You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Death of a Hero (work by Aldington)

    Richard Aldington: …best and best known novel, Death of a Hero (1929), to which All Men Are Enemies (1933) was a sequel, reflected the disillusionment of a generation that had fought through World War I. In The Colonel’s Daughter (1931) he satirized sham gentility and literary preciousness so outspokenly that two lending…

  • Death of a Ladies’ Man (album by Cohen)

    Leonard Cohen: …the worse with the disappointing Death of a Ladies’ Man (1977), a collaboration with legendary producer Phil Spector, whose grandiose style was ill suited to Cohen’s understated songs. For most of the 1980s Cohen was out of favour, but his 1988 album, I’m Your Man, included the club hits “First…

  • Death of a Naturalist (poetry by Heaney)

    Seamus Heaney: …poetry collection was the prizewinning Death of a Naturalist (1966). In this book and Door into the Dark (1969), he wrote in a traditional style about a passing way of life—that of domestic rural life in Northern Ireland. In Wintering Out (1972) and North (1975), he began to encompass such…

  • Death of a President (work by Manchester)

    biography: Ethical: …the United States, William Manchester’s Death of a President (1967), on John F. Kennedy, created an even greater stir in the popular press. There the issue is usually presented as “the public’s right to know”; but for the biographer it is a problem of his obligation to preserve historical truth…

  • Death of a President, The (work by Manchester)
  • Death of a River Guide (novel by Flanagan)

    Richard Flanagan: His first novel, Death of a River Guide (1994), an account of a drowning man reflecting on his life and those of his ancestors, earned the 1996 Australian National Fiction Award. That work was followed by the highly acclaimed novel The Sound of One Hand Clapping (1997), a…

  • Death of a Salesman (play by Miller)

    Death of a Salesman, a play in “two acts and a requiem” by Arthur Miller, written in 1948 and produced in 1949. Miller won a Pulitzer Prize for the work, which he described as “the tragedy of a man who gave his life, or sold it” in pursuit of the American Dream. After many years on the road as a

  • Death of Adam, The (essays by Robinson)

    Marilynne Robinson: Early nonfiction and other works: …book of scholarly essays titled The Death of Adam (1998), which challenged the accepted views of such historical figures as John Calvin and Charles Darwin and raised philosophical and ethical questions on how to live.

  • Death of Artemio Cruz, The (work by Fuentes)

    The Death of Artemio Cruz, novel by Carlos Fuentes, published in Spanish as La muerte de Artemio Cruz in 1962. An imaginative portrait of an unscrupulous individual, the story also serves as commentary on Mexican society, most notably on the abuse of power—a theme that runs throughout Fuentes’s

  • Death of Balder, The (work by Ewald)

    Johannes Ewald: …the ode; Balders d?d (1775; The Death of Balder), a lyric drama on a subject from Saxo and Old Norse mythology; and the first chapters of his memoirs, Levnet og meninger (written c. 1774–78: “Life and Opinions”), explaining his enthusiasm for the adventurous and fantastic. In 1775 he was transferred…

  • Death of Bessie Smith, The (play by Albee)

    Bessie Smith: …the subject of his play The Death of Bessie Smith (1960). She was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in its inaugural class (1980), and she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989.

  • Death of Empedocles, The (tragedy by H?lderlin)

    Friedrich H?lderlin: …Der Tod des Empedokles (The Death of Empedocles), the first version of which he nearly completed; fragments of a second and a third version have also survived. Symptoms of great nervous irritability alarmed his family and friends. Nevertheless, the years 1798–1801 were a period of intense creativity; in addition…

  • Death of General Wolfe, The (painting by West)

    Benjamin West: The Death of General Wolfe(c. 1771), one of his best-known and—at the time—most controversial works, made a noteworthy concession to realism in its use of modern dress rather than antique drapery to depict a contemporary historical event within a classical composition. It was considered by…

  • Death of Germanicus, The (painting by Poussin)

    Nicolas Poussin: Beginnings: …in his first great masterpiece, The Death of Germanicus (1627), painted for Cardinal Francesco Barberini. Inspired by comparable compositions on ancient sarcophagi, this is the first heroic deathbed scene in the artist’s career—and in the entire history of painting—and it spawned countless later imitations.

  • Death of God movement (Christian theology)

    Death of God movement, radical Christian theological school, mainly Protestant, that arose in the United States during the 1960s, evoking prolonged attention, response, and controversy. Though thinkers of many varied viewpoints have been grouped in this school, basic to practically all of them is

  • Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions, The (work by Prejean)

    Sister Helen Prejean: …Man Walking, Prejean’s second book, The Death of Innocents: An Eyewitness Account of Wrongful Executions (2005), detailed some of Prejean’s personal experiences while ministering on death row but also attacked flaws in the American legal system that allowed innocent people to be executed. In 2019 she published her memoir, River…

  • Death of Ivan Ilyich, The (novella by Tolstoy)

    The Death of Ivan Ilyich, novella by Leo Tolstoy, published in Russian as Smert Ivana Ilyicha in 1886, considered a masterpiece of psychological realism. The protagonist’s crisis is remarkably similar to that of Tolstoy himself as described in Ispoved (1884; My Confession). The first section of the

  • Death of King Arthur, The (work by Borron)

    French literature: Prose literature: …Mort le Roi Artu (The Death of King Arthur), powerfully describing the collapse of the Arthurian world. The Tristan legend was reworked and extended in prose. To spin out their romances while maintaining their public’s interest, authors wove in many characters and adventures, producing complex interlacing patterns, which Sir…

  • Death of Klinghoffer, The (opera by Adams)

    John Adams: The Death of Klinghoffer (1991) was based on the hijacking by Palestinian terrorists of the cruise ship Achille Lauro in 1985 and the killing of a disabled Jewish passenger. The composer’s third opera, Doctor Atomic (2005), was the story of the scientists in Los Alamos,…

  • Death of Laoco?n (work by Lippi)

    Filippino Lippi: …executed a fresco of the Death of Laoco?n for the villa of Lorenzo de’ Medici at Poggio a Caiano, in which some of the decorative devices used in the Carafa Chapel are again employed, and resumed work in the Strozzi Chapel (completed 1502), the frescoes of which anticipate Tuscan Mannerism…

  • Death of Lepeletier de Saint-Fargeau (painting by David)

    Jacques-Louis David: Rise to fame: 1780–94: The Death of Lepeletier de Saint-Fargeau, painted to honour a murdered deputy and regarded by David as one of his best pictures, was eventually destroyed. The result of all this is that the artist’s Jacobin inspiration is represented principally by The Death of Marat, painted in…

  • Death of Louis XIV, The (film by Serra [2016])

    Jean-Pierre Léaud: …Mort de Louis XIV (2016; The Death of Louis XIV), Léaud was cast in the title role, and he portrayed a veteran actor dealing with mortality in Le Lion est mort ce soir (2017; The Lion Sleeps Tonight).

  • Death of Marat, The (painting by David)

    Jacques-Louis David: Rise to fame: 1780–94: …inspiration is represented principally by The Death of Marat, painted in 1793 shortly after the murder of the revolutionary leader by Charlotte Corday. This “pietà of the Revolution,” as it has been called, is generally considered David’s masterpiece and an example of how, under the pressure of genuine emotion, Neoclassicism…

  • Death of Naturalistic Photography, The (pamphlet by Emerson)

    Peter Henry Emerson: …published a black-bordered pamphlet “The Death of Naturalistic Photography,” in which he recanted his opinion that the accurate reproduction of nature was synonymous with art. Despite his change of mind, his initial views remained influential and formed the rationale of much 20th-century photography.

  • Death of Procris, The (work by Piero di Cosimo)

    Piero di Cosimo: …the theme of the famous A Satyr Mourning over a Nymph (c. 1495). The softly undulating form of a nymph, or possibly the accidentally slain Procris, lies in a meadow bathed in a golden light while a curious satyr kneels beside her and her faithful dog mourns at her feet—considered…

  • Death of Queen Jane, The (ballad)

    ballad: Historical ballads: For example, neither “The Death of Queen Jane,” about one of the wives of Henry VIII, nor “The Bonny Earl of Murray” is correct in key details, but they accurately express the popular mourning for these figures. By far the largest number of ballads that can be traced…

  • Death of Sardanapalus, The (painting by Delacroix)

    Eugène Delacroix: Development of mature style: Chief among them is The Death of Sardanapalus (1827), a violent and voluptuous Byronic subject in which women, slaves, animals, jewels, and rich fabrics are combined in a sensuous but somewhat incoherent scene. One of his finest paintings on historical subjects, The Execution of the Doge Marino Faliero (1826–27),…

  • Death of Smail Aga, The (work by Ma?urani?)

    Croatian literature: …poem Smrt Smail-age ?engi?a (1846; The Death of Smail Aga), written in the tradition of oral epic poetry and showing South Slavic allegiance by taking as its subject the struggle of Montenegrins against the Turks. Other representative lyrical works include the patriotic songs and poetic drama of Petar Preradovi? and…

  • Death of the Heart, The (novel by Bowen)

    The Death of the Heart, novel by Elizabeth Bowen, published in 1938. It is one of Bowen’s best-known works and demonstrates her debt to Henry James in the careful observation of detail and the theme of innocence darkened by experience. The novel is noted for its dexterous portrayal of an

  • Death of the Hired Man, The (poem by Frost)

    The Death of the Hired Man, narrative poem by Robert Frost, published in North of Boston in 1914. The poem, written in blank verse, consists of a conversation between the farmer Warren and his wife, Mary, about their former farmhand Silas, an elderly man who has come “home” to their farm to die.

  • Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire World, The (play by Parks)

    Suzan-Lori Parks: Parks’s other plays included The Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire World (produced 1990); The America Play (produced 1994), about a man obsessed with Abraham Lincoln; In the Blood (produced 1999), which updates Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter; and The Book of Grace (produced 2010),…

  • Death of the Virgin (painting by Caravaggio)

    Caravaggio: Continued successes and the murder of Tomassoni: …great altarpieces for Roman churches, The Death of the Virgin. Austere, solemn, tragic in its very mundanity, the work shows the Apostles lamenting the death of Mary in the poorest of homes. In the words of the 20th-century art historian Roberto Longhi, it resembles “a death in a night refuge.”…

  • Death of the Virgin (artistic theme)

    Caravaggio: Continued successes and the murder of Tomassoni: …shows the Apostles lamenting the death of Mary in the poorest of homes. In the words of the 20th-century art historian Roberto Longhi, it resembles “a death in a night refuge.” It is among the most-powerful and moving of Caravaggio’s paintings, but once more, not long after being installed in…

  • Death of the Virgin, Master of the (Netherlandish painter)

    Joos van Cleve, Netherlandish painter known for his portraits of royalty and his religious paintings. He is now often identified with the “Master of the Death of the Virgin.” In 1511 Joos van Cleve entered the Antwerp guild as a master painter, and in 1520 he was appointed dean of the guild. He

  • Death of the Virgin, The (painting by Poussin)

    Nicolas Poussin: Beginnings: The Notre-Dame painting, The Death of the Virgin (1623), went missing following the French Revolution and was known until the 21st century only by a preparatory drawing. The painting was discovered in a small church in the town of Sterrebeek outside Brussels and restored. The works for the…

  • Death of Virgil, The (novel by Broch)

    The Death of Virgil, novel by Hermann Broch, published simultaneously in German (as Der Tod des Vergil) and in English in 1945. The novel, the best known of the author’s works, imaginatively re-creates the last 18 hours of the Roman poet Virgil’s life as he is taken to Brundisium (now Brindisi)

  • Death on the Installment Plan (work by Céline)

    French literature: Céline and Drieu: …and Mort à credit (1936; Death on the Installment Plan), were radically experimental in form and language. They give a dark account of the machinery of repressive authoritarianism and the operations of capitalist ambition in war and peace, and across continents. With hindsight, Céline’s novels can be seen as portraying…

  • Death on the Nile (film by Guillermin [1978])

    Angela Lansbury: Her later movies included Death on the Nile (1978); The Mirror Crack’d (1980), in which she starred as Miss Jane Marple; and the family comedies Nanny McPhee (2005), Mr. Popper’s Penguins (2011), and Mary Poppins Returns (2018).

  • Death on the Pale Horse (painting by West)

    Benjamin West: …exhibited his final sketch for Death on the Pale Horse (c. 1802), which anticipated developments in French Romantic painting. He never returned to the United States, but through such pupils as Washington Allston, Gilbert Stuart, Charles Willson Peale, and John Singleton Copley, he exerted considerable influence on the development of…

  • death penalty (law)

    Capital punishment, execution of an offender sentenced to death after conviction by a court of law of a criminal offense. Capital punishment should be distinguished from extrajudicial executions carried out without due process of law. The term death penalty is sometimes used interchangeably with

  • Death Penalty on Trial, The

    Along with the report in 2002 that the number of executions carried out worldwide in 2001—3,048—was more than double the 1,457 known to have taken place in 2000 came the news that more than 90% of them had occurred in just four countries—China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and the United States. This

  • Death Proof (film by Tarantino [2007])

    Quentin Tarantino: …B-movie double features, paired Tarantino’s Death Proof, a thriller about a homicidal stuntman, with Robert Rodriguez’s horror film Planet Terror. Tarantino’s next three films took an irreverent approach to history. Inglourious Basterds (2009), set during World War II, follows a group of Jewish American soldiers trained to kill Nazis in…

  • death rate (demography)

    Mortality, in demographic usage, the frequency of death in a population. In general, the risk of death at any given age is less for females than for males, except during the childbearing years (in economically developed societies females have a lower mortality even during those years). The risk of

  • death rite (anthropology)

    African dance: The social context: …designed to be performed during funeral rites, after burial ceremonies, and at anniversaries. Dances may be created for a specific purpose, as in the Igogo dance of the Owo-Yoruba, when young men use stamping movements to pack the earth of the grave into place. In Fulani communities in Cameroon, the…

  • Death Row Records (American company)

    Death Row Records and Interscope Records: Among the individuals responsible for the flourishing of hip-hop in Los Angeles in the 1990s was a white man, Jimmy Iovine, a former engineer on recordings by Bruce Springsteen and the new head of Interscope Records. Although Interscope had a stable of successful alternative rock…

  • Death Row Records and Interscope Records

    Among the individuals responsible for the flourishing of hip-hop in Los Angeles in the 1990s was a white man, Jimmy Iovine, a former engineer on recordings by Bruce Springsteen and the new head of Interscope Records. Although Interscope had a stable of successful alternative rock acts—including

  • death spiral (ice skating)

    figure skating: Spins and throws: …unique to pairs include the death spiral, in which the man pivots on the toe pick of one skate and the edge of another while the woman clasps his hand with an extended arm. She then leans horizontally over the ice on a single edge and drops her head toward…

  • death spiral (economics)

    adverse selection: …unraveling, also known as a death spiral, is typical of adverse selection environments.

  • Death Squad (work by Sastre)

    Spanish literature: Theatre: …Escuadra hacia la muerte (1953; Death Squad), a disturbing Cold War drama, presents soldiers who have been accused of “unpardonable” offenses and condemned to stand guard in a no-man’s-land where they await the advance of an unknown enemy and face almost certain death. Other plays demonstrate the socially committed individual’s…

  • Death Takes a Holiday (film by Leisen [1934])

    Mitchell Leisen: Films of the 1930s: …film, the elegantly made allegory Death Takes a Holiday (1934), that Leisen first made his mark as a director. In it Fredric March played Death incarnate, who visits an Italian villa to observe humanity in action and then falls in love with a woman (played by Evelyn Venable) who willingly…

  • death tax (taxation)

    Sir William Harcourt: …the total estate of a deceased person, Harcourt’s legislation of 1894 was capable of producing much more revenue than taxes only on the amounts inherited by beneficiaries. The new death duties were enacted over the opposition of Rosebery and Gladstone, who believed that easily increased taxes would encourage frivolous governmental…

  • Death Valley (region, California, United States)

    Death Valley, structural depression primarily in Inyo county, southeastern California, U.S. It is the lowest, hottest, and driest portion of the North American continent. Death Valley is about 140 miles (225 km) long, trends roughly north-south, and is from 5 to 15 miles (8 to 24 km) wide. The

  • Death Valley Days (American radio program)

    radio: Westerns: …drama appears to have been Death Valley Days, which first aired on September 30, 1930, over NBC’s Red network. The series came about when the Pacific Borax Company wanted to sponsor a dramatic show about the Old West (which fit in with the “20 Mule Team” trademark of its cleaning…

  • Death Valley National Monument (park, California-Nevada, United States)

    Death Valley National Park, the hottest and driest national park in the United States, located in Death Valley, largely in southwestern California, though a small portion extends into Nevada’s Bullfrog Hills. It is also the largest national park in the 48 conterminous U.S. states. Much of its

  • Death Valley National Park (park, California-Nevada, United States)

    Death Valley National Park, the hottest and driest national park in the United States, located in Death Valley, largely in southwestern California, though a small portion extends into Nevada’s Bullfrog Hills. It is also the largest national park in the 48 conterminous U.S. states. Much of its

  • Death Wish (film by Roth [2018])

    Bruce Willis: …in the 2018 remake of Death Wish, a 1974 action film about a father who becomes a vigilante after his family is attacked. In Glass (2019) Willis reprised his role as a security guard/superhero from Unbreakable. His other films from 2019 included the comedy Between Two Ferns and Motherless Brooklyn,…

  • Death Wish (film by Winner [1974])

    Dino De Laurentiis: …was only a 20-page draft—Death Wish (1974), Three Days of the Condor (1975), and King Kong (1976), as well as Ragtime (1981), a critically lauded adaptation of E.L. Doctorow’s novel. In 1984 he opened another film studio in Wilmington, North Carolina, and—after engineering the De Laurentiis

  • Death with Dignity Act (Oregon, United States [1997])

    crime: The concept of crime: criminal codes: state of Oregon the Death with Dignity Act (passed in 1997) allows terminally ill individuals to end their lives through the use of lethal medications prescribed by a physician. Nonetheless, the general trend has been toward increasing the scope of criminal law rather than decreasing it, and it has…

  • death’s head moth (insect)

    hawk moth: …common name for Acherontia atropos, death’s head moth, derives from the fancied facsimile of a human skull on the upper surface of the body. Common in Europe and Africa, these moths have a short proboscis and often feed on honey from beehives. They produce loud chirping or squeaking sounds by…

  • Death’s Jest-Book (work by Beddoes)

    Thomas Lovell Beddoes: In Death’s Jest-Book itself, which Beddoes described as an example of “the florid Gothic,” he aimed to use Gothic material to discuss the problems of mortality and immortality.

  • Death’s-Head Battalions (German history)

    SS: …Leibstandarte, Hitler’s personal bodyguard; the Totenkopfverb?nde (Death’s-Head Battalions), which administered the concentration camps and a vast empire of slave labour drawn from the Jews and the populations of the occupied territories; and the Verfügungstruppen (Disposition Troops), which swelled to 39 divisions in World War II and which, serving as elite…

  • Death, Angel of (German physician)

    Josef Mengele, Nazi doctor at Auschwitz extermination camp (1943–45) who selected prisoners for execution in the gas chambers and conducted medical experiments on inmates in pseudoscientific racial studies. Mengele’s father was founder of a company that produced farm machinery, Firma Karl Mengele &

  • Death, Be Not Proud (sonnet by Donne)

    Death, Be Not Proud, sonnet by John Donne, one of the 19 Holy Sonnets, published in 1633 in the first edition of Songs and Sonnets. This devotional lyric directly addresses death, raging defiantly against its perceived haughtiness. The theme, seen throughout Donne’s poetry, is that death is unable

  • death, dance of (allegorical concept)

    Dance of death, medieval allegorical concept of the all-conquering and equalizing power of death, expressed in the drama, poetry, music, and visual arts of western Europe mainly in the late Middle Ages. Strictly speaking, it is a literary or pictorial representation of a procession or dance of both

  • death, trumpet of (fungus)

    mushroom: cibarius) and the horn-of-plenty mushroom (Craterellus cornucopioides). Puffballs (family Lycoperdaceae), stinkhorns, earthstars (a kind of puffball), and bird’s nest fungi are usually treated with the mushrooms. The morels (Morchella, Verpa) and false morels or lorchels (Gyromitra, Helvella) of the phylum

  • death-qualified jury (American law)

    Death-qualified jury, in law, a trial jury pronounced fit to decide a case involving the death penalty. The fitness of jurors to serve in death-punishable cases depends on their views on capital punishment. For example, jurors absolutely opposed to the death penalty generally are disqualified from

  • Deathday Cake, The (novel by Rolin)

    Dominique Rolin: …Le Gateau des morts (1982; The Deathday Cake) the narrator fantasizes her own death in the year 2000. Trente ans d’amour fou (1988; “Thirty Years of Passionate Love”) recalls her annual visits to Venice. Her later works include Train de rêves (1994; “Train of Dreams”); Les Géraniums (1993), a collection…

  • Deaths and Entrances (work by Thomas)

    Deaths and Entrances, volume of verse by Dylan Thomas, published in 1946. It demonstrates an affirmative and deepening harmony between Thomas and his Welsh environment. Using elemental and religious imagery, the poet looks with sympathy at the impact of World War II, particularly the bombing of

  • deathwatch beetle (insect)

    Deathwatch beetle, (Xestobium rufovillosum), an anobiid, or borer insect, of the family Anobiidae (insect order Coleoptera) that makes a ticking or clicking sound by bumping its head or jaws against the sides of the tunnels as it bores in old furniture and wood. According to superstition, the

  • Deaton Paradox (economics)

    Angus S. Deaton: …came to be called the Deaton Paradox, and it was instrumental in spurring a rapid expansion of research into the careful study of consumer behaviour in economics, both theoretically and empirically.

  • Deaton, Angus S. (British American economist)

    Angus S. Deaton, British American economist who received the 2015 Nobel Prize for Economics. His fundamental contributions to the theory of consumption, savings, and the measurement of economic well-being transformed the field of applied and development economics. Deaton received a B.A. (1967), an

  • Deaton, Angus Stewart (British American economist)

    Angus S. Deaton, British American economist who received the 2015 Nobel Prize for Economics. His fundamental contributions to the theory of consumption, savings, and the measurement of economic well-being transformed the field of applied and development economics. Deaton received a B.A. (1967), an

  • Deauville (France)

    Deauville, fashionable resort, Calvados département, Normandy région, northern France. It lies at the mouth of the Touques River, opposite Trouville, across the Seine estuary from Le Havre. It is 55 miles (89 km) west of Rouen by road and 128 miles (206 km) from Paris. The town was founded by the

  • Deaver, Michael (United States government official)

    Michael Keith Deaver, U.S. government official (born April 11, 1938, Bakersfield, Calif.—died Aug. 18, 2007, Bethesda, Md. ), expertly orchestrated the public image of U.S. Pres. Ronald Reagan while serving as his deputy chief of staff (1981–85) and was a close personal friend of Reagan and his

  • Deb Raja (Bhutani title)

    Bhutan: The emergence of Bhutan: …and acquired the title of deb raja. This institution of two supreme authorities—a dharma raja for spiritual affairs and a deb raja for temporal matters—existed until the death of the last dharma raja in the early 20th century. Succession to the spiritual office of dharma raja was dependent on what…

  • Deba (Nigeria)

    Deba Habe, town, Gombe state, northeastern Nigeria, on the road from Gombe town to Numan. It was captured about 1810 by Buba Yero, the first Fulani emir of Gombe, and is still one of the largest towns in the Gombe area. A collecting point for peanuts (groundnuts) and cotton, it also serves as a

  • Deba Habe (Nigeria)

    Deba Habe, town, Gombe state, northeastern Nigeria, on the road from Gombe town to Numan. It was captured about 1810 by Buba Yero, the first Fulani emir of Gombe, and is still one of the largest towns in the Gombe area. A collecting point for peanuts (groundnuts) and cotton, it also serves as a

  • Debacle, The (work by Zola)

    émile Zola: Life: His novel La Débacle (1892), which was openly critical of the French army and government actions during the Franco-German War (1870–71), drew vitriolic criticism from French and Germans alike. Despite Zola’s undisputed prominence, he was never elected to the French Academy, although he was nominated on no…

  • DeBakey, Michael (American surgeon)

    Michael DeBakey, American cardiovascular surgeon, educator, international medical statesman, and pioneer in surgical procedures for treatment of defects and diseases of the cardiovascular system. In 1932 DeBakey devised the “roller pump,” an essential component of the heart-lung machine that

  • DeBakey, Michael Ellis (American surgeon)

    Michael DeBakey, American cardiovascular surgeon, educator, international medical statesman, and pioneer in surgical procedures for treatment of defects and diseases of the cardiovascular system. In 1932 DeBakey devised the “roller pump,” an essential component of the heart-lung machine that

  • debasement (monetary theory)

    money: Metallic money: …bc, did institute a partial debasement of the currency. For the next four centuries (until the absorption of Greece into the Roman Empire) the Athenian drachma had an almost constant silver content (67 grains of fine silver until Alexander, 65 grains thereafter) and became the standard coin of trade in…

  • Debasien, Mount (mountain, Uganda)

    Uganda: Relief: include Mounts Morungole, Moroto, and Kadam, all of which exceed 9,000 feet (2,750 metres) in elevation. The southernmost mountain—Mount Elgon—is also the highest of the chain, reaching 14,178 feet (4,321 metres). South and west of these mountains is an eastern extension of the Rift Valley, as well as Lake Victoria.…

  • debasilectalization (linguistics)

    African American English: (Decreolization, or debasilectalization, is the process by which a vernacular loses its basilectal, or “creole,” features under the influence of the language from which it inherited most of its vocabulary. The basilect is the variety that is the most divergent from the local standard speech.)…

  • débat (literature)

    Débat, a type of literary composition popular especially in medieval times in which two or more usually allegorical characters discuss or debate some subject, most often a question of love, morality, or politics, and then refer the question to a judge. A tenson is a specific type of débat. A débat

  • Débat de Folie et d’Amour (work by Labé)

    Louise Labé: …also contained a prose dialogue, Débat de Folie et d’Amour (“Debate of Love and Folly”).

  • debate (rhetoric)

    Debate, formal, oral confrontation between two individuals, teams, or groups who present arguments to support opposing sides of a question, generally according to a set form or procedure. In the House of Commons each bill presented is given three readings, each of which provides the opportunity

  • Debates in the Senate of Magna Lilliputia (work by Johnson)

    Samuel Johnson: The Gentleman’s Magazine and early publications: The series was dubbed “Debates in the Senate of Magna Lilliputia,” and this Swiftian expedient gives the speeches satiric overtones. Their status was complicated by the fact that Johnson, who had visited the House of Commons only once, wrote the debates on the basis of scant information about the…

  • debayashi (Japanese music)

    Japanese music: Onstage music: …divided into onstage activities (debayashi) and offstage groups (geza). In plays derived from puppet dramas the gidayū musicians, called here the chobo, are placed on their traditional platform offstage left or behind a curtained alcove above the stage-left exit. If other genres are used, the performers are placed about…

  • Debba Habe (Nigeria)

    Deba Habe, town, Gombe state, northeastern Nigeria, on the road from Gombe town to Numan. It was captured about 1810 by Buba Yero, the first Fulani emir of Gombe, and is still one of the largest towns in the Gombe area. A collecting point for peanuts (groundnuts) and cotton, it also serves as a

  • Debbora (biblical figure)

    Deborah, prophet and heroine in the Old Testament (Judg. 4 and 5), who inspired the Israelites to a mighty victory over their Canaanite oppressors (the people who lived in the Promised Land, later Palestine, that Moses spoke of before its conquest by the Israelites); the “Song of Deborah” (Judg.

  • Debe Habe (Nigeria)

    Deba Habe, town, Gombe state, northeastern Nigeria, on the road from Gombe town to Numan. It was captured about 1810 by Buba Yero, the first Fulani emir of Gombe, and is still one of the largest towns in the Gombe area. A collecting point for peanuts (groundnuts) and cotton, it also serves as a

  • Debed (river, Armenia)

    Armenia: Drainage: The tributaries of the Kura—the Debed (109 miles), the Aghstev (80 miles), and others—pass through Armenia’s northeastern regions. Lake Sevan, with a capacity in excess of 9 cubic miles (39 cubic kilometres) of water, is fed by dozens of rivers, but only the Hrazdan leaves its confines.

  • DeBeers Consolidated Mines, Ltd. (South African company)

    De Beers S.A., South African company that is the world’s largest producer and distributor of diamonds. Through its many subsidiaries and brands, De Beers participates in most facets of the diamond industry, including mining, trading, and retail. In the early 21st century the company marketed 40

  • Debellacyon (work by More)

    Thomas More: Years as chancellor of England: …1533: the Apology and the Debellacyon. He also laughs away the accusation of greed leveled by William Tyndale, translator of parts of the first printed English Bible. More’s poverty was so notorious that the hierarchy collected £5,000 to recoup his polemical costs, but he refused this grant lest it be…

  • deben (unit of weight)

    measurement system: The Egyptians: …ratio, 10 kites equaling 1 deben and 10 debens equaling 1 sep. Over the long duration of Egyptian history, the weight of the kite varied from period to period, ranging all the way from 4.5 to 29.9 grams (0.16 to 1.05 ounces). Approximately 3,500 different weights have been recovered from…

  • debenture (finance)

    bond: …it is known as a debenture bond.

  • debenture bond (finance)

    bond: …it is known as a debenture bond.

  • debenture stock (finance)

    Debenture stock, loan contract issued by a company or public body specifying an obligation to return borrowed funds and pay interest, secured by all or part of the company’s property. Certificates specifying the amount of stock, with coupons for interest attached, are usually issued to the

  • Debestēvs (Baltic god)

    Dievs, in Baltic religion, the sky god. Dievs and Laima, the goddess of human fate, determine human destiny and world order. Dievs is a wooer of Saule, the sun. As pictured by the pre-Christian Balts, he is an Iron Age Baltic king who lives on a farmstead in the sky. Wearing a silver gown,

  • debide (Gaelic literature)

    Celtic literature: Verse: …the later popular metre, the debide (literally “cut in two”), consisted of two couplets with the two lines of each couplet rhyming.

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载