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  • Danmarks Nationalbanken (bank, Denmark)

    Denmark: Finance: ) The National Bank of Denmark (Danmarks Nationalbank) is responsible for issuing the currency and enjoys a special status as a self-governing institution under government supervision. Profits revert to the state treasury. The national stock exchange, established in 1861, is located in Copenhagen. In the early 21st…

  • Danmarks Nationalmuseum (museum, Copenhagen, Denmark)

    museum: Museums of antiquities: …in 1892 to form the National Museum of Denmark. In France the Museum of National Antiquities opened at Saint-Germain-en-Laye late in the 18th century. It still acts as a national archaeological repository, as does the State Historical Museum in Stockholm, which houses material recovered as early as the 17th century.…

  • danmono (Japanese music)

    Japanese music: Schools and genres: …most important type is the danmono, a variation piece in several sections (dan), each normally of 104-beat length. The term for koto chamber music, sankyoku, means music for three. The standard instrumentation today consists of a koto player who also sings, along with performers on a three-stringed plucked samisen lute…

  • Dannay, Frederic (American author)

    Ellery Queen, American cousins who were coauthors of a series of more than 35 detective novels featuring a character named Ellery Queen. Dannay and Lee first collaborated on an impulsive entry for a detective-story contest; the success of the result, The Roman Hat Mystery (1929), started Ellery

  • Dannebrog

    national flag consisting of a red field with an off-centre white cross. The width-to-length ratio of the flag is 28 to 34 (14 to 17), but the length may be extended until the ratio is 28 to 37. According to tradition, the Danish flag fell from heaven on June 15, 1219, during the Battle of

  • Dannecker, Johann Heinrich von (German sculptor)

    Western sculpture: Relation to the Baroque and the Rococo: …early in the period was Johann Heinrich von Dannecker. Subsequent Neoclassicists included Johann Gottfried Schadow, who was also a painter but is better known as a sculptor; his pupil, the sculptor Christian Friedrich Tieck; the painter and sculptor Martin von Wagner; and the sculptor Christian Daniel Rauch.

  • Dannenberg, Konrad (German-born engineer and rocket scientist)

    Konrad Dannenberg, German-born engineer and rocket scientist (born Aug. 5, 1912, Weissenfels, near Leipzig, Ger.—died Feb. 16, 2009, Hunstville, Ala.), was one of more than 100 German scientists who devised the V-1 and V-2 missiles for Nazi Germany and then, after the end of World War II,

  • Danner process (glassmaking)

    industrial glass: Tubes and rods: …made in three processes: the Danner process, the downdraw process, and the Vello process. In the Danner process, a continuous stream of glass flows over a hollow, rotating mandrel that is mounted on an incline inside a surrounding muffle. With the rotation of the needle, the downward glass flow gradually…

  • Danner, Blythe (American actress)

    Gwyneth Paltrow: Paltrow and Tony Award-winning actress Blythe Danner. By her own account, Paltrow knew from a young age that she wanted to act, and she appeared in her first part, a stage walk-on role, at age five. Her family moved to New York City when Paltrow was 11 years old. She…

  • Dannevirke (Danish history)

    Danewirk, ancient frontier earthwork of ramparts and ditches built by the Danes across the neck of Jutland in order to block Frankish expansion into the area. It ultimately extended to an overall length of about 19 miles (30 km) from just south of the town of Schleswig to the marshes of the river

  • Dannewerk (Danish history)

    Danewirk, ancient frontier earthwork of ramparts and ditches built by the Danes across the neck of Jutland in order to block Frankish expansion into the area. It ultimately extended to an overall length of about 19 miles (30 km) from just south of the town of Schleswig to the marshes of the river

  • Dannewirk (Danish history)

    Danewirk, ancient frontier earthwork of ramparts and ditches built by the Danes across the neck of Jutland in order to block Frankish expansion into the area. It ultimately extended to an overall length of about 19 miles (30 km) from just south of the town of Schleswig to the marshes of the river

  • Dannoura, Battle of (Japanese history)

    Antoku: …death in the famous naval Battle of Dannoura (1185) on the Inland Sea in western Japan resulted in the loss of the great sword that was one of the Three Imperial Regalia, the symbols of Imperial authority, supposedly brought to earth when the first Japanese emperor descended from heaven.

  • Danny Collins (film by Fogelman [2015])

    Al Pacino: Academy Award and later films: …of a rock star in Danny Collins (2015). After a series of roles in unremarkable movies, Pacino joined a cast of colourful characters in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood (2019). He then costarred with De Niro in The Irishman (2019), his first film with director Martin Scorsese. In…

  • Dano-Norwegian language

    Scandinavian languages: The emergence of Old Scandinavian, 600–1500: …became jak (dialects je, j?, Dano-Norwegian jeg) but remained ek (dialects a, ?) in Jutland.

  • Danoa (people)

    Lake Chad: Settlement history: …for example, were apparently the Danoa (Haddad), who currently serve as blacksmiths among the Kanembu. Other groups resisted integration into the medieval kingdoms. The Yedina (Buduma) established themselves among the inaccessible islands and along the marshy northern shore of Lake Chad, and the Kuri did the same in inaccessible areas…

  • danpi (Chinese musical instrument)

    Bangu, Chinese frame drum that, when struck by one or two small bamboo sticks, creates a sharp dry sound essential to the aesthetics of Chinese opera. It is also used in many Chinese chamber music ensembles. The drum, which is about 25 cm (10 inches) in diameter and 10 cm (4 inches) deep, consists

  • danpi bodiless ware (Chinese pottery)

    Eggshell porcelain, Chinese porcelain characterized by an excessively thin body under the glaze. It often had decoration engraved on it before firing that, like a watermark in paper, was visible only when held to the light; such decoration is called anhua, meaning literally “secret language.”

  • Danquah, J. B. (Ghanaian politician)

    J.B. Danquah, lawyer, author, and politician—the dean of Ghanaian nationalist politicians—who played a pivotal role throughout Ghana’s pursuit of independence and during the country’s early years up until his death. He was also one of the principal opposition leaders against Kwame Nkrumah, the

  • Danquah, Joseph Kwame Kyeretwi Boakye (Ghanaian politician)

    J.B. Danquah, lawyer, author, and politician—the dean of Ghanaian nationalist politicians—who played a pivotal role throughout Ghana’s pursuit of independence and during the country’s early years up until his death. He was also one of the principal opposition leaders against Kwame Nkrumah, the

  • Danrin school (Japanese poetry)

    Japanese literature: Early Tokugawa period (1603–c. 1770): The poets of the Danrin school, headed by Nishiyama Sōin and Saikaku, insisted that it was pointless to waste months if not years perfecting a sequence of 100 verses. Their ideal was rapid and impromptu composition, and their verses, generally colloquial in diction, were intended to amuse for a…

  • Dans la solitude des champs de coton (play by Koltès)

    French literature: Drama: His Dans la solitude des champs de coton (1986; “In the Solitude of Cotton Fields”), written two years before his death from AIDS and now translated and performed across the world, is a brilliant two-actor play that embodies the central theme of his drama. Modern life,…

  • Dansalan (Philippines)

    Marawi, chartered city, capital of Lanao del Sur province, northwest-central Mindanao, Philippines. It is located on the northern shore of Lake Lanao, 3,500 feet (1,100 metres) above sea level, and it is one of the country’s largest cities inhabited by Muslims (Moros). An important trading centre

  • danse à deux (dance)

    Native American dance: Patterns and body movement: …Austrian influences probably inspired the couple dances of Latin America, for aboriginal dances juxtapose male and female partners only rarely, and never in overt courtship mime.

  • danse basse (dance)

    Basse danse, (French: “low dance”), courtly dance for couples, originating in 14th-century Italy and fashionable in many varieties for two centuries. Its name is attributed both to its possible origin as a peasant, or “low,” dance and to its style of small gliding steps in which the feet remain

  • danse macabre (allegorical concept)

    Dance of death, medieval allegorical concept of the all-conquering and equalizing power of death, expressed in the drama, poetry, music, and visual arts of western Europe mainly in the late Middle Ages. Strictly speaking, it is a literary or pictorial representation of a procession or dance of both

  • Dansen gjenom skuggeheimen (work by Uppdal)

    Kristofer Oliver Uppdal: …major work is the 10-volume Dansen gjenom skuggeheimen (1911–24; “The Dance Through the World of Shadows”), which deals with the development of the Norwegian industrial working class from its peasant origin.

  • Dansereau, Pierre (Canadian plant ecologist)

    Pierre Dansereau, French Canadian plant ecologist who was a pioneer in the study of the dynamics of forests and who attempted to extend ecological concepts to the modern human environment. Dansereau attended St. Mary’s College, affiliated with the University of Montreal, and earned a bachelor of

  • Dansereau, Pierre Mackay (Canadian plant ecologist)

    Pierre Dansereau, French Canadian plant ecologist who was a pioneer in the study of the dynamics of forests and who attempted to extend ecological concepts to the modern human environment. Dansereau attended St. Mary’s College, affiliated with the University of Montreal, and earned a bachelor of

  • Danserinden (work by Paludan-Müller)

    Frederik Paludan-Müller: …philosophy) for his Byronic epic Danserinden (1833; “The Danseuse”).

  • Dansgaard, Willi (Danish paleoclimatologist)

    Willi Dansgaard, Danish paleoclimatologist (born Aug. 30, 1922, Copenhagen, Den.—died Jan. 8, 2011, Copenhagen), pioneered research with ice cores drilled into Greenland’s ice cap to understand changes in Earth’s atmosphere and climate over the most recent 150,000 years. Dansgaard was educated at

  • Dansgaard-Oeschger cycle (climatology)

    Dansgaard-Oeschger event, any of several dramatic but fleeting global climatic swings characterized by a period of abrupt warming followed by a period of slow cooling that occurred during the last ice age. Evidence of Dansgaard-Oeschger events is primarily observed in and around the North Atlantic

  • Dansgaard-Oeschger event (climatology)

    Dansgaard-Oeschger event, any of several dramatic but fleeting global climatic swings characterized by a period of abrupt warming followed by a period of slow cooling that occurred during the last ice age. Evidence of Dansgaard-Oeschger events is primarily observed in and around the North Atlantic

  • Danshui (Taiwan)

    Tan-shui, former municipality (shih, or shi), northern Taiwan. In 2010 it became a city district of the special municipality of New Taipei City, which had been created when the former T’ai-pei county was administratively reorganized. Tan-shui is located on the northern bank of the Tan-shui River at

  • Dansk Folkeparti (political party, Denmark)

    Denmark: Denmark since the 1990s: …the ascendancy of the far-right Danish People’s Party (Dansk Folkeparti), a nationalist organization focused on immigration control. The new government immediately instituted policies further restricting immigration, including rules preventing would-be immigrants younger than age 24 from being naturalized as a result of marriage to, or sponsorship by, a Danish citizen.…

  • Dansk language

    Danish language, the official language of Denmark, spoken there by more than five million people. It is also spoken in a few communities south of the German border; it is taught in the schools of the Faroe Islands, of Iceland, and of Greenland. Danish belongs to the East Scandinavian branch of

  • dansk students eventyr, En (work by M?ller)

    Poul Martin M?ller: …read his most famous work, En dansk students eventyr (“The Adventures of a Danish Student”), to the students’ union at Copenhagen in 1824. Originally planned as a historical novel in the manner of Sir Walter Scott, it describes, in its final (though fragmentary) form, student life as experienced by its…

  • danske Mercurius, Den (Danish newspaper)

    Danish literature: The literary Renaissance: …of the first Danish newspaper, Den danske Mercurius (from 1666), in which the news appeared in rhymed alexandrines. The only truly great poet of the period was Thomas Kingo, a supreme master in almost every kind of poetry. His hymns reflect a violent, passionate character, worldly and yet deeply religious.

  • Danson, Ted (American actor)

    Mary Steenburgen: She starred with Ted Danson (her husband from 1995) in the acclaimed two-part TV miniseries Gulliver’s Travels (1996). Steenburgen and Danson also starred in the short-lived TV comedy Ink (1996–97). She later appeared in Life as a House (2001), John Sayles’s Sunshine State (2002), the romance Hope Springs…

  • danson-johi (Japanese society)

    Japan: The Tokugawa status system: …low, and the idea of danson-johi (“respect for the male, contempt for the female”) was prevalent.

  • Dan?ovsky, Václav (Czech poet)

    Otakar B?ezina, poet who had a considerable influence on the development of 20th-century Czech poetry. B?ezina spent most of his life as a schoolmaster in Moravia. Although isolated from public life, he was well informed about the national and international literary movements that influenced the

  • Dansu Dansu Dansu (novel by Murakami Haruki)

    Haruki Murakami: …with Dansu Dansu Dansu (1988; Dance Dance Dance).

  • dánta grádha (Gaelic literary genre)

    Celtic literature: Bardic verse: …produce the enchanting poems called dánta grádha. A different departure from praise poetry was the crosánacht, in which verse was frequently interspersed with humorous or satirical prose passages.

  • Dante (Italian poet)

    Dante, Italian poet, prose writer, literary theorist, moral philosopher, and political thinker. He is best known for the monumental epic poem La commedia, later named La divina commedia (The Divine Comedy). Dante’s Divine Comedy, a landmark in Italian literature and among the greatest works of all

  • Dante and Virgil in Hell (work by Delacroix)

    Eugène Delacroix: Development of mature style: …he exhibited his first masterpiece, Dante and Virgil in Hell, is one of the landmarks in the development of French 19th-century Romantic painting. Dante and Virgil in Hell was inspired by Dante’s Divine Comedy, but its tragic feeling and the powerful modeling of its figures are reminiscent of Michelangelo, and…

  • Dante chair

    Scissors chair, chair supported by two crossed and curved supports either at the sides or at the back and front. Because of its basic simplicity, it is one of the oldest forms of chair or stool, with examples reaching back to the 2nd millennium bc. The seat, which was originally made of leather or

  • Dante’s Convivio (poem by Dante)

    aesthetics: Medieval aesthetics: 1304–07; The Banquet). In this piece, generally considered one of the first sustained works of literary criticism in the modern manner, the poet analyzes the four levels of meaning contained in his own poems.

  • Dante’s View (mountain, United States)

    Amargosa Range: Dante’s View, in the Black Mountains, rises to 5,475 feet (1,669 m) and provides a clear view of Death Valley and the Panamint Range, which lies beyond it.

  • Dante, Piazza (marketplace, Naples, Italy)

    Naples: Via Toledo: …into the Neoclassical hemicycle of Piazza Dante, Via Toledo resumes its route under other names, skirting the western flank of the National Archaeological Museum in its ascent toward Capodimonte.

  • Danter, John (English printer)

    history of publishing: England: …printed by a notorious pirate, John Danter, who also brought out, anonymously, a defective Romeo and Juliet (1597), largely from shorthand notes made during performance. Eighteen of the plays appeared in “good” and “bad” quartos before the great First Folio in 1623. A typical imprint of the time, of the…

  • Dantès, Edmond (fictional character)

    Edmond Dantès, fictional character, the hero of the novel The Count of Monte Cristo (1844–45) by Alexandre Dumas père. When Dantès is imprisoned as a young sailor because of the treachery of four acquaintances, he spends the rest of his life plotting and then carrying out plans for revenge against

  • Dantès, Edmond (American film director)

    John Hughes, American film director, writer, and producer who in the 1980s established the modern American teen movie as a genre. Hughes successfully portrayed the reality of adolescent life while maintaining a funny and lighthearted tone. As a teen, Hughes moved with his family to Chicago, the

  • Danthonia (plant genus)

    oat grass: …genera of grasses, Arrhenatherum and Danthonia (family Poaceae). Named for their similarity to true oats (Avena sativa), the plants generally feature long dense spikelets of seeds. Several species are grown as forage and pasture grasses.

  • Danthonia spicata (plant)

    oat grass: Poverty oat grass (D. spicata) is a grayish green mat-forming species that grows on dry poor soil in many parts of North America.

  • Danti, Vincenzo (Italian sculptor)

    Western sculpture: Mannerism: Vincenzo Danti followed closely in Michelangelo’s footsteps. His bronze “Julius III” of 1553–56 in Perugia is derived from Michelangelo’s lost bronze statue of Julius II for Bologna. Many of his figures in marble are only free variations on themes by Michelangelo. In much the same…

  • Danticat, Edwidge (Haitian American author)

    Edwidge Danticat, Haitian American author whose works focus on the lives of women and their relationships. She also addressed issues of power, injustice, and poverty. By the time she was four years old, her mother and father had moved to the United States, leaving Danticat and her brother behind

  • Dantidurga (Rā??rakū?a leader)

    India: The Deccan: …a feudatory of the Calukyas, Dantidurga of the Rashtrakuta dynasty, rose to importance and established himself in place of the declining Calukya dynasty. The Eastern Calukyas, who had managed to avoid involvement in the conflict, survived longer and came into conflict with the Rashtrakutas. Another branch of the Calukyas established…

  • Dantin, Louis (French-Canadian poet)

    Eugène Seers, French Canadian poet and critic who is regarded as the first major literary critic of Quebec. While a member of the religious order Congrégation de Très Saint-Sacrement, he wrote religious poetry, short stories, and critical articles, especially on the poetry of émile Nelligan. Seers

  • Dantiscus, Johannes (Polish author and bishop)

    Johannes Dantiscus, Polish poet and diplomat who was among the first representatives in Poland of Renaissance humanism. Dantiscus wrote, in Latin, incidental verse, love poetry, and panegyrics (formal speeches of praise). A courtier to the Polish king Sigismund I, Dantiscus accompanied the king to

  • Dantley, Adrian (American basketball player)

    Utah Jazz: …Utah, the team traded for Adrian Dantley, who became the key figure in the Jazz’s ascent to the upper echelon of the Western Conference. In the 1983–84 season, Dantley led the Jazz to a 45–37 record and a division title. While the Jazz lost in the conference semifinals to the…

  • Danto, Arthur (American philosopher and critic)

    Arthur Coleman Danto, American philosopher and critic (born Jan. 1, 1924, Ann Arbor, Mich.—died Oct. 25, 2013, New York, N.Y.), shaped theories about the nature of art both as a professor (1952–92) at Columbia University, New York City, and as an art critic (1984–2009) for The Nation magazine.

  • Danto, Arthur Coleman (American philosopher and critic)

    Arthur Coleman Danto, American philosopher and critic (born Jan. 1, 1924, Ann Arbor, Mich.—died Oct. 25, 2013, New York, N.Y.), shaped theories about the nature of art both as a professor (1952–92) at Columbia University, New York City, and as an art critic (1984–2009) for The Nation magazine.

  • Danton’s Death (opera by Einem)

    Gottfried von Einem: …first opera, Dantons Tod (Danton’s Death), with a text by Blacher based on Georg Büchner’s play, was produced in 1947 at the Salzburg Festival. The opera Der Prozess (The Trial), a work inspired by Einem’s 1938 arrest and by Franz Kafka’s novel, was first performed in 1953. Einem composed…

  • Danton’s Death (play by Büchner)

    Georg Büchner: His first play, Dantons Tod (1835; Danton’s Death), a drama of the French Revolution, is suffused with deep pessimism. Its protagonist, the revolutionary Danton, is shown as a man deeply distraught at the bloodshed he had helped unleash. Leonce und Lena (written 1836), a satire on the nebulous…

  • Danton, Georges (French revolutionary leader)

    Georges Danton, French Revolutionary leader and orator, often credited as the chief force in the overthrow of the monarchy and the establishment of the First French Republic (September 21, 1792). He later became the first president of the Committee of Public Safety, but his increasing moderation

  • Danton, Georges-Jacques (French revolutionary leader)

    Georges Danton, French Revolutionary leader and orator, often credited as the chief force in the overthrow of the monarchy and the establishment of the First French Republic (September 21, 1792). He later became the first president of the Committee of Public Safety, but his increasing moderation

  • Dantons Tod (opera by Einem)

    Gottfried von Einem: …first opera, Dantons Tod (Danton’s Death), with a text by Blacher based on Georg Büchner’s play, was produced in 1947 at the Salzburg Festival. The opera Der Prozess (The Trial), a work inspired by Einem’s 1938 arrest and by Franz Kafka’s novel, was first performed in 1953. Einem composed…

  • Dantons Tod (play by Büchner)

    Georg Büchner: His first play, Dantons Tod (1835; Danton’s Death), a drama of the French Revolution, is suffused with deep pessimism. Its protagonist, the revolutionary Danton, is shown as a man deeply distraught at the bloodshed he had helped unleash. Leonce und Lena (written 1836), a satire on the nebulous…

  • Dantu (China)

    Zhenjiang, city and port, southern Jiangsu sheng (province), China, situated on the southern bank of the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang). It was capital of the province in 1928–49. Pop. (2002 est.) 536,137; (2007 est.) urban agglom., 854,000. Zhenjiang was the seat of feudal domains from the 8th

  • Dantyszek, Jan (Polish author and bishop)

    Johannes Dantiscus, Polish poet and diplomat who was among the first representatives in Poland of Renaissance humanism. Dantiscus wrote, in Latin, incidental verse, love poetry, and panegyrics (formal speeches of praise). A courtier to the Polish king Sigismund I, Dantiscus accompanied the king to

  • Dantzig, George (American mathematician)

    George Dantzig, American mathematician who devised the simplex method, an algorithm for solving problems that involve numerous conditions and variables, and in the process founded the field of linear programming. Dantzig earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and physics from the University of

  • Dantzig, Tobias (American mathematician)

    Tobias Dantzig, Latvian-born American mathematician, best known for his science and mathematics books written for the general public. As a young man, Dantzig was caught distributing anti-tsarist political tracts and fled to Paris, where he studied mathematics under Henri Poincaré and met and

  • Danu (Celtic goddess)

    Danu, in Celtic religion, the earth-mother goddess or female principle, who was honoured under various names from eastern Europe to Ireland. The mythology that surrounded her was contradictory and confused; mother goddesses of earlier peoples were ultimately identified with her, as were many

  • Danube Bend (area, Hungary)

    Pest: Tourists flock to the Danube Bend, which stretches from Esztergom to Szentendre. Szentendre still reflects the influence of its Dalmatian Serb founders in its Mediterranean-style cityscape, Baroque buildings, and numerous museums—including the Hungarian Open Air Museum (an ethnographical village that re-creates aspects of historic Hungarian folklife); the museums featuring…

  • Danube delta (region, Moldova-Romania)

    Romania: Relief: …great swampy triangle of the Danube delta is a unique physiographic region covering some 2,000 square miles (5,180 square km), of which the majority is in Romania. The delta occupies the site of an ancient bay, which in prehistoric times became wholly or partially isolated from the sea by the…

  • Danube Gorge (region, Austria)

    Nieder?sterreich: …in the Danube Gorge (Wachau), in the southeast, and in the Vienna Basin. Later, the area was part of the Roman province of Noricum and of Charlemagne’s empire. The region was granted to the Bavarian Babenberg margraves in 976; the name Ostarichi (Eastern Region) dates from that period. A…

  • Danube Hills (plateau, Germany)

    Bavarian Forest: The Vorderer Forest, or Danube Hills, a rolling plateau situated to the southwest between the Danube and the Pfahl, seldom rises more than 3,300 feet (1,000 m) above sea level. Meadow, isolated farmsteads, and small hamlets dominate the landscape; only the higher and steeper slopes are…

  • Danube River (river, Europe)

    Danube River, river, the second longest in Europe after the Volga. It rises in the Black Forest mountains of western Germany and flows for some 1,770 miles (2,850 km) to its mouth on the Black Sea. Along its course it passes through 10 countries: Germany, Austria, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia,

  • Danube school (painting)

    Danube school, a tradition of landscape painting that developed in the region of the Danube River valley in the early years of the 16th century. A number of painters are considered to have been members of the Danube school. Chief among them was the Regensburg master Albrecht Altdorfer (c.

  • Danube Water Meadows Nature Reserve (reserve, Ukraine)

    Ukraine: Plant and animal life: …on the Black Sea, the Danube Water Meadows Reserve protects the Danube River’s tidewater biota. Other reserves in Ukraine preserve segments of the forest-steppe woodland, the marshes and forests of the Polissya, and the mountains and rocky coast of Crimea.

  • Danube-Black Sea Canal (canal, Europe)

    Danube River: The economy: …scheme of connecting waterways—include the Danube–Black Sea Canal, which runs from Cernovad?, Romania, to the Black Sea and provides a more direct and easily navigable link, and the Main–Danube Canal, completed in 1992 to link the Danube to the Rhine and thus to the North Sea.

  • Danubian Convention (convention, [1948])

    Danube River: History: …was not reached until the Danubian Convention of 1948. The new convention provided for the Danubian countries alone to participate in a reconstituted Danube Commission; of those countries, only West Germany did not join the convention.

  • Danubian culture (prehistory)

    LBK culture, Neolithic culture that expanded over large areas of Europe north and west of the Danube River (from Slovakia to the Netherlands) about the 5th millennium bc. Farmers probably practiced a form of shifting cultivation on the loess soil. Emmer wheat and barley were grown, and domestic

  • Danubian Lowland (basin, Europe)

    Little Alfold, extensive basin occupying the northwestern part of Transdanubia in northwestern Hungary, and extending into Austria and Slovakia (where it is called Podunajská Lowland). It has an area of approximately 3,000 square miles (8,000 square km). It is bounded on the south and east by the

  • Danubian Plain (region, Europe)

    Bulgaria: North Bulgaria: …Mountains is the fertile, hilly Danubian Plain. The average elevation of the region is 584 feet (178 metres), and it covers some 12,200 square miles (31,600 square km). Several rivers cross the plain, flowing northward from the Balkans to join the Danube. The Balkan Mountains border the Danubian Plain on…

  • Danubian principalities (historical area, Europe)

    Crimean War: …the Russians, who occupied the Danubian principalities (modern Romania) on the Russo-Turkish border in July 1853. The British fleet was ordered to Constantinople (Istanbul) on September 23. On October 4 the Turks declared war on Russia and in the same month opened an offensive against the Russians in the Danubian…

  • Danubyu (Myanmar)

    Maha Bandula: …Myanmar, Maha Bandula marched to Danubyu, on the Irrawaddy River, where he established his headquarters in October 1824. In December he attempted, unsuccessfully, to encircle the British, who were entrenched in the neighbourhood of Yangon. When his headquarters fell to the British, he retreated to prepare for the defense of…

  • Danvers (Massachusetts, United States)

    Danvers, town (township), Essex county, eastern Massachusetts, U.S. It lies just northeast of Boston. Founded in the 1630s by Governor John Endecott, it was part of Salem and originally known as Salem Village (site of the witchcraft hysteria of 1692). Set off from Salem as a district in 1752, it

  • Danvers, Carol (fictional character)

    Captain Marvel: From Ms. Marvel to Captain Marvel and back: Carol Danvers made her first appearance in Marvel Super-Heroes no. 13 (March 1968), and she soon became embroiled in Mar-Vell’s adventures. After Danvers was abducted by a jealous Kree officer named Yon-Rogg, Mar-Vell flew to her rescue in Captain Marvel no. 18 (November 1969). During…

  • Danville (Illinois, United States)

    Danville, city, seat (1827) of Vermilion county, eastern Illinois, U.S. It lies on the junction of forks of the Vermilion River (there bridged) near the Indiana border, about 35 miles (55 km) east of Champaign. Early inhabitants of the area included Miami, Kickapoo, and Potawatomi Indians, and a

  • Danville (Virginia, United States)

    Danville, city, administratively independent of, but located in, Pittsylvania county, south-central Virginia, U.S. It lies along the Dan River, just north of the North Carolina border, 45 miles (72 km) northeast of Greensboro, North Carolina. The earliest settlement on the site was known as The

  • Danville (Kentucky, United States)

    Danville, city, seat of Boyle county, central Kentucky, U.S., in the Bluegrass region, 36 miles (58 km) southwest of Lexington. Located along the Old Wilderness Road, it was settled in about 1775 and named for Walker Daniel, who purchased the deed for the site (1784). It was capital of the Kentucky

  • Danyang-Kunshan Grand Bridge (bridge, China)

    bridge: Danyang-Kunshan Grand Bridge: The Danyang-Kunshan Grand Bridge, located between Shanghai and Nanjing in Jiangsu province, is a viaduct 164.8 km (102.4 miles) long on the Beijing-Shanghai High-Speed Railway. Opened in June 2011 at a cost of about $8.5 billion, it is the world’s longest bridge.…

  • Danylo Romanovych (ruler of Galicia and Volhynia)

    Daniel Romanovich, ruler of the principalities of Galicia and Volhynia (now in Poland and Ukraine, respectively), who became one of the most powerful princes in east-central Europe. Son of Prince Roman Mstislavich, Daniel was only four years old when his father, who had united Galicia and Volhynia,

  • danza (Puerto Rican dance)

    Latin American dance: Puerto Rico: In the south the elegant danza was born in Ponce during the second half of the 19th century. Danza was the first national music and dance genre of Puerto Rico, and, like the Cuban danzón, it was a subtle expression of opposition to Spanish rule. As mentioned above, the closed…

  • danza de la conquista (dance)

    Latin American dance: Ritual contexts: …of Moors and Christians (la danza de Moros y Cristianos), which was performed at major religious festivals in medieval Spain. The dance was based on an older form of religious street theatre, autos sacramentales (“mystery plays”), portrayals of the competition of forces of good and evil. In the 8th…

  • Danza de la muerte (Spanish literature)

    Spanish literature: The 15th century: …anonymous 15th-century poem, the “Danza de la muerte” (“Dance of Death”), exemplifies a theme then popular with poets, painters, and composers across western Europe. Written with greater satiric force than other works that treated the dance of death theme, it introduced characters (e.g., a rabbi) not found in its…

  • danza de los Moros (dance)

    Latin American dance: Ritual contexts: …of Moors and Christians (la danza de Moros y Cristianos), which was performed at major religious festivals in medieval Spain. The dance was based on an older form of religious street theatre, autos sacramentales (“mystery plays”), portrayals of the competition of forces of good and evil. In the 8th…

  • danza de los voladores (ritual dance)

    Juego de los voladores, (Spanish: “game of the fliers”), ritual dance of Mexico, possibly originating among the pre-Columbian Totonac and Huastec Indians of the region now occupied by Veracruz and Puebla states, where it is still danced. Although the costumes and music show Spanish influence, the

  • danza de Moros y Cristianos (dance)

    Latin American dance: Ritual contexts: …of Moors and Christians (la danza de Moros y Cristianos), which was performed at major religious festivals in medieval Spain. The dance was based on an older form of religious street theatre, autos sacramentales (“mystery plays”), portrayals of the competition of forces of good and evil. In the 8th…

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