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  • Davis, Glenn Woodward (American football player)

    Glenn Woodward Davis, American football player (born Dec. 26, 1924, Claremont, Calif.—died March 9, 2005, La Quinta, Calif.), teamed with Doc Blanchard to form arguably the greatest rushing tandem in the history of American collegiate football. The speedy and elusive Davis was “Mr. Outside” to B

  • Davis, H. L. (American author)

    H.L. Davis, American novelist and poet who wrote realistically about the West, rejecting the stereotype of the cowboy as hero. Davis worked as a cowboy, typesetter, and surveyor and in other jobs before being recognized for his writing. He first received recognition for his poems, written as

  • Davis, Harold Lenoir (American author)

    H.L. Davis, American novelist and poet who wrote realistically about the West, rejecting the stereotype of the cowboy as hero. Davis worked as a cowboy, typesetter, and surveyor and in other jobs before being recognized for his writing. He first received recognition for his poems, written as

  • Davis, Henry Gassaway (United States politician)

    United States presidential election of 1904: The candidates: As the vice presidential nominee, Henry Gassaway Davis, a railroad tycoon and former West Virginia senator, became, at age 80, the oldest candidate ever to be named to a major party’s presidential ticket.

  • Davis, Henry Winter (American politician)

    Henry Winter Davis, Maryland unionist during the secession crisis, harsh critic of Abraham Lincoln, and coauthor of the congressional plan for Reconstruction during the American Civil War. Davis graduated from Kenyon College and studied law at the University of Virginia. He began his practice in

  • Davis, Hugh (American physician)

    Dalkon Shield: …Shield was invented by physician Hugh Davis and electrical engineer Irwin Lerner in 1968. After promoting the device at medical meetings, they formed the Dalkon Corporation. In 1970 Davis published an article in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology that described a study of 640 women using the Dalkon…

  • Davis, Jack (American cartoonist)

    Jack Davis, (Jack Burton Davis, Jr.), American cartoonist (born Dec. 2, 1924, Atlanta, Ga.—died July 27, 2016, St. Simons Island, Ga.), was a founding and enduring illustrator for Mad magazine; his wildly detailed drawings were legendary within the industry and widely influenced other comic

  • Davis, Jack Burton, Jr. (American cartoonist)

    Jack Davis, (Jack Burton Davis, Jr.), American cartoonist (born Dec. 2, 1924, Atlanta, Ga.—died July 27, 2016, St. Simons Island, Ga.), was a founding and enduring illustrator for Mad magazine; his wildly detailed drawings were legendary within the industry and widely influenced other comic

  • Davis, James Bodie (American singer)

    James Bodie Davis, American gospel singer (born June 6, 1916, Greenville, S.C.—died April 17, 2007 , Philadelphia, Pa. ), was a founding member (as an 11-year-old boy) of the Dixie Hummingbirds (briefly known as the Sterling High School Quartet), an a cappella group that pioneered a style called

  • Davis, Jeep (American track and field athlete)

    Glenn Davis, American world-record holder in the 400-metre hurdles (1956–62) who was the first man to win the Olympic gold medal twice in that event. Davis excelled in track for Barberton (Ohio) High School, often scoring more individually than entire opposing teams. At Ohio State University

  • Davis, Jefferson (president of Confederate States of America)

    Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate States of America throughout its existence during the American Civil War (1861–65). After the war he was imprisoned for two years and indicted for treason but was never tried. Jefferson Davis was the 10th and last child of Samuel Emory Davis, a

  • Davis, Jefferson Finis (president of Confederate States of America)

    Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate States of America throughout its existence during the American Civil War (1861–65). After the war he was imprisoned for two years and indicted for treason but was never tried. Jefferson Davis was the 10th and last child of Samuel Emory Davis, a

  • Davis, Jim (American cartoonist)

    Garfield: Cartoonist Jim Davis (born 1945) created Garfield in 1978, after serving as an assistant to Tumbleweeds cartoonist Tom Ryan and writing his own series, Gnorm Gnat, for a local Indiana newspaper for five years. In Garfield Davis avoided topical humour, adhered to a highly readable art…

  • Davis, Jim (American actor)

    Jim Davis, American actor, best known for his character Jock Ewing, the tough, gravel-voiced patriarch of the oil-rich Ewing family on Dallas (1978–81), a top-rated American television series. Davis also appeared in more than 150 films, including Little Big Horn (1951) and The Parallax View (1974),

  • Davis, Joe (British billiards and snooker player)

    Joe Davis, English billiards and snooker player who was the world snooker champion from 1927 until his retirement in 1946. During his career Davis scored a total of 689 century breaks and held the world record for a maximum break of 147. He also held the world billiard championship from 1928 to

  • Davis, John (English navigator)

    John Davis, English navigator who attempted to find the Northwest Passage through the Canadian Arctic to the Pacific. Davis appears to have first proposed his plan to look for the Northwest Passage in 1583 to Sir Francis Walsingham, principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth I. In 1585 he began his

  • Davis, John W. (American politician)

    John W. Davis, conservative Democratic politician who was his party’s unsuccessful candidate for the presidency of the United States in 1924. Davis was admitted to the Virginia bar in 1895 but returned to his birthplace two years later. In 1899 he was elected to the West Virginia House of

  • Davis, John William (American politician)

    John W. Davis, conservative Democratic politician who was his party’s unsuccessful candidate for the presidency of the United States in 1924. Davis was admitted to the Virginia bar in 1895 but returned to his birthplace two years later. In 1899 he was elected to the West Virginia House of

  • Davis, Josh (American musician)

    trip-hop: The notable exception is DJ Shadow (byname of Josh Davis; b. Jan. 1, 1973, Hayward, Calif., U.S.), an American, who honed his version of trip-hop in northern California. A hip-hop fan disillusioned by rap’s commercialization, Shadow created emotionally evocative song suites such as “In/Flux” (1993), “Lost and Found” (1994),…

  • Davis, Julia Ann (American poet)

    Julia A. Moore, Midwestern versifier whose maudlin, often unintentionally hilarious poetry was parodied by many. Moore was born into poverty in rural Michigan. She attended school through the third grade, when her mother’s illness forced her to assume many adult responsibilities. She began writing

  • Davis, Katharine Bement (American penologist)

    Katharine Bement Davis, American penologist, social worker, and writer who had a profound effect on American penal reform in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Davis graduated from the Rochester (New York) Free Academy in 1879 and for 10 years thereafter taught high-school science in Dunkirk,

  • Davis, Kingsley (American sociologist)

    Kingsley Davis, American sociologist and demographer who coined the terms population explosion and zero population growth. His specific studies of American society led him to work on a general science of world society, based on empirical analysis of each society in its habitat. Davis received his

  • Davis, Kristin (American actress)

    Sex and the City: …idealistic and naive Charlotte (Kristin Davis). The dynamics of their relationships are revealed with wit and playful irreverence as the four friends experience love, loss, and betrayal. Carrie’s tumultuous relationship with the charismatic yet emotionally unavailable Mr. Big (Chris Noth) underpins the story line, forming a defining relationship in…

  • Davis, Lavonne Paire (American baseball player)

    Lavonne Paire Davis, (Pepper Paire), American baseball player (born May 29, 1924, Los Angeles, Calif.—died Feb. 2, 2013, Los Angeles), was a standout star during 10 seasons in the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL), playing such positions as catcher, shortstop, and third base

  • Davis, Lydia (American writer)

    Lydia Davis, American writer noted for her idiosyncratic and extremely short stories often characterized by vivid observations of mostly mundane and routine occurrences. Davis grew up surrounded by readers, writers, and teachers. Her father, Robert Gorham Davis, taught English literature at Smith

  • Davis, Marc (American cartoonist)

    Marc Davis, American cartoonist (born March 30, 1913, Bakersfield, Calif.—died Jan. 12, 2000, Glendale, Calif.), was an animator for Walt Disney Studios from 1935 to 1978 and helped create the title characters for such classic Disney films as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), Cinderella (

  • Davis, Margaret Bryan (American behavioral biologist and and paleoecologist)

    Margaret Bryan Davis, American paleoecologist best known for her pioneering work in the science of palynology (the study of plant pollen and spores). Her most-influential work involved the use of pollen recovered from lake sediment and soil to reconstruct ancient plant communities. Her research was

  • Davis, Marlin Jim (American actor)

    Jim Davis, American actor, best known for his character Jock Ewing, the tough, gravel-voiced patriarch of the oil-rich Ewing family on Dallas (1978–81), a top-rated American television series. Davis also appeared in more than 150 films, including Little Big Horn (1951) and The Parallax View (1974),

  • Davis, Meryl (American ice skater)

    Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir: …by their American training partners, Meryl Davis and Charlie White. The next year, the pair rebounded to capture their second world championship as well as the first of three consecutive Canadian titles. At the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, Virtue and Moir again finished behind Davis and White,…

  • Davis, Michael (American musician)

    the MC5: September 7, 1948), and bassist Michael Davis (b. June 5, 1943, Detroit—d. February 17, 2012, Chico, California).

  • Davis, Miles (American musician)

    Miles Davis, American jazz musician, a great trumpeter who as a bandleader and composer was one of the major influences on the art from the late 1940s. Davis grew up in East St. Louis, Illinois, where his father was a prosperous dental surgeon. (In later years he often spoke of his comfortable

  • Davis, Miles Dewey, III (American musician)

    Miles Davis, American jazz musician, a great trumpeter who as a bandleader and composer was one of the major influences on the art from the late 1940s. Davis grew up in East St. Louis, Illinois, where his father was a prosperous dental surgeon. (In later years he often spoke of his comfortable

  • Davis, Mount (mountain, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Mount Davis, highest point in Pennsylvania, U.S., at an elevation of 3,213 feet (979 metres). The peak is on a ridge of the Allegheny and Appalachian mountains in Somerset county, 15 miles (24 km) south-southwest of Somerset, near the Maryland

  • Davis, Nancy (American first lady)

    Nancy Reagan, American first lady (1981–89)—the wife of Ronald Reagan, 40th president of the United States—and actress, noted for her efforts to discourage drug use by American youths. Christened Anne Frances, she was quickly nicknamed Nancy by her mother and used that name throughout her life. Her

  • Davis, Natalie Zemon (Canadian-American historian)

    Martin Guerre: … as the impostor; the historian Natalie Zemon Davis, who advised the filmmakers, told the story and explored why the impostor succeeded in The Return of Martin Guerre, first published in French in 1982 and in English in 1983. Claude-Michel Sch?nberg and Alain Boublil’s musical Martin Guerre opened in 1996.

  • Davis, Ossie (American actor and playwright)

    Ossie Davis, American writer, actor, director, and social activist who was known for his contributions to African American theatre and film and for his passionate support of civil rights and humanitarian causes. He was also noted for his artistic partnership with his wife, Ruby Dee, which was

  • Davis, Patricia Ann (American actress and author)

    Nancy Reagan: Marriage to Ronald Reagan and turn to politics: Their daughter, Patricia Ann (“Patti”), was born in October, and their son, Ronald Prescott, in 1958; Ronald was already the father of a daughter, Maureen, and had adopted a son, Michael, with his first wife in 1945.

  • Davis, Patti (American actress and author)

    Nancy Reagan: Marriage to Ronald Reagan and turn to politics: Their daughter, Patricia Ann (“Patti”), was born in October, and their son, Ronald Prescott, in 1958; Ronald was already the father of a daughter, Maureen, and had adopted a son, Michael, with his first wife in 1945.

  • Davis, Paulina Kellogg Wright (American reformer)

    Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis, American feminist and social reformer, active in the early struggle for woman suffrage and the founder of an early periodical in support of that cause. Paulina Kellogg grew up from 1820, when her parents died, in the home of a strict and religious aunt in LeRoy, New

  • Davis, Raiford Chatman (American actor and playwright)

    Ossie Davis, American writer, actor, director, and social activist who was known for his contributions to African American theatre and film and for his passionate support of civil rights and humanitarian causes. He was also noted for his artistic partnership with his wife, Ruby Dee, which was

  • Davis, Raymond, Jr. (American scientist)

    Raymond Davis, Jr., American physicist who, with Koshiba Masatoshi, won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2002 for detecting neutrinos. Riccardo Giacconi also won a share of the award for his work on X-rays. Davis received a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1942. After military service during World War

  • Davis, Rebecca Blaine Harding (American author)

    Rebecca Blaine Harding Davis, American essayist and writer, remembered primarily for her story “Life in the Iron Mills,” which is considered a transitional work of American realism. Rebecca Harding graduated from the Washington Female Seminary in 1848. An avid reader, she had begun dabbling in the

  • Davis, Rennie (American activist)

    Chicago Seven: …the group; David Dellinger and Rennie Davis of the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam (MOBE); and John Froines and Lee Weiner, who were alleged to have made stink bombs—were tried on charges of criminal conspiracy and incitement to riot.

  • Davis, Richard Harding (American author)

    Richard Harding Davis, U.S. author of romantic novels and short stories and the best known reporter of his generation. Davis studied at Lehigh and Johns Hopkins universities and in 1886 became a reporter on the Philadelphia Record. He then worked on various newspapers in Philadelphia and New York,

  • Davis, Roquel (American music producer)

    Billy Davis, American songwriter and advertising executive (born July 11, 1932, Detroit, Mich.—died Sept. 2, 2004, New Rochelle, N.Y.), collaborated with Gwen Gordy and her brother Berry Gordy, Jr., in the 1950s on Jackie Wilson’s hits “Reet Petite” and “Lonely Teardrops.” In 1958 he cofounded A

  • Davis, Ruth Elizabeth (American actress)

    Bette Davis, versatile, volatile American actress, whose raw, unbridled intensity kept her at the top of her profession for 50 years. Davis developed a taste for acting while attending her mother’s alma mater, Cushing Academy in Massachusetts. After gaining a smattering of experience in summer

  • Davis, Sammy, Jr. (American entertainer)

    Sammy Davis, Jr., American singer, dancer, and entertainer. At age three Davis began performing in vaudeville with his father and uncle, Will Mastin, in the Will Mastin Trio. Davis studied tap dancing under Bill (“Bojangles”) Robinson but never received a formal education. After serving in the U.S.

  • Davis, Shani (American athlete)

    Shani Davis, American speed skater who was the first African American athlete to win an individual Winter Olympics gold medal. Davis learned to roller-skate at age two and a year later was skating so fast that he had to be slowed by the rink’s skate guards. He switched to ice skating at age six, a

  • Davis, Sir Colin (British conductor)

    Sir Colin Davis, English conductor, the foremost modern interpreter of the composer Hector Berlioz, whose complete orchestral and operatic works Davis recorded. Davis turned to conducting after studying clarinet at the Royal College of Music in London. He was appointed assistant conductor of the

  • Davis, Sir Colin Rex (British conductor)

    Sir Colin Davis, English conductor, the foremost modern interpreter of the composer Hector Berlioz, whose complete orchestral and operatic works Davis recorded. Davis turned to conducting after studying clarinet at the Royal College of Music in London. He was appointed assistant conductor of the

  • Davis, Sir Thomas (prime minister of Cook Islands)

    Oceanic literature: Early writings: …Oceania was Makutu (1960) by Thomas Davis, a Cook Islander, and Lydia Henderson, his New Zealand-born wife. Like their earlier autobiography, Doctor to the Islands (1954), it was written in English. The novel, which deals with the cultural conflict between Pacific and Western values in an imaginary land called Fenua…

  • Davis, Stuart (American painter)

    Stuart Davis, American abstract artist whose idiosyncratic Cubist paintings of urban landscapes presaged the use of commercial art and advertising by Pop artists of the 1960s. Davis grew up in an artistic environment. His father was a graphic artist and art editor of a Philadelphia newspaper, where

  • Davis, Thomas Osborne (Irish author)

    Thomas Osborne Davis, Irish writer and politician who was the chief organizer and poet of the Young Ireland movement. A Protestant who resented the traditional identification of Irish nationalism with Roman Catholic interests, he evolved, while at Trinity College, Dublin, an ideal of uniting all

  • Davis, Tyrone (American singer)

    Tyrone Davis, American rhythm-and-blues singer (born May 4, 1938, Greenville, Miss.—died Feb. 9, 2005, Hinsdale, Ill.), helped shape Chicago soul music in the 1960s and ’70s. He allied himself with Chicago soul and bluesmen Bobby (“Blue”) Bland, Little Milton, Johnny Taylor, and Otis Clay, among o

  • Davis, Varina (first lady of the Confederate States)

    Richmond Bread Riot: …four, and Minerva Meredith, whom Varina Davis (the wife of President Davis) described as “tall, daring, Amazonian-looking,” the crowd of more than 100 women armed with axes, knives, and other weapons took their grievances to Letcher on April 2. Letcher listened, but his words failed to pacify the crowd, and…

  • Davis, Victor (Canadian athlete)

    Victor Davis, Canadian swimmer, an aggressive competitor who won four Olympic medals. At the 1982 world championships in Guayaquil, Ecuador, Davis set a world record and won a gold medal in the 200-metre breaststroke. At the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles, he won a gold medal in the 200-metre

  • Davis, Viola (American actress)

    Viola Davis, American actress known for her precise, controlled performances and her regal presence. Davis was raised in Central Falls, Rhode Island, where her father found work as a horse groom at nearby racetracks and her mother took on domestic and factory jobs. Their income was frequently

  • Davis, Virginia Elizabeth (American actress)

    Geena Davis, American actress who was skilled at comedic roles and brought charm and likability to eccentric characters. Davis studied drama at New England College and later at Boston University’s College of Fine Arts, from which she graduated in 1979; she also worked in summer stock theatre. She

  • Davis, Walter (American basketball player)

    Phoenix Suns: In 1977 the Suns drafted Walter Davis, who would go on to set the franchise scoring record during his 11 years with the team.

  • Davis, Wild Bill (American musician)

    William Strethen Davis, ("WILD BILL"), U.S. jazz organist and arranger who popularized the Hammond organ as a jazz instrument (b. Nov. 24, 1918--d. Aug. 22,

  • Davis, William Morris (American geographer)

    William Morris Davis, U.S. geographer, geologist, and meteorologist who founded the science of geomorphology, the study of landforms. In 1870 he began three years of service as a meteorologist with the Argentine Meteorological Observatory, Córdoba. In 1876 he obtained a position with Harvard

  • Davis, William Strethen (American musician)

    William Strethen Davis, ("WILD BILL"), U.S. jazz organist and arranger who popularized the Hammond organ as a jazz instrument (b. Nov. 24, 1918--d. Aug. 22,

  • Davisean window (architecture)

    Alexander Jackson Davis: …window type he later called Davisean—vertically unified, multistoried, and often recessed windows.

  • Davison, Emily (British activist)

    Emily Davison, British activist who became a martyr to the cause of woman suffrage when she entered the racetrack during the 1913 Epsom Derby and moved in front of King George V’s horse, which struck her while galloping at full force. She never regained consciousness and died four days later.

  • Davison, Emily Wilding (British activist)

    Emily Davison, British activist who became a martyr to the cause of woman suffrage when she entered the racetrack during the 1913 Epsom Derby and moved in front of King George V’s horse, which struck her while galloping at full force. She never regained consciousness and died four days later.

  • Davison, Wild Bill (American musician)

    Wild Bill Davison, American jazz cornet player who recorded some 800 songs and traveled extensively in his 70-year career. After playing in Ohio with the Ohio Lucky Seven, Davison moved to Chicago in the late 1920s and performed in legendary gangster-run nightclubs. He worked with clarinettist

  • Davison, William (English royal official)

    William Davison, secretary to Queen Elizabeth I of England, chiefly remembered for his part in the execution of Mary, Queen of Scots. Of Scottish descent (by his own account), he went to Scotland as secretary to the English ambassador, Henry Killigrew, in 1566. He remained there for about 10 years.

  • Davison, William Edward (American musician)

    Wild Bill Davison, American jazz cornet player who recorded some 800 songs and traveled extensively in his 70-year career. After playing in Ohio with the Ohio Lucky Seven, Davison moved to Chicago in the late 1920s and performed in legendary gangster-run nightclubs. He worked with clarinettist

  • Davisson, Clinton Joseph (American physicist)

    Clinton Joseph Davisson, American experimental physicist who shared the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1937 with George P. Thomson of England for discovering that electrons can be diffracted like light waves, thus verifying the thesis of Louis de Broglie that electrons behave both as waves and as

  • Davisville (Rhode Island, United States)

    North Kingstown: …includes the villages of Allenton, Davisville, Hamilton, Lafayette, Quonset Point, Saunderstown, Slocum, and Wickford (the administrative centre).

  • Davitt, Michael (Irish political leader)

    Michael Davitt, founder of the Irish Land League (1879), which organized resistance to absentee landlordism and sought to relieve the poverty of the tenant farmers by securing fixity of tenure, fair rent, and free sale of the tenant’s interest. Davitt was the son of an evicted tenant farmer. In

  • Davos (Switzerland)

    Davos, town, Graubünden canton, eastern Switzerland, consisting of two villages, Davos-Platz and Davos-Dorf, in the Davos Valley, on the Landwasser River, 5,118 feet (1,560 metres) above sea level. The town is mentioned in historical documents of 1160 and 1213; it was then inhabited by

  • Davos Declaration (international agreement [1988])

    World Economic Forum: …in 1988 of the “Davos Declaration,” a no-war agreement signed by Greece and Turkey, which were then on the brink of war because of underwater research being conducted by Turkish entities in areas near the Greek islands. The WEF subsequently helped pave the way for some significant diplomatic breakthroughs,…

  • Davout, Louis-Nicolas, Duc d’Auerstedt, Prince d’Eckmühl (French general)

    Louis-Nicolas Davout, duke of Auerstedt, French marshal who was one of the most distinguished of Napoleon’s field commanders. Born into the noble family of d’Avout, he was educated at the école Royale Militaire in Paris and entered Louis XVI’s service as a second lieutenant in 1788. Amid the

  • Davout, Louis-Nicolas, Duke of Auerstedt (French general)

    Louis-Nicolas Davout, duke of Auerstedt, French marshal who was one of the most distinguished of Napoleon’s field commanders. Born into the noble family of d’Avout, he was educated at the école Royale Militaire in Paris and entered Louis XVI’s service as a second lieutenant in 1788. Amid the

  • Davringhausen, Heinrich (German artist)

    Neue Sachlichkeit: Carlo Mense, Georg Scholz, and Heinrich Davringhausen.

  • Davtyan, O. K. (Soviet chemist)

    fuel cell: Development of fuel cells: By mid-century O.K. Davtyan of the Soviet Union had published the results of experimental work on solid electrolytes for high-temperature fuel cells and for both high- and low-temperature alkaline electrolyte hydrogen-oxygen cells.

  • davul (musical instrument)

    bass drum: …drums are the Turkish folk davul and the South Asian dhol.

  • Davuto?lu, Ahmet (prime minister of Turkey)

    Turkey: An emboldened Erdo?an and the AKP face resistance: Ahmet Davuto?lu took over the post of prime minister that same month. Davuto?lu, an AKP member who had previously served for five years as foreign minister under Erdo?an, was widely expected to follow the course set by his predecessor in both domestic and foreign affairs.

  • Davy Crockett (weapon)

    tactical nuclear weapons: …main warhead used on the Davy Crockett nuclear recoilless rifle, a portable warhead launcher that was crewed by a single soldier. The Davy Crockett could deliver a warhead to a target up to 2.5 miles away.

  • Davy Crockett (American television miniseries)

    Fess Parker: …of the iconic American frontiersmen Davy Crockett and Daniel Boone. Although he played the former character in only a few episodes during 1954–56 as part of the Walt Disney series Disneyland, Parker’s earnest portrayal of the heroic Crockett triggered a craze among American children, a hit record of the theme…

  • Davy Crockett Lake (lake, North Carolina, United States)

    Nolichucky River: , impounds Davy Crockett Lake, named for the frontiersman, who was born (1786) on the river near Limestone. John Sevier, first governor of Tennessee, lived on the riverbank (1783–90) and was nicknamed “Nolichucky Jack.” The river was named for a Cherokee village, and the word probably means…

  • Davy Jones (personification of the sea)

    Davy Jones, the personification of the spirit of the sea, usually seen as a spirit malevolent to sailors. Davy Jones’s locker is a common phrase meaning the bottom of the ocean, the grave of those who die at

  • Davy lamp (instrument)

    Davy lamp, safety lamp (q.v.) devised by Sir Humphry Davy in

  • Davy, Edward (British inventor)

    Edward Davy, physician, chemist, and inventor who devised the electromagnetic repeater for relaying telegraphic signals and invented an electrochemical telegraph (1838). Davy, who wrote an Experimental Guide to Chemistry (1836), emigrated in 1839 to Australia, where, in addition to practicing

  • Davy, Sir Humphry, Baronet (British chemist)

    Sir Humphry Davy, English chemist who discovered several chemical elements (including sodium and potassium) and compounds, invented the miner’s safety lamp, and became one of the greatest exponents of the scientific method. Davy was the elder son of middle-class parents who owned an estate in

  • Davys, John (English navigator)

    John Davis, English navigator who attempted to find the Northwest Passage through the Canadian Arctic to the Pacific. Davis appears to have first proposed his plan to look for the Northwest Passage in 1583 to Sir Francis Walsingham, principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth I. In 1585 he began his

  • daw (bird)

    Jackdaw, (species Corvus monedula), crowlike black bird with gray nape and pearly eyes of the family Corvidae (q.v.; order Passeriformes). Jackdaws, which are 33 cm (13 inches) long, breed in colonies in tree holes, cliffs, and tall buildings: their flocks fly in formation around the site. They l

  • Daw Aung San Suu Kyi (Myanmar politician and opposition leader)

    Aung San Suu Kyi, politician and opposition leader of Myanmar, daughter of Aung San (a martyred national hero of independent Burma) and Khin Kyi (a prominent Burmese diplomat), and winner of the Nobel Prize for Peace in 1991. She held multiple governmental posts since 2016, including that of state

  • Dawa, K?gltin (Mongolian poet)

    Mongolian literature: The 20th century and beyond: The poet K?gltin Dawa (David Kugultinov) is perhaps the most recognized of 20th-century Kalmyk writers. A politician who had previously been a soldier and a labour camp detainee, he wrote lyrics that, late in his career, attained great thoughtfulness. Some of his poems were collected in English…

  • Dawānī (Persian philosopher)

    Dawānī, jurist and philosopher who was chiefly responsible for maintaining the traditions of Islāmic philosophy in the 15th century. Dawānī’s family claimed descent from Abū Bakr (the first caliph of Islām). He received a traditional Islāmic education, first at Dawān, where he studied with his

  • Dawānī, Mu?ammad ibn Jalāl ad-Dīn (Persian philosopher)

    Dawānī, jurist and philosopher who was chiefly responsible for maintaining the traditions of Islāmic philosophy in the 15th century. Dawānī’s family claimed descent from Abū Bakr (the first caliph of Islām). He received a traditional Islāmic education, first at Dawān, where he studied with his

  • Dawāsir, Wadi ad- (river, Arabia)

    Arabian Desert: Physiography: as Al-Rimah–Al-Bā?in, Al-Sahbā?, and Dawāsir-Jawb, which carried vast loads of sediment from the interior toward the Persian Gulf. The Al-Dibdibah region once was the delta of Wadi Al-Rimah–Al-Bā?in, and Al-Budū? Plain was the delta of Wadi Al-Sahbā?. The gravel plains of Raydā? and Abū Ba?r, and adjacent areas covered…

  • Dawāsir-Jawb, Wadi (river, Arabia)

    Arabian Desert: Physiography: as Al-Rimah–Al-Bā?in, Al-Sahbā?, and Dawāsir-Jawb, which carried vast loads of sediment from the interior toward the Persian Gulf. The Al-Dibdibah region once was the delta of Wadi Al-Rimah–Al-Bā?in, and Al-Budū? Plain was the delta of Wadi Al-Sahbā?. The gravel plains of Raydā? and Abū Ba?r, and adjacent areas covered…

  • Dawe, Bruce (Australian author)

    Australian literature: Literature from 1970 to 2000: …Dog Fox Field [1990]), and Bruce Dawe, who evinced the Australian voice in his contemporary, journalistic poetry appearing in, for example, Sometimes Gladness (1978). Robert Gray continued the tradition of spare, almost Imagistic lyric verse in such volumes of his as Piano (1988) and Certain Things (1993). Robert Adamson and…

  • Dawei (Myanmar)

    Tavoy, town, southern Myanmar (Burma). It lies at the head of the Tavoy River estuary on the Andaman Sea. Tavoy is a weaving centre and is engaged in coastal trade with northern Myanmar and the Malay Peninsula. It is served by an airport. A hunting reserve and Mamagan, a popular beach area, are

  • Dawenkou culture (ancient culture)

    Dawenkou culture, Chinese Neolithic culture of c. 4500–2700 bc. It was characterized by the emergence of delicate wheel-made pots of various colours; ornaments of stone, jade, and bone; walled towns; and high-status burials involving ledges for displaying grave goods, coffin chambers, and the

  • Dawes General Allotment Act (United States [1887])

    Dawes General Allotment Act, (February 8, 1887), U.S. law providing for the distribution of Indian reservation land among individual Native Americans, with the aim of creating responsible farmers in the white man’s image. It was sponsored in several sessions of Congress by Sen. Henry L. Dawes of

  • Dawes Plan (World War I reparations)

    Dawes Plan, arrangement for Germany’s payment of reparations after World War I. On the initiative of the British and U.S. governments, a committee of experts (with two members each from France, Belgium, Italy, Britain, and the United States), presided over by an American financier, Charles G.

  • Dawes Severalty Act (United States [1887])

    Dawes General Allotment Act, (February 8, 1887), U.S. law providing for the distribution of Indian reservation land among individual Native Americans, with the aim of creating responsible farmers in the white man’s image. It was sponsored in several sessions of Congress by Sen. Henry L. Dawes of

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