You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Froude, Richard Hurrell (British theologian)

    Richard Hurrell Froude, Anglican churchman and a leader of the Oxford Movement, which sought to reintroduce High Church, or “catholic,” thought and practice into the Church of England. Froude was educated at Oriel College, Oxford (B.A., 1824; M.A., 1827), where he met John Keble, and was tutor of

  • Froude, William (British engineer)

    William Froude, English engineer and naval architect who influenced ship design by developing a method of studying scale models propelled through water and applying the information thus obtained to full-size ships. He discovered the laws by which the performance of the model could be extrapolated

  • froufrou (textile)

    taffeta: …and a rustle known as scroop, or froufrou. It is used for evening dresses and for underskirts for couture dresses in chiffon or georgette and is also used for academic hood linings. Piece-dyed taffeta, which is soft and washable, is a favourite fabric for linings. It is also used for…

  • Frowick, Roy Halston (American designer)

    Halston, American designer of elegant fashions with a streamlined look. He was widely considered the first superstar designer in the United States, and his clothing defined 1970s American fashion. Halston studied at Indiana University and the Art Institute of Chicago and operated a millinery shop

  • frozen custard (food)

    dairy product: Composition of frozen desserts: …frozen desserts are ice cream, frozen custard, ice milk, frozen yogurt, sherbet, and water ices. Ice cream has the highest fat content, ranging from 10 to 20 percent. Frozen custard, or French ice cream, is basically the same formula as ice cream but contains added eggs or egg solids (usually…

  • frozen dessert (food)

    dairy product: Ice cream and other frozen desserts: Ice cream evolved from flavoured ices that were popular with the Roman nobility in the 4th century bce. The emperor Nero is known to have imported snow from the mountains and topped it with fruit juices and honey. In the 13th century Marco…

  • frozen fog deposit (meteorology)

    rime: …the wind and are called “frozen fog deposits,” or “frost feathers.” Rime is composed of small ice particles with air pockets between them; this structure causes its typical white appearance and granular structure. Because of the rapid freezing of each individual supercooled droplet, there is relatively poor cohesion between the…

  • frozen prepared food

    Frozen prepared food, any of the complete meals or portions of meals that are precooked, assembled into a package, and frozen for retail sale. They are popular among consumers because they provide a diverse menu and are convenient to prepare. A typical frozen prepared meal contains a meat entree, a

  • Frozen River (film by Hunt [2008])

    Melissa Leo: …smuggler of illegal refugees in Frozen River (2008) earned her a nomination for the Academy Award for best actress, and she won both the Golden Globe Award and the Oscar for best supporting actress for her merciless portrayal of the domineering mother of an aspiring boxer in The Fighter (2010).…

  • Frozen Tundra (stadium, Green Bay, Wisconsin, United States)

    Lambeau Field, gridiron football stadium in Green Bay, Wisconsin, that is the home of the city’s NFL team, the Packers. It is the oldest stadium with an NFL team in continuous residence but has been much enlarged since opening in 1957. City Stadium was built to replace a smaller stadium of the same

  • frozen yogurt

    dairy product: Composition of frozen desserts: Frozen yogurt is a cultured frozen product containing the same ingredients as ice cream. It must contain at least 3.25 percent milk fat and 8.25 percent milk solids other than fat and must weigh at least five pounds per gallon. Low-fat frozen yogurt contains between…

  • frozen-in flux (physics)

    Hannes Alfvén: …physics, including the theorem of frozen-in flux, according to which under certain conditions a plasma is bound to the magnetic lines of flux that pass through it. Alfvén later used the concept to explain the origin of cosmic rays.

  • Fru Marianne (work by Benedictsson)

    Victoria Benedictsson: …and another, somewhat contradictory, novel, Fru Marianne (1887; “Mrs. Marianne”), in which a doll wife outgrows her early romantic notions and finds fulfillment in sharing work and responsibilities with her husband. Her success made her acquainted with the brilliant and influential critic Georg Brandes, whom she had long admired. She…

  • Fru Marie Grubbe (work by Jacobsen)

    Jens Peter Jacobsen: …novel, Fru Marie Grubbe (1876; Marie Grubbe: A Lady of the Seventeenth Century), is a psychological study of a 17th-century woman whose natural instincts are stronger than her social instincts and result in her descent on the social scale from a viceroy’s consort to the wife of a ferryman. The…

  • Fruchtbringende Gesellschaft (German literary society)

    Johann Michael Moscherosch: …also a member of the Fruchtbringende Gesellschaft (“Productive Society”), which was founded for the purification of the German language and the fostering of German literature.

  • Fructidor Year V, Coup of (France [1797])

    France: The Directory: …the government responded with the coup of Fructidor, year V (September 1797), ousting two of the current directors, arresting leading royalist politicians, annulling the elections in 49 départements, shutting down the royalist press, and resuming the vigorous pursuit of returned émigrés and refractory clergy. This heartened the Neo-Jacobins, who organized…

  • Fructidor, Coup of 18 (France [1797])

    Coup of 18 Fructidor, (Sept. 4, 1797), the purge of conservatives from the Corps Législatif and other posts during the Revolutionary period of the Directory in France. The Directory, fearing that it was losing favour in the country, called upon Napoleon Bonaparte to send a general to command troops

  • fructofuranose (chemical compound)

    heterocyclic compound: Five-membered rings with one heteroatom: …a cyclized isomer (called a fructofuranose).

  • fructokinase (enzyme)

    fructosuria: …organic catalyst or enzyme called fructokinase. In fructosuria this particular enzyme is defective, and the concentration of fructose increases in the blood and urine. There are no other clinical manifestations or disabilities, and the condition is compatible with normal life expectancy.

  • fructose (chemical compound)

    Fructose, a member of a group of carbohydrates known as simple sugars, or monosaccharides. Fructose, along with glucose, occurs in fruits, honey, and syrups; it also occurs in certain vegetables. It is a component, along with glucose, of the disaccharide sucrose, or common table sugar. Phosphate

  • fructose 1,6-diphosphatase (enzyme)

    metabolism: Energy state of the cell: Fructose 1,6-diphosphatase, which catalyzes the reaction opposite to phosphofructokinase, is strongly inhibited by AMP.

  • fructose 1,6-diphosphatase deficiency (pathology)

    metabolic disease: Galactose and fructose disorders: Fructose 1,6-diphosphatase deficiency is associated with an impaired ability to form glucose from other substrates (a process called gluconeogenesis). Symptoms include severe hypoglycemia, intolerance to fasting, and enlargement of the liver. Rapid treatment of hypoglycemic episodes with intravenous fluids containing glucose and the avoidance of…

  • fructose 1,6-diphosphate (chemical compound)

    metabolism: Glycolysis: The product is fructose 1,6-diphosphate [3]. Again, as in the hexokinase reaction, the decrease in free energy of the reaction, which is catalyzed by phosphofructokinase, is sufficiently large to make this reaction virtually irreversible under physiological conditions; ADP is also a product.

  • fructose 1-phosphate aldolase (chemical compound)

    metabolism: Fragmentation of other sugars: …fructokinase that gives rise to fructose 1-phosphate [17]. ATP supplies the phosphate group in both cases.

  • fructose 1-phosphate kinase (enzyme)

    metabolism: Fragmentation of other sugars: Instead, a fructose 1-phosphate kinase, distinct from the phosphofructokinase that catalyzes step [3] of glycolysis, effects the direct conversion of fructose 1-phosphate and ATP to fructose 1,6-diphosphate and ADP.

  • fructose 6-phosphate (chemical compound)

    metabolism: Glycolysis: …glucose 6-phosphate is changed to fructose 6-phosphate is catalyzed by phosphoglucoisomerase [2]. In the reaction, a secondary alcohol group (―C∣HOH) at the second carbon atom is oxidized to a keto-group (i.e., ―C∣=O), and the aldehyde group (―CHO) at the first carbon atom is reduced to a primary alcohol group (―CH2OH).…

  • fructose diphosphatase (enzyme)

    metabolism: Hydrolysis of fructose 1,6-diphosphate and glucose 6-phosphate: The enzyme fructose diphosphatase catalyzes reaction [59], in which the products are fructose 6-phosphate and inorganic phosphate. The fructose 6-phosphate thus formed is a precursor of mucopolysaccharides (polysaccharides with nitrogen-containing components). In addition, its conversion to glucose 6-phosphate provides the starting material for the formation of storage…

  • fructosuria (disease)

    Fructosuria, disturbance of fructose metabolism resulting from a hereditary disorder or intolerance. Normally, fructose is first metabolized in the body to fructose-1-phosphate by a specific organic catalyst or enzyme called fructokinase. In fructosuria this particular enzyme is defective, and the

  • FRUD (political party, Djibouti)

    Djibouti: Multiparty politics and civil war: …and in late 1991 the Afar Front for the Restoration of Unity and Democracy (Front pour la Restauration de l’Unité et de la Démocratie; FRUD) took up arms against the Issa-dominated government; the conflict quickly developed into civil war. By mid-1992 FRUD forces occupied some two-thirds of the country, although…

  • Frueh, Al (American caricaturist)

    Al Frueh, American cartoonist and caricaturist for The New Yorker magazine from 1925 to 1962. Reared variously to be a farmer and then a brewer and also studying at a business school in his home town (learning shorthand), Frueh turned to cartooning professionally after being hired by the St. Louis

  • Frueh, Alfred (American caricaturist)

    Al Frueh, American cartoonist and caricaturist for The New Yorker magazine from 1925 to 1962. Reared variously to be a farmer and then a brewer and also studying at a business school in his home town (learning shorthand), Frueh turned to cartooning professionally after being hired by the St. Louis

  • Fruehauf Corporation (American corporation)

    Fruehauf Trailer Corporation, American corporation engaged in the manufacture and sale of truck trailers. Headquarters are in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S. The founder, August Charles Fruehauf (1868–1930), began as a blacksmith and carriage builder around Detroit. In 1914, at the request of a local

  • Fruehauf Trailer Company (American corporation)

    Fruehauf Trailer Corporation, American corporation engaged in the manufacture and sale of truck trailers. Headquarters are in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S. The founder, August Charles Fruehauf (1868–1930), began as a blacksmith and carriage builder around Detroit. In 1914, at the request of a local

  • Fruehauf Trailer Corporation (American corporation)

    Fruehauf Trailer Corporation, American corporation engaged in the manufacture and sale of truck trailers. Headquarters are in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S. The founder, August Charles Fruehauf (1868–1930), began as a blacksmith and carriage builder around Detroit. In 1914, at the request of a local

  • Fruehauf, August Charles (American industrialist)

    Fruehauf Trailer Corporation: The founder, August Charles Fruehauf (1868–1930), began as a blacksmith and carriage builder around Detroit. In 1914, at the request of a local lumber merchant, he built a trailer to carry the merchant’s pleasure boat, to be hauled by a Ford automobile. The trailer was so successful…

  • Fruehauf, Roy August (American industrialist)

    Fruehauf Trailer Corporation: Harvey’s younger brother Roy August Fruehauf (1908–65) became president of the company in 1949, and Harvey became chairman of the board. Tension between Harvey and Roy culminated in Harvey’s being voted off the board in 1953. Harvey retaliated by selling his shares to the Detroit and Cleveland Navigation…

  • Fruela I (king of Asturias)

    Alfonso II: …to 842, the son of Fruela I. He had to face frequent and determined attacks by the armies of the emirate of Córdoba and was often defeated, but his doggedness saved Asturias from extinction. He built a new capital, Oviedo, on a strategic site in the mountains. Inspired in part…

  • Fruela II (king of Asturias and Leon)

    Alfonso IV: …the successor of his uncle Fruela II. He became a monk, abdicated, and then thought better of it and tried to recover his throne. His short reign was, in consequence, one of political chaos, ending about 932.

  • Fruen fra havet (play by Ibsen)

    The Lady from the Sea, play in five acts by Henrik Ibsen, published in Norwegian as Fruen fra havet in 1888 and first performed in early 1889. It was the first of several mystical psychological dramas by Ibsen. The play traces the increasing distraction of Ellida Wangel, the second wife of Dr.

  • frug (dance)

    twist: …from the twist—for example, the frug and the watusi—were invariably performed by shaking the pelvis. In these dances partners only sometimes coordinated their movements. Among the suggested precursors of the twist are included the shimmy and the black bottom, and a song that was popular before 1910 included the lines…

  • frugivore (animal)

    Frugivore, any animal that subsists totally or primarily on fruit. Although the diets of many animals include fruits, many species practice frugivory exclusively. Such animals include several species of bats, such as the Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis) and a number of flying foxes

  • Frühbeck de Burgos, Rafael (Spanish conductor)

    Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, (Rafael Frühbeck), Spanish conductor (born Sept. 15, 1933, Burgos, Spain—died June 11, 2014, Pamplona, Spain), effortlessly drew upon both his German immigrant heritage and his Spanish upbringing to create a broad repertoire during his more than 50-year career. He was

  • Frühbeck, Rafael (Spanish conductor)

    Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, (Rafael Frühbeck), Spanish conductor (born Sept. 15, 1933, Burgos, Spain—died June 11, 2014, Pamplona, Spain), effortlessly drew upon both his German immigrant heritage and his Spanish upbringing to create a broad repertoire during his more than 50-year career. He was

  • Frühling (novella by Lehr)

    German literature: The turn of the 21st century: Thomas Lehr’s experimental novella Frühling (2001; “Spring”) employs drastically ruptured syntax to reproduce, in the form of a hesitating interior monologue, the final 39 seconds of its protagonist’s life. Only toward the end of the story does the narrator, who has just completed a suicide pact with his female…

  • Frühling, Der (poem by Kleist)

    Ewald Christian von Kleist: …known for his long poem Der Frühling, which, with its realistically observed details of nature, contributed to the development of a new poetic style.

  • Frühlings Erwachen (work by Wedekind)

    Frank Wedekind: …his tragedy Frühlings Erwachen (The Awakening of Spring, also published as Spring Awakening) created a scandal. Successfully produced by Max Reinhardt in 1905, the play is a series of brief scenes, some poetic and tender, others harsh and frank, dealing with the awakening of sexuality in three adolescents. In…

  • Frühlingssinfonie (symphony by Schumann)

    Symphony No. 1 in B-flat Major, Op. 38, symphony by German composer Robert Schumann that premiered on March 31, 1841, in Leipzig and was conducted by Schumann’s friend Felix Mendelssohn. It is an intensely optimistic work and is the most frequently performed of Schumann’s four symphonies.

  • fruit (plant reproductive body)

    Fruit, the fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a flowering plant, enclosing the seed or seeds. Thus, apricots, bananas, and grapes, as well as bean pods, corn grains, tomatoes, cucumbers, and (in their shells) acorns and almonds, are all technically fruits. Popularly, however, the term is restricted to

  • fruit (food)

    fruit: Popularly, however, the term is restricted to the ripened ovaries that are sweet and either succulent or pulpy. For treatment of the cultivation of fruits, see fruit farming. For treatment of the nutrient composition and processing of fruits, see fruit processing.

  • fruit bat (mammal)

    Fruit bat, any of numerous tropical bat species belonging either to the Old World fruit bats (family Pteropodidae), such as flying foxes, or to fruit-eating genera of the American leaf-nosed bats (family Phyllostomidae), especially those of the genus Artibeus (see Jamaican fruit

  • Fruit Dish and Glass (work by Braque)

    Georges Braque: Cubism: …of wallpaper to the drawing Fruit Dish and Glass. He also began to introduce sand and sawdust onto his canvases. This work significantly strengthened the idea, full of consequences for the future of art, that a picture is not an illusionistic representation but rather an autonomous object.

  • fruit farming

    Fruit farming, growing of fruit crops, including nuts, primarily for use as human food. The subject of fruit and nut production deals with intensive culture of perennial plants, the fruits of which have economic significance (a nut is a fruit, botanically). It is one part of the broad subject of

  • fruit fly (insect)

    Fruit fly, any two-winged insect of either the family Trypetidae or the family Drosophilidae (order Diptera) whose larvae feed on fruit or other vegetative matter. Insects of the family Trypetidae are often referred to as large fruit flies, and those of the Drosophilidae as small fruit flies or

  • fruit jelly (food)

    food preservation: Concentration of moist foods: Fruit jelly and preserve manufacture, an important fruit by-product industry, is based on the high-solids–high-acid principle, with its moderate heat-treatment requirements. Fruits that possess excellent qualities but are visually unattractive may be preserved and utilized in the form of concentrates, which have a pleasing taste…

  • fruit juice

    fruit processing: Fruit juice: After fresh fruit, one of the most common fruit products is fruit juice. Fruit juice can take on many forms, including a natural-style cloudy product, a “nectar”-type product containing suspended solids, a fully clarified juice, juice concentrate, and fruit drinks.

  • fruit machine (gambling device)

    Slot machine, gambling device operated by dropping one or more coins or tokens into a slot and pulling a handle or pushing a button to activate one to three or more reels marked into horizontal segments by varying symbols. The machine pays off by dropping into a cup or trough from two to all the

  • fruit moth (insect)

    Olethreutid moth, (subfamily Olethreutinae), any of a group of moths in the family Tortricidae (order Lepidoptera) that contains several species with economically destructive larvae. The pale caterpillars roll or tie leaves and feed on foliage, fruits, or nuts. Some examples include Cydia

  • Fruit of the Vine, The (work by Blasco Ibá?ez)

    Vicente Blasco Ibá?ez: …such as La bodega (1906; The Fruit of the Vine, 1919), are held to have suffered from a heavy ideological treatment of serious social problems. More popular novels, Sangre y arena (1909; Blood and Sand, 1922); La maja desnuda (1906; Woman Triumphant); his best known, Los cuatro jinetes del Apocalipsis;…

  • Fruit of Wisdom (Myanmar religion)

    Telakhon, one of the oldest Buddhist-influenced prophet cults among the Karen hill peoples of Myanmar (Burma). In their mythology, the restoration of their lost Golden Book by their white younger brothers heralds the millennium. Ywa, a withdrawn high god whose offer of the book to their ancestors

  • fruit pigeon (bird)

    pigeon: The Treroninae, or the fruit pigeons, consists of about 115 species in about 10 genera, found primarily in Africa, southern Asia, Australia, and the Pacific islands. These fruit-eating birds are soft-billed, short-legged, and arboreal in habit. Their plumage is usually greenish, often with yellow, red, or other brightly coloured…

  • fruit processing

    Fruit processing, preparation of fruit for human consumption. Fruit is sometimes defined as the product of growth from an angiosperm, or flowering plant. From a purely botanical point of view, the fruit may be only the fleshy growth that arises from the ovary of a flower and may not necessarily

  • fruit salad (dish)
  • fruit spot (plant pathology)

    Fruit spot, symptom of plant disease, usually caused by fungi and bacteria. A spot is a definite, localized area. Spots frequently enlarge and merge to form a rot, a softening discoloration and often a disintegration of tissue. All fruits are susceptible; infection commonly starts at a wound, the

  • fruit sugar (chemical compound)

    Fructose, a member of a group of carbohydrates known as simple sugars, or monosaccharides. Fructose, along with glucose, occurs in fruits, honey, and syrups; it also occurs in certain vegetables. It is a component, along with glucose, of the disaccharide sucrose, or common table sugar. Phosphate

  • fruit wine

    wine: Fruit wines: Fruit wines, derived from fruits other than grapes, include cider, made from apples; perry, produced from pears; plum wine and cherry wine; and wines made from various berries. They are frequently made by home winemakers and have some commercial importance in cold climates…

  • Fruita (former town, Utah, United States)

    Capitol Reef National Park: The contemporary park: The small Mormon community of Fruita (originally called Junction) began to develop along the Fremont River in the 1880s, and it persevered even after the national monument was established in 1937. The monument remained virtually isolated and largely unvisited during its first decade of existence. However, after a paved road…

  • Fruitful (memoir by Roiphe)

    Anne Roiphe: In the memoir Fruitful (1996), she faulted the women’s movement for its ongoing negligence of women who choose motherhood and called for it to devote more energy to issues of child care and parenting. Later memoirs include 1185 Park Avenue (1999), Epilogue (2008), and Art and Madness (2011).…

  • fruiting body (fungi)

    fungus: Size range: …is the fruiting body, or sporophore. Sporophores vary greatly in size, shape, colour, and longevity. Some are microscopic and completely invisible to the unaided eye; others are no larger than a pin head; still others are gigantic structures. Among the largest sporophores are those of mushrooms, bracket fungi, and puffballs.…

  • Fruits and Fruit Trees of America, The (work by Downing)

    Andrew Jackson Downing: His The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America (1845), written with his brother Charles, was the most complete treatise of its kind yet written and led to Downing’s becoming the editor of a new periodical, the Horticulturist, a post that he retained until his death. Downing’s…

  • Fruits of Ecuador (work by Albán)

    Latin American art: Latin American themes: …set of six paintings titled Fruits of Ecuador, both people and fruits are labeled. Similarly, about 1790–1800 an anonymous artist from Bolivia rendered pairs of different ethnic groups and social classes in their distinctive indigenous dress from the new Viceroyalty of the Río de la Plata (which had been formed…

  • Fruits of Enlightenment, The (play by Tolstoy)

    Konstantin Stanislavsky: Early influences: …first independent production, Leo Tolstoy’s The Fruits of Enlightenment, in 1891, a major Moscow theatrical event. Most significantly, it impressed a promising writer and director, Vladimir Nemirovich-Danchenko (1858–1943), whose later association with Stanislavsky was to have a paramount influence on the theatre.

  • Fruits of Philosophy: or The Private Companion of Young Married People, The (work by Knowlton)

    Charles Knowlton: …advising couples of birth-control methods, The Fruits of Philosophy: or The Private Companion of Young Married People (1832), the first work of its kind in the United States. A second edition, bearing the author’s name, appeared in 1833.

  • Fruits of the Earth (work by Gide)

    André Gide: Symbolist period: …poem Les Nourritures terrestres (1897; Fruits of the Earth) reflects Gide’s personal liberation from the fear of sin and his acceptance of the need to follow his own impulses. But after he returned to France, Gide’s relief at having shed the shackles of convention evaporated in what he called the…

  • Fruits of the Earth (novel by Grove)

    Canadian literature: Modern period, 1900–60: …of the Marsh (1925) and Fruits of the Earth (1933), depicting man’s struggle for mastery of himself and his land, are moving testaments to the courage of farmers. Painter Emily Carr wrote stories about her childhood and her visits to First Nations sites in British Columbia (Klee Wyck, 1941).

  • Fruits of the MLA, The (work by Wilson)

    Edmund Wilson: …the Income Tax (1963), and The Fruits of the MLA (1968), a lengthy attack on the Modern Language Association’s editions of American authors, which he felt buried their subjects in pedantry. His plays are in part collected in Five Plays (1954) and in The Duke of Palermo and Other Plays…

  • fruitworm beetle (insect)

    Fruitworm beetle, any of a few genera of insects in the family Byfuridae (order Coleoptera) whose larvae feed on fruit. A common example of this family of small, hairy, oval beetles is the raspberry fruitworm (Byturus rubi). The small, pale larva, which is covered with short fine hairs, attacks

  • Frullania (plant genus)

    plant: Annotated classification: representative genera include Porella, Frullania, Marchantia, Conocephalum, and Riccia. Division Lycophyta (club mosses, spike mosses,

  • Frum, David (journalist)

    axis of evil: presidential speechwriter David Frum and presidential aide Michael Gerson for use by U.S. President George W. Bush in his 2002 State of the Union address, when he asserted that

  • Frumentius, Saint (Ethiopian bishop)

    Saint Frumentius, ; feast day October 27 in the Roman Catholic Church; November 30 in Eastern Orthodox churches; December 18th in the Coptic Church), Syrian apostle who worked to spread Christianity throughout Ethiopia. As first bishop of its ancient capital, Aksum, he structured the emerging

  • Frundsberg, Georg von (German military officer)

    Georg von Frundsberg, German soldier and devoted servant of the Habsburgs who fought on behalf of the Holy Roman emperors Maximilian I and Charles V. In 1499 Frundsberg took part in Maximilian’s struggle against the Swiss, and, in the same year, he was among the imperial troops sent to assist

  • Frunze (national capital, Kyrgyzstan)

    Bishkek, city and capital of Kyrgyzstan. It lies in the Chu River valley near the Kyrgyz Mountains at an elevation of 2,500–3,000 feet (750–900 metres). Bishkek is situated along the Alaarcha and Alamedin rivers and intersects in the north with the Bolshoy (Great) Chuysky Canal. In 1825 the Uzbek

  • Frunze, Mikhail Vasilyevich (Russian military officer)

    Mikhail Vasilyevich Frunze, Soviet army officer and military theorist, regarded as one of the fathers of the Red Army. Frunze took part in the Moscow insurrection in 1905 and, after frequent arrests for revolutionary activity, escaped in 1915 to conduct agitation in the Russian army, first on the

  • Frusciante, John (American musician)

    Red Hot Chili Peppers: …included guitar player and singer John Frusciante (b. March 5, 1970, Queens, New York, U.S.) and drummer Chad Smith (b. October 25, 1962, St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S.).

  • Frusino (Italy)

    Frosinone, city, Lazio (Latium) regione, central Italy, on a hill above the Cosa River, on the Via Casilina. It originated as Frusino, a town of the ancient Volsci people, and became a colonia (colony) of the Roman Empire. There are traces of ancient walls and a Roman amphitheatre, but Frosinone,

  • Fru?ka Gora Hills (hills, Serbia)

    Serbia: Relief: The Fru?ka Gora hills interrupt these plains on the west, stretching along a triangle of land between the Danube and Sava rivers. Their highest point is 1,765 feet (540 metres). Much of the Vojvodina is blanketed by portions of a former plateau that rose up to…

  • Frusta letteraria, La (work by Baretti)

    Italian literature: The Enlightenment (Illuminismo): …published a critical journal called La Frusta Letteraria (“The Literary Whip”), in which he castigated “bad authors”—had learned much through a lengthy sojourn in England, where his friendship with Samuel Johnson helped to give independence and vigour, if not always accuracy, to his judgments. Viaggi di Enrico Wanton (1749–64; “Travels…

  • frustration (psychology)

    frustration-aggression hypothesis: …behaviour as stemming from the frustration of goals. The hypothesis was applied in studies of scapegoating and hate crimes, which indicated that as sources of frustration accumulate—during an economic crisis, for example—frustrated groups may unleash their aggression on a convenient social target, often a minority group. Later research suggested,

  • frustration-aggression hypothesis (psychology)

    Frustration-aggression hypothesis, psychological explanation of aggressive behaviour as stemming from the frustration of goals. The hypothesis was applied in studies of scapegoating and hate crimes, which indicated that as sources of frustration accumulate—during an economic crisis, for

  • frustule (biology)

    diatom: …forms a pillbox-like shell (frustule) composed of overlapping halves (epitheca and hypotheca) perforated by intricate and delicate patterns. Food is stored as oil droplets, and the golden-brown pigment fucoxanthin masks the chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments that are also present. Diatoms are commonly divided into two orders on the basis…

  • fruticose thallus

    fungus: Basic features of lichens: Fruticose (stalked) thalli and filamentous forms prefer to utilize water in vapour form and are prevalent in humid, foggy areas such as seacoasts and mountainous regions of the tropics.

  • Frutos de mi tierra (novel by Carrasquilla)

    Tomás Carrasquilla: …career with the publication of Frutos de mi tierra (1896; “Fruits of My Native Land”), a realistic novel critical of the hypocrisy of small-town life that immediately appealed to a wide audience. He continued to deal with regional subjects in his short stories and in such later novels as El…

  • Fry and Sons (English company)

    chocolate: …1847 the English firm of Fry and Sons combined cocoa butter with chocolate liquor and sugar to produce sweet (eating) chocolate—the base of most chocolate confectionary—and in 1876 Daniel Peter of Switzerland added dried milk to make milk chocolate. The proliferation of flavoured, solid, and coated chocolate foods rapidly followed.

  • Fry, Christopher (British author)

    Christopher Fry, British writer of verse plays. Fry adopted his mother’s surname after he became a schoolteacher at age 18, his father having died many years earlier. He was an actor, director, and writer of revues and plays before he gained fame as a playwright for The Lady’s Not for Burning

  • Fry, Daniel (American author)

    new religious movement: Scientific NRMs: UFO groups and Scientology: , founded by Daniel Fry (who claimed to be a contactee), argued that UFOs carried beings who had come to Earth to promote world peace and personal development. The Amalgamated Flying Saucer Clubs of America, led by Gabriel Green, and the Aetherius Society, organized by George King, maintained…

  • Fry, Edwin Maxwell (British architect)

    Maxwell Fry , British architect who, with his wife, Jane Drew, pioneered in the field of modern tropical building and town planning. One of the earliest British adherents to the modern movement, Fry was trained at the School of Architecture, University of Liverpool. In 1924 he joined the

  • Fry, Elizabeth (British philanthropist)

    Elizabeth Fry, British Quaker philanthropist and one of the chief promoters of prison reform in Europe. She also helped to improve the British hospital system and the treatment of the insane. The daughter of a wealthy Quaker banker and merchant, she married (1800) Joseph Fry, a London merchant, and

  • Fry, Maxwell (British architect)

    Maxwell Fry , British architect who, with his wife, Jane Drew, pioneered in the field of modern tropical building and town planning. One of the earliest British adherents to the modern movement, Fry was trained at the School of Architecture, University of Liverpool. In 1924 he joined the

  • Fry, Roger (British art critic and painter)

    Roger Fry, English art critic and artist, best known as the champion of the movement he termed Post-Impressionism. Fry was born into a Quaker family and was educated at the University of Cambridge for a career in science. His interest in art grew, however, and he studied painting in Italy and also

  • Fry, Stephen (British actor, writer, and director)

    Stephen Fry, British actor, comedian, author, screenwriter, and director, known especially for his virtuosic command and comical manipulation of the English language—in both speech and writing. He is especially admired for his ability to desacralize even the most serious or taboo of topics. Fry

  • Fry, Stephen John (British actor, writer, and director)

    Stephen Fry, British actor, comedian, author, screenwriter, and director, known especially for his virtuosic command and comical manipulation of the English language—in both speech and writing. He is especially admired for his ability to desacralize even the most serious or taboo of topics. Fry

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载