You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Duke of Bedford, Master of the (English artist)

    Western painting: International Gothic: …of the artist called the Master of the Duke of Bedford, often seems to run wild and to lack the restraint characteristic of Parisian painting up to this date.

  • Duke of Clarence Island (atoll, Tokelau, New Zealand)

    Nukunonu, coral atoll of Tokelau, a dependency of New Zealand in the South Pacific Ocean. It comprises 30 islets encircling a lagoon 8 miles (13 km) by 7 miles (11.3 km). Discovered (1791) and named Duke of Clarence Island by the captain of the British ship Pandora, which was searching for

  • Duke of Earl, the (American baseball player and manager)

    Earl Weaver, American professional baseball player and manager whose career managerial record of 1,480 wins and 1,060 losses is one of the best in major league history. Weaver managed the Baltimore Orioles for 17 seasons (1968–82; 1985–86), leading them to four American League (AL) titles—three in

  • Duke of Flatbush, the (American baseball player)

    Duke Snider, American professional baseball player who was best known for playing centre field on the famed “Boys of Summer” Brooklyn Dodgers teams of the 1950s. Snider was raised in Compton, California, where he came to the attention of the Dodgers while playing for Compton Junior College. He

  • Duke of York Group (islands, Papua New Guinea)

    Duke of York Group, coral formations of the Bismarck Archipelago, eastern Papua New Guinea, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The Duke of York Group is situated in St. George’s Channel between the islands of New Ireland (east) and New Britain (southwest). The low, wooded islands, which include

  • Duke of York Island (atoll, Tokelau, New Zealand)

    Atafu, coral atoll of Tokelau, a territory of New Zealand in the South Pacific Ocean. It comprises 19 islets that rise to 15 feet (5 metres) above sea level and enclose a lagoon measuring 3 miles (5 km) by 2.5 miles (4 km). Discovered (1765) by British navigator John Byron, who named it Duke of

  • Duke of York Islands (islands, Papua New Guinea)

    Duke of York Group, coral formations of the Bismarck Archipelago, eastern Papua New Guinea, in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The Duke of York Group is situated in St. George’s Channel between the islands of New Ireland (east) and New Britain (southwest). The low, wooded islands, which include

  • Duke Power Company (American corporation)

    Griggs v. Duke Power Co.: …African American workers at the Duke Power Company in North Carolina sued the company because of a rule that required employees who were transferring between different departments to have a high-school diploma or pass an intelligence test. The plaintiffs in the case, the employees, argued that those requirements did not…

  • Duke Records (American company)

    Duke and Peacock Records: A decade before the ascendance of Motown, Houston’s Duke and Peacock record labels flourished as an African-American-owned company. Don Robey, a nightclub owner with reputed underworld connections, founded Peacock Records in 1949 and ran it with an iron hand. In 1952 Robey and James Mattias…

  • Duke Town (Nigeria)

    Efik: …some) and founded Creek Town, Duke Town, and other settlements.

  • Duke University (university, Durham, North Carolina, United States)

    Duke University, private coeducational institution of higher learning in Durham, North Carolina, U.S., affiliated with but not controlled by the United Methodist Church. In 1838 a regular program of education was initiated at a schoolhouse in Randolph county, to the west of Durham, and a year later

  • Duke’s Children, The (novel by Trollope)

    Palliser novels: >The Duke’s Children.

  • Duke’s Theatre, Dorset Garden (theatre, London, United Kingdom)

    Western theatre: Restoration theatre: …Sir Christopher Wren built the Duke’s Theatre, Dorset Garden, for Davenant, and three years later he built the first Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, for Killigrew. These theatres combined Continental innovations with some of the features of the Elizabethan stage. A curved “apron” stage extended beyond the proscenium arch from which…

  • Duke, Angier Biddle (American diplomat)

    Angier Biddle Duke, U.S. heir to the American Tobacco Co. fortune, diplomat, and chief of protocol to Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson (b. Nov. 30, 1915--d. April 29,

  • Duke, Anna Marie (American actress)

    Patty Duke, (Anna Marie Duke; Patty Duke Astin; Anna Pearce), American actress (born Dec. 14, 1946, Elmhurst, N.Y.—died March 29, 2016, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho), won an Academy Award for best supporting actress in 1963 for her powerful performance as the deaf and blind Helen Keller, who is taught to

  • Duke, Benjamin N. (American tobacco magnate)

    American Tobacco Company: …1874 he and his sons, Benjamin N. Duke and James Buchanan Duke, built a factory and in 1878 formed the firm of W. Duke, Sons & Co., one of the first tobacco companies to introduce cigarette-manufacturing machines.

  • Duke, David (American politician)

    Louisiana: Louisiana since c. 1900: One Republican, David Duke—an avowed white supremacist and former head of the KKK—was elected to a term (1989–93) in the Louisiana House of Representatives and has run for other state and federal offices. Edwin W. Edwards, a flamboyant Democrat who was elected governor four times between 1972…

  • Duke, Doris (American philanthropist)

    Doris Duke, U.S. tobacco heiress and philanthropist (born Nov. 22, 1912, New York, N.Y.—died Oct. 28, 1993, Beverly Hills, Calif.), inherited most of her father’s American Tobacco Co. fortune at the age of 12 and used her position as one of the world’s richest women to benefit Duke University, A

  • Duke, George (American musician and record producer)

    George Duke, American musician and record producer (born Jan. 12, 1946, San Rafael, Calif.—died Aug. 5, 2013, Los Angeles, Calif.), crossed jazz and popular-music boundaries repeatedly during his more-than-40-year career of playing soulful music on keyboard instruments (particularly the

  • Duke, James Buchanan (American tobacco magnate)

    James Buchanan Duke, American tobacco magnate and philanthropist. The son of Washington Duke, who had entered the tobacco business after the American Civil War, James entered the family business with his brother Benjamin (1855–1929). When the principal American cigarette-manufacturing companies

  • Duke, Patty (American actress)

    Patty Duke, (Anna Marie Duke; Patty Duke Astin; Anna Pearce), American actress (born Dec. 14, 1946, Elmhurst, N.Y.—died March 29, 2016, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho), won an Academy Award for best supporting actress in 1963 for her powerful performance as the deaf and blind Helen Keller, who is taught to

  • Duke, Vernon (American composer)

    Vernon Duke, Russian-born American composer noted for his sophisticated melodies for films, Broadway musicals, and revues. Among his most popular songs are “April in Paris” from the revue Walk a Little Faster (1932) and “I Can’t Get Started” from Ziegfeld Follies of 1936. After training at the Kiev

  • Duke, Washington (American tobacco magnate)

    American Tobacco Company: …Carolina, when a Confederate veteran, Washington Duke, began trading in tobacco. In 1874 he and his sons, Benjamin N. Duke and James Buchanan Duke, built a factory and in 1878 formed the firm of W. Duke, Sons & Co., one of the first tobacco companies to introduce cigarette-manufacturing machines.

  • Dukelsky, Vladimir Aleksandrovich (American composer)

    Vernon Duke, Russian-born American composer noted for his sophisticated melodies for films, Broadway musicals, and revues. Among his most popular songs are “April in Paris” from the revue Walk a Little Faster (1932) and “I Can’t Get Started” from Ziegfeld Follies of 1936. After training at the Kiev

  • Dukenfield, William Claude (American actor)

    W.C. Fields, actor whose flawless timing and humorous cantankerousness made him one of America’s greatest comedians. His real-life and screen personalities were often indistinguishable, and he is remembered for his distinctive nasal voice, his antisocial character, and his fondness for alcohol.

  • Dukes, Alan (Irish politician)

    Ireland: The rough road to prosperity: …Gael and was succeeded by Alan Dukes. The new Progressive Democrat party (PD), formed in December 1985 largely from Fianna Fáil dissidents under the leadership of Desmond O’Malley, made a strong showing. Following a decision in November 1986 to abandon its policy of refusing to contest Dáil elections, Sinn Féin,…

  • Dukes, Marie (ballet producer, director, and teacher)

    Dame Marie Rambert, ballet producer, director, and teacher who founded Ballet Rambert, the oldest English ballet company still performing. A student of émile Jaques-Dalcroze, the originator of eurhythmics, Rambert was invited in 1913 to teach this technique of rhythmic education to members of Serge

  • dukha (Buddhism)

    Dukkha, (Pāli: “sorrow,” “suffering”) in Buddhist thought, the true nature of all existence. Much Buddhist doctrine is based on the fact of suffering; its reality, cause, and means of suppression formed the subject of the Buddha’s first sermon (see Four Noble Truths). Recognition of the fact of

  • Dukhān (Qatar)

    Qatar: Resources and power: …along the western coast at Dukhān and offshore from the eastern coast, are modest by regional standards.

  • Dukhān Hill, Al- (hill, Bahrain)

    Bahrain: Relief and drainage: …metres) above sea level at Al-Dukhān Hill (Jabal Al-Dukhān), the country’s highest point. The southern and western lowlands consist of a bleak sandy plain with some salt marshes, while the northern and northwestern coasts afford a striking contrast, forming a narrow belt of date palms and vegetable gardens irrigated from…

  • Dukhobor (Russian religious sect)

    Dukhobor, (Russian: “Spirit Wrestler”), member of a Russian peasant religious sect, prominent in the 18th century, that rejected all external authority, including the Bible, in favour of direct individual revelation. The liturgical reforms of Patriarch Nikon in 1652 and the opening of Russia to

  • Dukhonin, Nikolay Nikolayevich (Russian commander)

    Nikolay Nikolayevich Dukhonin, last commander of the tsarist army, killed by a mob during the Russian Revolution. One of the youngest generals in the Russian army, Dukhonin held various posts during World War I before being appointed chief of staff by Aleksandr Kerensky’s provisional government in

  • Dukhovny Reglament (work by Prokopovich)

    Feofan Prokopovich: …drawing up in 1720 the Spiritual Regulations, a new constitution for Orthodoxy. Appointed synodal first vice president, he was responsible for the legislative reform of the entire Russian church, subordinating it to the secular and spiritual authority of Tsar Peter, and for effecting a church-state relationship, sometimes termed a Protestantized…

  • Dukielska, Prze??cz (mountain pass, Europe)

    Dukla Pass, passage through the Carpathian Mountains (locally, the eastern Beskids), on the frontier between Slovakia and Poland. The Russian army used the pass to cross Slovakia southward into Hungary in 1849 and used it again in World Wars I and II. It constitutes a major commercial route for

  • Dukkef?reren (novel by Gaarder)

    Jostein Gaarder: …Castle in the Pyrenees), and Dukkef?reren (2016; “The Puppet Master”).

  • dukkehjem, Et (play by Ibsen)

    A Doll’s House, play in three acts by Henrik Ibsen, published in Norwegian as Et dukkehjem in 1879 and performed the same year. The play centres on an ordinary family—Torvald Helmer, a bank lawyer, his wife Nora, and their three little children. Torvald supposes himself the ethical member of the

  • dukkha (Buddhism)

    Dukkha, (Pāli: “sorrow,” “suffering”) in Buddhist thought, the true nature of all existence. Much Buddhist doctrine is based on the fact of suffering; its reality, cause, and means of suppression formed the subject of the Buddha’s first sermon (see Four Noble Truths). Recognition of the fact of

  • Dukla Pass (mountain pass, Europe)

    Dukla Pass, passage through the Carpathian Mountains (locally, the eastern Beskids), on the frontier between Slovakia and Poland. The Russian army used the pass to cross Slovakia southward into Hungary in 1849 and used it again in World Wars I and II. It constitutes a major commercial route for

  • Dukliansky Priesmyk (mountain pass, Europe)

    Dukla Pass, passage through the Carpathian Mountains (locally, the eastern Beskids), on the frontier between Slovakia and Poland. The Russian army used the pass to cross Slovakia southward into Hungary in 1849 and used it again in World Wars I and II. It constitutes a major commercial route for

  • Dukowski, Chuck (American musician)

    Black Flag: ), bassist Chuck Dukowski (b. February 1, 1954), lead singer Keith Morris (b. September 18, 1955, Los Angeles, California), and drummer Brian Migdol. Later members included Henry Rollins (original name Henry Garfield; b. February 13, 1961, Washington, D.C., U.S.), Ron Reyes, Dez Cadena, Kira Roessler, and Anthony…

  • Dukurs, Martins (Latvian skeleton racer)

    Martins Dukurs, Latvian skeleton racer who dominated the sport in the early 21st century, winning the overall World Cup title eight times (2010–17). He also captured silver medals at the 2010 and 2014 Winter Olympic Games. Dukurs grew up in Sigulda, Latvia. His focus during his early life was on

  • Dukus Horant (poem)

    West Germanic languages: History: …for its version of “Dukus Horant” (a poem from the Hildesage of the Kudrun [Gudrun] epic known from the Ambras Manuscript copied by Hans Ried, 1502/04–16), which antedates the earliest extant manuscript of the Hildesage by at least 130 years. The documentary history of Yiddish is unbroken thereafter to…

  • DUKW (amphibious vehicle)

    DUKW, 2.5-ton six-wheel amphibious truck used in World War II by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps. Its primary purpose was to ferry ammunition, supplies, and equipment from supply ships in transport areas offshore to supply dumps and fighting units at the beach. DUKW is a manufacturer’s code based on

  • Dulany, Daniel (American lawyer [1722-1797])

    Daniel Dulany, lawyer who was an influential political figure in the period just before the American Revolution. The son of the Maryland official of the same name, Daniel Dulany was educated in England and became a lawyer after returning to Maryland. He was a member of the Maryland legislative

  • Dulany, Daniel (Irish-American colonial lawyer [1685-1753])

    Daniel Dulany, Irish-American colonial lawyer, landowner, and public official. Daniel Dulany went to Maryland in 1703, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1709. He soon became prominent and wealthy from his legal practice. A year after Dulany moved to Annapolis, he was elected to represent

  • dulband (headdress)

    Turban, a headdress consisting of a long scarf wound round the head or a smaller, underlying hat. Turbans vary in shape, colour, and size; some are made with up to 50 yards (45 metres) of fabric. In the Old World, the turban is of Eastern origin and is often worn by Muslim men, though after the

  • Dulbecco, Renato (Italian-American virologist)

    Renato Dulbecco, Italian American virologist who shared the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1975 with Howard M. Temin and David Baltimore, both of whom had studied under him. Dulbecco obtained an M.D. from the University of Turin in 1936 and remained there several years as a member of its

  • Dulce et decorum est (poem by Owen)

    Remembering World War I: Wilfred Owen: Dulce et decorum est: By late 1917 the enthusiasm and sense of noble sacrifice that typified earlier trench poems had given way to fatalism, anger, and despair. Wilfred Owen was an experienced, if unpublished, English poet when the war began, but his personal style underwent…

  • dulce melos (musical instrument)

    Dulce melos, (French: “sweet song”), a rectangular stringed keyboard musical instrument of the late European Middle Ages, known entirely from written records; no original examples are extant. It is possible, however, that the instrument presented to the king of France by King Edward III of E

  • Dulce, Gulf of (gulf, Costa Rica)

    Gulf of Dulce, long, narrow inlet of the Pacific Ocean, bounded on the north, east, and west by southwestern Costa Rica. Extending northwestward from Cape Matapalo and Banco Point for 30 miles (50 km), it measures about 15 miles (24 km) from the Osa Peninsula on the west to the mainland on the

  • Dulce, Mar (estuary, South America)

    Río de la Plata, (Spanish: “River of Silver”) a tapering intrusion of the Atlantic Ocean on the east coast of South America between Uruguay to the north and Argentina to the south. While some geographers regard it as a gulf or as a marginal sea of the Atlantic, and others consider it to be a river,

  • Dulce, Mar (lake, Nicaragua)

    Lake Nicaragua, the largest of several freshwater lakes in southwestern Nicaragua and the dominant physical feature of the country. It is also the largest lake in Central America. Its indigenous name is Cocibolca, and the Spanish called it Mar Dulce—both terms meaning “sweet sea.” Its present name

  • Dulce, Río (river, United States)

    Savannah River, river formed by the confluence of the Tugaloo and Seneca rivers at Hartwell Dam, Georgia, U.S. It constitutes the boundary between Georgia and South Carolina as it flows southeastward past Augusta and Savannah, Ga., into the Atlantic Ocean after a course of 314 miles (505 km). Its

  • Dulcibella (poetic device)

    Dulcibella, in English poetry, an idealized sweetheart, based on the Latin word dulcis (“sweet”). Dulcibella, like Dulcinea, represents beauty, inspiration, and virtuous love. The name was used in medieval literature and appeared with some frequency in the 16th century, but it was obsolete by the

  • dulcimer (musical instrument)

    Dulcimer, stringed musical instrument, a version of the psaltery in which the strings are beaten with small hammers rather than plucked. European dulcimers—such as the Alpine hackbrett, the Hungarian cimbalom, the Romanian ?ambal, the Greek santouri, and the Turkish and Persian san?ūr, as well as

  • Dulcina

    Antigua and Barbuda, islands that form an independent state in the Lesser Antilles in the eastern Caribbean Sea, at the southern end of the Leeward Islands chain. There is one dependency, the small island of Redonda. The capital is St. John’s, on Antigua. Antigua’s coastline is intricate, with bays

  • Dulcinea (fictional character)

    Dulcinea, fictional character in the two-part picaresque novel Don Quixote (Part I, 1605; Part II, 1615) by Miguel de Cervantes. Aldonza Lorenzo, a sturdy Spanish peasant girl, is renamed Dulcinea by the crazed knight-errant Don Quixote when he selects her to be his lady. Don Quixote perceives

  • Dulcinea del Toboso (fictional character)

    Dulcinea, fictional character in the two-part picaresque novel Don Quixote (Part I, 1605; Part II, 1615) by Miguel de Cervantes. Aldonza Lorenzo, a sturdy Spanish peasant girl, is renamed Dulcinea by the crazed knight-errant Don Quixote when he selects her to be his lady. Don Quixote perceives

  • dulcitone (musical instrument)

    celesta: The typophone, a similar, softer-toned instrument with graduated steel tuning forks instead of bars, is sometimes mistakenly called a celesta. It was invented by Mustel’s father, Victor, in 1865 and patented, with improvements, in 1868.

  • Dulhan (work by Nanda)

    South Asian arts: Modern theatre: …1914 the first Punjabi play, Dulhan (“The Bride”), written by her pupil I.C. Nanda. For 50 years she promoted rural drama and inspired actors and producers, including Prithvi Raj Kapoor.

  • DuLhut, Daniel Greysolon, Sieur (French soldier and explorer)

    Daniel Greysolon, Sieur DuLhut, French soldier and explorer who was largely responsible for establishing French control over the country north and west of Lake Superior. The city of Duluth, Minn., was named for him. DuLhut became an ensign in the regiment at Lyon in 1657, and about 1665 he became

  • dulisk (red algae)

    Dulse, (Palmaria palmata), edible red alga (Rhodophyta) found along the rocky northern coasts of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Dulse can be eaten fresh or dried. In traditional dishes, it is boiled with milk and rye flour or made into a relish and is commonly served with fish and butter. The

  • Duliujian River (river, China)

    Hebei: Drainage and soils: The Duliujian River, connecting the Daqing to the sea, helps to drain the extremely low-lying tract around the large Baiyang Lake and the Wen’an Marsh. Water from the streams is used to wash away excess salt in the alkaline soil and to make it arable. Similar…

  • Dulkadir (historical principality, Turkey)

    Selim I: Selim’s subjugation of the Dulkadir (Dhū al-Qadr) principality of Elbistan (now in Turkey) brought the Ottomans into conflict with the Mamlūk rulers of Syria and Egypt, who regarded Dulkadir as their protégé. Selim defeated the Mamlūk armies at the battles of Marj Dābiq (north of Aleppo; Aug. 24, 1516)…

  • Dulkadir dynasty (Turkmen dynasty)

    Dulkadir Dynasty, Turkmen dynasty (1337–1522) that ruled in the Elbistan-Mara?-Malatya region of eastern Anatolia. Its lands were the focus of rivalry between the Ottoman Empire and the Mamlūks of Syria. The dynasty was founded by Karaca, the chief of the Bozok Turkmen, who was recognized as nā?īb

  • Dulkadir Mehmed (Turkmen ruler)

    Dulkadir Dynasty: …I, challenging Mamlūk influence, installed Dulkadir Mehmed as ruler. He tried to maintain peaceful relations with both powers.

  • dull coal (coal)

    Durain, macroscopically distinguishable component, or lithotype, of coal characterized by a hard, granular texture and composed of the maceral groups exinite and inertinite as well as relatively large amounts of inorganic minerals. Durain occurs as thick, lenticular bands, usually dull black to

  • Dull Knife (Cheyenne chief)

    Dull Knife, chief of the northern Cheyenne who led his people on a desperate trek from confinement in Indian Territory (Oklahoma) to their home in Montana. He was known to his people as Morning Star. Five months after Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer’s defeat at the Battle of the Little Big

  • Dulle Griet (novel by Rolin)

    Dominique Rolin: …figure, a process repeated in Dulle Griet (1977), in which the father’s death triggers a host of memories. Deux (1975; “Two”) dramatizes a conflict between woman and writer represented by two sides of a single narrator. L’Enragé (1978; “The Furious One”) is a fictional biography of Flemish painter Pieter Bruegel…

  • Dullea, Keir (American actor)

    2001: A Space Odyssey: …Lockwood) and Dave Bowman (Keir Dullea), is sent to Jupiter to investigate. The middle segment of the film takes place on board Discovery and is perhaps the most memorable—and most straightforward. The ship’s computer, HAL 9000, which possesses human intellect and vocal ability, malfunctions and begins to work against…

  • Dulles International Airport (airport, Washington, District of Columbia, United States)

    Eero Saarinen: Life: ” Later, Saarinen designed the Dulles International Airport at Chantilly, Va., outside Washington, D.C. (1958–62), with a hanging roof suspended from diagonal supports.

  • Dulles, Allen W. (United States statesman)

    Allen W. Dulles, U.S. diplomat and intelligence expert, who was director (1953–61) of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) during its early period of growth. The younger brother of U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles received an M.A. from Princeton in 1916 and then served in

  • Dulles, Allen Welsh (United States statesman)

    Allen W. Dulles, U.S. diplomat and intelligence expert, who was director (1953–61) of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) during its early period of growth. The younger brother of U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles received an M.A. from Princeton in 1916 and then served in

  • Dulles, Avery Robert, Cardinal (American prelate and theologian)

    Avery Robert Cardinal Dulles, American prelate and theologian (born Aug. 24, 1918, Auburn, N.Y.—died Dec. 12, 2008, Bronx, N.Y.), was one of the preeminent Roman Catholic theologians in the United States and an astute liaison between the church’s liberal and conservative factions during the latter

  • Dulles, Eleanor Lansing (United States diplomat)

    Eleanor Lansing Dulles, U.S. career diplomat and prominent economic specialist for the U.S. State Department in Austria and West Germany, where she was hailed as "the Mother of Berlin" for helping to revitalize the economy and culture of the warworn city during the 1950s; she was also the sister of

  • Dulles, John Foster (United States statesman)

    John Foster Dulles, U.S. secretary of state (1953–59) under President Dwight D. Eisenhower. He was the architect of many major elements of U.S. foreign policy in the Cold War with the Soviet Union after World War II. Dulles was one of five children of Allen Macy and Edith (Foster) Dulles. His

  • Dullin, Charles (French actor and producer)

    French literature: Theatre: continued in Jacques Copeau’s tradition—Charles Dullin, Louis Jouvet, Georges and Ludmila Pito?ff, and Gaston Baty, known collectively as the Cartel—rebuilt the commercial theatre. They fostered a literary and poetic theatre, developing high standards of acting, production, and stage design; and they tried (less successfully) to reach out beyond the…

  • Dulong and Petit’s law (science)

    Dulong–Petit law, statement that the gram-atomic heat capacity (specific heat times atomic weight) of an element is a constant; that is, it is the same for all solid elements, about six calories per gram atom. The law was formulated (1819) on the basis of observations by the French chemist

  • Dulong, Pierre-Louis (French scientist)

    Pierre-Louis Dulong, chemist and physicist who helped formulate the Dulong–Petit law of specific heats (1819), which proved useful in determining atomic weights. He was an assistant to Claude-Louis Berthollet, eventually became a professor of physics at the Polytechnical School, Paris (1820), and

  • Dulong-Petit law (science)

    Dulong–Petit law, statement that the gram-atomic heat capacity (specific heat times atomic weight) of an element is a constant; that is, it is the same for all solid elements, about six calories per gram atom. The law was formulated (1819) on the basis of observations by the French chemist

  • dulse (red algae)

    Dulse, (Palmaria palmata), edible red alga (Rhodophyta) found along the rocky northern coasts of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Dulse can be eaten fresh or dried. In traditional dishes, it is boiled with milk and rye flour or made into a relish and is commonly served with fish and butter. The

  • Dultgen halftone intaglio process (printing)

    photoengraving: Other methods: In the so-called Dultgen halftone intaglio process, which is widely used in colour work, two positives are made from the continuous-tone copy, one through a halftone screen or a special contact screen and the other without a screen. The carbon tissue is first exposed to the screened positive,…

  • Dulus dominicus (bird)

    Palm-chat, (species Dulus dominicus), songbird of Hispaniola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic) and nearby Gonave Island, which may belong in the waxwing family (Bombycillidae) but which is usually separated as the family Dulidae. This 19-centimetre (7.5-inch) bird has a stout bill, and its plumage

  • Duluth (Minnesota, United States)

    Duluth, city, seat of St. Louis county, northeastern Minnesota, U.S. One of Minnesota’s largest cities, it is a major inland port on the western tip of Lake Superior, at the mouth of the St. Louis River, opposite Superior, Wisconsin. Elevation is abrupt, rising 600 feet (180 metres) above the level

  • Duluth, Daniel Greysolon, Sieur (French soldier and explorer)

    Daniel Greysolon, Sieur DuLhut, French soldier and explorer who was largely responsible for establishing French control over the country north and west of Lake Superior. The city of Duluth, Minn., was named for him. DuLhut became an ensign in the regiment at Lyon in 1657, and about 1665 he became

  • Duluth, Lake (ancient lake, North America)

    Great Lakes: Geology: At the same time, Lake Duluth, in the western Lake Superior basin, also drained to the Mississippi.

  • Dulwich (neighbourhood, London, United Kingdom)

    Dulwich, fashionable residential neighbourhood in the Greater London borough of Southwark, part of the historic county of Surrey. It lies in the southern part of the borough and is centred on Dulwich College. The name Dilwihs (Dulwich), meaning “Marshy Meadow Where Dill Grows,” was first recorded

  • Dulwich College (school, Southwark, London, United Kingdom)

    Edward Alleyn: …Elizabethan stage and founder of Dulwich College, London. Rivaled only by Richard Burbage, Alleyn won the outspoken admiration of such authors as Ben Jonson and Thomas Nashe for his interpretations of Christopher Marlowe’s Tamburlaine, Doctor Faustus, and The Jew of Malta and of Robert Greene’s Orlando Furioso.

  • Dulwich Picture Gallery (gallery, London, United Kingdom)

    Dulwich: Dulwich Picture Gallery (1814), fully restored after World War II, is a leading art gallery.

  • Dulzian (musical instrument)

    Curtal, Renaissance-era musical instrument and predecessor of the bassoon, with a double-back bore cut from a single piece of wood and built in sizes from treble to double bass (sometimes called the double curtal in England and the Choristfagott in Germany). The curtal was developed in the 16th c

  • Dum Dum (India)

    Dum Dum, the industrial suburbs of Kolkata (Calcutta), southeastern West Bengal state, northeastern India. The name was derived from the Persian word damdama, which refers to a raised mound or a battery. The three cities that bear the name are Dum Dum, North Dum Dum, and South Dum Dum. All three

  • dum-dum fever (pathology)

    Kala-azar, infectious disease that is a type of leishmaniasis

  • Duma (Russian assembly)

    Duma, elected legislative body that, along with the State Council, constituted the imperial Russian legislature from 1906 until its dissolution at the time of the March 1917 Revolution. The Duma constituted the lower house of the Russian parliament, and the State Council was the upper house. As a t

  • Duma Key (novel by King)

    Stephen King: and Lisey’s Story (both 2006); Duma Key (2008); Under the Dome (2009; TV series 2013–15); 11/22/63 (2011; TV miniseries 2016); Joyland (2013); Doctor Sleep (2013; film 2019), a sequel to The Shining; Revival (2014); The Outsider (2018; TV miniseries 2020); and The

  • Duma pro Opanasa (work by Bagritsky)

    Eduard Georgiyevich Bagritsky: …style of his own, publishing Duma pro Opanasa (1926; “The Lay of Opanas”), a skillful poetic narrative set during the Revolution with a Ukrainian peasant named Opanas as its hero. Although his later works expressed accord with the aims of the Soviet regime, Bagritsky nevertheless retained his Romantic style despite…

  • Dumaguete (Philippines)

    Dumaguete, city, southeastern Negros island, Philippines. Situated on the Bohol (Mindanao) Sea at the southern entrance to the Tanon Strait, it is the second leading port in the central Visayas (after Cebu City), serving both interisland and overseas vessels. Despite its commercial and

  • Dumain (fictional character)

    Love's Labour's Lost: Dumaine (Dumain)—debate their intellectual intentions. Their plans are thrown into disarray, however, when the Princess of France, attended by three ladies (Rosaline, Maria, and Katharine), arrives on a diplomatic mission from the king of France and must therefore be admitted into Navarre’s park. The gentlemen…

  • Dumaine (fictional character)

    Love's Labour's Lost: Dumaine (Dumain)—debate their intellectual intentions. Their plans are thrown into disarray, however, when the Princess of France, attended by three ladies (Rosaline, Maria, and Katharine), arrives on a diplomatic mission from the king of France and must therefore be admitted into Navarre’s park. The gentlemen…

  • dumala (tree)

    Shorea: …with a few other species, dumala (S. oblongifolia), a very large tree, yields dammar resin, which has various uses, including as varnish and incense.

  • Dumanoir, Pierre (French admiral)

    Battle of Trafalgar: …and Spanish ships, under Admiral Pierre Dumanoir, were ignored in the first attack and about 3:30 pm were able to turn about to aid those behind. But Dumanoir’s weak counterattack failed and was driven off. Collingwood completed the destruction of the rear, and the battle ended about 5:00 pm. Villeneuve…

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载