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  • Fantasy Island (American television program)

    Television in the United States: Jiggle TV: …man sharing an apartment; and Fantasy Island (ABC, 1978–84), which was set on a tropical island where people went to have their (often romantic) dreams fulfilled.

  • fantasy literature (narrative genre)

    Fantasy, imaginative fiction dependent for effect on strangeness of setting (such as other worlds or times) and of characters (such as supernatural or unnatural beings). Examples include William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord

  • Fantasy Records (American company)

    Fantasy Records: Cosimo's Factory: Fantasy was founded as a jazz label in San Francisco in 1949 by brothers Sol and Max Weiss. Their artists included the pianist Dave Brubeck (whose Jazz at Oberlin was among the first live jazz albums) and controversial comedian Lenny Bruce. After organizing a buyout…

  • Fantasy Records: Cosimo’s Factory

    Fantasy was founded as a jazz label in San Francisco in 1949 by brothers Sol and Max Weiss. Their artists included the pianist Dave Brubeck (whose Jazz at Oberlin was among the first live jazz albums) and controversial comedian Lenny Bruce. After organizing a buyout in 1967, the label’s new owner

  • fantasy sport

    Fantasy sport, any of a number of games that permit a person to play either a virtual game or a virtual season of a sport. In fantasy sports, the fans pose as both general manager and field manager of their team, building a roster through a draft and trades and making lineups in pursuit of the

  • fantasy theme analysis (communication)

    Ernest G. Bormann: … (SCT) and its attendant method, fantasy theme analysis, which both explore how the sharing of narratives or “fantasies” can create and sustain group consciousness. For Bormann, these communal narratives encouraged group cohesion and fostered the development of a shared social reality among group members. While Bormann’s initial conception of symbolic…

  • Fante (people)

    Fante, people of the southern coast of Ghana between Accra and Sekondi-Takoradi. They speak a dialect of Akan, a language of the Kwa branch of the Niger-Congo language family. Oral tradition states that the Fante migrated from Techiman (or Tekyiman), in what is now the northwestern Asante region,

  • Fante confederacy (African history [late 17th century-1824])

    Fante confederacy, historical group of states in what is now southern Ghana. It originated in the late 17th century when Fante people from overpopulated Mankessim, northeast of Cape Coast, settled vacant areas nearby. The resulting Fante kingdoms formed a confederacy headed by a high king (the

  • Fante language (African language)

    Akan languages: …principal members are Asante (Ashanti), Fante (Fanti), Brong (Abron), and Akuapem. The Akan cluster is located primarily in southern Ghana, although many Brong speakers live in eastern C?te d’Ivoire. Altogether speakers of Akan dialects and languages number more than seven million. Written forms of Asante and Akuapem (both formerly considered…

  • Fante, John (American writer)

    John Fante, U.S. writer. Born to Italian immigrant parents, Fante moved to Los Angeles in the early 1930s. His first novel, Wait Until Spring, Bandini (1938), was followed by his best-known book, Ask the Dust (1939), the first of his novels set in Depression-era California. Other books included the

  • Fanthorpe, U. A. (British poet)

    U.A. Fanthorpe, British poet (born July 22, 1929, London, Eng.—died April 28, 2009, Gloucester, Eng.), created verse based to a large extent on her everyday experiences as assistant instructor (1954–62) and head of English (1962–70) at Cheltenham Ladies’ College in Gloucestershire and then as a

  • Fanthorpe, Ursula Askham (British poet)

    U.A. Fanthorpe, British poet (born July 22, 1929, London, Eng.—died April 28, 2009, Gloucester, Eng.), created verse based to a large extent on her everyday experiences as assistant instructor (1954–62) and head of English (1962–70) at Cheltenham Ladies’ College in Gloucestershire and then as a

  • Fanti (people)

    Fante, people of the southern coast of Ghana between Accra and Sekondi-Takoradi. They speak a dialect of Akan, a language of the Kwa branch of the Niger-Congo language family. Oral tradition states that the Fante migrated from Techiman (or Tekyiman), in what is now the northwestern Asante region,

  • Fanti confederacy (African history [late 17th century-1824])

    Fante confederacy, historical group of states in what is now southern Ghana. It originated in the late 17th century when Fante people from overpopulated Mankessim, northeast of Cape Coast, settled vacant areas nearby. The resulting Fante kingdoms formed a confederacy headed by a high king (the

  • Fanti language (African language)

    Akan languages: …principal members are Asante (Ashanti), Fante (Fanti), Brong (Abron), and Akuapem. The Akan cluster is located primarily in southern Ghana, although many Brong speakers live in eastern C?te d’Ivoire. Altogether speakers of Akan dialects and languages number more than seven million. Written forms of Asante and Akuapem (both formerly considered…

  • Fanti, Manfredo (Italian general)

    Manfredo Fanti, one of the most capable patriot generals during the mid-19th-century wars of Italian independence; he helped the northern Italian house of Sardinia–Piedmont consolidate Italy under its leadership. Exiled for participating in a republican uprising in Savoy (1831), Fanti distinguished

  • Fantin-Latour, Henri (French painter)

    Henri Fantin-Latour, French painter, printmaker, and illustrator noted for his still lifes with flowers and his portraits, especially group compositions, of contemporary French celebrities in the arts. Fantin-Latour’s first teacher was his father, a well-known portrait painter. Later, he studied at

  • Fantin-Latour, Ignace-Henri-Jean-Théodore (French painter)

    Henri Fantin-Latour, French painter, printmaker, and illustrator noted for his still lifes with flowers and his portraits, especially group compositions, of contemporary French celebrities in the arts. Fantin-Latour’s first teacher was his father, a well-known portrait painter. Later, he studied at

  • Fant?mas (film by Feuillade)

    Louis Feuillade: Fant?mas (1913–14; Master of Terror), Feuillade’s first serial, established his popularity in both France and the United States. Its swift-moving, intricate plot features a series of thrilling episodes involving clever disguises, trapdoors, kidnappings, hairbreadth escapes, and rooftop chases. It was followed by Les Vampires (1915), which centres…

  • Fant?me de l’opéra, Le (novel by Leroux)

    Gaston Leroux: In 1910 The Phantom of the Opera appeared serially (before publication as a novel) and received only moderate sales and somewhat poor reviews. The melodrama of the hideous recluse abducting a beautiful young woman in a Paris opera house did not achieve international celebrity until the American…

  • Fant?me de Staline, Le (article by Sartre)

    Jean-Paul Sartre: Political activities: …Modernes a long article, “Le Fant?me de Staline,” that condemned both the Soviet intervention and the submission of the French Communist Party to the dictates of Moscow. Over the years this critical attitude opened the way to a form of “Sartrian Socialism” that would find its expression in a…

  • Fanu, Sheridan Le (Irish writer)

    Sheridan Le Fanu, Irish writer of ghost stories and mystery novels, celebrated for his ability to evoke the ominous atmosphere of a haunted house. Le Fanu belonged to an old Dublin Huguenot family and was related on his mother’s side to Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Educated at Trinity College,

  • Fanum Voltumnae (ancient shrine, Italy)

    ancient Italic people: Organization: …sanctuary of the Etruscans, the Fanum Voltumnae, or shrine of Voltumna, near Volsinii. The precise location of the shrine is unknown, though it may have been in an area near modern Orvieto (believed by many to be the ancient Volsinii). As for the Twelve Peoples, no firm list of these…

  • fanweed (plant)

    Pennycress, (genus Thlaspi), genus of plants of the mustard family (Brassicaceae), named and sometimes grown for their round seedpods. Most of the species are Eurasian, but a few are native to North and South America, mostly in mountain areas. Pennycress species can be annuals or perennials and

  • fanworm (polychaete)

    Feather-duster worm, any large, segmented marine worm of the family Sabellidae (class Polychaeta, phylum Annelida). The name is also occasionally applied to members of the closely related polychaete family Serpulidae. Sabellids live in long tubes constructed of mud or sand cemented by mucus,

  • fanwort (plant)

    Fanwort, any of about seven species of aquatic flowering plants constituting the genus Cabomba, of the fanwort or water-shield family (Cabombaceae), native to the New World tropics and subtropics. Water shield is also the more commonly used name for Brasenia, the only other genus of the family. The

  • FAO (United Nations organization)

    Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), oldest permanent specialized agency of the United Nations, established in October 1945 with the objective of eliminating hunger and improving nutrition and standards of living by increasing agricultural productivity. The FAO coordinates the efforts of

  • FAP (biology)

    animal behaviour: Ontogeny: …termed pecking behaviour a “fixed action pattern” to indicate that it was performed automatically and correctly the first time it was elicited, apparently regardless of the animal’s experience.

  • FAP (disease)

    amyloidosis: …common forms is known as familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP), which is caused by mutations in a gene designated TTR (transthyretin). Transthyretin protein, produced by the TTR gene, normally circulates in the blood and plays an important role in the transport and tissue delivery of thyroid hormone and retinol. FAP primarily…

  • FAP (pathology)

    colorectal cancer: Causes and symptoms: …colorectal cancer—specifically, forms such as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), Gardner syndrome, and hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC)—can predispose an individual to developing colorectal cancer. Each of these conditions is caused in part by a known genetic mutation. In addition, Ashkenazi Jews have a slightly higher incidence of colorectal cancer due…

  • FAP (proposed United States legislation)

    Richard Nixon: Domestic policies: Nixon’s proposed Family Assistance Program (FAP), intended to replace the service-oriented Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), would have provided working and nonworking poor families with a guaranteed annual income—though Nixon preferred to call it a “negative income tax.” Although the measure was defeated in the…

  • FAPE (law)

    Board of Education of the Hendrick Hudson Central School District v. Rowley: …disabled students with a “free appropriate public education” (FAPE) in the “least restrictive environment”—i.e., in classrooms with nondisabled children, where feasible—as detailed in an individualized education program (IEP) developed for each child by school officials in consultation with parents or guardians. The court’s decision in Rowley thus defined the…

  • Fapp, Daniel L. (American cinematographer)
  • Faqāriyyah (Mamluk dynasty)

    Egypt: Ottoman administration: …into two great rival houses—the Faqāriyyah and the Qāsimiyyah—whose mutual hostility often broke out into fighting and impaired the strength of the Mamlūks as a bloc.

  • faqīh (Islamic jurist)

    North Africa: The Maghrib under the Almoravids and the Almohads: The fuqahā? (experts on Islamic law) supervised both the administration of justice by the qā?īs and the work of the provincial governors, and they acted as advisers to the rulers. The empire’s simple system of government, in which military commanders acted as administrators, was rendered especially…

  • faqih (Islamic jurist)

    North Africa: The Maghrib under the Almoravids and the Almohads: The fuqahā? (experts on Islamic law) supervised both the administration of justice by the qā?īs and the work of the provincial governors, and they acted as advisers to the rulers. The empire’s simple system of government, in which military commanders acted as administrators, was rendered especially…

  • faqīr (Islam and Hinduism)

    Fakir, originally, a mendicant dervish. In mystical usage, the word fakir refers to man’s spiritual need for God, who alone is self-sufficient. Although of Muslim origin, the term has come to be applied in India to Hindus as well, largely replacing gosvāmin, sadhu, bhikku, and other designations.

  • faqr (?ūfism)

    maqām: …acquisitiveness; (4) the maqām of faqr (poverty), in which he asserts his independence of worldly possessions and his need of God alone; (5) the maqām of ?abr (patience), the art of steadfastness; (6) the maqām of tawakkul (trust, or surrender), in which the Sufi knows that he cannot be discouraged…

  • Faqrnāmeh (work by Asik Pasa)

    A??k Pa?a: The Faqrnāmeh (“The Book of Poverty”) is also attributed to the poet. Introduced by the famous ?adīth “poverty is my pride,” this poem of 160 rhymed couplets deals with poverty and humility, the ideal ethic of the Muslim mystic. A??k Pa?a at his death was a…

  • Far Country, The (film by Mann [1954])

    Anthony Mann: The 1950s: westerns: …returned to the western with The Far Country (1954), a tale of two cattlemen (Stewart and Walter Brennan) who drive their herd to an Alaskan gold-rush town, only to have it seized by a despotic sheriff (John Mclntire). Stewart’s performance was particularly effective as his character transforms from a good-natured…

  • Far Cry (electronic game)

    Far Cry, electronic game released for personal computers (PCs) in 2004 by Ubisoft Entertainment SA, an entertainment-software company based in France. Far Cry enjoyed strong sales and impressed critics with its mix of stealth and “shoot-’em-up” first-person action. The game also was noted for its

  • Far East

    alcohol consumption: Among Classical peoples: …Middle East, the people of East Asia discovered the technology of manufacturing alcoholic beverages in prehistoric times. Barley and rice were the chief crops and the raw materials for producing the beverages that, as in the Middle East, were incorporated into religious ceremonies, both as drink and libation, with festivals…

  • Far Eastern Economic Review (magazine)

    Far Eastern Economic Review, former weekly newsmagazine covering general, political, and business and financial news of East and Southeast Asia. It was published in Hong Kong, where it was established in 1946. The magazine carried feature articles on the major developments in the region and on

  • Far Eastern Republic (historical state, Russia)

    Far Eastern Republic, nominally independent state formed by Soviet Russia in eastern Siberia in 1920 and absorbed into the Soviet Union in 1922. At the time of the Far Eastern Republic’s creation, the Bolsheviks controlled Siberia west of Lake Baikal, while Japan held much of the Pacific coast,

  • Far from Heaven (film by Haynes [2002])

    Todd Haynes: In Far from Heaven (2002), Haynes re-created the style of a Douglas Sirk melodrama to tell the tale of a seemingly perfect married couple in 1950s suburbia whose relationship is afflicted when the husband (Dennis Quaid) reveals to his wife (Moore) that he has been struggling…

  • Far From Home (album by Traffic)

    Traffic: …name in 1994 to record Far From Home. The pair also staged a successful concert tour. Traffic was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004.

  • Far from the Madding Crowd (film by Schlesinger [1967])

    John Schlesinger: British films: Far from the Madding Crowd (1967), based on Thomas Hardy’s epic novel of the same name, was Schlesinger’s big-budget payoff for the success of Darling. It was made for MGM’s British division and cast Christie as the beleaguered heroine and Bates, Peter Finch, and Terence…

  • Far from the Madding Crowd (novel by Hardy)

    Far from the Madding Crowd, novel by Thomas Hardy, published serially and anonymously in 1874 in The Cornhill Magazine and published in book form under Hardy’s name the same year. It was his first popular success. The plot centres on Bathsheba Everdene, a farm owner, and her three suitors, Gabriel

  • Far Horizons, The (film by Maté [1955])

    Donna Reed: Reed portrayed Sacagawea in The Far Horizons (1955), appeared as the title character’s love interest in The Benny Goodman Story (1956), and played opposite Richard Widmark in John Sturges’s Backlash (1956).

  • far side of the Moon (astronomy)

    Moon: Large-scale features: …about the appearance of the Moon’s unseen side. The mystery began to be dispelled with the flight of the Soviet space probe Luna 3 in 1959, which returned the first photographs of the far side. In contrast to the near side, the surface displayed in the Luna 3 images consisted…

  • Far Tortuga (novel by Matthiessen)

    Peter Matthiessen: Far Tortuga (1975) concerns the events leading up to the death of the crew of a turtle-fishing boat in the Caribbean. A trilogy, composed of Killing Mister Watson (1990), Lost Man’s River (1997), and Bone by Bone (1999), fictionalizes the life of a murderous planter…

  • Far Traveler (Old English literature)

    Widsith, Old English poem, probably from the 7th century, that is preserved in the Exeter Book, a 10th-century collection of Old English poetry. “Widsith” is an idealized self-portrait of a scop (minstrel) of the Germanic heroic age who wandered widely and was welcomed in many mead halls, where he

  • Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (United States satellite observatory)

    Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE), U.S. satellite observatory that observed the universe in far-ultraviolet light (wavelengths between 90.5 and 119.5 nanometres). FUSE was launched on June 24, 1999. One of its main aims was the study of hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) ratios in intergalactic

  • Far West (region, United States)

    The West, region, western U.S., mostly west of the Great Plains and including, by federal-government definition, Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming. Virtually every part of the United States except the Eastern Seaboard has

  • Far, Verden, Farvel (song by Kingo)

    Thomas Kingo: …songs, the best-known are “Far, Verden, Farvel” (“Fare, World, Farewell”) and “Sorrig og Gl?de de vandre til Hobe” (“Sorrow and Joy They Wander Together”). He is remembered today mainly for what is popularly known as Kingo’s hymnbook, a collection that appeared in 1699 and contained 86 of his own…

  • far-infrared spectroscopy (physics)

    spectroscopy: Infrared spectroscopy: …mid-infrared (400–4,000 cm?1) and the far infrared (10–400 cm?1). With the development of Fourier-transform spectrometers, this distinction of areas has blurred and the more sophisticated instruments can cover from 10 to 25,000 cm?1 by an interchange of source, beam splitter, detector, and sample cell.

  • far-sightedness (visual disorder)

    Hyperopia, refractive error or abnormality in which the cornea and lens of the eye focus the image of the visual field at an imaginary point behind the retina (the light-sensitive layer of tissue lining the back and sides of the eye). The retina thus receives an unfocused image of near objects,

  • Far-Worshiping Commander, A (work by Ibuse Masuji)

    Ibuse Masuji: …office, and Yōhai taichō (1950; A Far-Worshiping Commander), an antimilitary satire, were especially well received. Ibuse received the Order of Culture for the novel Kuroi ame (1966; Black Rain), which deals with the terrible effects of the bombing of Hiroshima during World War II.

  • Fara Filiorum Petri (Italy)

    Christianity: Christian practice in the modern world: …his feast, the people of Fara Filiorum Petri, a town in the Abruzzi region of Italy, ignite enormous bonfires on the night of January 16. Each of the 12 outlying hamlets brings into the main town’s square a bundle (farchia) of long poles. Set on end, the bundles are lashed…

  • Fārābī, al- (Muslim philosopher)

    Al-Fārābī, Muslim philosopher, one of the preeminent thinkers of medieval Islam. He was regarded in the medieval Islamic world as the greatest philosophical authority after Aristotle. Very little is known of al-Fārābī’s life, and his ethnic origin is a matter of dispute. He eventually moved from

  • Fārābī, Mu?ammad ibn Mu?ammad ibn ?arkhān ibn Awzalagh al- (Muslim philosopher)

    Al-Fārābī, Muslim philosopher, one of the preeminent thinkers of medieval Islam. He was regarded in the medieval Islamic world as the greatest philosophical authority after Aristotle. Very little is known of al-Fārābī’s life, and his ethnic origin is a matter of dispute. He eventually moved from

  • Fārābī, Mu?ammad ibn Mu?ammad ibn ?arkhān ibn Uzalagh al- (Muslim philosopher)

    Al-Fārābī, Muslim philosopher, one of the preeminent thinkers of medieval Islam. He was regarded in the medieval Islamic world as the greatest philosophical authority after Aristotle. Very little is known of al-Fārābī’s life, and his ethnic origin is a matter of dispute. He eventually moved from

  • Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (political party, El Salvador)

    Farabundo Martí National Liberation Front (FMLN), insurgent group that became a legal political party of El Salvador at the end of the country’s civil war in 1992. By the end of that decade, the FMLN had become one of the country’s prominent political parties. On October 10, 1980, the FMLN was

  • Farabundo Martí, Augustín (Salvadoran revolutionary)

    El Salvador: Military dictatorships: …1932 that was organized by Augustín Farabundo Martí, head of the recently formed Salvadoran Communist Party. Hernández Martínez easily suppressed the rebellion and authorized the summary execution of at least 10,000 suspected participants. The uprising and its brutal repression, which is referred to as la matanza (“the slaughter”), were momentous…

  • farad (unit of measurement)

    Farad, unit of electrical capacitance (ability to hold an electric charge), in the metre–kilogram–second system of physical units, named in honour of the English scientist Michael Faraday. The capacitance of a capacitor is one farad when one coulomb of electricity changes the potential between the

  • faraday (unit of measurement)

    Faraday, unit of electricity, used in the study of electrochemical reactions and equal to the amount of electric charge that liberates one gram equivalent of any ion from an electrolytic solution. It was named in honour of the 19th-century English scientist Michael Faraday and equals 9.648533289 ×

  • faraday constant (unit of measurement)

    Faraday, unit of electricity, used in the study of electrochemical reactions and equal to the amount of electric charge that liberates one gram equivalent of any ion from an electrolytic solution. It was named in honour of the 19th-century English scientist Michael Faraday and equals 9.648533289 ×

  • Faraday cup (science)

    mass spectrometry: Faraday cup: The direct measurement of ion currents collected by a shielded electrode, called a Faraday cup, became possible in the 1930s with the introduction of electrometer tubes capable of measuring currents below a nanoampere, although sensitive galvanometers had been used for larger currents. The…

  • Faraday effect (physics)

    Faraday effect, in physics, the rotation of the plane of polarization (plane of vibration) of a light beam by a magnetic field. Michael Faraday, an English scientist, first observed the effect in 1845 when studying the influence of a magnetic field on plane-polarized light waves. (Light waves

  • Faraday generator (device)

    magnetohydrodynamic power generator: Principles of operation: In a Faraday generator, as shown in part A of the figure, the electrode walls are segmented and insulated from each other to support the axial electric field and the electric power is taken out in a series of loads. In the alternate configuration known as a…

  • Faraday rotation (physics)

    Faraday effect, in physics, the rotation of the plane of polarization (plane of vibration) of a light beam by a magnetic field. Michael Faraday, an English scientist, first observed the effect in 1845 when studying the influence of a magnetic field on plane-polarized light waves. (Light waves

  • Faraday shutter (photography)

    technology of photography: High-speed shutters: A magneto-optical shutter (Faraday shutter) consists of a glass cylinder placed inside a magnetic coil between two crossed polarizing filters; so long as the filters remain crossed, virtually no light can pass through. A brief current pulse through the coil generates a magnetic field that rotates…

  • Faraday’s law of induction (physics)

    Faraday’s law of induction, in physics, a quantitative relationship between a changing magnetic field and the electric field created by the change, developed on the basis of experimental observations made in 1831 by the English scientist Michael Faraday. The phenomenon called electromagnetic

  • Faraday’s law of magnetic induction (physics)

    Faraday’s law of induction, in physics, a quantitative relationship between a changing magnetic field and the electric field created by the change, developed on the basis of experimental observations made in 1831 by the English scientist Michael Faraday. The phenomenon called electromagnetic

  • Faraday’s laws of electrolysis (chemistry)

    Faraday’s laws of electrolysis, in chemistry, quantitative laws used to express magnitudes of electrolytic effects, first described by the English scientist Michael Faraday in 1833. The laws state that (1) the amount of chemical change produced by current at an electrode-electrolyte boundary is p

  • Faraday, Michael (British physicist and chemist)

    Michael Faraday, English physicist and chemist whose many experiments contributed greatly to the understanding of electromagnetism. Faraday, who became one of the greatest scientists of the 19th century, began his career as a chemist. He wrote a manual of practical chemistry that reveals his

  • Faradofay (Madagascar)

    T?lan?aro, town, southeastern tip of Madagascar. It was settled temporarily between 1504 and 1528 by shipwrecked Portuguese sailors. The French built a fort there in 1643, and étienne de Flacourt wrote his descriptive Histoire de la Grande Isle de Madagascar there in 1661. A port on the Indian

  • Farāfīr, Al- (play by Idrīs)

    Arabic literature: Modern Arabic drama: …whose celebrated play Al-Farāfīr (1964; The Farfoors, or The Flipflap) combined elements of traditional comic forms of dramatic presentation with such Brechtian effects as the presence of an “author” as a stage character and the use of theatre-in-the-round staging. Alfred Faraj took a somewhat different course, invoking tales and incidents…

  • Farage, Nigel (British politician)

    Nigel Farage, British politician who served as a member of the European Parliament from 1999 to 2020. He led the populist libertarian United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) from 2006 to 2009 and again from 2010 to 2016. In 2019 he launched the Brexit Party. Farage was born into a prosperous

  • Farage, Nigel Paul (British politician)

    Nigel Farage, British politician who served as a member of the European Parliament from 1999 to 2020. He led the populist libertarian United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP) from 2006 to 2009 and again from 2010 to 2016. In 2019 he launched the Brexit Party. Farage was born into a prosperous

  • Faragher v. City of Boca Raton (law case)

    Faragher v. City of Boca Raton, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on June 26, 1998, ruled (7–2) that—under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964—an employer may be liable for supervisory employees whose sexual harassment of subordinates results in “a hostile work environment amounting to job

  • Farago, Ladislas (Hungarian-born writer and popular historian)

    Ladislas Farago, Hungarian-born writer and popular historian who produced an impressive array of war and espionage books about World War II. Farago’s output included Burn After Reading (1961), The Broken Seal (1967), The Game of the Foxes (1972), and The Tenth Fleet and Strictly from Hungary (both

  • Farāh (Afghanistan)

    Farāh, town, southwestern Afghanistan, on the Farāh River. Usually identified with the ancient town of Phrada, it was once a centre of agriculture and commerce until destroyed by the Mongols in 1221; it later revived but was sacked in 1837 by the Persians. The building of the Kandahār-Herāt road

  • Farāh River (river, Afghanistan)

    Farāh River, river in western Afghanistan, rising on the southern slopes of the Band-e Bāyan Range, flowing southwest past the town of Farāh, and emptying into the Helmand (Sīstān) swamps on the Iranian border after a course of 350 miles (560 km). The river fluctuates greatly with the seasons, s

  • Farah, Mo (British athlete)

    Mo Farah, Somalian-born British distance runner who won gold medals in both the 5,000-metre and 10,000-metre races at the 2012 London Olympics and the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. Farah and his twin brother, Hassan, were among the six children of British-born Muktar Farah and his Somali wife.

  • Farah, Mohamed (British athlete)

    Mo Farah, Somalian-born British distance runner who won gold medals in both the 5,000-metre and 10,000-metre races at the 2012 London Olympics and the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics. Farah and his twin brother, Hassan, were among the six children of British-born Muktar Farah and his Somali wife.

  • Farah, Nuruddin (Somalian writer)

    Nuruddin Farah, Somali writer who was known for his rich imagination and refreshing and often fortuitous use of his adopted language, English. He was widely considered the most significant Somali writer in any European language. The son of a merchant and the well-known Somali poet Aleeli Faduma,

  • Farahnaz Pahlavi Dam (dam, Iran)

    dam: Concrete buttress and multiple-arch dams: …in the construction of the Farahnaz Pahlavi Dam in Iran. Built for the Tehrān Regional Water Board in 1967, this dam has a maximum height of 107 metres (351 feet) and a crest length of nearly 360 metres (1,181 feet).

  • farai (musical instrument)

    African music: Trumpets: …long metal kakaki and wooden farai, both end-blown, fulfill this role in combination with drums. In East and central Africa, the instruments are often made from gourds, wood, hide, horn, or a combination of these materials. In the historic kingdom of Buganda (now part of Uganda), trumpet sets were part…

  • Faraj (Mamlūk ruler of Egypt)

    Faraj, 26th Mamlūk ruler of Egypt and Syria; his reign was marked by a loss of internal control of the Mamlūk kingdom, whose rulers were descendants of slaves. Faraj was the victim of forces—including foreign invasion and domestic feuds—that he did not create and could not control. Faraj’s f

  • faraj ba?d al-shiddah, al- (Arabic literature genre)

    Arabic literature: Varieties of adab: compilations, anthologies, and manuals: …is an example of the al-faraj ba?d al-shiddah (“escape from hardship”) genre, which involves sequences of anecdotes in which people find release from difficult situations, often at the very last minute and as a result of the generosity of others. A still later work by al-Qalqashandī, the 15th-century ?ub? al-a?shā…

  • Faraj, Alfred (Egyptian dramatist and writer)

    Arabic literature: Modern Arabic drama: Alfred Faraj took a somewhat different course, invoking tales and incidents from history and folklore (and especially from The Thousand and One Nights) in order to illustrate contemporary political and social realities. Faraj chose to follow al-?akīm in selecting as his language medium a more…

  • Faraj, Muhammad Abd al-Salam (Egyptian Islamist)

    Egyptian Islamic Jihad: …1970s under the leadership of Muhammad Abd al-Salam Faraj. His treatise Al-Farī?ah al-ghā?ibah (1981; The Neglected Duty), which urged Muslims to use violence for the purpose of creating an Islamic state, became the group’s ideological platform. On October 6, 1981, EIJ members disguised as soldiers assassinated Egyptian Pres. Anwar Sadat,…

  • Farakka Barrage (dam, India)

    Ganges River: Navigation: The Farakka Barrage at the head of the delta, just inside Indian territory in West Bengal, began diverting Ganges waters south into India in 1976. The Indian government argued that hydrological changes had diverted Ganges water from the port of Kolkata over the preceding century and…

  • Farallon Capital Management (American company)

    Tom Steyer: …and philanthropist who founded (1986) Farallon Capital Management and later became a noted environmental activist.

  • Farallon slab (tectonic plate)

    New Madrid earthquakes of 1811–12: Possible causes of the New Madrid earthquakes: …that the remains of the Farallon slab, a small tectonic plate that subducted beneath the western part of the North American Plate some 70 million years ago, may be indirectly responsible for the faulting, as well as the seismicity, in the NMSZ. He noted that these remnants lie directly beneath…

  • Faranah (Guinea)

    Faranah, town, central Guinea, western Africa. The town is located on the Niger River and was founded in the 1890s as a French outpost in the campaign against Samory Touré, the Malinke warrior-leader. It is connected by road with Dabola and Kissidougou and is a trading centre for rice, cattle, and

  • farandole (dance)

    Farandole, lively and popular chain dance—an ancient dance style in which dancers form a chain, usually by linking hands with two others—of Provence (France) and Catalonia (Spain). The dancers, following the steps introduced by the chain leader, wind through the streets to the accompaniment of

  • Faraz, Ahmed (Pakistani poet)

    Ahmed Faraz, (Syed Ahmad Shah), Pakistani poet (born Jan. 14, 1931, Nowshera, near Kohat, North West Frontier, British India [now in Pakistan]—died Aug. 25, 2008, Islamabad, Pak.), crafted more than a dozen volumes of contemporary Urdu poetry, in which he expressed passionate feelings about love

  • Farazdaq, al- (Islamic poet)

    Al-Farazdaq, Arab poet famous for his satires in a period when poetry was an important political instrument. With his rival Jarīr, he represents the transitional period between Bedouin traditional culture and the new Muslim society that was being forged. Living in Basra, al-Farazdaq (“The Lump of

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