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  • Damaskinos (archbishop of Athens)

    Damaskinos, archbishop of Athens and regent of Greece during the civil war of 1944–46, under whose regency came a period of political reconstruction. He was a private in the army during the Balkan Wars (1912) and was ordained priest in 1917. In 1922 Damaskinos became bishop of Corinth, and in 1

  • Dámaso de Alonso, Luis Antonio (American actor)

    Gilbert Roland, (LUIS ANTONIO DáMASO DE ALONSO), U.S. actor (born Dec. 11, 1905, Ciudad Juárez, Mexico—died May 15, 1994, Beverly Hills, Calif.), specialized in portraying charismatic and dashing Latin lovers, most notably in the 1927 silent-film classic Camille opposite Norma Talmadge, but he w

  • Damastes (Greek mythological figure)

    Procrustes, in Greek legend, a robber dwelling somewhere in Attica—in some versions, in the neighbourhood of Eleusis. His father was said to be Poseidon. Procrustes had an iron bed (or, according to some accounts, two beds) on which he compelled his victims to lie. Here, if a victim was shorter

  • Damasus I, Saint (pope)

    Saint Damasus I, ; feast day December 11), pope from Oct. 1, 366, to Dec. 11, 384. During his rule the primacy of the Roman see was asserted. Damasus was a deacon during the reign of his predecessor, Pope Liberius, and accompanied him when Liberius was exiled by the Roman emperor Constantius for

  • Damasus II (pope)

    Damasus II, pope from July 17 to Aug. 9, 1048. His brief reign, delayed by a rival claimant to the papal throne, occurred during a period when the German emperors and factions of the Roman nobility vied for control of the papacy. He was bishop of Brixen when nominated (December 1047) by the German

  • Damaturu (Nigeria)

    Damaturu, town, capital of Yobe state, northeastern Nigeria. Damaturu became the capital of newly created Yobe state in 1991. The town lies in a plains region that is covered by savanna and that supports crops of millet, sorghum (Guinea corn), and peanuts (groundnuts). The town is a market centre

  • Damāvand, Mount (mountain, Iran)

    Mount Damāvand, extinct volcanic peak of the Elburz Mountains in northern Iran, about 42 miles (68 km) northeast of Tehrān. Estimates of its height range from about 18,400 feet (5,610 metres) to 18,600 feet (5,670 metres); it dominates the surrounding ranges by 3,000 to 8,000 feet (900 to 2,450

  • Damāvand, Qolleh-ye (mountain, Iran)

    Mount Damāvand, extinct volcanic peak of the Elburz Mountains in northern Iran, about 42 miles (68 km) northeast of Tehrān. Estimates of its height range from about 18,400 feet (5,610 metres) to 18,600 feet (5,670 metres); it dominates the surrounding ranges by 3,000 to 8,000 feet (900 to 2,450

  • Damāzīn, Al- (Sudan)

    Al-Damāzīn, town, southeastern Sudan, on the western bank of the Blue Nile River. Irrigation made possible by the Ru?ayri? (Roseires) dam to the east of Al-Damāzīn has increased the agricultural potential of Sudan. Industries include flour mills, sugar refineries, and oilseed mills. The town is

  • Damazin, El- (Sudan)

    Al-Damāzīn, town, southeastern Sudan, on the western bank of the Blue Nile River. Irrigation made possible by the Ru?ayri? (Roseires) dam to the east of Al-Damāzīn has increased the agricultural potential of Sudan. Industries include flour mills, sugar refineries, and oilseed mills. The town is

  • Damba (Angola)

    Damba, town, northwestern Angola. In a fertile area, it is a market centre for coffee, rice, and sugarcane. The Kongo peoples of the town’s hinterland cultivate beans and cassava (manioc). About 1950 Damba was the site of an unsuccessful government-sponsored African resettlement project; the area

  • Damba, Dashiin (Mongolian politician)

    Yumjaagiin Tsedenbal: …charges, as he did with Dashiin Damba after regaining the party leadership from Damba in 1958. He advocated policies that downplayed Mongolian nationalism in his pursuit of a socialist system in the country, and he was responsible for introducing the Cyrillic alphabet in the 1940s to replace the traditional Mongolian…

  • Dambadeniya dynasty (Sri Lankan dynasty)

    Dambade?iya Dynasty, rulers of most of Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) from 1255 to about 1330 whose seat was at Dambade?iya. Arising in opposition to the Malay usurper Māgha, who seized power in northern Ceylon in 1215, the Dambade?iya dynasty is of uncertain origin. Officially acceding to power in

  • Damballah (short stories by Wideman)

    John Edgar Wideman: …a collection of short stories, Damballah (1981). In Brothers and Keepers (1984), his first nonfiction book, he contemplated the role of the black intellectual by studying his relationship with his brother, who was serving a life sentence in prison.

  • dambo (grassland)

    Malawi: Plant and animal life: Grass-covered broad depressions, called madambo (singular: dambo), dot the plateaus. Grasslands and evergreen forests are found in conjunction on the highlands and on the Mulanje and Zomba massifs.

  • Dambovi?a (county, Romania)

    Dambovi?a, jude? (county), southern Romania. The Transylvanian Alps (Southern Carpathians) and the sub-Carpathians rise above settlement areas in intermontane valleys and lowlands of the county. Dambovi?a is drained by the Ialomi?a, Dambovi?a, and Arge? rivers. Targovi?te is the county capital and

  • Dambovi?a River (river, Romania)

    D?mbovi?a River, river in south-central Romania that rises in the Transylvanian Alps and flows 155 miles (250 km) into the Arges

  • dambuster (bomb)

    Sir Barnes Wallis: …who invented the innovative “dambuster” bombs used in World War II.

  • Damdinsüren, Tsendiin (Mongolian writer)

    Mongolian literature: The 20th century and beyond: Tsendiin Damdinsüren (Damdinsürüng) wrote poems on nature (e.g., Dzugaatssaar mordson-ni [“Went Out for a Walk”]) and short stories (e.g., “Soliig solison-ni” [“How Mrs. Change Was Changed”] and Gologdson khüükhen [“The Unwanted Girl”]). He also rewrote (1943) Natsagdorj’s Uchirtai gurwan tolgoi, adding to it a happy…

  • Damdinsürüng, Tsendiin (Mongolian writer)

    Mongolian literature: The 20th century and beyond: Tsendiin Damdinsüren (Damdinsürüng) wrote poems on nature (e.g., Dzugaatssaar mordson-ni [“Went Out for a Walk”]) and short stories (e.g., “Soliig solison-ni” [“How Mrs. Change Was Changed”] and Gologdson khüükhen [“The Unwanted Girl”]). He also rewrote (1943) Natsagdorj’s Uchirtai gurwan tolgoi, adding to it a happy…

  • dame (title)

    Dame, properly a name of respect or a title equivalent to lady, surviving in English as the legal designation for the wife or widow of a baronet or knight or for a dame of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire; it is prefixed to the given name and surname. Dame has also been used by

  • Dame à la licorne, La (tapestry)

    Paris: Saint-Germain-des-Prés and the Latin Quarter: …including the renowned six-panel tapestry La Dame à la licorne (“The Lady and the Unicorn”).

  • Dame aux camélias, La (play by Dumas)

    La traviata: Alexandre Dumas fils (La Dame aux camélias), the opera marked a large step forward for Verdi in his quest to express dramatic ideas in music. La traviata means “the fallen woman” or “the one who goes astray” and refers to the main character, Violetta Valéry, a courtesan. The…

  • Dame Blanche, La (opera by Boieldieu)

    Fran?ois-Adrien Boieldieu: …Riding Hood”), and his masterpiece, La Dame blanche (1825; “The White Lady”). Composed on a libretto by Eugène Scribe, derived from Sir Walter Scott’s novels The Lady of the Lake, Guy Mannering, and Monastery, it had received 1,700 performances by 1914. Boieldieu’s work illustrates the evolution of French operatic music…

  • Dame Care (novel by Sudermann)

    Hermann Sudermann: Frau Sorge (1887; Dame Care), dealing with the growing up of a sensitive youth, and Der Katzensteg (1889; Regina) are the best known of his early novels. He won renown, however, with his plays. Die Ehre (Eng. trans., What Money Cannot Buy), first performed in Berlin on Nov.…

  • Dame Edna Everage (Australian actor)

    Barry Humphries, Australian actor best known for his character Dame Edna Everage, a sharp-tongued housewife and talk show host. Humphries attended Melbourne University but left to pursue acting. He made his theatrical debut in 1953 at the Union Theatre in Melbourne and subsequently toured with a

  • dame school (education)

    Dame school, small private school for young children run by women; such schools were the precursors of nursery, or infant, schools in England and colonial America. They existed in England possibly before the 16th century in both towns and rural areas and survived into the 19th century. The school

  • Dame Sirith (Middle English fabliau)

    English literature: Verse romance: …manuscript with this work is Dame Sirith, the earliest English fabliau. Another sort of humour is found in The Land of Cockaygne, which depicts a utopia better than heaven, where rivers run with milk, honey, and wine, geese fly about already roasted, and monks hunt with hawks and dance with…

  • dame’s gillyflower (plant)

    Dame’s rocket, (Hesperis matronalis), herbaceous plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Native to Eurasia, dame’s rocket is often cultivated as an ornamental and has naturalized in North America, where it is now considered an invasive species. The plant is a biennial or short-lived perennial

  • dame’s rocket (plant)

    Dame’s rocket, (Hesperis matronalis), herbaceous plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Native to Eurasia, dame’s rocket is often cultivated as an ornamental and has naturalized in North America, where it is now considered an invasive species. The plant is a biennial or short-lived perennial

  • dame’s violet (plant)

    Dame’s rocket, (Hesperis matronalis), herbaceous plant of the mustard family (Brassicaceae). Native to Eurasia, dame’s rocket is often cultivated as an ornamental and has naturalized in North America, where it is now considered an invasive species. The plant is a biennial or short-lived perennial

  • Damenspiel (game)

    Polish checkers: The German game Damenspiel is Polish checkers played on the 64-square chessboard with 12 men on a side, as in draughts-style checkers.

  • Damer, El- (Sudan)

    Al-Dāmir, town, northeastern Sudan. It lies on the right (east) bank of the Nile River, at an elevation of 1,158 feet (353 metres), about 155 miles (250 km) northeast of Khartoum. Al-Dāmir is a local commercial centre for the date-producing areas to the north. The town’s industries include date

  • Dameron, Tadd (American musician and composer)

    Tadd Dameron, American jazz pianist, arranger, composer, and bandleader, especially noted during the bop era for the melodic beauty and warmth of the songs he composed. Dameron was initially known as an arranger and composer for big bands, in particular for Harlan Leonard and His Rockets in the

  • Dameron, Tadley Ewing (American musician and composer)

    Tadd Dameron, American jazz pianist, arranger, composer, and bandleader, especially noted during the bop era for the melodic beauty and warmth of the songs he composed. Dameron was initially known as an arranger and composer for big bands, in particular for Harlan Leonard and His Rockets in the

  • Dames Point Bridge (bridge, Jacksonville, Florida, United States)

    bridge: U.S. designs: The Dames Point Bridge (1987), designed by Howard Needles in consultation with Ulrich Finsterwalder, crosses the St. Johns River in Jacksonville, Florida. The main span at Dames Point is 390 metres (1,300 feet), with side spans of 200 metres (660 feet). From H-shaped towers of reinforced…

  • Dames, Paix des (Europe [1529])

    Treaty of Cambrai, (French: “Peace of the Ladies”; Aug. 3, 1529), agreement ending one phase of the wars between Francis I of France and the Habsburg Holy Roman emperor Charles V; it temporarily confirmed Spanish (Habsburg) hegemony in Italy. After a series of successes, Charles had defeated the

  • Dāmghān (Iran)

    Dāmghān, town, northern Iran. It lies at an elevation of 3,900 feet (1,200 metres), just southeast of the Elburz Mountains on a large, barren gravel plain. It is on the road and railway between Tehrān and Meshed. Possibly the oldest mosque in Iran, the Tārīk Khāneh (c. 9th century), and several

  • Damia (classical goddess)

    Bona Dea, (Latin: “Good Goddess”) in Roman religion, deity of fruitfulness, both in the earth and in women. She was identified with various goddesses who had similar functions. The dedication day of her temple on the Aventine was celebrated May 1. Her temple was cared for and attended by women

  • Damian, Saint (Christian martyr)
  • Dami?o, Frei (Brazilian monk)

    Frei Dami?o, Italian-born Brazilian Roman Catholic monk. He became a Capuchin friar at age 16 and later studied in Rome. In 1931 he was sent to Brazil, where he spent the rest of his life traveling in the poverty-stricken northeastern region. Soon after he arrived he developed a reputation as a

  • Damien of Molokai, St. (Belgian priest)

    St. Damien of Molokai, ; canonized October 11, 2009; feast day May 10), Belgian priest who devoted his life to missionary work among the Hawaiian lepers and became a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. Joseph de Veuster was born in rural Belgium, the youngest of seven children. He was educated at

  • Damien, Father (Belgian priest)

    St. Damien of Molokai, ; canonized October 11, 2009; feast day May 10), Belgian priest who devoted his life to missionary work among the Hawaiian lepers and became a saint of the Roman Catholic Church. Joseph de Veuster was born in rural Belgium, the youngest of seven children. He was educated at

  • Damiens, Robert-Fran?ois (French regicide)

    Robert-Fran?ois Damiens, French fanatic who in 1757 made an unsuccessful attempt on the life of King Louis XV. Damiens, the son of a gatekeeper, held a succession of jobs as a household servant and was dismissed from several of them for stealing from his employers. On Jan. 5, 1757, he stabbed Louis

  • Damietta (Egypt)

    Damietta, city, capital of Dumyā? mu?āfa?ah (governorate), in the Nile River delta, Lower Egypt, on the Mediterranean coast. Damietta, the port of the governorate, is located 8 miles (13 km) from the Mediterranean, on the right (east) bank of the Damietta branch of the Nile. The name is a

  • Damietta (river, Egypt)

    Nile River: Physiography: …distributaries, the Rosetta and the Damietta (Dumyā?) branches.

  • Daming calendar (chronology)

    Zu Geng: …advocated his father’s calendar (the Daming calendar) and finally succeeded in getting it officially adopted in 510. His astronomical observations with gnomons allowed him to measure the angular distance between Polaris and the celestial north pole. Although none of his complete mathematical writings is extant, some scholars suggest that the…

  • Daming Palace (palace, Xi’an, China)

    Chinese architecture: The Sui (581–618) and Tang (618–907) dynasties: … built a new palace, the Daming Palace, on higher ground just outside the city to the northeast. The site of the Daming Palace, which became the centre of court life during the glittering reigns of Gaozong (649–683) and Xuanzong (712–756), was partly excavated. Remains were found of two great halls,…

  • Daminozide (dimethylamino)

    poison: Plant growth regulator: Daminozide, also known as Alar, is a plant growth regulator used to improve the appearance and shelf life of apples. Because of its carcinogenicity in animals (Table 1), concerns have been raised that daminozide may produce tumours in children who consume apples. As a result, the use of daminozide…

  • Dāmir, Al- (Sudan)

    Al-Dāmir, town, northeastern Sudan. It lies on the right (east) bank of the Nile River, at an elevation of 1,158 feet (353 metres), about 155 miles (250 km) northeast of Khartoum. Al-Dāmir is a local commercial centre for the date-producing areas to the north. The town’s industries include date

  • Damīrī, ad- (Muslim theologian)

    Ad-Damīrī, Muslim theologian, best known for his encyclopaedia of animals. A student of some of the leading scholars of his day, ad-Damīrī mastered theology as well as law and philology. He gave lectures and sermons regularly at several schools and mosques of Cairo, including al-Azhar University. A

  • Damīrī, Mu?ammad ibn Mūsā Kamāl ad-Dīn ad- (Muslim theologian)

    Ad-Damīrī, Muslim theologian, best known for his encyclopaedia of animals. A student of some of the leading scholars of his day, ad-Damīrī mastered theology as well as law and philology. He gave lectures and sermons regularly at several schools and mosques of Cairo, including al-Azhar University. A

  • Dammām, Al- (Saudi Arabia)

    Dammam, city, eastern Saudi Arabia. It lies on the Persian Gulf northwest of Bahrain Island and forms a larger metropolitan and industrial complex with Khobar, Qatif, and Dhahran. The discovery of immense oil reserves in the locality in 1938 led to the radical transformation of the once small

  • Damman, Ad- (Saudi Arabia)

    Dammam, city, eastern Saudi Arabia. It lies on the Persian Gulf northwest of Bahrain Island and forms a larger metropolitan and industrial complex with Khobar, Qatif, and Dhahran. The discovery of immense oil reserves in the locality in 1938 led to the radical transformation of the once small

  • dammar (varnish resin)

    Dammar, any of a variety of hard varnish resins obtained from coniferous and hardwood trees characteristic of Southeast and East Asia. These include the conifer genus Agathis (family Araucariaceae), such flowering plants as Shorea (especially S. wiesneri) and other genera of the family

  • dammar pine (plant)

    Kauri pine, (Agathis australis), a resinous timber conifer of the family Araucariaceae, native to the North Island of New Zealand. The tree sometimes reaches 45 metres (150 feet) in height, with a diameter up to 7 m (23 ft). Kauri resin, obtained from this and other Agathis species, is an a

  • Dammartin (medieval countship, France)

    Dammartin, medieval French countship, whose seat was at Dammartin-en-Go?le, northwest of Meaux (in the modern département of Seine-et-Marne). Hugh, the first recorded count, built a castle in the area in the 10th century. In the 11th and 12th centuries its possessors were strong enough to oppose

  • Dammastock (mountain, Switzerland)

    Uri: …summit in Uri is the Dammastock (11,909 feet [3,630 m]), north of the Furka Pass.

  • dammer (varnish resin)

    Dammar, any of a variety of hard varnish resins obtained from coniferous and hardwood trees characteristic of Southeast and East Asia. These include the conifer genus Agathis (family Araucariaceae), such flowering plants as Shorea (especially S. wiesneri) and other genera of the family

  • dammūsa (lizard)

    Arabian Desert: Animal life: …pretty, a salmon-coloured lizard, the dammūsa seeks the black beetle for food and literally dives and swims in the slipfaces of the sand dunes. An agamid lizard (?u?ay?ī) scurries across the sand with its tail coiled like a watch spring, uncoiling when it stops.

  • Damn the Torpedoes (album by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers)

    Tom Petty: Damn the Torpedoes (1979), featuring the hits “Don’t Do Me Like That” and “Refugee,” shot to number two, and, though the group’s success in the 1980s leveled off, there were several hits, including Petty’s duet with Stevie Nicks, “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” (1981), and…

  • Damn Yankees (film by Donen and Abbott [1958])

    Stanley Donen: Films of the 1950s: With Damn Yankees (1958), Donen and Abbott codirected another musical that originated onstage under Abbott’s direction. Combining the Faust legend with baseball, the film retained most of the Broadway cast (notably Gwen Verdon, Ray Walston, and Jean Stapleton) and a score that included “Whatever Lola Wants”…

  • DAMN. (album by Lamar)

    Kendrick Lamar: …Lamar released another album, titled DAMN., which featured the hit song “HUMBLE.” and was well received by fans and critics alike. He won Grammys for best rap album (DAMN.), best rap song, rap performance, and music video (all for “HUMBLE.”), and best rap/sung performance (“LOYALTY.”; with Rihanna). In addition, DAMN.…

  • damnatio memoriae (Roman imperial politics)

    ancient Rome: The succession: …the first emperor to suffer damnatio memoriae—his reign was officially stricken from the record by order of the Senate.

  • damnation (religion)

    The Protestant Heritage: Justification by grace through faith: …the sole agent of human damnation?

  • Damnation de Faust, La (cantata by Berlioz)

    Hector Berlioz: Mature career: …works, two became internationally known: La Damnation de Faust (1846) and L’Enfance du Christ (1854). Two others began to emerge from neglect after World War I: the massive two-part drama Les Troyens (1855–58), based on Virgil’s story of Dido and Aeneas, and the short, witty comedy Béatrice et Bénédict, written…

  • Damnation of Theron Ware, The (work by Frederic)

    Harold Frederic: …his New York State novels, The Damnation of Theron Ware (1896; English title Illumination), the story of the decline and fall of a Methodist minister, brought him his greatest fame. Three other novels, March Hares (1896), Gloria Mundi (1898), and The Market Place (1899), are about English life.

  • Damned, the (British rock group)

    punk: …by British groups such as the Damned and the Sex Pistols later fueled prominent regional punk scenes in Seattle, Washington; San Francisco (the Dead Kennedys); and Los Angeles (X and Black Flag). In the late 1970s, however, punk in the United States was eclipsed by disco and went underground in…

  • Damnés de la terre, Les (work by Fanon)

    Frantz Fanon: …Damnés de la terre (1961; The Wretched of the Earth) established Fanon as a leading intellectual in the international decolonization movement; the preface to his book was written by Jean-Paul Sartre.

  • Damnonii (people)

    Clackmannanshire: …known to the Romans as Damnonii; they may have been the ancestors of the Picts who lived there afterward. Later the historic county was part of the district of Mannan, disputed land in central Scotland. Near the end of the 7th century St. Serf, who had come to the Fife…

  • Damocles (Greek courtier)

    Damocles, a courtier of Dionysius I of Syracuse, in Sicily, tyrant from 405 to 367 bce. The courtier is known to history through the legend of the “Sword of Damocles.” According to the legend, when Damocles spoke in extravagant terms of his sovereign’s happiness, Dionysius invited him to a

  • Damodar River (river, India)

    Damodar River, river in northeastern India, rising with its many tributaries, notably the Bokaro and Konar, in the Chota Nagpur plateau of south-central Bihar state. It follows a generally eastward course for 368 miles (592 km) through West Bengal to join the Hugli (Hooghly) River southwest of

  • Damodar Valley (valley, India)

    Chota Nagpur: …east, runs the coal-bearing, faulted Damodar River valley. Numerous streams have dissected the uplands into a peneplain (an area reduced almost to a plain by erosion) with isolated hills.

  • Damodar Valley Corporation (Indian corporation)

    Burdwan: The Damodar Valley Corporation provides irrigation, industrial power supply, and flood control. Rice, corn (maize), legumes, and oilseeds are the chief crops in the east. Pop. (2001) city, 285,602; (2011) city, 314,265.

  • Damoh (India)

    Damoh, city, central Madhya Pradesh state, central India. It is situated in a plateau region about 12 miles (19 km) southeast of the Sonar River. The city’s name comes from Damayanti, the wife of King Nala of Hindu mythology. Damoh was part of the province (subah) of Malwa during the reign of the

  • damoiseau (title)

    knight: …(literally “lordling”), or varlet, or valet (German: Knappe), until he followed his patron on a campaign as his shield bearer, écuyer, or esquire, or as the bearer of his weapons (armiger). When he was adjudged proficient and the money was forthcoming for the purchase of his knightly equipment, he would…

  • Damon (Greek music theorist)

    Pericles: Background and education: …that of the musical theorist Damon, whose influence, it is said, was not just confined to music. The arrival of the Sophist philosophers in Athens occurred during his middle life, and he seems to have taken full advantage of the society of Zeno and particularly Anaxagoras, from whom he is…

  • Damon and Phintias (Greek legend)

    Damon and Pythias, in Greek legend, a celebrated pair of friends who came to signify the willingness to sacrifice oneself for the sake of a friend. Versions of the tale differ, but the best known of these variants is that told by Cicero in De Officiis (“On Moral Duties”). When one of the two

  • Damon and Pythias (Greek legend)

    Damon and Pythias, in Greek legend, a celebrated pair of friends who came to signify the willingness to sacrifice oneself for the sake of a friend. Versions of the tale differ, but the best known of these variants is that told by Cicero in De Officiis (“On Moral Duties”). When one of the two

  • Damon, Matt (American actor, screenwriter, and producer)

    Matt Damon, American actor, screenwriter, and producer who was noted for his clean-cut good looks and intelligent performances. He won an Academy Award for best original screenplay for Good Will Hunting (1997). Damon was raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and attended the Cambridge Rindge and

  • Damon, Matthew Paige (American actor, screenwriter, and producer)

    Matt Damon, American actor, screenwriter, and producer who was noted for his clean-cut good looks and intelligent performances. He won an Academy Award for best original screenplay for Good Will Hunting (1997). Damon was raised in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and attended the Cambridge Rindge and

  • Damone, Vic (American singer)

    Burt Bacharach: …arrangements for Steve Lawrence and Vic Damone and later toured with Marlene Dietrich. In the late 1950s he began his long association with David, which would produce many hits especially for singer Dionne Warwick, including “Walk On By,” “I Say a Little Prayer,” and “Do You Know the Way to…

  • D?monen, Die (novel by Doderer)

    Heimito von Doderer: …I Vienna, Die D?monen (1956; The Demons), on which he had worked since 1931. It explores the society and mood of Vienna in 1926–27 in a many-layered web of detail and complex characterization.

  • Damophon (Greek sculptor)

    Damophon, ancient Greek sculptor of Messene, who executed many statues at Messene, Megalopolis, Aegium, and other cities of the Peloponnese. Soon after 183 bce he repaired Phidias’s sculpture of Zeus at Olympia, which had been damaged by an earthquake. Considerable fragments, including three

  • damoz (type of marriage)

    Amhara: …marriage: kal kidan, qurban, and damoz. Kal kidan (also called serat or semanya [“eighty”]) is marriage by civil contract. It is by far the most common form, though a great percentage of such unions end in divorce. Qurban marriages are performed in church and are regarded as sacred; they cannot…

  • damp (mining)

    Mine gas, any of various harmful vapours produced during mining operations. The gases are frequently called damps (German Dampf, “vapour”). Firedamp is a gas that occurs naturally in coal seams. The gas is nearly always methane (CH4) and is highly inflammable and explosive when present in the air

  • damp-fold drapery (painting)

    Western painting: England: …islands of taut cloth (so-called damp-fold drapery) to describe three-dimensional forms in torsion. Faces are more heavily modeled than before, and glances and gestures are even more piercing and insistent. This is first seen about 1130 in the great Bible of the Abbey of St. Edmund at Bury; later stages…

  • damped oscillation

    mechanics: Damped and forced oscillations: The simple harmonic oscillations discussed above continue forever, at constant amplitude, oscillating as shown in Figure 3 between A and ?A. Common experience indicates that real oscillators behave somewhat differently, however. Harmonic oscillations tend to die away as time goes on.…

  • damped vibration

    mechanics: Damped and forced oscillations: The simple harmonic oscillations discussed above continue forever, at constant amplitude, oscillating as shown in Figure 3 between A and ?A. Common experience indicates that real oscillators behave somewhat differently, however. Harmonic oscillations tend to die away as time goes on.…

  • damper (keyboard instrument)

    piano: …found on most pianos, the damper pedal on the right lifts all the felt dampers above the strings, allowing them all to vibrate freely; the left pedal shifts the keyboard and action sideways to enable the hammer to strike only one of the two or three unison strings of each…

  • damper winding (electrical engineering)

    electric motor: Synchronous motors: …usually referred to as a damper winding because of its additional property of damping out any oscillation that might be caused by sudden changes in the load on the rotor when in synchronism. Adjustment to load changes involves changes in the angle by which the rotor field lags the stator…

  • Dampier (Western Australia, Australia)

    Dampier, town and port, northwestern Western Australia, on King Bay, an inlet of the Indian Ocean. Beginning in 1965, the town and port were constructed by the Hamersley Iron company to handle iron ore mined at Mount Tom Price (about 180 miles [290 km] south) and Paraburdoo in the Hamersley Range.

  • Dampier Archipelago (archipelago, Australia)

    William Dampier: …to what was thereafter called Dampier Archipelago, he went on to New Guinea and, passing around the north of the island, reached New Britain. With a deteriorating ship and a discontented crew, he then continued to Batavia, Java (now Jakarta, Indon.), for repairs and provisions. He sailed for England on…

  • Dampier, William (British explorer)

    William Dampier, buccaneer who later explored parts of the coasts of Australia, New Guinea, and New Britain for the British Admiralty. A keen observer of natural phenomena, he was, in some respects, a pioneer in scientific exploration. Dampier, orphaned at the age of 16, voyaged to Newfoundland and

  • Dampierre, Chateau de (chateau, France)

    garden and landscape design: 17th- and 18th-century French: …appeared in the grounds of Dampierre. There the moat that formerly surrounded French castles became an ornamental body of water on one side and a decorative canal on the other. Both aspects of the new garden design—coordination with the dwelling and extension along a central axis—were united at the chateau…

  • Dampierre, Gui de (count of Flanders)

    Guy, count of Flanders (from 1278) and margrave of Namur (Namen). He was the son of Margaret, countess of Flanders and Hainaut. The government of Guy of Dampierre was unfortunate. It was in the interest of the Flemish weavers to be on good terms with England, the wool-producing country, and Guy

  • damping (physics)

    Damping, in physics, restraining of vibratory motion, such as mechanical oscillations, noise, and alternating electric currents, by dissipation of energy. Unless a child keeps pumping a swing, its motion dies down because of damping. Shock absorbers in automobiles and carpet pads are examples of

  • damping capacity (physics)

    magnesium processing: Structural applications: …light weight, high strength, high damping capacity, close dimensional tolerance, and ease of fabrication of its alloys. Applications include hand tools, sporting goods, luggage frames, cameras, household appliances, business machines, and automobile parts. The aerospace industry employs magnesium alloys in the manufacture of aircraft, rockets, and space satellites. Magnesium is…

  • damping-off (plant disease)

    Damping-off, destructive disease of plant seedlings. Damping-off is caused by a number of seed- and soil-borne fungi and funguslike oomycetes, including Rhizoctonia solani, Aphanomyces cochlioides, and species of Pythium, Phytophthora, Botrytis, Fusarium, Cylindrocladium, Diplodia, Phoma, and

  • Damqog Kanbab (river, China)

    Tibet: Drainage and soils: …Ganges (Ganga) River; and the Maquan River (Tibetan: Damqog Kanbab, “Horse Spring”) flows east and, after joining the Lhasa River south of Lhasa, forms the Brahmaputra.

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