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  • Faustin I (emperor of Haiti)

    Faustin-élie Soulouque, Haitian slave, president, and later emperor of Haiti, who represented the black majority of the country against the mulatto elite. Soulouque was born a slave while Haiti was still under French rule. He participated in a successful revolt in 1803 that expelled the French, and

  • Faustina the Elder (Roman patrician)

    Western sculpture: Antonine and Severan periods: …honour of Antoninus Pius and Faustina the Elder. The front bears a dignified, classicizing scene of apotheosis: a powerfully built winged figure lifts the Emperor and Empress aloft, while two personifications, Roma and Campus Martius, witness their departure. On each side is a decursio, or military parade, in which the…

  • Faustina the Younger (Roman patrician)

    Annia Galeria Faustina, cousin and wife of the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius (ruled 161–180) and his companion on several of his military campaigns. Faustina was the daughter of the emperor Antoninus Pius (ruled 138–160) and Annia Galeria Faustina the Elder. She was engaged to marry the future

  • Faustina, Annia Galeria (Roman patrician)

    Annia Galeria Faustina, cousin and wife of the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius (ruled 161–180) and his companion on several of his military campaigns. Faustina was the daughter of the emperor Antoninus Pius (ruled 138–160) and Annia Galeria Faustina the Elder. She was engaged to marry the future

  • Faustine and the Beautiful Summer (film by Companéez [1971])

    Isabelle Huppert: Early career and acclaim: …et le bel été (1971; Faustine and the Beautiful Summer). Though cast in a bit part, she attracted notice and began working steadily; by the mid-1970s she had made more than 15 films. It was not until 1977, however, that she received international acclaim. In La Dentellière (The Lacemaker) her…

  • Faustine et le bel été (film by Companéez [1971])

    Isabelle Huppert: Early career and acclaim: …et le bel été (1971; Faustine and the Beautiful Summer). Though cast in a bit part, she attracted notice and began working steadily; by the mid-1970s she had made more than 15 films. It was not until 1977, however, that she received international acclaim. In La Dentellière (The Lacemaker) her…

  • Fausto: Impresiones del gaucho Anastasio el Pollo en la representación de ésta ópera (poem by Campo)

    Estanislao del Campo: …Opera”; published in English as Faust).

  • Faustulus (mythological figure)

    Romulus and Remus: …were found by the herdsman Faustulus.

  • Faustus (literary character)

    Faust, hero of one of the most durable legends in Western folklore and literature, the story of a German necromancer or astrologer who sells his soul to the devil in exchange for knowledge and power. There was a historical Faust, indeed perhaps two, one of whom more than once alluded to the devil

  • Faustus of Riez, Saint (French bishop)

    St. Faustus of Riez, ; feast day in southern France, September 28), bishop of Riez, France, who was one of the chief exponents and defenders of Semi-Pelagianism. In the early 5th century Faustus went to southern Gaul, where he joined a newly founded monastic community on the ?les de Lérins (off the

  • Faut, Jean (American baseball player)

    All-American Girls Professional Baseball League: …baseman Sophie Kurys, and pitcher Jean Faut. Televised major league baseball and lackadaisical promotion of AAGPBL games, however, led to the league’s demise in 1954.

  • Faute de l’abbé Mouret, La (work by Zola)

    French literature: Zola: …Faute de l’abbé Mouret (1875; The Sin of Father Mouret). As the cycle progresses, the sense of a doomed society rushing toward the apocalypse grows, to be confirmed in Zola’s penultimate novel, on the Franco-German War, La Débacle (1892; The Debacle).

  • Fauvelet, Louis Antoine (French diplomat)

    Louis-Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne, French diplomat and one-time secretary to Napoleon Bonaparte. His Mémoires provide a colourful but not very reliable commentary on the First Empire. Bourrienne claimed to have been a friend of the future emperor at the military school of Brienne. In the early

  • Fauvet, Jacques-Jules-Pierre-Constant (French journalist)

    Jacques-Jules-Pierre-Constant Fauvet, French journalist (born June 9, 1914, Paris, France—died June 1, 2002, Paris), was a driving force at Le Monde, one of France’s most influential and respected daily newspapers, for more than 50 years; he joined the staff of the newly established paper in 1945 a

  • Fauvette, La (French painter)

    Marie Laurencin, French painter, printmaker, and stage designer known for her delicate portraits of elegant, vaguely melancholic women. From 1903 to 1904 Laurencin studied art at the Humbert Academy in Paris. Among her fellow students was Georges Braque, who, with Pablo Picasso, soon developed the

  • Fauvism (French painting)

    Fauvism, style of painting that flourished in France around the turn of the 20th century. Fauve artists used pure, brilliant colour aggressively applied straight from the paint tubes to create a sense of an explosion on the canvas. The Fauves painted directly from nature, as the Impressionists had

  • faux leather (material)
  • Faux passeports (work by Plisnier)

    Charles Plisnier: …Goncourt for Faux passeports (1937; Memoirs of a Secret Revolutionary) and was the first non-French writer to do so. This set of five novellas about disillusioned militants uses one of his favourite techniques: a first-person witness as a screen between hero and reader. Plisnier’s shorter works, such as Figures détruites…

  • Faux-Monnayeurs, Les (novel by Gide)

    The Counterfeiters, novel by André Gide, published in French in 1926 as Les Faux-Monnayeurs. Constructed with a greater range and scope than his previous short fiction, The Counterfeiters is Gide’s most complex and intricately plotted work. It is a novel within a novel, concerning the relatives and

  • fauxbourdon (music)

    Fauxbourdon, musical texture prevalent during the late Middle Ages and early Renaissance, produced by three voices proceeding primarily in parallel motion in intervals corresponding to the first inversion of the triad. Only two of the three parts were notated, a plainchant melody together with the

  • fava bean (plant)

    favism: …an allergic-like reaction to the broad, or fava, bean (Vicia faba). Susceptible persons may develop a blood disorder (hemolytic anemia) by eating the beans, or even by walking through a field where the plants are in flower.

  • Favaloro, René Gerónimo (Argentine surgeon)

    René Gerónimo Favaloro, Argentine heart surgeon (born July 14, 1923, La Plata, Arg.—died July 29, 2000, Buenos Aires, Arg.), performed the first documented coronary bypass operation and was the first surgeon to perform successful heart-transplant surgery in Argentina. Favaloro earned a degree in m

  • Favara (Italy)

    Favara, town, south central Sicily, Italy, just east of Agrigento city. The name of the town is believed to be of Arabic origin. It is the site of a late 13th-century castle, built by the Chiaramonte family, Sicilian nobles from the 11th–15th centuries. In a sulphur-mining and marble-quarrying

  • Favart, Charles-Simon (French dramatist)

    Charles-Simon Favart, French dramatist and theatre director who was one of the creators of the opéra comique. After his father’s death, Favart simultaneously carried on his business as a pastry cook and wrote librettos for light operas. He became stage manager of the Opéra-Comique in 1743 and

  • favela (Brazilian shantytown)

    Favela, in Brazil, a slum or shantytown located within or on the outskirts of the country’s large cities, especially Rio de Janeiro and S?o Paulo. A favela typically comes into being when squatters occupy vacant land at the edge of a city and construct shanties of salvaged or stolen materials. Some

  • favella (Brazilian shantytown)

    Favela, in Brazil, a slum or shantytown located within or on the outskirts of the country’s large cities, especially Rio de Janeiro and S?o Paulo. A favela typically comes into being when squatters occupy vacant land at the edge of a city and construct shanties of salvaged or stolen materials. Some

  • Faventia (Italy)

    Faenza, city, Ravenna provincia, in the Emilia-Romagna regione of northern Italy, on the Lamone River, southeast of Bologna. In the 2nd century bc it was a Roman town (Faventia) on the Via Aemilia, but excavations show Faenza to have had a much earlier origin. It was later subject to many barbarian

  • Faversham (England, United Kingdom)

    Faversham, town (parish), Swale district, administrative and historic county of Kent, southeastern England. Faversham grew first as a port on the River Swale near Watling Street (an ancient Roman road). It was assessed in 1086 in Domesday Book as a royal demesne, and a market was held there. King

  • favism (genetic disorder)

    Favism, a hereditary disorder involving an allergic-like reaction to the broad, or fava, bean (Vicia faba). Susceptible persons may develop a blood disorder (hemolytic anemia) by eating the beans, or even by walking through a field where the plants are in flower. The known distribution of the d

  • favola d’Orfeo, La (opera by Monteverdi)

    Orpheus: …operas by Claudio Monteverdi (Orfeo, 1607), Christoph Gluck (Orfeo ed Euridice, 1762), and Jacques Offenbach (Orpheus in the Underworld, 1858); Jean Cocteau’s drama (1926) and film (1949) Orphée; and Brazilian director Marcel Camus’s film Black Orpheus (1959).

  • favola del figlio cambiato, La (play by Pirandello)

    mask: Theatrical uses: …for a 1957 production of La favola del figlio cambiato (The Fable of the Transformed Son) by Italian dramatist Luigi Pirandello (1867–1936). A well-known mid-20th-century play using masks was Les Nègres (1958; The Blacks) by French writer Jean Genet. The mask, however, unquestionably lost its importance as a theatrical convention…

  • Favorinus (Roman philosopher and orator)

    Favorinus, Skeptical philosopher and rhetorician of the Roman Empire who was highly esteemed for his learning and eloquence. He was a congenital eunuch and is known to have lived in Rome, Athens, Corinth, and Ephesus. He was the teacher of Herodes Atticus, Gellius, and Fronto and was a friend of

  • Favorlang language

    Austronesian languages: Size and geographic scope: Siraya and Favorlang, which are now extinct, are attested from fairly extensive religious texts compiled by missionaries during the Dutch occupation of southwestern Taiwan (1624–62). All the roughly 160 native languages of the Philippines are Austronesian, although it is likely that the now highly marginalized hunter-gatherer populations…

  • Favors, Malachi (American musician)

    Malachi Maghostut Favors, American jazz bassist (born Aug. 22, 1927, Lexington, Miss.—died Jan. 30, 2004, Chicago, Ill.), was devoted to a rich, pure, unamplified sound as he played swinging accompaniments and dense, extended solos; he painted his face in ceremonial designs and wore traditional c

  • Favors, Malachi Maghostut (American musician)

    Malachi Maghostut Favors, American jazz bassist (born Aug. 22, 1927, Lexington, Miss.—died Jan. 30, 2004, Chicago, Ill.), was devoted to a rich, pure, unamplified sound as he played swinging accompaniments and dense, extended solos; he painted his face in ceremonial designs and wore traditional c

  • Favosites (fossil genus of corals)

    Favosites, extinct genus of corals found as fossils in marine rocks from the Ordovician to the Permian periods (between 488 million and 251 million years old). Favosites is easily recognized by its distinctive form; the genus is colonial, and the individual structures that house each coral animal

  • Favourite, The (film by Lanthimos [2018])

    Nicholas Hoult: …played an 18th-century politician in The Favourite (2018), a historical drama about Queen Anne’s court. During this time he also lent his voice to the animated TV miniseries Watership Down (2018), which was based on Richard Adams’s beloved children’s book. Hoult’s credits from 2019 included the biopic Tolkien, about the…

  • Favre, Brett (American football player)

    Brett Favre, American professional gridiron football player who broke all the major National Football League (NFL) career passing records as quarterback of the Green Bay Packers. Favre grew up in Kiln, Mississippi, and attended the University of Southern Mississippi, where he became the football

  • Favre, Brett Lorenzo (American football player)

    Brett Favre, American professional gridiron football player who broke all the major National Football League (NFL) career passing records as quarterback of the Green Bay Packers. Favre grew up in Kiln, Mississippi, and attended the University of Southern Mississippi, where he became the football

  • Favre, Claude (French grammarian)

    Claude Favre, seigneur de Vaugelas, French grammarian and an original member of the Académie Fran?aise who played a major role in standardizing the French language of literature and of polite society. A courtier, he was a habitué of the salon of the Marquise de Rambouillet, where his taste and

  • Favre, Gabriel-Claude-Jules (French politician)

    Jules Favre, a resolute French opponent of Napoleon III and a negotiator of the Treaty of Frankfurt ending the Franco-German War. From the time of the Revolution of 1830, he declared himself a republican. Elected to the legislative assembly of 1849 by the Rh?ne département, he tried with Victor

  • Favre, Jules (French politician)

    Jules Favre, a resolute French opponent of Napoleon III and a negotiator of the Treaty of Frankfurt ending the Franco-German War. From the time of the Revolution of 1830, he declared himself a republican. Elected to the legislative assembly of 1849 by the Rh?ne département, he tried with Victor

  • Favre, Pierre (French theologian)

    Peter Faber, French Jesuit theologian and a cofounder of the Society of Jesus, who was tutor and friend of Ignatius Loyola at Paris. He was appointed professor of theology at Rome by Pope Paul III (1537), founded Jesuit colleges at Cologne and in Spain, and was a delegate to the Council of

  • Favrile glass

    glassware: United States: …of the fancy glasses, the Favrile glass of Louis Comfort Tiffany represented an altogether higher level of achievement both in its shapes and in the colouring and figuring of the glass. It was first shown to the public in 1893, and in pieces that were produced a few years later…

  • favus (pathology)

    ringworm: …or honeycomb, ringworm, also called favus, a ringworm of the scalp, characterized by the formation of yellow, cup-shaped crusts that enlarge to form honeycomb-like masses; and black dot ringworm, also a ringworm of the scalp, deriving its distinctive appearance and name from the breaking of the hairs at the scalp…

  • fawāti? (Islam)

    Fawāti?, (Arabic: “prefatory ones”) letters of the alphabet appearing at the beginning of 29 of the sūrāhs (chapters) of the Muslim sacred scripture, the Qur?ān. The 14 letters thus designated occur singly and in various combinations of two to five. As the letters always stand separately

  • Fawcett Comics (American publishing house)

    Captain Marvel: Shazam! and the litigious origins of Captain Marvel: Beck created the superhero for Fawcett Comics in an effort to capitalize on the blockbuster success of DC Comics’ Superman, who had debuted the previous year. Fawcett’s Captain Marvel was a young boy named Billy Batson, who upon speaking the magic word “Shazam!” could transform himself into “Earth’s mightiest mortal.”…

  • Fawcett, Dame Millicent Garrett (British suffragist)

    Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett, leader for 50 years of the movement for woman suffrage in England. From the beginning of her career she had to struggle against almost unanimous male opposition to political rights for women; from 1905 she also had to overcome public hostility to the militant

  • Fawcett, Farrah (American actress)

    Farrah Fawcett, (Mary Farrah Leni Fawcett; Farrah Fawcett-Majors), American actress (born Feb. 2, 1947, Corpus Christi, Texas—died June 25, 2009, Santa Monica, Calif.), was a glamorous pinup girl whose feathered blond hair inspired the style adopted by legions of fans in the 1970s; her beguiling

  • Fawcett, Henry (British politician and economist)

    Dame Millicent Garrett Fawcett: In April 1867 Millicent married Henry Fawcett, a radical politician and professor of political economy at Cambridge. She helped him to overcome the handicap of his blindness, while he supported her work for women’s rights, beginning with her first speech on the subject of woman suffrage (1868).

  • Fawcett, Mary Farrah Leni (American actress)

    Farrah Fawcett, (Mary Farrah Leni Fawcett; Farrah Fawcett-Majors), American actress (born Feb. 2, 1947, Corpus Christi, Texas—died June 25, 2009, Santa Monica, Calif.), was a glamorous pinup girl whose feathered blond hair inspired the style adopted by legions of fans in the 1970s; her beguiling

  • Fawcett-Majors, Farrah (American actress)

    Farrah Fawcett, (Mary Farrah Leni Fawcett; Farrah Fawcett-Majors), American actress (born Feb. 2, 1947, Corpus Christi, Texas—died June 25, 2009, Santa Monica, Calif.), was a glamorous pinup girl whose feathered blond hair inspired the style adopted by legions of fans in the 1970s; her beguiling

  • Fawcettstown (Ohio, United States)

    East Liverpool, city, Columbiana county, eastern Ohio, U.S., some 45 miles (70 km) south of Youngstown. It lies along the Ohio River (there bridged to Newell and Chester, W.Va.), at a point where Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia meet. Founded in 1798 by Thomas Fawcett, an Irish Quaker, it was

  • Fawehinmi, Gani (Nigerian lawyer)

    Gani Fawehinmi, (Ganiyu Oyesola Fawehinmi), Nigerian human rights lawyer (born April 22, 1938, Ondo Town, Nigeria—died Sept. 5, 2009, Lagos, Nigeria), devoted his life to fighting for the rights of the Nigerian people; as a tireless advocate for justice, he made many enemies among Nigeria’s

  • Fawehinmi, Ganiyu Oyesola (Nigerian lawyer)

    Gani Fawehinmi, (Ganiyu Oyesola Fawehinmi), Nigerian human rights lawyer (born April 22, 1938, Ondo Town, Nigeria—died Sept. 5, 2009, Lagos, Nigeria), devoted his life to fighting for the rights of the Nigerian people; as a tireless advocate for justice, he made many enemies among Nigeria’s

  • fawjdār (Mughal official)

    Fawjdār, in India, under the Mughals, an executive head of a district (sarkar). The fawjdār was responsible for law and order, held police powers and criminal jurisdiction, and commanded irregular levies for the maintenance of peace. The name was also used for the āmil, or chief officer of a

  • Fawkes, Guy (American actor and writer)

    Robert Benchley, American humorist, actor, and drama critic, whose main persona, that of a slightly confused, ineffectual, socially awkward bumbler, served in his essays and short films to gain him the sobriquet “the humorist’s humorist.” The character allowed him to comment brilliantly on the

  • Fawkes, Guy (English conspirator)

    Guy Fawkes, British soldier and best-known participant in the Gunpowder Plot. Its object was to blow up the palace at Westminster during the state opening of Parliament, while James I and his chief ministers met within, in reprisal for increasing oppression of Roman Catholics in England. Fawkes was

  • Fawkes, Richard (English printer)

    history of publishing: Medieval Europe: …pamphlet, printed in England by Richard Fawkes, and dated September 1513, was a description of the Battle of Flodden Field. Titled The Trew Encountre, this four-leaved pamphlet gave an eyewitness account of the battle together with a list of the English heroes involved. By the final decade of the 15th…

  • Fawkner, John Pascoe (Australian settler)

    Melbourne: Early settlement: …party led by another pioneer, John Fawkner, settled on the banks of the Yarra River. There has been much debate about whether Batman or Fawkner should be regarded as the founder of Melbourne. Both seem to have an equal claim, but if the term is interpreted to include expansion and…

  • Fawley, Jude (fictional character)

    Jude Fawley, fictional character, the unfortunate stonemason who is the protagonist of Thomas Hardy’s novel Jude the Obscure

  • Fawlty Towers (British television program)

    John Cleese: Cleese’s next television venture was Fawlty Towers (1975 and 1979), considered by many to be one of the funniest and best-written situation comedies ever produced. Portraying Basil Fawlty, a rude hotel manager always on the brink of nervous collapse, Cleese turned the slow burn into high comic art. He and…

  • fawn-coloured mouse (rodent)

    mouse: Natural history: In Southeast Asia, the fawn-coloured mouse (M. cervicolor) has been reported to produce litters of two to six young in July and December. In East Africa, the pygmy mouse breeds during the wet seasons from April to June and September to December and bear litters of two to eight…

  • Fawzi, Mahmoud (prime minister of Egypt)

    Mahmoud Fawzi, Egyptian diplomat who served as the Egyptian foreign minister under Pres. Gamal Abdel Nasser and as prime minister during the presidency of Anwar el-Sādāt (1970–72). Fawzi obtained a doctorate in criminal law from the University of Rome after studying in Egypt, the United Kingdom,

  • fax (communications)

    Fax, in telecommunications, the transmission and reproduction of documents by wire or radio wave. Common fax machines are designed to scan printed textual and graphic material and then transmit the information through the telephone network to similar machines, where facsimiles are reproduced close

  • fax machine (technology)

    fax: Common fax machines are designed to scan printed textual and graphic material and then transmit the information through the telephone network to similar machines, where facsimiles are reproduced close to the form of the original documents. Fax machines, because of their low cost and their reliability,…

  • Faxa Bay (inlet, Iceland)

    Faxa Bay, inlet of the North Atlantic Ocean on the southwestern coast of Iceland. It indents the coast for 30 miles (50 km) and extends for 50 miles (80 km) between the Snaefells and Reykja peninsulas, to the north and south, respectively. The bay is the largest in Iceland, and its banks form

  • Faxaflói (inlet, Iceland)

    Faxa Bay, inlet of the North Atlantic Ocean on the southwestern coast of Iceland. It indents the coast for 30 miles (50 km) and extends for 50 miles (80 km) between the Snaefells and Reykja peninsulas, to the north and south, respectively. The bay is the largest in Iceland, and its banks form

  • Faxian (Chinese Buddhist monk)

    Faxian, Buddhist monk whose pilgrimage to India in 402 initiated Sino-Indian relations and whose writings give important information about early Buddhism. After his return to China he translated into Chinese the many Sanskrit Buddhist texts he had brought back. Sehi, who later adopted the spiritual

  • Faxiang (Buddhist school)

    Fa-hsiang, school of Chinese Buddhism derived from the Indian Yogācāra school. See

  • Fay, Charles Fran?ois de Cisternay Du (French chemist)

    thermionic power converter: Development of thermionic devices: …early as the mid-18th century, Charles Fran?ois de Cisternay Du Fay, a French chemist, noted that electricity may be conducted in the gaseous matter—that is to say, plasma—adjacent to a red-hot body. In 1853 the French physicist Alexandre-Edmond Becquerel reported that only a few volts were required to drive electric…

  • Fay, Frank (American actor and comedian)

    stand-up comedy: Origins: …a few performers, such as Frank Fay, became known for their facility at off-the-cuff patter while serving as emcees in vaudeville houses such as the famed Palace Theatre in New York City. This solo style was honed further in the resorts of the Catskill Mountains region of New York in…

  • Fay, Larry (American gangster)

    Texas Guinan: …up by bootlegger and racketeer Larry Fay, who installed her as hostess of his El Fay Club. Perched on a stool in the centre of the club, armed with a whistle and her own booming voice, “Texas” Guinan single-handedly created an atmosphere of camaraderie unique among nightclubs of Prohibition-era New…

  • Fay, Martin (Irish musician)

    Martin Fay , Irish musician (born Sept. 19, 1936, Dublin, Ire.—died Nov. 14, 2012, Dublin), cofounded the folk music ensemble, the Chieftains, who were credited with reviving worldwide interest in traditional Celtic music; he performed as the group’s fiddler (and bone player) for some 40 years. Fay

  • Fay, Sidney Bradshaw (American historian)

    Sidney Bradshaw Fay, U.S. historian known primarily for his classical reexamination of the causes of World War I. After receiving a Ph.D. (1900) from Harvard University, Fay studied at the Sorbonne and the University of Berlin, returning to teach history at Dartmouth (Hanover, New Hampshire) and

  • Faya (Chad)

    Faya, oasis town located in northern Chad, north-central Africa. It lies in the Sahara at the northern tip of the Bodélé geographic depression, 490 miles (790 km) northeast of the capital, N’Djamena. Originally called Faya, the town was renamed Largeau following the capture in 1913 of Borkou by the

  • Fayal Island (island, Portugal)

    Faial Island, island forming part of the Azores archipelago of Portugal, in the North Atlantic Ocean. Its area of 67 square miles (173 square km) was increased by 1 square mile (2.5 square km) because of volcanic activity in 1957–58. The centre of the island consists of a perfectly shaped volcano,

  • fayalite (mineral)

    Fayalite, iron-rich silicate mineral that is a member of the forsterite–fayalite series (q.v.) of

  • Fayan (work by Yang)

    Confucianism: Dong Zhongshu: The Confucian visionary: 53 bce–18 ce) in the Fayan (“Model Sayings”), a collection of moralistic aphorisms in the style of the Analects, and the Taixuan jing (“Classic of the Supremely Profound Principle”), a cosmological speculation in the style of the Yijing, presented an alternative worldview. That school, claiming its own recensions of authentic…

  • fay? (Islamic philosophy)

    Fay?, (Arabic: “emanation”), in Islāmic philosophy, the emanation of created things from God. The word is not used in the Qur?ān (Islāmic scripture), which uses terms such as khalq (“creation”) and ibdā? (“invention”) in describing the process of creation. Early Muslim theologians dealt with this

  • Faydherbe, Lucas (Flemish sculptor)

    Western sculpture: Flanders: …the Younger, Rombout Verhulst, and Lucas Faydherbe.

  • Faye, Alice (American singer and actress)

    Alice Faye, American singer and actress who from the mid-1930s to the mid-1940s made 32 films, among them In Old Chicago, Alexander’s Ragtime Band, and Hello, Frisco, Hello; she later starred on radio with her husband on "The Phil Harris-Alice Faye Show" (b. May 5, 1915, New York, N.Y.--d. May 9,

  • Fayed, Dodi (Egyptian film producer)

    Emad Mohamed al-Fayed, Egyptian-born producer of motion pictures, including The World According to Garp and the Oscar-winning Chariots of Fire, and playboy son of multimillionnaire Mohamed al-Fayed, the owner of Harrods department stores. Fayed was killed in an automobile crash with Diana, princess

  • Fayed, Emad (Egyptian film producer)

    Emad Mohamed al-Fayed, Egyptian-born producer of motion pictures, including The World According to Garp and the Oscar-winning Chariots of Fire, and playboy son of multimillionnaire Mohamed al-Fayed, the owner of Harrods department stores. Fayed was killed in an automobile crash with Diana, princess

  • Fayed, Mohamed (Egyptian businessman)

    Mohamed al-Fayed, Egyptian businessman who acquired a number of prestigious holdings throughout his career, including the Ritz Hotel in Paris and Harrods department store in London. He also was known for his clashes with the British establishment, which escalated after his son Dodi and Diana,

  • Fayed, Mohamed al- (Egyptian businessman)

    Mohamed al-Fayed, Egyptian businessman who acquired a number of prestigious holdings throughout his career, including the Ritz Hotel in Paris and Harrods department store in London. He also was known for his clashes with the British establishment, which escalated after his son Dodi and Diana,

  • fayence (pottery)

    Faience, tin-glazed earthenware made in France, Germany, Spain, and Scandinavia. It is distinguished from tin-glazed earthenware made in Italy, which is called majolica (or maiolica), and that made in the Netherlands and England, which is called delft. The tin glaze used in faience is actually a

  • Fayence-Porcellaine (pottery)

    pottery: Painting: The wares were sometimes called Fayence-Porcellaine.

  • Fayette (county, Kentucky, United States)

    Lexington: Fayette county, north-central Kentucky, U.S., the focus of the Bluegrass region and a major centre for horse breeding. Named in 1775 for the Battle of Lexington, Massachusetts, it was chartered by the Virginia legislature in 1782 and was the meeting place (1792) for the first…

  • Fayette (ghost town, Michigan, United States)

    Silurian Period: Economic significance of Silurian deposits: …is the ghost town of Fayette in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. It was founded as a company town in 1867 because local resources offered an abundance of Silurian dolomite for use in iron smelting. At the opposite end of the Upper Peninsula, on Drummond Island, dolomite from the Wenlock Engadine Group…

  • Fayette (county, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Fayette, county, southwestern Pennsylvania, U.S., bounded to the north by Jacobs Creek; to the east by Laurel Hill, the Youghiogheny River, and Youghiogheny River Lake; to the south by Maryland and West Virginia; and to the west by the Monongahela River. It consists of a hilly region on the

  • Fayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La (French noble)

    Marquis de Lafayette, French aristocrat who fought in the Continental Army with the American colonists against the British in the American Revolution. Later, as a leading advocate for constitutional monarchy, he became one of the most powerful men in France during the first few years of the French

  • Fayette, Marie-Madeleine Pioche de la Vergne, comtesse de La (French author)

    Marie-Madeleine, comtesse de La Fayette, French writer whose La Princesse de Clèves is a landmark of French fiction. In Paris during the civil wars of the Fronde, young Mlle de la Vergne was brought into contact with Madame de Sévigné, now famous for her letters. She also met a leading political

  • Fayetteville (North Carolina, United States)

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