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  • Duquesne, Abraham, marquis du Quesne (French naval officer)

    Abraham Duquesne, marquis du Quesne, French naval officer during the administrations of Richelieu and Colbert who decisively defeated the combined fleets of Spain and Holland in 1676. Duquesne served as a captain in the royal navy under two great commanders, Henri d’Escoubleau de Sourdis and Armand

  • Duquesne, Fort (historical fort, Pennsylvania, United States)

    George Washington: Early military career: …Company and had renamed it Fort Duquesne. Happily, the Indians of the area offered support. Washington therefore struggled cautiously forward to within about 40 miles (60 km) of the French position and erected his own post at Great Meadows, near what is now Confluence, Pennsylvania. From this base, he made…

  • Duquesnoy, Fran?ois (Flemish-Italian sculptor)

    Fran?ois Duquesnoy, Flemish-born Roman sculptor whose relatively restrained works reveal the influence of his close friend the painter Nicolas Poussin and helped to counter the influence of the more extravagantly emotional art prevailing in 17th-century Rome. Duquesnoy was one of a family of

  • Duquesnoy, Hieronymus, the Younger (Flemish sculptor)

    Western sculpture: Flanders: …Flanders, such as his brother Hieronymus Duquesnoy the Younger, were mostly secondary artists influenced by Rubens. Artus Quellinus the Elder reveals a much more individual style, particularly in his decorations for the Town Hall in Amsterdam, and the tendency toward a painterly style is more pronounced in the work of…

  • Dur Sharrukin (ancient city, Iraq)

    Dur Sharrukin, (Akkadian: “Sargon’s Fortress”) ancient Assyrian city located northeast of Nineveh, in Iraq. Built between 717 and 707 bce by the Assyrian king Sargon II (reigned 721–705), Dur Sharrukin exhibits careful town planning. The city measured about one mile square (2.59 square km); its

  • Dur-Kurigalzu (ancient city, Iraq)

    Dur-Kurigalzu, fortified city and royal residence of the later Kassite kings, located near Babylon in southern Mesopotamia (now in Iraq). This city was founded either by Kurigalzu I (c. 1400–c. 1375 bc) or by Kurigalzu II (c. 1332–08). Between ad 1943 and 1945, Iraqi excavations unearthed a

  • dura mater (anatomy)

    epidural hematoma: Anatomy: The outermost layer, the dura mater, provides a thicker and tougher layer of protection.

  • Dura-Europus (ancient city, Syria)

    Dura-Europus, ruined Syrian city, located in the Syrian Desert near Dayr al-Zawr. Excavations were carried out first by Franz Cumont (1922–23) and later by M. Rostovtzev (1928–37). Dura was originally a Babylonian town, but it was rebuilt as a military colony about 300 bce by the Seleucids and

  • durability (physics)

    surface coating: Exterior durability: Exterior durability—that is, the durability of protection from exterior exposure provided to substrates—is usually considered to be a special performance property of coatings. Durability includes many of the aspects of chemical and corrosion protection mentioned above, but it is most commonly thought to consist…

  • durable good (economics)

    consumption: Consumption and the business cycle: Durable goods are generally defined as those whose expected lifetime is greater than three years, and spending on durable goods is much more volatile than spending in the other two categories. Services include a broad range of items including telephone and utility service, legal and…

  • durable good, industrial (economics)

    economic forecasting: Forecasting the GNP and its elements: Capital investment by business (spending for new plants and equipment) is particularly important. The incomes generated in the process of manufacturing new equipment and building new plants play a major role in increasing consumer spending during periods of expansion. But when investment slumps, employment and…

  • Durack, Elizabeth (Australian painter)

    Elizabeth Durack, Australian painter (born July 6, 1915, Perth, Australia—died May 25, 2000, Perth), created oil paintings using Aboriginal themes, a variety of artistic techniques, and natural materials and drew international applause beginning in the 1960s. In the 1990s many of her paintings w

  • durain (coal)

    Durain, macroscopically distinguishable component, or lithotype, of coal characterized by a hard, granular texture and composed of the maceral groups exinite and inertinite as well as relatively large amounts of inorganic minerals. Durain occurs as thick, lenticular bands, usually dull black to

  • dural sheath (anatomy)

    human eye: The outermost coat: …blend with its covering, or dural sheath—in fact, the sclera may be regarded as a continuation of the dura mater, the outer covering of the brain. The inner third of the sclera, combined with some choroidal tissue, stretches across the opening, and the sheet thus formed is perforated to permit…

  • duralumin (alloy)

    Duralumin, strong, hard, lightweight alloy of aluminum, widely used in aircraft construction, discovered in 1906 and patented in 1909 by Alfred Wilm, a German metallurgist; it was originally made only at the company Dürener Metallwerke at Düren, Germany. (The name is a contraction of Dürener and

  • duramen (plant anatomy)

    Heartwood, dead, central wood of trees. Its cells usually contain tannins or other substances that make it dark in colour and sometimes aromatic. Heartwood is mechanically strong, resistant to decay, and less easily penetrated by wood-preservative chemicals than other types of wood. One or more

  • Durán Ballén, Sixto (president of Ecuador)

    Sixto Durán Ballén, (Sixto Alfonso Durán Ballén Cordovez), Ecuadoran politician (born July 14, 1921, Boston, Mass.—died Nov. 15, 2016, Quito, Ecuador), served (1992–96) as president of Ecuador and led the country with admired resolution when a long-simmering border dispute with Peru in an area in

  • Durán Bellén Cordovez, Sixto Alfonso (president of Ecuador)

    Sixto Durán Ballén, (Sixto Alfonso Durán Ballén Cordovez), Ecuadoran politician (born July 14, 1921, Boston, Mass.—died Nov. 15, 2016, Quito, Ecuador), served (1992–96) as president of Ecuador and led the country with admired resolution when a long-simmering border dispute with Peru in an area in

  • Duran Duran (British musical group)

    Neil Gaiman: …of the pop music group Duran Duran in 1984. While the subject matter was certainly not indicative of his later work, its success was, and the first printing sold out in a matter of days. It was about that time that he met artist Dave McKean, and the two collaborated…

  • Durán, Agustín (Spanish literary critic)

    Agustín Durán, Spanish literary critic, bibliographer, librarian, writer, and editor who was one of the major opponents of Neoclassicism and a major theoretician of Spanish Romanticism. The son of a court physician, Durán was sent to the seminary at Vergara, studied at the University of Seville,

  • Duran, Profiat (Spanish philosopher)

    Profiat Duran, Jewish philosopher and linguist, the author of a devastating satire on medieval Christianity and of a notable work on Hebrew grammar. Duran was the descendant of a scholarly Jewish family of southern France. He was educated in Germany and then took a position as tutor with a wealthy

  • Durán, Roberto (Panamanian boxer)

    Roberto Durán, Panamanian professional boxer who was world lightweight, welterweight, junior-middleweight, and middleweight champion. Durán began his professional career on March 8, 1967, and won the first 32 matches of his career, 26 by knockout, before losing for the first time in a 10-round

  • Duran, Simeon ben Zemah (Spanish theologian)

    Simeon ben Zemah Duran, first Spanish Jewish rabbi to be paid a regular salary by the community and author of an important commentary on Avot (“Fathers”), a popular ethical tractate in the Talmud, the rabbinical compendium of law, lore, and commentary. Before the 14th century, the rabbinical post

  • Durance (river, France)

    Durance, principal river draining the French side of the Alps toward the Mediterranean. From its origin in the Montgenèvre region, Hautes-Alpes département, to its confluence with the Rh?ne below Avignon, it is 189 mi (304 km) long. The Clairée and Guisane rivers, both of which are longer and more

  • Durand de Saint-Pour?ain (French theologian)

    Durandus of Saint-Pour?ain, French bishop, theologian, and philosopher known primarily for his opposition to the ideas of St. Thomas Aquinas. Durandus entered the Dominican order and studied at Paris, where he obtained his doctorate in 1313. Shortly afterward Pope Clement V summoned him to Avignon

  • Durand Line (boundary, Asia)

    Durand Line, boundary established in the Hindu Kush in 1893 running through the tribal lands between Afghanistan and British India, marking their respective spheres of influence; in modern times it has marked the border between Afghanistan and Pakistan. The acceptance of this line—which was named

  • Durand, Asher B. (American artist)

    Asher B. Durand, American painter, engraver, and illustrator, one of the founders of the Hudson River school of landscape painting. He was apprenticed in 1812 to an engraver. By 1823 his reputation was established with his engraving of John Trumbull’s painting Declaration of Independence. For the

  • Durand, Asher Brown (American artist)

    Asher B. Durand, American painter, engraver, and illustrator, one of the founders of the Hudson River school of landscape painting. He was apprenticed in 1812 to an engraver. By 1823 his reputation was established with his engraving of John Trumbull’s painting Declaration of Independence. For the

  • Durand, Cyrus (American inventor)

    Asher B. Durand: With his brother Cyrus Durand (1787–1868), he formed a partnership for a banknote engraving company. Cyrus invented machines for the mechanical drawing of lines that revolutionized the art of currency engraving, while Asher’s graphic work for the Federal Bureau of Printing and Engraving was influential in establishing the…

  • Durand, Guillaume (French scholar)

    Guillaume Durand, French prelate who was a renowned canonist and medieval liturgist. After receiving a doctorate in canon law at Bologna, Italy, Durand taught briefly there and later at Modena, Italy. Some time after 1260 he was appointed auditor (a judge commissioned to hear cases of appeal

  • Durand, Peter (English inventor)

    canning: In 1810 Peter Durand of England patented the use of tin-coated iron cans instead of bottles, and by 1820 he was supplying canned food to the Royal Navy in large quantities. European canning methods reached the United States soon thereafter, and that country eventually became the world…

  • Durand, Sir Mortimer (British statesman)

    India: The Second Anglo-Afghan War: In 1893 Lansdowne sent Sir Mortimer Durand, the government of India’s foreign secretary, on a mission to Kabul to open negotiations on the delimitation of the Indo-Afghan border. The delimitation, known as the Durand Line, was completed in 1896 and added the tribal territory of the Afrīdīs, Ma?sūds, Wazīrīs,…

  • Durand-Ruel, Paul (French art dealer)

    Paul Durand-Ruel, French art dealer who was an early champion of the Barbizon school artists and the Impressionists. Durand-Ruel began his career in his father’s art gallery, which he inherited in 1865. At the outset he concentrated on buying the work of Barbizon artists—particularly Camille Corot,

  • Durand-Ruel, Paul-Marie-Joseph (French art dealer)

    Paul Durand-Ruel, French art dealer who was an early champion of the Barbizon school artists and the Impressionists. Durand-Ruel began his career in his father’s art gallery, which he inherited in 1865. At the outset he concentrated on buying the work of Barbizon artists—particularly Camille Corot,

  • Durandus of Saint-Pour?ain (French theologian)

    Durandus of Saint-Pour?ain, French bishop, theologian, and philosopher known primarily for his opposition to the ideas of St. Thomas Aquinas. Durandus entered the Dominican order and studied at Paris, where he obtained his doctorate in 1313. Shortly afterward Pope Clement V summoned him to Avignon

  • Durandus, William (French scholar)

    Guillaume Durand, French prelate who was a renowned canonist and medieval liturgist. After receiving a doctorate in canon law at Bologna, Italy, Durand taught briefly there and later at Modena, Italy. Some time after 1260 he was appointed auditor (a judge commissioned to hear cases of appeal

  • Durang, John (American dancer)

    John Durang, the first U.S.-born professional dancer of note, who was best known for his hornpipe dance. In 1784, when Durang was 17 years old, he made his debut as a performer in Lewis Hallam’s “lecture” and patriotic extravaganza. Plays and dances were banned by law at that time, and the

  • dūra?gamā (Buddhism)

    bhūmi: …both transmigration and nirvana), (7) dūra?gamā (“far-going”), (8) acalā (“immovable”), (9) sādhumatī (“good-minded”), and (10) dharmameghā (showered with “clouds of dharma,” or universal truth).

  • Durango (state, Mexico)

    Durango, estado (state), north-central Mexico. It is bounded by the states of Chihuahua to the north, Coahuila and Zacatecas to the east, Jalisco and Nayarit to the south, and Sinaloa to the west. The state capital is the city of Durango (Durango de Victoria). The western portion of the state’s

  • Durango (Colorado, United States)

    Durango, city, seat (1881) of La Plata county, southwestern Colorado, U.S. It is situated on the Animas River in the foothills of the La Plata Mountains at an elevation of 6,512 feet (1,983 metres), about 100 miles (160 km) south of Montrose. Durango was founded in 1880 during a mining boom by the

  • Durango (Mexico)

    Durango, city, capital of Durango estado (state), north-central Mexico. It lies in the south-central part of the state in a fertile valley of the Sierra Madre Occidental, about 6,200 feet (1,900 metres) above sea level. Although first settled in 1556, Durango was not officially founded until 1563.

  • Durango de Victoria (Mexico)

    Durango, city, capital of Durango estado (state), north-central Mexico. It lies in the south-central part of the state in a fertile valley of the Sierra Madre Occidental, about 6,200 feet (1,900 metres) above sea level. Although first settled in 1556, Durango was not officially founded until 1563.

  • Durango root (plant)

    Datiscaceae: Durango root (D. glomerata), native in coastal ranges of southwestern North America, grows to 1.25 metres (4 feet) tall and has deeply cut leaflets and inconspicuous flowers.

  • Durānī (people, Afghanistan)

    Durrānī, one of the two chief tribal confederations of Afghanistan, the other being the Ghilzay. In the time of Nāder Shāh the Durrānī were granted lands in the region of Qandahār, which was their homeland; and they moved there from Herāt. In the late 18th century the Durrānī took up agriculture. U

  • Durant (city, Oklahoma, United States)

    Durant, city, seat (1907) of Bryan county, southern Oklahoma, U.S., located in the Red River valley a few miles north of the Texas border. Settled about 1870 and named for a well-known Choctaw family, the city grew steadily after the arrival of the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad in 1872. Durant

  • Durant, Ariel (American author)

    Will Durant and Ariel Durant: …1981, Los Angeles), American husband-and-wife writing collaborators whose Story of Civilization, 11 vol. (1935–75), established them among the best-known writers of popular philosophy and history.

  • Durant, George (American colonial leader)

    Culpeper's Rebellion: Led by John Culpeper and George Durant, the rebels imprisoned Miller and other officials, convened a legislature of their own, chose Culpeper governor, and for two years capably exercised all powers and duties of government. Culpeper was finally removed by the proprietors and tried for treason and embezzlement but was…

  • Durant, Henry Fowle (American philanthropist)

    Wellesley College: …in 1875, was founded by Henry Fowle Durant to provide women with college opportunities equal to those of men. Wellesley was the first women’s college to have scientific laboratories, and its physics laboratory was the second in an American college. The Wellesley campus, on the shore of Lake Waban, includes…

  • Durant, Kevin (American basketball player)

    Kevin Durant, American professional basketball player who won the 2013–14 National Basketball Association (NBA) Most Valuable Player (MVP) award and established himself as one of the best players of his generation while only in his early 20s. Durant was a basketball prodigy as a youth, becoming one

  • Durant, Kevin Wayne (American basketball player)

    Kevin Durant, American professional basketball player who won the 2013–14 National Basketball Association (NBA) Most Valuable Player (MVP) award and established himself as one of the best players of his generation while only in his early 20s. Durant was a basketball prodigy as a youth, becoming one

  • Durant, Will (American author)

    Will Durant and Ariel Durant: 25, 1981, Los Angeles), American husband-and-wife writing collaborators whose Story of Civilization, 11 vol. (1935–75), established them among the best-known writers of popular philosophy and history.

  • Durant, Will; and Durant, Ariel (American authors)

    Will Durant and Ariel Durant, American husband-and-wife writing collaborators whose Story of Civilization, 11 vol. (1935–75), established them among the best-known writers of popular philosophy and history. Will Durant’s writing career began with the publication of Philosophy and the Social Problem

  • Durant, William Crapo (American industrialist)

    William Crapo Durant, American industrialist and founder of General Motors Corporation, which later became one of the largest corporations in the world in terms of sales. After establishing a carriage company in Michigan in 1886, Durant took over a small firm in 1903 and began to manufacture Buick

  • Durant, William James (American author)

    Will Durant and Ariel Durant: 25, 1981, Los Angeles), American husband-and-wife writing collaborators whose Story of Civilization, 11 vol. (1935–75), established them among the best-known writers of popular philosophy and history.

  • Durant-Dort Carriage Company (American company)

    Flint: …development in 1886 of the Durant-Dort Carriage Company, and by 1900 Flint was producing more than 100,000 horse-drawn vehicles a year. The body, spring, and wheel companies of the carriage industry became suppliers for the Buick Motor Company, which moved from Detroit to Flint in 1903. The next year Buick…

  • Duranta (plant)

    Verbenaceae: … (Holmskioldia sanguinea) and species of pigeon berry, or golden dewdrop (Duranta), and glory-bower (Clerodendrum) are cultivated as ornamentals. The shrub lemon verbena (Aloysia triphylla) is notable for its fragrant oil. The family also includes teak (Tectona grandis), an important timber tree of Southeast Asia (see teak).

  • Durante, Francesco (Italian composer)

    Francesco Durante, Italian composer of religious and instrumental music who was especially known for his teaching. Durante studied in Rome and probably in Naples and in 1710 taught at the San Onofrio Conservatory. He was chapelmaster at the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo in Naples

  • Durante, James Francis (American comedian)

    Jimmy Durante, American comedian whose career in every major entertainment performance medium spanned more than six decades. As a boy, Durante wanted to become a saloon pianist. His father, a barber, bought him a piano and provided intermittent lessons. Although Durante left school in seventh grade

  • Durante, Jimmy (American comedian)

    Jimmy Durante, American comedian whose career in every major entertainment performance medium spanned more than six decades. As a boy, Durante wanted to become a saloon pianist. His father, a barber, bought him a piano and provided intermittent lessons. Although Durante left school in seventh grade

  • Duranti, Francesca (Italian author)

    Italian literature: Women writers: Francesca Duranti writes about a male character’s recollections of a house in La casa sul lago della luna (1984; The House on Moon Lake). Fabrizia Ramondino, in such novels as Althénopis (1981; Eng. trans. Althenopis) and L’isola riflessa (1998; “The Inward-Looking Island”), is also concerned…

  • Duranti, William (French scholar)

    Guillaume Durand, French prelate who was a renowned canonist and medieval liturgist. After receiving a doctorate in canon law at Bologna, Italy, Durand taught briefly there and later at Modena, Italy. Some time after 1260 he was appointed auditor (a judge commissioned to hear cases of appeal

  • Duranty, Louis-émile-Edmond (French author and puppeteer)

    puppetry: Styles of puppet theatre: …this time for the public; Louis Duranty opened his theatre in the Tuileries Gardens in Paris in 1861, but it lacked popular appeal and did not survive in its original form for very long. The next year Duranty’s experiment inspired a group of literary and artistic friends to found the…

  • Duranty, Walter (American journalist)

    Holodomor: From famine to extermination: …Moscow correspondents at the time, Walter Duranty of The New York Times, went out of his way to dismiss reports of the famine when they were published by a young freelancer, Gareth Jones, as he “thought Mr. Jones’s judgment was somewhat hasty.” Jones was murdered under suspicious circumstances in 1935…

  • Dur?o, José de Santa Rita (Brazilian poet)

    José de Santa Rita Dur?o, Brazilian epic poet, best known for his long poem Caramúru. Dur?o was a pioneer in his use of the South American Indians as subjects of literature. After an education at the Jesuit college in Rio de Janeiro, Dur?o obtained the degree of doctor of theology (1756) at the

  • Duras of Holdenby, Baron (British military officer)

    Louis de Durfort, 2nd earl of Feversham, French-born soldier who played a notable role in military and diplomatic affairs in England under Charles II and James II. Durfort (known as the marquis de Blanquefort in France) met James, then duke of York, in 1650 and went to England in 1665, where he was

  • Duras, Marguerite (French author)

    Marguerite Duras, French novelist, screenwriter, scenarist, playwright, and film director, internationally known for her screenplays of Hiroshima mon amour (1959) and India Song (1975). The novel L’Amant (1984; The Lover; film, 1992) won the prestigious Prix Goncourt in 1984. Duras spent most of

  • duration (music)

    musical notation: Pitch and duration: Representation of time (duration) by horizontal spacing is used only in a very limited way. It is in reality made almost redundant because the symbol for a note gives the necessary information itself: not its absolute duration but its duration in relation to the notes around it. These…

  • duration (time perception)

    Henri Bergson: Early years: The first result of this change was his Essai…

  • Durazno (Uruguay)

    Durazno, city, central Uruguay, on the Yi River. Long part of an unclaimed area between Spanish and Portuguese territories, Durazno was not formally founded until 1821, when José Fructuoso Rivera established a settlement called San Pedro de Durazno, a name concocted from Dom Pedro de Alcantara,

  • Durazzo (Albania)

    Durr?s, primary seaport of Albania. It lies on the Adriatic Sea coast, west of Tirana. Founded as Epidamnus by Greeks from Corcyra and Corinth in the 7th century bce, it was seized by the Illyrian king Glaucias in 312 bce. It later passed to the Romans, who called it Dyrrhachium and made it the

  • Durban (South Africa)

    Durban, largest city of KwaZulu-Natal province and chief seaport of South Africa, located on Natal Bay of the Indian Ocean. European settlement began with a band of Cape Colony traders led by Francis G. Farewell, who charted the port in 1824 and named the site Port Natal. Land was ceded to the

  • Durban Stadium (stadium, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa)

    Durban: …sporting events are held in Moses Mabhida Stadium, part of the larger King’s Park Sporting Precinct, a commercial, retail, and leisure district.

  • durbar (Indian government)

    Durbar, (Persian: “court”) in India, a court or audience chamber, and also any formal assembly of notables called together by a governmental authority. In British India the name was specially attached to formal imperial assemblies called together to mark state occasions. The three best-known

  • Durbeyfield, Tess (fictional character)

    Tess Durbeyfield, fictional character, the protagonist of Thomas Hardy’s novel Tess of the d’Urbervilles (1891). Tess is an innocent young girl whose life is changed dramatically when her family discovers its noble lineage and she becomes involved with a neighbour who bears the family’s

  • Durbin, Deanna (American actress)

    Deanna Durbin, (Edna Mae Durbin), American actress (born Dec. 4, 1921, Winnipeg, Man.—died April 20?, 2013, near Paris, France), charmed moviegoers on both sides of the Atlantic with her effervescent personality and sweet soprano voice in a series of Depression-era Hollywood musicals that featured

  • Durbin, Dick (United States senator)

    Dick Durbin, American politician who represented Illinois in the U.S. House of Representatives (1983–97) and in the U.S. Senate (1997– ), where he served as the Democratic majority whip (2005–15) and minority whip (2015– ). Durbin attended Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., where he earned

  • Durbin, Edna Mae (American actress)

    Deanna Durbin, (Edna Mae Durbin), American actress (born Dec. 4, 1921, Winnipeg, Man.—died April 20?, 2013, near Paris, France), charmed moviegoers on both sides of the Atlantic with her effervescent personality and sweet soprano voice in a series of Depression-era Hollywood musicals that featured

  • Durbin, Richard Joseph (United States senator)

    Dick Durbin, American politician who represented Illinois in the U.S. House of Representatives (1983–97) and in the U.S. Senate (1997– ), where he served as the Democratic majority whip (2005–15) and minority whip (2015– ). Durbin attended Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., where he earned

  • Durcan, Paul (Irish poet)

    Paul Durcan, Irish poet whose work displays a desire to surprise the reader by resorting to surrealist eccentricity. Durcan studied archaeology and medieval history at University College Cork. Although he described himself as a devout follower of the Christian faith (evidenced in poems such as “On

  • Durchkomponiert

    vocal music: The 17th–20th centuries: Through-composed setting proceeds to a different musical plan for each new stanza. The simple-strophic approach is effective if the entire poem suggests a central mood that can be captured in the music or if the composer creates a neutral setting that avoids detailed text illustration.…

  • Düren (Germany)

    Düren, city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), western Germany. It lies along the Rur River, on the northeastern slopes of the Eifel Hills. A Frankish settlement first mentioned in 748, it grew from the Villa Duria of Pippin III the Short, the king of the Franks. It was subsequently the seat of

  • Durenberger, David (United States senator)

    Tim Pawlenty: David Durenberger, a Minnesota Republican, in 1980. Two years later Pawlenty returned to work on Durenberger’s campaign, and in 1988 he served as political director for the senator’s reelection bid. In 1989 Pawlenty was elected to the Eagan City Council, and in 1992 he was…

  • Dürer, Albrecht (German artist)

    Albrecht Dürer, painter and printmaker generally regarded as the greatest German Renaissance artist. His vast body of work includes altarpieces and religious works, numerous portraits and self-portraits, and copper engravings. His woodcuts, such as the Apocalypse series (1498), retain a more Gothic

  • Duret, Théodore (French connoisseur)

    édouard Manet: Mature life and works: In Madrid he met Théodore Duret, who was later to be one of the first connoisseurs and champions of his work. The following year, The Fife Player (1866), after having been rejected by the Salon jury under the pretext that its modeling was flat, was displayed along with others…

  • Durey, Louis (French composer)

    Les Six: Honegger, Georges Auric, Louis Durey, and Germaine Tailleferre. The French critic Henri Collet originated the label Les Six in his article “The Russian Five, the French Six, and M. Erik Satie” (Comoedia, January 1920). Collet wished to draw a parallel between the well-known, highly nationalistic, late 19th-century Russian…

  • Durfort family (French noble family)

    Durfort Family, French noble family of prominence in the 17th and 18th centuries. The family, which can be traced back to the 11th century, claims as a member Guy Aldonce I de Durfort (1605–65), Marquis de Duras, who raised three famous sons: Jacques Henri I (1625–1704), marshal of France (1675)

  • Durfort, Louis de, 2nd earl of Feversham (British military officer)

    Louis de Durfort, 2nd earl of Feversham, French-born soldier who played a notable role in military and diplomatic affairs in England under Charles II and James II. Durfort (known as the marquis de Blanquefort in France) met James, then duke of York, in 1650 and went to England in 1665, where he was

  • Durg (India)

    Durg, city, central Chhattisgarh state, east-central India. It is located just east of the Seonath River and is part of a larger urban area that also includes Bhilai, 4 miles (6 km) to the east. The city is an agricultural market and is heavily engaged in milling rice and pigeon peas. Durg gained

  • Durga (Hindu mythology)

    Durga, (Sanskrit: “the Inaccessible”) in Hinduism, a principal form of the Goddess, also known as Devi and Shakti. According to legend, Durga was created for the slaying of the buffalo demon Mahisasura by Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, and the lesser gods, who were otherwise powerless to overcome him.

  • Durga Puja (Hindu festival)

    Durga Puja, major festival of Hinduism, traditionally held for 10 days in the month of Ashvina (September–October), the seventh month of the Hindu calendar, and particularly celebrated in Bengal, Assam, and other eastern Indian states. Durga Puja celebrates the victory of the goddess Durga over the

  • Durga Temple (temple, Varanasi, India)

    Varanasi: The contemporary city: The Durga Temple is famous for the swarms of monkeys that inhabit the large trees near it. The Great Mosque of Aurangzeb is another prominent religious building. Two of the more important modern temples are those of Tulasi Manas and the Vishvanatha on the campus of…

  • Durgapur (India)

    Durgapur, city, southern West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies just north of the Damodar River, roughly equidistant from Asansol (northwest) and Burdwan (southeast). Duragpur is connected by road and rail with Asansol and Burdwan and Kolkata (Calcutta) beyond Burdwan. It is one of India’s

  • Durge?anandinī (work by Chatterjee)

    Bankim Chandra Chatterjee: …Bengali work was the novel Durge?nandinī, which features a Rajput hero and a Bengali heroine. In itself it is of indifferent quality, but in the philosopher Debendranath Tagore’s words, it took “the Bengali heart by storm,” and with it the Bengali novel was full born. Kapālku??alā, a love story against…

  • Durgin, Francis Timothy (American actor)

    Rory Calhoun, (Francis Timothy McCown [Durgin]), American actor whose chance meeting with actor Alan Ladd led him to a career as the rugged hero of a number of B westerns in the 1950s; he also starred in the television series The Texan in 1958–60 and appeared on the soap opera Capitol from 1982 to

  • Durham (North Carolina, United States)

    Durham, city, seat (1881) of Durham county, north-central North Carolina, U.S. It is situated about 10 miles (16 km) northeast of Chapel Hill and 25 miles (40 km) northwest of Raleigh, the three cities forming one of the state’s major urban areas—the Research Triangle. The first settlement (about

  • Durham (England, United Kingdom)

    Durham, urban area (from 2011 built-up area) and former city (district), unitary authority and historic county of Durham, northeastern England. It is the administrative centre for Durham county. The historic core of the city is located on a peninsula in a bend of the River Wear. This natural

  • Durham (breed of cattle)

    Shorthorn, cattle breed raised for beef. The Shorthorn was developed during the last quarter of the 18th century through selective breeding of local cattle of the Teeswater district, Durham county, in the north of England. It is characterized by short horns, blocky conformation, and colour ranging

  • Durham (Middle English poem)

    English literature: Poetry: …of the early 12th century—“Durham,” which praises that city’s cathedral and its relics, and “Instructions for Christians,” a didactic piece—show that correct alliterative verse could be composed well after 1066. But even before the conquest, rhyme had begun to supplant rather than supplement alliteration in some poems, which continued…

  • Durham (New Hampshire, United States)

    Durham, town (township), Strafford county, southeastern New Hampshire, U.S., on the Oyster River just southwest of Dover. Settled in 1635, it was known as the parish of Oyster River until it was incorporated in 1732 and named for Durham, England. A series of savage Indian attacks began in 1675; in

  • Durham (unitary authority, England, United Kingdom)

    Durham, unitary authority and geographic and historic county of northeastern England, on the North Sea coast. The unitary authority and the geographic and historic counties cover somewhat different areas. The unitary authority is bounded to the northeast by the metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear,

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