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  • feet (measurement)

    Foot, in measurement, any of numerous ancient, medieval, and modern linear measures (commonly 25 to 34 cm) based on the length of the human foot and used exclusively in English-speaking countries, where it generally consists of 12 inches or one-third yard. In most countries and in all scientific

  • Feet of Flames (performance work by Flatley)

    Michael Flatley: …introduced the equally popular show Feet of Flames, which featured more than 100 dancers performing on a four-tiered stage. Flatley toured with different versions of the show through 2001. He continued to work as a creative director on new shows, and he oversaw the Lord of the Dance franchise with…

  • feet, washing of (religious rite)

    Foot washing, a religious rite practiced by the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church on Maundy Thursday of Holy Week (preceding Easter) and by members of some other Christian churches in their worship services. The early Christian church introduced the custom to imitate the humility and selfless

  • Feferman, Solomon (American mathematician)

    foundations of mathematics: Impredicative constructions: … (1885–1955) and the American mathematician Solomon Feferman have shown that impredicative arguments such as the above can often be circumvented and are not needed for most, if not all, of analysis. On the other hand, as was pointed out by the Italian computer scientist Giuseppe Longo (born 1929), impredicative constructions…

  • Fefferman, Charles Louis (American mathematician)

    Charles Louis Fefferman, American mathematician who was awarded the Fields Medal in 1978 for his work in classical analysis. Fefferman attended the University of Maryland (B.S., 1966) and Princeton (N.J.) University. After receiving his Ph.D. in 1969, he remained at Princeton for a year, then moved

  • Fefu and Her Friends (play by Fornes)

    Maria Irene Fornés: Her best-known play, Fefu and Her Friends (1977), explores women’s relationships with one another. Fornés’s numerous awards include nine Obies, and in 1972 she received a Guggenheim fellowship.

  • Feggar a ferg (work by Bru)

    Hedin Brú: …work, Fedgar á ferd (1940; The Old Man and His Sons). Brú played a central role in cultural life as coeditor of the literary periodical Vardin and as a member of the Faroese Scientific Society and began to acquire an international reputation. He also produced Faroese translations of Hamlet and…

  • Fegte, Ernst (German-American art director)
  • fehmic court (medieval tribunal)

    Fehmic court, medieval law tribunal properly belonging to Westphalia, though extending jurisdiction throughout the German kingdom. After 1180, when ducal rights in Westphalia passed to the archbishop of Cologne, Westphalian jurisdiction still retained Carolingian features: in every county, or

  • Fehn, Sverre (Norwegian architect)

    Sverre Fehn, Norwegian architect known for his designs of private houses and museums that integrated modernism with traditional vernacular architecture. He considered the process of building “an attack by our culture on nature” and stated that it was his goal “to make a building that will make

  • Fehrenbach, Konstantin (German chancellor)

    Konstantin Fehrenbach, German statesman who was chancellor of the Weimar Republic (1920–21). A noted criminal lawyer, Fehrenbach was elected to the Baden Landtag (provincial diet) in 1885 as a member of the Catholic Centre Party, but differences with the party leadership obliged him to resign his

  • FEI (sports organization)

    horse show: The Fédération équestre Internationale and such member national organizations as the American Horse Shows Association regulate and promote the shows.

  • Fei Hsiao-T’ung (Chinese social anthropologist)

    Fei Xiaotong, one of the foremost Chinese social anthropologists, noted for his studies of village life in China. Fei graduated in 1933 from Yanjing University in Beijing and did graduate work at Qinghua University (also in Beijing) and the London School of Economics. In 1945 he became professor of

  • Fei Xiaotong (Chinese social anthropologist)

    Fei Xiaotong, one of the foremost Chinese social anthropologists, noted for his studies of village life in China. Fei graduated in 1933 from Yanjing University in Beijing and did graduate work at Qinghua University (also in Beijing) and the London School of Economics. In 1945 he became professor of

  • Feichtmayr, Michael (German sculptor)

    Western sculpture: Central Europe: …the models from which Johann Michael Feichtmayr created the superb series of larger than life-size saints and angels that are the glory of these Rococo interiors. Feichtmayr was a member of the group of families from Wessobrunn in southern Bavaria that specialized in stucco work and produced a long series…

  • Feiffer (comic strip by Feiffer)

    comic strip: The United States: …major strip of political satire, Feiffer by Jules Feiffer (first appearing weekly in The Village Voice, 1956), was run in the more liberal or left-wing papers; as a mainstream newspaper strip, it was consigned to the editorial rather than comics pages. In Feiffer the dialogue was more important than the…

  • Feiffer, Jules (American cartoonist and writer)

    Jules Feiffer, American cartoonist and writer who became famous for his Feiffer, a satirical comic strip notable for its emphasis on very literate captions. The verbal elements usually took the form of monologues in which the speaker (sometimes pathetic, sometimes pompous) exposed his own

  • Feigenbaum, Edward Albert (American computer scientist)

    Edward Albert Feigenbaum, an American systems analyst and the most important pioneer in the development of expert systems in artificial intelligence (AI). The son of an accountant, Feigenbaum was especially fascinated with how his father’s adding machine could reproduce human calculations. Given

  • Feigl, Herbert (American philosopher)

    Western philosophy: Logical positivism: of logical positivism—Rudolf Carnap, Herbert Feigl, Philipp Frank, and Gustav Bergmann—all emigrated from Germany and Austria to the United States to escape Nazism. Their influence on American philosophy was profound, and, with various modifications, logical positivism was still a vital force on the American scene at the beginning of…

  • Feijó, Diogo António (Brazilian politician)

    Brazil: Pedro I and the regency: The priest Diogo Ant?nio Feijó, who was chosen as regent in 1835, struggled for two years to hold the nation together, but he was forced to resign. Pedro de Araújo Lima succeeded him. Many Brazilians were impatient with the regency and believed that the entire nation would…

  • feijoa (plant species)

    Feijoa, (Acca sellowiana), small evergreen tree of the myrtle family (Myrtaceae), related to the guava. It is native to southern Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and parts of Argentina and is cultivated in mild dry climates for its sweet fruit. The feijoa was introduced into southern Europe in 1890 and

  • Feijoa sellowiana (plant species)

    Feijoa, (Acca sellowiana), small evergreen tree of the myrtle family (Myrtaceae), related to the guava. It is native to southern Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, and parts of Argentina and is cultivated in mild dry climates for its sweet fruit. The feijoa was introduced into southern Europe in 1890 and

  • feijoada completa (food)

    Feijoada completa, the national dish of Brazil, black beans cooked with fresh and smoked meats and accompanied by traditional side dishes. The modern feijoada completa is an elaborated version of a simple dish of beans flavoured with meat. Most commonly smoked tongue, corned (salted) spareribs,

  • Feijóo y Montenegro, Benito Jerónimo (Spanish author)

    Benito Jerónimo Feijóo y Montenegro, teacher and essayist, a leading 18th-century Spanish stylist. A member of the Benedictine order, he taught philosophy and theology at the University of Oviedo. His essays publicized and encouraged the spread of the new scientific knowledge and exalted reason.

  • féile-breacan (Scottish dress)

    kilt: …in 17th-century Scotland from the féile-breacan, a long piece of woolen cloth whose pleated first half was wrapped around the wearer’s waist, while the (unpleated) second half was then wrapped around the upper body, with a loose end thrown over the left shoulder. Subsequently in the 17th century two lengths…

  • Feilner, Simon (German potter)

    pottery: Porcelain: … and for the work of Simon Feilner.

  • Feinberg Certificate (test oath)

    Keyishian v. Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York: Facts of the case: …required to sign the “Feinberg Certificate,” disavowing any association with the Communist Party and declaring their loyalty to state and federal governments. When Keyishian and his colleagues refused to sign on principle, his one-year contract was not renewed. SUNY officials also announced that the contracts of Keyishian’s colleagues would…

  • Feinberg, Bea (American author)

    Cynthia Freeman, American author who rocketed to the top of the best-seller list with such romance novels as A World Full of Strangers (1975), Fairytales (1977), Days of Winter (1978), Come Pour the Wine (1980), No Time for Tears (1981), and The Last Princess (1988), all penned under the pseudonym

  • Feinberg, Joel (American philosopher)

    paternalism: Moral considerations of paternalism: Joel Feinberg delineated principles for reconciling opposing views regarding permissible grounds for interference with someone’s actions for the sake of preventing harm. First, he established distinctions: self-inflicted harm is still harm; intended self-harm is different from unintended self-harm as a consequence of another intended action;…

  • Feinberg, Kenneth (American attorney)

    Deepwater Horizon oil spill: Charges, settlements, and penalties: Previously managed by lawyer Kenneth Feinberg—who had also overseen the compensation fund for victims of the September 11 attacks—the fund was transferred to court control as part of the accord. In addition to covering economic losses sustained in the wake of the spill, the settlement mandated the payment of…

  • Feinberg, Louis (American actor)

    the Three Stooges: May 4, 1975, Los Angeles), Larry Fine (original name Louis Feinberg; b. October 5, 1902, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania—d. January 24, 1975, Woodland Hills, California), Curly Howard (original name Jerome Horwitz; b. October 22, 1903, New York City—d. January 18, 1952, San Gabriel, California), Joe Besser (b. August 12, 1907, St. Louis,…

  • Feinberg, Samuel (American composer)

    Sammy Fain, prolific American composer of popular songs, including many for Broadway musicals and Hollywood motion pictures. Numbered among his best-known tunes are “Let a Smile Be Your Umbrella,” “Tender is the Night,” and “I’ll Be Seeing You,” all of which became standards. Fain was a self-taught

  • Feinechus (ancient Irish laws)

    Brehon laws, ancient laws of Ireland. The text of these laws, written in the most archaic form of the Gaelic language, dates back to the 7th and 8th centuries and is so difficult to translate that the official renderings are to some extent conjectural. The ancient Irish judge, or Brehon, was an

  • Feingold, Russell (American politician)

    John McCain: Political career: …with the liberal Democratic senator Russ Feingold of Wisconsin, and, after a seven-year battle, the pair saw the McCain-Feingold Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act signed into law in 2002. The legislation, which restricted the political parties’ use of funds not subject to federal limits, was McCain’s signal achievement on Capitol Hill.

  • Feininger, Andreas (American photographer)

    Andreas Feininger, American photographer and writer on photographic technique, noted for his photos of nature and cityscapes. The eldest son of the painter Lyonel Feininger, he studied cabinetmaking and architecture at the Bauhaus, the innovative design school in Weimar, Germany. During this period

  • Feininger, Andreas Bernhard Lyonel (American photographer)

    Andreas Feininger, American photographer and writer on photographic technique, noted for his photos of nature and cityscapes. The eldest son of the painter Lyonel Feininger, he studied cabinetmaking and architecture at the Bauhaus, the innovative design school in Weimar, Germany. During this period

  • Feininger, Lyonel (American artist)

    Lyonel Feininger, American artist whose paintings and teaching activities at the Bauhaus brought a new compositional discipline and lyrical use of colour into the predominantly Expressionistic art of Germany. Feininger left the United States for Germany in 1887 to study music but decided to become

  • Feininger, Lyonel Charles Adrian (American artist)

    Lyonel Feininger, American artist whose paintings and teaching activities at the Bauhaus brought a new compositional discipline and lyrical use of colour into the predominantly Expressionistic art of Germany. Feininger left the United States for Germany in 1887 to study music but decided to become

  • Feinstein, Dianne (United States senator)

    Dianne Feinstein, American politician who was elected as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 1992 and began repesenting California later that year. She was the first woman to serve as senator from that state. Feinstein previously was the first female mayor of San Francisco (1978–88). Goldman grew up

  • Feinstein, Elaine (British writer and translator)

    Elaine Feinstein, British writer and translator who examined her own eastern European heritage in a number of novels and collections of poetry. Feinstein attended the University of Cambridge (B.A., 1952; M.A., 1955). Her first published work was a collection of poetry, In a Green Eye (1966). After

  • Feinstein, Isidor (American journalist)

    I. F. Stone, spirited and unconventional American journalist whose newsletter, I.F. Stone’s Weekly (later I.F. Stone’s Bi-Weekly), captivated readers by the author’s unique blend of wit, erudition, humanitarianism, and pointed political commentary. Feinstein worked on newspapers while still in high

  • feiqian (Chinese history)

    China: The Shiguo (Ten Kingdoms): …drafts for transmitting funds called feiqian (“flying money”). Somewhat later the private assay shops in Sichuan began to issue certificates of deposit to merchants who had left valuables at the shops for safekeeping. These instruments, which began to circulate, were the direct ancestors of the paper money that emerged in…

  • Feira de Sant’ Anna (Brazil)

    Feira de Santana, city, northeastern Bahia estado (state), northeastern Brazil. It lies between the Jacuípe and Pojuca rivers, at 820 feet (250 metres) above sea level. Formerly spelled Feira de Sant’ Anna, it was given city status in 1873 and was known for its cattle fairs (hence its name, meaning

  • Feira de Santana (Brazil)

    Feira de Santana, city, northeastern Bahia estado (state), northeastern Brazil. It lies between the Jacuípe and Pojuca rivers, at 820 feet (250 metres) above sea level. Formerly spelled Feira de Sant’ Anna, it was given city status in 1873 and was known for its cattle fairs (hence its name, meaning

  • Feira de Santana, Cathedral of (cathedral, Feira de Santana, Brazil)

    Feira de Santana: It has a cathedral dating to 1732 and other historic churches and is also home to a football (soccer) stadium. Highways fan out from Feira de Santana to Rio de Janeiro, Salvador (the state capital), and other urban centres, and the city has an airport as well. Pop.…

  • Feisal I (king of Iraq)

    Fay?al I, Arab statesman and king of Iraq (1921–33) who was a leader in advancing Arab nationalism during and after World War I. Fay?al was the son of ?usayn ibn ?Alī, amīr and grand sharīf of Mecca who ruled the Hejaz from 1916 to 1924. When World War I provided an opportunity for rebellion for

  • Fei?al I (king of Iraq)

    Fay?al I, Arab statesman and king of Iraq (1921–33) who was a leader in advancing Arab nationalism during and after World War I. Fay?al was the son of ?usayn ibn ?Alī, amīr and grand sharīf of Mecca who ruled the Hejaz from 1916 to 1924. When World War I provided an opportunity for rebellion for

  • Feisal ibn ?Abd al-?Azīz ibn ?Abd ar-Ra?mān as-Sa?ūd (king of Saudi Arabia)

    Faisal of Saudi Arabia, king of Saudi Arabia from 1964 to 1975, an influential figure of the Arab world known for his statecraft at home and his assertiveness abroad. Faisal was a son of King Ibn Saud and a brother of King Saud. He was appointed foreign minister and viceroy of Hejaz in 1926 after

  • Fei?al II (king of Iraq)

    Fay?al II, the last king of Iraq, who reigned from 1939 to 1958. Fay?al II, the grandson of Fay?al I and great-grandson of ?usayn ibn ?Alī, former sharif of Mecca and king of the Hejaz, became king of Iraq following the untimely death of his father, King Ghāzī. Because Fay?al was only four years

  • Feistel, Horst (German-American cryptographer)

    Data Encryption Standard: …one of the company’s researchers, Horst Feistel, a few years earlier. The Lucifer algorithm was evaluated in secret consultations between the NBS and the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA). After some modifications to the internal functions and a shortening of the code key size from 112 bits to 56 bits,…

  • Feit, Walter (American mathematician)

    modern algebra: Group theory: …paper by the American mathematicians Walter Feit and John Thompson showed that if a finite simple group is not merely the group of rotations of a regular polygon, then it must have an even number of elements. This result was immensely important because it showed that such groups had to…

  • Feith, Douglas (United States government official)

    September 11 attacks: The aftermath: Undersecretary of Defense Douglas J. Feith later explained,

  • Fejér (county, Hungary)

    Fejér, megye (county), central Hungary, occupying an area in the eastern portion of Transdanubia. It is bordered by the counties of Komárom-Esztergom to the north, Pest and Bács-Kiskun to the east, Tolna to the south, and Veszprém and Somogy to the west. Székesfehérvár is the county seat. Other

  • Feke, Robert (American painter)

    Robert Feke, British-American painter whose portraits depict the emerging colonial aristocracy. The facts of Feke’s life are uncertain: stories differ over his employment as a mariner, his supposed travels, and his artistic training. The record of his work, however—created in Boston, Philadelphia,

  • fekete város, A (work by Mikszáth)

    Kálmán Mikszáth: Mikszáth’s last work, A fekete város (1910; “The Black City”), is the finest of his historical novels.

  • Fela! (work by Jones)

    Bill T. Jones: …choreographed, and directed the musical Fela! (2008), about the life of Nigerian musician and activist Fela Anikulapo-Kuti. For his exuberant choreography, he won a second Tony Award.

  • felafel (food)

    Falafel, a staple Middle Eastern dish—and a popular street food around the world—that consists of fried spiced balls or patties of ground chickpeas or fava beans (or a mixture of both) stuffed into a pita or wrapped in laffa bread with hot sauce, tahini sauce, and generally some saladlike

  • Felapton (syllogistic)

    history of logic: Syllogisms: Darapti, Disamis, Datisi, Felapton,

  • Felasha (people)

    Beta Israel, Jews of Ethiopian origin. Their beginnings are obscure and possibly polygenetic. The Beta Israel (meaning House of Israel) themselves claim descent from Menilek I, traditionally the son of the Queen of Sheba (Makeda) and King Solomon. At least some of their ancestors, however, were

  • Feld Entertainment, Inc. (American entertainment company)

    Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus: Animal rights criticism and the end of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus: In 1995 Feld Entertainment, Inc., established the Center for Elephant Conservation in Florida, but, as the understanding of the complex intellectual and emotional lives of elephants spread and protests of the circus’s treatment of elephants increased, more and more people began to view elephant performances negatively.

  • Feld, Eliot (American dancer)

    Eliot Feld, American dancer, choreographer, and director. Feld began his classical training at the School of American Ballet and danced the role of the Little Prince in the New York City Ballet’s The Nutcracker in 1954. He studied modern dance at the High School for the Performing Arts and with

  • Feld, Irvin (American circus manager)

    Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus: The Feld family circus: …an agreement with concert promoter Irvin Feld, under which the circus continued performing—not under the big-top tent but in indoor facilities which Feld contracted. Without the need to put up and take down the tent, the circus was able to reduce costs and cut its workforce from about 1,400 to…

  • Feld, Mount (mountain, Germany)

    Black Forest: …Kinzig valley, its highest summits—Feldberg (4,897 feet [1,493 metres]), Herzogenhorn, and Bl?ssling—are to the south. Its northern half has an average height of 2,000 feet.

  • Feld, Steven (American anthropologist)

    Oceanic music and dance: Musical style and cultural context: …New Guinea, the American anthropologist Steven Feld has demonstrated the integration of diverse musical structures and natural sounds under one aesthetic ideology. The concept of “lift-up-over sounding,” which calls for a continuity of overlapping sound qualities and the avoidance of unison, governs all Kaluli musical expression, including recently acquired Christian…

  • Feldberg (mountain, Germany)

    Black Forest: …Kinzig valley, its highest summits—Feldberg (4,897 feet [1,493 metres]), Herzogenhorn, and Bl?ssling—are to the south. Its northern half has an average height of 2,000 feet.

  • Felder, Don (American musician)

    the Eagles: Later members included Don Felder (b. September 21, 1947, Topanga, California), Joe Walsh (b. November 20, 1947, Wichita, Kansas), and Timothy B. Schmit (b. October 30, 1947, Sacramento, California).

  • Felder, Jerome (American songwriter)

    Doc Pomus, American songwriter who teamed with Mort Shuman to write some of the most memorable rock and pop songs in the Brill Building style of the early 1960s. Pomus, who began singing in jazz and blues clubs as a teenager, met pianist Shuman during a recording session. Together (Shuman wrote

  • Felder, Wilton (American musician)

    Wilton Felder, (Wilton Louis Felder), American musician (born Aug. 31, 1940, Houston, Texas—died Sept. 27, 2015, Whittier, Calif.), played soulful tenor saxophone as a founding member of the Jazz Crusaders (initially the Swingsters), a popular jazz combo that became the even-more-popular jazz-rock

  • Feldkirch (Austria)

    Feldkirch, town, western Austria. It lies along the Ill River, near the Liechtenstein border, about 48 miles (77 km) east-southeast of Zürich, Switzerland. First mentioned as Veldkirichae (Veldkirichum) in 830, the settlement belonged to the counts of Montfort from 1190 until it was sold to Austria

  • Feldman, David Henry (American psychologist)

    prodigy: The American psychologists David Henry Feldman and Martha Morelock summarized late 20th-century research on prodigies to identify those inherent traits and environmental influences that contribute to the development of a prodigy. In general, they observed that most prodigies do not appear spontaneously; instead, they emerge when several important…

  • Feldman, Eugene (American artist)

    lithography: Commercial lithography: …increasing number of artists, including Eugene Feldman, Hanne Darboven, Joseph Beuys, Gerhard Richter, Dieter Roth, and Kara Walker, had used the offset process to noncommercial ends.

  • Feldman, Lew (American boxer)

    Kid Chocolate: …his 12th-round knockout of American Lew Feldman on Oct. 13, 1932, it was a disputed title. Chocolate fought his last five bouts in Havana before retiring in 1938—having contested about 150 professional fights, with only 10 losses. He then opened a gym in Havana and chose to remain in Cuba…

  • Feldman, Morton (American composer)

    Morton Feldman, American avant-garde composer associated with John Cage. Feldman studied composition with Wallingford Riegger and Stefan Wolpe. In the 1950s, much more influenced by Abstract Expressionist painters than by other composers, he began using a method of graphic notation that included

  • Feldman, Sylvia Field (American economist and journalist)

    Sylvia Field Porter, American economist and journalist whose financial advice—in newspaper columns, books, and magazines—garnered a wide audience in a field dominated by men. Porter graduated from Hunter College in New York City in 1932. She worked as an assistant in a Wall Street investment house,

  • Feldmuehle Nobel AG (German company)

    Flick Group, former diversified industrial and manufacturing company founded in Germany in the early 1920s by Friedrich Flick, who rapidly gained control of a massive empire in both steel and coal. The end of World War II, however, found three-fourths of the Flick operations inside the Soviet zone

  • feldsher (medical title)

    medicine: Russia: …may be seen first by feldshers (auxiliary health workers), nurses, or midwives who work under the supervision of a polyclinic or hospital physician. The feldsher was once a lower-grade physician in the army or peasant communities, but feldshers are now regarded as paramedical workers.

  • feldspar (mineral)

    Feldspar, any of a group of aluminosilicate minerals that contain calcium, sodium, or potassium. Feldspars make up more than half of Earth’s crust, and professional literature about them constitutes a large percentage of the literature of mineralogy. Of the more than 3,000 known mineral species,

  • feldspathic glaze (pottery)

    pottery: Decorative glazing: …four principal kinds of glazes: feldspathic, lead, tin, and salt. (Modern technology has produced new glazes that fall into none of these categories while remaining a type of glass.) Feldspathic, lead, and salt glazes are transparent; tin glaze is an opaque white. Hard porcelain takes a feldspathic glaze, soft porcelain…

  • feldspathoid (mineral)

    Feldspathoid, any of a group of alkali aluminosilicate minerals similar to the feldspars in chemical composition but either having a lower silica-alkali ratio or containing chloride, sulfide, sulfate, or carbonate. They are considered to be the specific minerals of igneous rocks usually termed

  • Feldstein, Al (American comic book artist, writer, and editor)

    Al Feldstein, (Albert Bernard Feldstein), American comic book artist, writer, and editor (born Oct. 24, 1925, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died April 29, 2014, Paradise Valley, Mont.), succeeded Mad magazine founder Harvey Kurtzman as editor of the irreverent magazine just four issues after its debut and put his

  • Feldstein, Albert Bernard (American comic book artist, writer, and editor)

    Al Feldstein, (Albert Bernard Feldstein), American comic book artist, writer, and editor (born Oct. 24, 1925, Brooklyn, N.Y.—died April 29, 2014, Paradise Valley, Mont.), succeeded Mad magazine founder Harvey Kurtzman as editor of the irreverent magazine just four issues after its debut and put his

  • Félibien, André (French critic)

    art criticism: Art criticism in the 17th century: Programmatic theory: …in the 17th century with André Félibien’s 10-volume Entretiens sur les vies et sur les ouvrages des plus excellens peintres anciens et modernes (1666–88; “Conversations on the Most Excellent Painters, Ancient and Modern”). Like Vasari, Félibien presents what he regards as the proper principles of art, as well as an…

  • Félibrige (Proven?al literary society)

    Félibrige, association organized in the 19th century for the maintenance of the Proven?al customs and language that stimulated the renaissance of the literature, language, and customs of the whole of southern France. The Félibrige was founded in 1854 by seven poets—Joseph Roumanille, Frédéric

  • Felicia’s Journey (film by Egoyan [1999])

    Atom Egoyan: …book for the screen with Felicia’s Last Journey (1999), based on a novel by William Trevor.

  • Felicia’s Journey (novel by Trevor)

    William Trevor: In addition, Felicia’s Journey (1994) was named the Whitbread Book of the Year. Reading Turgenev (1991) and The Story of Lucy Gault (2002) were both short-listed for the Booker Prize. His last novel, Love and Summer, was published in 2009.

  • Feliciano de Castilho, António (Portuguese poet and translator)

    António Feliciano de Castilho, poet and translator, a central figure in the Portuguese Romantic movement. Although blind from childhood, he became a classical scholar and at the age of 16 published a series of poems, translations, and pedagogical works. Castilho’s literary life may be divided into

  • Feliciano, Cheo (Puerto Rican singer)

    Cheo Feliciano , (José Luis Feliciano Vega), Puerto Rican singer (born July 3, 1935, Ponce, P.R.—died April 17, 2014, San Juan, P.R.), was a salsa legend who enjoyed a more-than-50-year career with such hit songs as “Anacaona,” “Amada mia,” “Una en un millón,” “Mi triste problema,” and “Juan

  • Feliciano, Felice (calligrapher)

    calligraphy: The scripts of humanism (14th to 16th century): …enthusiasts as Cyriacus of Ancona, Felice Feliciano and Giovanni Giocondo of Verona, and Giovanni Marcanova, Bartolomeo Sanvito, and Andrea Mantegna from Padua; Mantegna, an engraver and painter, became one of the first Renaissance artists to incorporate classical lettering into his artwork. These men compiled their researches into sillogi (anthologies of…

  • Felicitas (Roman deity)

    Felicitas, Roman goddess of good luck to whom a temple was first built in the mid-2nd century bc. She became the special protector of successful commanders. Caesar planned to erect another temple to her, and it was built by the triumvir M. Aemilius Lepidus. The emperors made her prominent as

  • Felicitas Julia (national capital, Portugal)

    Lisbon, city, port, capital of Portugal, and the centre of the Lisbon metropolitan area. Located in western Portugal on the estuary of the Tagus (Tejo) River, it is the westernmost capital city in continental Europe and serves as the country’s chief port, largest city, and commercial, political,

  • Felicity (American television series)

    J.J. Abrams: …television and cocreated the series Felicity (1998–2002), which followed the trials and tribulations of a college student in New York City. Even though it lasted only 4 seasons, Felicity was a hit, and Abrams’s newfound clout allowed him to get the go-ahead for another series creation: Alias (2001–06), a fast-paced…

  • Felidae (mammal family)

    Feline, (family Felidae), any of 37 cat species that among others include the cheetah, puma, jaguar, leopard, lion, lynx, tiger, and domestic cat. Cats are native to almost every region on Earth, with the exception of Australia and Antarctica. They are carnivorous mammals that live in a wide

  • Felinae (mammal subfamily)

    feline: Evolution and classification: Cats of the subfamily Felinae appeared in western Eurasia about 10 million years ago and have continued almost unchanged into modern times. Genetic studies examining living and fossil pantherines—cats of the subfamily Pantherinae—suggest that the pantherine lineage emerged in central Asia some 16 million years ago and subsequently spread…

  • feline (mammal family)

    Feline, (family Felidae), any of 37 cat species that among others include the cheetah, puma, jaguar, leopard, lion, lynx, tiger, and domestic cat. Cats are native to almost every region on Earth, with the exception of Australia and Antarctica. They are carnivorous mammals that live in a wide

  • feline calicivirus (virus)

    calicivirus: Feline calicivirus (FCV) is an agent that causes upper respiratory disease in cats.

  • feline distemper (viral disease)

    Feline distemper, viral disease of cats, kittens two to six months old being most susceptible. Highly contagious, it is caused by a parvovirus that is closely related to canine parvovirus type 2. About 3 to 10 days after exposure to the disease, infected kittens cough and sneeze, have running eyes

  • feline leukemia (disease)

    Feline leukemia, viral disease of cats, one of the most serious diseases affecting domestic cats and a few other Felidae. The disease occurs worldwide. Signs include enlargement of the lymph nodes, depression, emaciation, and, frequently, diarrhea; there is no known treatment, and the outcome is

  • feline lymphosarcoma (disease)

    Feline leukemia, viral disease of cats, one of the most serious diseases affecting domestic cats and a few other Felidae. The disease occurs worldwide. Signs include enlargement of the lymph nodes, depression, emaciation, and, frequently, diarrhea; there is no known treatment, and the outcome is

  • feline respiratory disease

    Feline respiratory disease, a complex of viral contagions of cats (including rhinotracheitis, pneumonitis, and influenza), marked by fever, sneezing, and running eyes and nose. Rhinotracheitis and pneumonitis are the most common and have identical symptoms. Mortality is low, but recovery from

  • Felipe el Hermoso (king of Castile)

    Philip I, king of Castile for less than a month before his death and the founder of the Habsburg dynasty in Spain. Philip was the son of the future Holy Roman emperor Maximilian I of Habsburg and Mary of Burgundy. At his mother’s death (1482) he succeeded to her Netherlands dominions, with M

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