, London, Eng.—died Dec. 23, 2006, Twickenham, Middlesex, Eng.), delighted audiences with his slapstick comic antics in stage variety shows and on television for more than 50 years, often p

  • Drake, David (American potter and poet)

    Dave the Potter, American potter and poet who, while a slave in South Carolina, produced enormous stoneware pots, many of which he signed with his first name and inscribed with original poetic verses. Definitive information about Dave’s life is scarce. In 1919 a pot bearing his name and an

  • Drake, Edwin (American oil driller)

    Edwin Drake, driller of the first productive oil well in the United States. Raised on farms in New York and Vermont, Drake worked as a hotel and dry-goods clerk before becoming an agent for the Boston and Albany Railroad. In 1850 he became a conductor on the New York and New Haven Railroad, but a

  • Drake, Edwin Laurentine (American oil driller)

    Edwin Drake, driller of the first productive oil well in the United States. Raised on farms in New York and Vermont, Drake worked as a hotel and dry-goods clerk before becoming an agent for the Boston and Albany Railroad. In 1850 he became a conductor on the New York and New Haven Railroad, but a

  • Drake, Ervin (American songwriter)

    Ervin Drake, (Ervin Maurice Druckman), American songwriter (born April 3, 1919, New York, N.Y.—died Jan. 15, 2015, Great Neck, N.Y.), composed and/or wrote lyrics for hundreds of songs, notably “It Was a Very Good Year” (written in 1961 for the Kingston Trio and recorded in 1965 by Frank Sinatra)

  • Drake, Frances Ann Denny (American actress)

    Frances Ann Denny Drake, American actress who, with her extensive tours of the American West and her triumphs in New York City, was the leading actress on the American stage before the rise of Charlotte Cushman. Frances Ann Denny grew up in Albany, New York. In 1815 she joined a theatrical troupe

  • Drake, Francis Marion (American politician)

    Drake University: It was named for Francis Marion Drake, a former governor of Iowa and general of the American Civil War, whose financial backing helped establish the school. The famous Drake Relays, among the largest collegiate track-and-field meets in the world, were first held in 1910. After World War II the…

  • Drake, Frank D. (American astrophysicist)

    extraterrestrial life: The Drake equation and extrasolar life: American astrophysicist Frank D. Drake devised a simple approach that illuminates the uncertainties involved in determining whether extraterrestrial intelligence is possible. The number of extant technical civilizations in the Milky Way Galaxy is estimated by the following equation (the so-called Drake equation, or Green Bank formula): N…

  • Drake, Jim (American sailor)

    windsurfing: Californians Jim Drake (a sailor) and Hoyle Schweitzer (a surfer) received the first patent for a sailboard in 1968. They called their design a Windsurfer, and Schweitzer began mass-producing sailboards in the early 1970s. The sport quickly spread throughout North America, and by the late 1970s…

  • Drake, Joseph Rodman (American poet)

    Joseph Rodman Drake, Romantic poet who contributed to the beginnings of a U.S. national literature by a few memorable lyrics before his early death. Drake’s father died while the boy was young, and his mother remarried and went to live in New Orleans, leaving her son with relatives in New York. He

  • Drake, Nicholas Rodney (English singer, songwriter, and guitarist)

    Nick Drake, English singer, songwriter, and guitarist known for emotive vocals, sombre lyrics, and rich melodies. Drake never achieved widespread recognition in his lifetime but inspired a cult following in the decades following his death. Drake was raised principally in the English village of

  • Drake, Nick (English singer, songwriter, and guitarist)

    Nick Drake, English singer, songwriter, and guitarist known for emotive vocals, sombre lyrics, and rich melodies. Drake never achieved widespread recognition in his lifetime but inspired a cult following in the decades following his death. Drake was raised principally in the English village of

  • Drake, Samuel (American theatrical manager)

    theatre: Theatre and stage design in America: …frontier spirit was embodied by Samuel Drake, who took the first company west (to Kentucky) in 1815. Drake designed an adjustable proscenium that could be set up in any large room. The front curtain was a roll drop (lowered from behind the proscenium arch), and three sets of wings (one…

  • Drake, Sir Francis (English admiral)

    Sir Francis Drake, English admiral who circumnavigated the globe (1577–80) and was the most renowned seaman of the Elizabethan Age. Born on the Crowndale estate of Lord Francis Russell, 2nd earl of Bedford, Drake’s father, Edmund Drake, was the son of one of the latter’s tenant farmers. Edmund fled

  • Drakeford, Mark (Welsh politician)

    Wales: The 21st century: …Labour Party, former finance minister Mark Drakeford. When Boris Johnson, May’s replacement as the United Kingdom’s prime minister, called for a snap election in December 2019, Labour lost six seats but remained the largest Welsh presence in the House of Commons with 22 MPs. The Conservatives added six seats for…

  • Drakenberg, Christian Jacobsen (Norwegian centenarian)

    life span: Actual versus possible life span: Based on modern records, multiple persons have had life spans exceeding 115 years. This does not mean the span of life of each individual now living or to be born in the future is at least 115 years. The span of life, since it is…

  • Drakensberg (mountain range, Africa)

    Drakensberg, the main mountain range of Southern Africa. The Drakensberg rises to more than 11,400 feet (3,475 metres) and extends roughly northeast to southwest for 700 miles (1,125 km) parallel to the southeastern coast of South Africa. Rock and cave art several thousands of years old has been

  • Drakensberg Escarpment (mountain range, Africa)

    Drakensberg, the main mountain range of Southern Africa. The Drakensberg rises to more than 11,400 feet (3,475 metres) and extends roughly northeast to southwest for 700 miles (1,125 km) parallel to the southeastern coast of South Africa. Rock and cave art several thousands of years old has been

  • DRAM (electronics)

    computer: Main memory: …gradually decays, IC memory is dynamic RAM (DRAM), which must have its stored values refreshed periodically (every 20 milliseconds or so). There is also static RAM (SRAM), which does not have to be refreshed. Although faster than DRAM, SRAM uses more transistors and is thus more costly; it is used…

  • dram (unit of weight)

    Dram, unit of weight in the apothecaries’ and avoirdupois systems. An apothecaries’ dram contains 3 scruples (3.888 grams) of 20 grains each and is equal to one-eighth apothecaries’ ounce of 480 grains. The avoirdupois dram contains 27.344 grains (1.772 grams) and is equal to one-sixteenth

  • drama

    Dramatic literature, the texts of plays that can be read, as distinct from being seen and heard in performance. The term dramatic literature implies a contradiction in that literature originally meant something written and drama meant something performed. Most of the problems, and much of the

  • drama (art)

    Theatre, in dramatic arts, an art concerned almost exclusively with live performances in which the action is precisely planned to create a coherent and significant sense of drama. Though the word theatre is derived from the Greek theaomai, “to see,” the performance itself may appeal either to the

  • Dráma (Greece)

    Dráma, town and dímos (municipality), East Macedonia and Thrace (Modern Greek: Anatolikí Makedonía kai Thráki) periféreia (region), northeastern Greece. It lies on a major tributary of the Angítis River, at the northern edge of the Drámas Plain. The town, a tobacco and agricultural (cotton and

  • drama nuevo, Un (work by Tamayo y Baus)

    Manuel Tamayo y Baus: …is Un drama nuevo (1867; A New Drama), a skillful and moving tragedy.

  • Drama of Motion (dance by Humphrey)

    Doris Humphrey: Drama of Motion (1930) was themeless and also performed without music; it has been described as one of the first symphonic dances and exemplifies her belief that movement creates its own meaning.

  • Dramatic Association of Korea (Korean organization)

    Korean performing arts: After World War II: …to belong to the Japanese-organized Dramatic Association of Korea. Many groups survived the war with Japan by touring small towns and villages. Performances lagged immediately after World War II because of unsettled conditions. A new National Theatre was established in Seoul just before the Korean War began; national support included…

  • dramatic ballet (dance)

    Ballet d’action, ballet in which all the elements of production (e.g., choreography, set design, and costuming) are subordinate to the plot and theme. John Weaver, an English ballet master of the early 18th century, is considered the originator of pantomime ballet, a drama in dance form that

  • dramatic film (theatre)

    theatre: The influence of Piscator: Dramatic film contributed to the development of the action and served as a “substitute” for the live scene; where live scenes wasted time with explanations, dialogues, and action, film could illuminate a situation in the play with a few quick shots. Film commentary accompanied the…

  • dramatic irony (literary and performing arts)

    Dramatic irony, a literary device by which the audience’s or reader’s understanding of events or individuals in a work surpasses that of its characters. Dramatic irony is a form of irony that is expressed through a work’s structure: an audience’s awareness of the situation in which a work’s

  • dramatic literature

    Dramatic literature, the texts of plays that can be read, as distinct from being seen and heard in performance. The term dramatic literature implies a contradiction in that literature originally meant something written and drama meant something performed. Most of the problems, and much of the

  • Dramatic Lyrics (work by Browning)

    English literature: Robert Browning and Elizabeth Barrett Browning: …in 1842, with the volume Dramatic Lyrics. As the title suggests, it was a collection of dramatic monologues, among them “Porphyria’s Lover,” “Johannes Agricola in Meditation,” and “My Last Duchess.” The monologues make clear the radical originality of Browning’s new manner: they involve the reader in sympathetic identification with the…

  • dramatic monologue (poetic form)

    Dramatic monologue, a poem written in the form of a speech of an individual character; it compresses into a single vivid scene a narrative sense of the speaker’s history and psychological insight into his character. Though the form is chiefly associated with Robert Browning, who raised it to a

  • dramatic soprano (vocal music)

    soprano: …their colour or agility: a dramatic soprano has a rich, powerful quality; a lyric soprano, a lighter, singing tone; and a coloratura soprano possesses a high range (to the second C above middle C and higher) and extreme agility.

  • dramatic television (television programming)

    Television in the United States: Overview: …the categories of comedy and drama emerged in the 1950s to deserve the attention of discriminating viewers. They are the most fondly remembered of the Golden Age genres for both emotional and intellectual reasons. Live TV drama was, in essence, the legitimate theatre’s contribution to the new medium; such shows…

  • Dramatic Values (work by Montague)

    Charles Edward Montague: …dramatic criticism, partly collected in Dramatic Values (1911). Among his other works are the pre-war novel A Hind Let Loose (1910), a lighthearted satirical fantasy of journalistic life, and two works based on his experiences in World War I—Disenchantment (1922), an essay drawn from wartime diaries and articles that expresses…

  • Dramatis Personae (work by Browning)

    Robert Browning: Life.: …his next book of poems, Dramatis Personae (1864)—including “Abt Vogler,” “Rabbi Ben Ezra,” “Caliban upon Setebos,” and “Mr. Sludge, ‘The Medium’ ”—reached two editions, it was clear that Browning had at last won a measure of popular recognition.

  • dramatism (literature)

    Dramatism, a technique of analysis of language and thought as basically modes of action rather than as means of conveying information. It is associated with the critic Kenneth

  • dramatist

    Dramatic literature, the texts of plays that can be read, as distinct from being seen and heard in performance. The term dramatic literature implies a contradiction in that literature originally meant something written and drama meant something performed. Most of the problems, and much of the

  • dramaturge (theatrical advisor)

    theatre: The influence of writing and scholarship: …where for many centuries the dramaturge was a vital part of the state theatre companies. A dramaturge is usually a writer, critic, or scholar who advises a theatre on literary points, as well as editing classic texts and perhaps translating foreign plays. With the establishment of the National Theatre of…

  • dramaturgy (literature)

    Dramaturgy, the art or technique of dramatic composition or theatrical representation. In this sense English dramaturgy and French dramaturgie are both borrowed from German Dramaturgie, a word used by the German dramatist and critic Gotthold Lessing in an influential series of essays entitled

  • drame bourgeois (French literature)

    Drame bourgeois, type of play that enjoyed brief popularity in France in the late 18th century. Written for and about the middle class and based upon the theories of the French essayist and encyclopaedist Denis Diderot (1713–84), the drame bourgeois was conceived of as occupying a place between

  • Dramen (work by Canetti)

    Elias Canetti: They were published as Dramen in 1964.

  • Drammen (Norway)

    Drammen, city, southeastern Norway. Located at the junction of the Drams River with Drams Fjord, southwest of Oslo, the site was first settled in the 13th century as two separate communities, Bragernes and Str?ms?y. Each was granted common town privileges in 1715. In 1811 they merged with Tangen

  • Drammens River (river, Norway)

    Drams River, river, southeastern Norway. After rising on the southern slopes of the Halling Mountains as the Halling River and flowing east-northeast to the village of Gol, it flows south-southeast to Kr?deren (lake) and thence southward to enter Drams Fjord at the city of Drammen after a course of

  • Drammenselva (river, Norway)

    Drams River, river, southeastern Norway. After rising on the southern slopes of the Halling Mountains as the Halling River and flowing east-northeast to the village of Gol, it flows south-southeast to Kr?deren (lake) and thence southward to enter Drams Fjord at the city of Drammen after a course of

  • Dramouss (work by Laye)

    Camara Laye: …L’Enfant noir, entitled Dramouss (1966; A Dream of Africa), is less nostalgic than its predecessor and much more heavily weighted with social commentary, because the chief character, returning to his native land after six years in Paris, finds that political violence has replaced the values and way of life he…

  • Drams River (river, Norway)

    Drams River, river, southeastern Norway. After rising on the southern slopes of the Halling Mountains as the Halling River and flowing east-northeast to the village of Gol, it flows south-southeast to Kr?deren (lake) and thence southward to enter Drams Fjord at the city of Drammen after a course of

  • Dramselva (river, Norway)

    Drams River, river, southeastern Norway. After rising on the southern slopes of the Halling Mountains as the Halling River and flowing east-northeast to the village of Gol, it flows south-southeast to Kr?deren (lake) and thence southward to enter Drams Fjord at the city of Drammen after a course of

  • Drancy (France)

    Drancy, northeastern industrial suburb of Paris, Seine–Saint-Denis département, ?le-de-France région, north-central France. It lies 3 miles (5 km) from the city limits of the capital and is linked to the regional express railway. During the German occupation of France in World War II, buildings in

  • Drang (philosophy)

    Max Scheler: …vital energy, or “impulsion” (Drang). Impulsion is the nonphysical life energy that propels all biological motion and growth, up to and including all activities of the mind. According to Scheler, only by temporarily suspending impulsion would one be able to achieve pure intuitions of an unadulterated consciousness. Thus, whereas…

  • Drang nach Osten (German history)

    Drang nach Osten, (German: “Drive to the East”), German policy or disposition to colonize the Slavic lands east of Germany. The term originally referred to the eastward movement of German settlers in the 12th and 13th centuries but was resurrected by Adolf Hitler in the 20th century to describe his

  • Drangiana (depression, Asia)

    Sīstān, extensive border region, eastern Iran and southwestern Afghanistan. Forty percent of its area is in Iran, as well as the majority of its sparse population. The region comprises a large depression some 1,500–1,700 feet (450–520 m) in elevation. Numerous rivers fill a series of lagoons

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