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  • Felipe VI (king of Spain)

    Felipe VI, king of Spain from 2014. Felipe was born in the latter years of the Francisco Franco regime, as the dictator’s health was declining and the government was taking halting steps in the direction of greater political and economic liberalization. On November 22, 1975, two days after Franco’s

  • Felipe, León (Spanish poet)

    León Felipe, Spanish poet known chiefly as a poet of the Spanish Civil War. After performing across Spain with a traveling theatre company, Felipe published his first book, Versos y oraciones de caminante (1919; “Verses and Prayers of a Traveler”), in Madrid. He worked for an extended period of

  • Felis (genus of mammals)

    feline: Evolution and classification: Genus Felis (small cats) 6 Old World species, including the wildcat and domestic cat. Genus Lynx (lynxes) 4 species, including the bobcat. Genus Prionailurus

  • Felis aurata (mammal)

    golden cat: …of the family Felidae: the African golden cat (Profelis aurata), or the Asian golden cat (Catopuma temminckii), also known as Temminck’s cat.

  • Felis bengalensis (mammal)

    Leopard cat, (Prionailurus bengalensis), forest-dwelling cat, of the family Felidae, found across India, Southeast Asia, and nearby islands. The leopard cat is noted for its leopard-like colouring. The species is generally divided into one mainland subspecies, P. bengalensis bengalensis, and

  • Felis brachyura (mammal)

    serval: …individuals, which are known as servaline cats and were once considered a distinct species (Felis brachyura or servalina). All-black individuals are found in some populations, especially those from the high country of Kenya.

  • Felis caracal (mammal species)

    Caracal, (Felis caracal), short-tailed cat (family Felidae) found in hills, deserts, and plains of Africa, the Middle East, and central and southwestern Asia. The caracal is a sleek, short-haired cat with a reddish brown-coat and long tufts of black hairs on the tips of its pointed ears. Long

  • Felis catus (domesticated mammal)

    Cat, (Felis catus), domesticated member of the family Felidae, order Carnivora, and the smallest member of that family. Like all felids, domestic cats are characterized by supple low-slung bodies, finely molded heads, long tails that aid in balance, and specialized teeth and claws that adapt them

  • Felis colocolo (mammal)

    Pampas cat, (Felis colocolo), small cat, family Felidae, native to South America. It is about 60 cm (24 inches) long, including the 30-centimetre tail. The coat is long-haired and grayish with brown markings which in some individuals may be indistinct. Little is known about the habits of the pampas

  • Felis concolor (mammal species)

    Puma, (Puma concolor), large brownish New World cat comparable in size to the jaguar—the only other large cat of the Western Hemisphere. The puma, a member of the family Felidae, has the widest distribution of any New World mammal, with a range extending from southeastern Alaska to southern

  • Felis concolor coryi (mammal)

    Florida panther, member of a population of large New World cats belonging to the species Puma concolor, family Felidae, confined to a small, isolated, and inbred group in southern Florida. This population is the only breeding group of pumas in the eastern United States. The Florida panther was

  • Felis manul (mammal)

    Pallas’s cat, (Felis manul), small, long-haired cat (family Felidae) native to deserts and rocky, mountainous regions from Tibet to Siberia. It was named for the naturalist Peter Simon Pallas. The Pallas’s cat is a soft-furred animal about the size of a house cat and is pale silvery gray or light

  • Felis marmorata (mammal)

    Marbled cat, (species Felis marmorata), rare Southeast Asian cat, family Felidae, often referred to as a miniature version of the unrelated clouded leopard. The marbled cat is about the size of a domestic cat; it measures roughly 45–60 cm (18–24 inches) long, excluding a tail of approximately the

  • Felis pardalis (mammal)

    Ocelot, (Felis, or Leopardus, pardalis), spotted cat of the New World, found in lowland areas from Texas southward to northern Argentina. The short, smooth fur is patterned with elongated, black-edged spots that are arranged in chainlike bands. The cat’s upper parts vary in colour from light or

  • Felis pardalis albescens (mammal)

    ocelot: …and one scrubland subspecies, the Texas ocelot (F. p. albescens), is endangered. The hunting of ocelots and the trading of their pelts are prohibited in the United States and most other countries in the animal’s range.

  • Felis planiceps (mammal)

    Flat-headed cat, (Felis planiceps), extremely rare Asian cat found in the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, and Borneo. One of the smallest members of the cat family, Felidae, the adult is from 40 to 60 centimetres (16 to 24 inches) long without the 15–20-cm tail and weighs from 1.5 to 2.5 kilograms (3.3

  • Felis rufa (mammal)

    Bobcat, (Lynx rufus), bobtailed North American cat (family Felidae), found from southern Canada to southern Mexico. The bobcat is a close relative of the somewhat larger Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis). A long-legged cat with large paws, a rather short body, and tufted ears, the bobcat is 60–100 cm

  • Felis serval (mammal)

    Serval, (Felis serval), long-limbed cat, family Felidae, found in Africa south of the Sahara, especially in grass- and bush-covered country near water. A swift, agile cat, the serval climbs and leaps very well. It is a nocturnal hunter preying on birds and small mammals such as rodents and hares.

  • Felis servalina (mammal)

    serval: …individuals, which are known as servaline cats and were once considered a distinct species (Felis brachyura or servalina). All-black individuals are found in some populations, especially those from the high country of Kenya.

  • Felis silvestris (mammal, Felis silvestris)

    Wildcat, (species Felis silvestris), a small wild member of the cat family (Felidae) native to Eurasia and Africa. There are some three to five subspecies. The name wildcat is also used as a general term for feral domestic cats and for any of the smaller wild species of the cat family. The nominate

  • Felis silvestris libyca (mammal)

    African wildcat, (Felis silvestris libyca), small, tabbylike cat (family Felidae) found in open and forested regions of Africa and Asia. Likely the first cat to be domesticated, the African wildcat is somewhat larger and stockier than the modern house cat, with which it interbreeds readily. Its

  • Felis silvestris ornata (mammal)

    wildcat: The Asian wildcat (Felis silvestris ornata) ranges east of the Caspian Sea into China.

  • Felis silvestris silvestris (mammal)

    wildcat: The nominate subspecies, the European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris), inhabits forested regions from Scotland through continental Europe to western Asia. It is similar to the domestic cat but has longer legs, a larger, flatter head, and a full, relatively short tail ending in a rounded (not pointed) tip. The…

  • Felis temmincki (mammal)

    golden cat: …(Catopuma temminckii), also known as Temminck’s cat.

  • Felis viverrina (mammal)

    Fishing cat, (species Felis viverrina), tropical cat of the family Felidae, found in India and Southeast Asia. The coat of the fishing cat is pale gray to deep brownish gray and marked with dark spots and streaks. The adult animal stands about 40 cm (16 inches) at the shoulder, weighs 8–11 kg

  • Felix (Spanish bishop)

    Felix, bishop of Urgel, Spain, one of the chief proponents of Adoptionism (q.v.). When Archbishop Elipandus of Toledo promulgated the Adoptionist doctrine, he was condemned by Pope Adrian I. Elipandus then sought the support of Felix, who expressed agreement, whereupon Charlemagne in 792 summoned

  • Félix Guere?a, María de los ángeles (Mexican actress)

    María Félix, (María de los ángeles Félix Guere?a), Mexican actress (born May 4, 1914, álamos, Sonora, Mex.—died April 8, 2002, Mexico City, Mex.), used her extraordinary looks and fiery personality to propel herself from unknown to overnight star to icon of beauty in Spanish-speaking countries. H

  • Felix Holt (novel by Eliot)

    Felix Holt, novel by George Eliot, published in three volumes in 1866. The novel is set in England in the early 1830s, at the time of agitation for passage of the Reform Bill, a measure designed to reform the electoral system in Britain. Despite his education, Felix Holt has chosen to work as an

  • Felix Holt, the Radical (novel by Eliot)

    Felix Holt, novel by George Eliot, published in three volumes in 1866. The novel is set in England in the early 1830s, at the time of agitation for passage of the Reform Bill, a measure designed to reform the electoral system in Britain. Despite his education, Felix Holt has chosen to work as an

  • Felix I, Saint (pope)

    Saint Felix I, ; feast day May 30), pope from 269 to 274. Elected to succeed St. Dionysius, Felix was the author of an important dogmatic letter on the unity of Christ’s Person. He received the emperor Aurelian’s aid in settling a theological dispute between the anti-Trinitarian Paul of Samosata,

  • Felix II (antipope)

    Felix (II), antipope from 355 to 365. Originally an archdeacon, Felix was irregularly installed as pope in 355 after the emperor Constantius banished the reigning pope, Liberius. In May 357 the Roman laity, which had remained faithful to Liberius, demanded that Constantius recall the true pope. The

  • Felix II, Saint (pope)

    Saint Felix III, ; feast day March 1), pope from 483 to 492. He succeeded St. Simplicius on March 13. Felix excommunicated Acacius, patriarch of Constantinople, in 484 for publishing with the emperor Zeno a document called the Henotikon, which appeared to favour Monophysitism, a doctrine that had

  • Felix III, Saint (pope)

    Saint Felix III, ; feast day March 1), pope from 483 to 492. He succeeded St. Simplicius on March 13. Felix excommunicated Acacius, patriarch of Constantinople, in 484 for publishing with the emperor Zeno a document called the Henotikon, which appeared to favour Monophysitism, a doctrine that had

  • Felix in Exile (film by Kentridge [1994])

    William Kentridge: …City After Paris (1989) and Felix in Exile (1994)—follow the fortunes of the greedy capitalist Soho Eckstein and his alter ego, the sensitive and artistic Felix Teitelbaum. They present modern South Africa as reflective of the spiritual, ecological, and emotional crises of late capitalism.

  • Felix IV, Saint (pope)

    Saint Felix IV, ; feast day January 30), pope from 526 to 530. He was elected on July 12 as the choice of Theodoric the Great, king of the Ostrogoths, who had imprisoned Felix’ predecessor, St. John I, and who died shortly after Felix’ consecration. The new pope ended the controversy over grace at

  • Felix of Nola, Saint (Italian bishop)

    Saint Paulinus of Nola: Felix of Nola are particularly charming and are regarded as the chief source of Felix’ life. Paulinus also promoted the saint’s cult and built a basilica at Nola dedicated to him.

  • Felix of Urgel (Spanish bishop)

    Felix, bishop of Urgel, Spain, one of the chief proponents of Adoptionism (q.v.). When Archbishop Elipandus of Toledo promulgated the Adoptionist doctrine, he was condemned by Pope Adrian I. Elipandus then sought the support of Felix, who expressed agreement, whereupon Charlemagne in 792 summoned

  • Felix of Valois, Saint (Roman Catholic hermit)

    Saint Felix of Valois, ; feast day November 20), legendary religious hermit who, with St. John of Matha, has traditionally been considered a cofounder of the Trinitarians, a Roman Catholic religious order. Felix’ existence is known only from a spurious history of the order compiled in the 15th

  • Felix the Cat (cartoon)

    Otto Messmer: …animator who created the character Felix the Cat, the world’s most popular cartoon star before Mickey Mouse. The attribution has been questioned by some, in part because of the claims of Australian cartoonist, promoter, and producer Pat Sullivan, for whom Messmer worked. The cartoons were unfailingly billed as “Pat Sullivan’s…

  • Felix V (antipope and duke of Savoy)

    Amadeus VIII, count (1391–1416) and duke (1416–40) of Savoy, first member of the house of Savoy to assume the title of duke. His 42-year reign saw the extension of his authority from Lake Neuchatel on the north to the Ligurian coast, and under the title of Felix V he was an antipope for 10 years

  • Felix, Allyson (American athlete)

    Allyson Felix, At the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Games, Allyson Felix became the first female track and field athlete to win six career gold Olympic medals. She helped the U.S. capture the 4 × 100-m relay and the 4 × 400-m relay and took home a silver in the 400 m, giving her a total of nine Olympic

  • Félix, élisa (French actress)

    Mademoiselle Rachel, French classical tragedienne who dominated the Comédie-Fran?aise for 17 years. Mlle Rachel sang on the streets of Lyon and Paris, where her acting ability was quickly discovered by Isidore Samson, who taught her the acting techniques that he had learned from Fran?ois-Joseph

  • Felix, Marcus Minucius (Christian apologist)

    Marcus Minucius Felix, one of the earliest Christian Apologists to write in Latin. A Roman lawyer, he wrote the Octavius, a dialogue on Providence and Christianity in general, between the skeptic pagan Caecilius Natalis and the Christian Octavius Januarius, Minucius’ friend. Written for educated

  • Félix, María (Mexican actress)

    María Félix, (María de los ángeles Félix Guere?a), Mexican actress (born May 4, 1914, álamos, Sonora, Mex.—died April 8, 2002, Mexico City, Mex.), used her extraordinary looks and fiery personality to propel herself from unknown to overnight star to icon of beauty in Spanish-speaking countries. H

  • Felixmüller, Conrad (German artist)

    Elfriede Lohse-W?chtler: …in Dresden, she met artist Conrad Felixmüller, moved into his apartment, and shared studio space with him for two years. Felixmüller drew her into the bohemian artist circles of Dresden, including the Dresden Sezession group when he founded it in 1919, where she befriended artists such as Otto Griebel and…

  • Felixstowe (England, United Kingdom)

    Felixstowe, town (parish) and seaport, Suffolk Coastal district, administrative and historic county of Suffolk, eastern England. Although situated on the North Sea coast, the town in fact faces south and has a frontage to the estuary of the Rivers Orwell and Stour opposite Harwich in Essex.

  • Felker, Clay Schuette (American magazine editor)

    Clay Schuette Felker, American magazine editor (born Oct. 2, 1925, St. Louis, Mo.—died July 1, 2008, New York, N.Y.), was credited with the creation of a widely imitated magazine formula during his tenure as editor of New York magazine, which combined glossy pages and unique typography with

  • Fell in Love with a Girl (song by the White Stripes)

    the White Stripes: …video for the single “Fell in Love with a Girl” received regular airplay on MTV, and the group became media darlings. The duo followed with Elephant (2003), a percussion-driven collection of songs that featured Meg’s debut as a vocalist. Elephant earned a Grammy Award for best alternative music album,…

  • Fell, John (English educator, priest, and author)

    John Fell, English Anglican priest, author, editor, and typographer who as dean and bishop at Oxford was a benefactor to the University of Oxford and its press. Ordained in 1647, Fell was deprived of his fellowship at Oxford in 1648 for having fought with the Royalists against Oliver Cromwell

  • Fell, Norman (American actor)

    Norman Fell, American character actor in motion pictures and on television who was known especially for his role as the nosy and cranky landlord Stanley Roper on the TV sitcom "Three’s Company" (1977-79) and its spin-off, "The Ropers" (1979-80); The Graduate (1967), Bullitt (1968), and Catch-22

  • fellah (Arab society)

    Egypt: Ethnic groups: …delta, where peasant agriculturists, the fellahin, have been less affected by intermarriage with outside groups.

  • fellahin (Arab society)

    Egypt: Ethnic groups: …delta, where peasant agriculturists, the fellahin, have been less affected by intermarriage with outside groups.

  • Fellata (people)

    Fulani, a primarily Muslim people scattered throughout many parts of West Africa, from Lake Chad, in the east, to the Atlantic coast. They are concentrated principally in Nigeria, Mali, Guinea, Cameroon, Senegal, and Niger. The Fulani language, known as Fula, is classified within the Atlantic

  • Fellenberg, Philipp Emanuel von (Swiss educator)

    Philipp Emanuel von Fellenberg, Swiss philanthropist and educational reformer. In 1799 Fellenberg purchased an estate in Hofwyl, where he founded a self-supporting agricultural school for poor children that combined manual training with agricultural and academic instruction. He added a Classical

  • feller (machine)

    wood: Marking, felling, and processing: Felling machines (fellers) are equipped with shears, chain saws, or circular saws; they are usually employed on small-diameter trees (e.g., for pulpwood), but larger machines are available for trees up to about 50 cm (20 inches) in diameter. Some machines are specialized to perform separate operations such…

  • Feller, Bob (American baseball player)

    Bob Feller, American professional baseball player, a right-handed pitcher whose fastball made him a frequent leader in games won and strikeouts during his 18-year career with the Cleveland Indians of the American League (AL). Feller made his major league debut at age 17, when he joined the Indians

  • Feller, Robert William Andrew (American baseball player)

    Bob Feller, American professional baseball player, a right-handed pitcher whose fastball made him a frequent leader in games won and strikeouts during his 18-year career with the Cleveland Indians of the American League (AL). Feller made his major league debut at age 17, when he joined the Indians

  • Fellig, Arthur (American photographer)

    Weegee, photojournalist noted for his gritty yet compassionate images of the aftermath of New York street crimes and disasters. Weegee’s father, Bernard Fellig, immigrated to the United States in 1906 and was followed four years later by his wife and four children, including Usher, the second-born.

  • Fellig, Usher (American photographer)

    Weegee, photojournalist noted for his gritty yet compassionate images of the aftermath of New York street crimes and disasters. Weegee’s father, Bernard Fellig, immigrated to the United States in 1906 and was followed four years later by his wife and four children, including Usher, the second-born.

  • Felling (England, United Kingdom)

    Felling, former town, now a ward of Gateshead metropolitan borough, metropolitan county of Tyne and Wear, northeastern England. It lies on the south bank of the River Tyne. The town grew rapidly at the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century with the extension of coal mining and later

  • felling (agriculture)

    wood: Marking, felling, and processing: Harvesting includes marking the trees to be removed (in selective cutting), felling and processing (conversion) of trees, and transportation of the wood from the felling site, or stump area, to a roadside storage site or a central processing yard (landing) in the…

  • felling ax (tool)

    hand tool: European usage: First, there was the felling ax of the woodcutter, the blade beveled on both sides for symmetry and often fitted with a flat end suited to driving splitting wedges. There were numerous variations of this form as the tool evolved toward its finely balanced modern conformation.

  • Felling of the Forest, The (work by Cassola)

    Italian literature: Other writings: …Il taglio del bosco (1953; The Felling of the Forest), Un cuore arido (1961; An Arid Heart), and Un uomo solo (1978; “A Man by Himself”).

  • Fellini Satyricon (film by Fellini [1969])

    Federico Fellini: Major works: …Petronius Arbiter and Lucius Apuleius, Fellini Satyricon (1969), promoted with the slogan “Before Christ. After Fellini,” actually celebrated the hippie movement, which he first encountered in the United States. Two aimless young bisexual men wander a morally and physically decaying world of casual decadence, rendered in the gaudy colours that…

  • Fellini’s Casanova (film by Fellini [1976])

    Italian literature: Experimentalism and the new avant-garde: …collaborate on the screenplay of Casanova (1976).

  • Fellini’s Roma (film by Fellini [1972])

    Federico Fellini: Major works: In Roma (1972; Fellini’s Roma), the director applied the tools of fantasy to the national capital, alternating episodes of the modern hippie occupation of its monuments with his teenage visits to its brothels and the excavations that uncover what remains of the ancient city. An “ecclesiastical…

  • Fellini, Federico (Italian filmmaker)

    Federico Fellini, Italian film director who was one of the most celebrated and singular filmmakers of the period after World War II. Influenced early in his career by the Neorealist movement, he developed his own distinctive methods that superimposed dreamlike or hallucinatory imagery upon ordinary

  • fellow (academic member)

    Fellow, by origin a partner or associate, hence a companion, comrade, or mate. The Old English féolage meant “a partner in a business.” The word was, therefore, the natural equivalent for socius, a member of the foundation of an incorporated college, such as Eton, or a college at a university. In

  • fellow servant defense (law)

    insurance: Liability law: The fellow servant defense has been used at times by employers; an employer would argue in some cases that the injury to an employee was caused not by the employer’s negligence but by the negligence of another employee. However, workers’ compensation statutes in some countries have…

  • fellow traveler (Soviet literature)

    Fellow traveler, originally, a writer in the Soviet Union who was not against the Russian Revolution of 1917 but did not actively support it as a propagandist. The term was used in this sense by Leon Trotsky in Literature and the Revolution (1925) and was not meant to be pejorative. Implicit in the

  • Fellowes, Julian (British actor, producer, novelist, and screenwriter)

    Julian Fellowes, British actor, producer, novelist, and screenwriter best known for creating the television series Downton Abbey (2010–15). Fellowes was born in Egypt, where his father was with the British embassy. While attending Magdalene College, Cambridge, he joined the Footlights comedy group.

  • Fellows, Albion (American reformer and author)

    Albion Fellows Bacon, American reformer and writer, remembered largely for her campaigns to improve public housing standards. Albion Fellows was the daughter of a Methodist minister and was a younger sister of the writer Annie Fellows Johnston. After graduating from high school in Evansville,

  • Fellows, F. W. (American engineer)

    machine tool: History: …full development in 1896 when F.W. Fellows, an American, designed a gear shaper that could rapidly turn out almost any type of gear.

  • Fellows, Sir Charles (British archaeologist)

    Sir Charles Fellows, English archaeologist who discovered ruins of the cities of Lycia—in antiquity a region of present-day southwestern Turkey—and transported a large number of marble sculptures to England. In 1832 he began travelling through Italy, Greece, and the Middle East, sketching as he

  • Fellowship Church (American religious organization)

    Howard Thurman: …Howard to help found the Church for the Fellowship of All Peoples (also known as Fellowship Church) in San Francisco, the first congregation in the United States that encouraged participation in its spiritual life regardless of religious or ethnic background. Thurman stayed there until 1953, when he assumed the deanship…

  • Fellowship of Reconciliation (international pacifist group)

    Congress of Racial Equality: …branch of the pacifist group Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR) but resigned over a dispute in policy; he founded CORE as a vehicle for the nonviolent approach to combating racial prejudice that was inspired by Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi.

  • Fellowship of the Ring, The (work by Tolkien)

    The Fellowship of the Ring, first volume (1954) in the trilogy that forms the famed fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien, whose academic grounding in Anglo-Saxon, Celtic, and Norse mythology helped shape his fictional world. The three-part work, set in the land of Middle-earth,

  • Fellowship, The (international religious movement)

    The Family, international religious movement that ministers to political and economic elites. It is based on visions that members believe were granted by God to the movement’s founder, Abraham Vereide, and on subsequent refinements by Douglas Coe, Vereide’s successor, and other Family leaders.

  • Fells, Augusta Christine (American sculptor and educator)

    Augusta Savage, American sculptor and educator who battled racism to secure a place for African American women in the art world. Augusta Fells began modeling figures from the red-clay soil of her native Florida at an early age. When just 15 years old, she married John T. Moore in 1907 and had her

  • Felltham, Owen (British author)

    Owen Felltham, English essayist and poet, best known for his essays Resolves Divine, Morall, and Politicall, in which the striking images (some borrowed by the poet Henry Vaughan) are held to be more original than the ideas. Felltham wrote the first edition of Resolves (1623), which contained 100

  • Feloidea (mammal)

    carnivore: Critical appraisal: …two distinct superfamilies, Canoidea and Feloidea (or Aeluroidea), appears to be a natural arrangement dating back to the works of W.H. Flower and H. Winge in the late 1800s. In Canoidea, as revealed by studies in comparative anatomy and the fossil record, the families Canidae, Ursidae, and Procyonidae seem to…

  • felony (crime)

    Felony and misdemeanour, in Anglo-American law, classification of criminal offenses according to the seriousness of the crime. U.S. jurisdictions generally distinguish between felonies and misdemeanours. A class of minor offenses that may be described as petty offenses or quasi-crimes is also

  • felony murder rule (law)

    crime: Intention: …the other hand, some “felony murder” statutes attribute criminal intention to any deaths that occur during the commission of certain “dangerous felonies.” This is similar to strict liability. For example, in one case in the United States, a person committing a robbery took a hostage, who then was accidentally…

  • Felou gundi (rodent)

    gundi: The Felou gundi (Felovia vae) is confined to Senegal, Mali, and Mauritania. The East African gundi, or Speke’s pectinator (Pectinator spekei), is geographically isolated from all other gundi species and lives in Ethiopia and Somalia.

  • Felovia vae (rodent)

    gundi: The Felou gundi (Felovia vae) is confined to Senegal, Mali, and Mauritania. The East African gundi, or Speke’s pectinator (Pectinator spekei), is geographically isolated from all other gundi species and lives in Ethiopia and Somalia.

  • Felsch, Happy (American baseball player)

    Black Sox Scandal: …Joe (“Shoeless Joe”) Jackson and Oscar (“Happy”) Felsch, and utility infielder Fred McMullin. Court records suggest that the eight players received $70,000 to $100,000 for losing five games to three.

  • Felsch, Oscar (American baseball player)

    Black Sox Scandal: …Joe (“Shoeless Joe”) Jackson and Oscar (“Happy”) Felsch, and utility infielder Fred McMullin. Court records suggest that the eight players received $70,000 to $100,000 for losing five games to three.

  • Felsegg Bridge (bridge, Felsegg, Switzerland)

    bridge: Maillart’s innovations: …bridge over the Thur at Felsegg (1933), the Schwandbach Bridge near Hinterfultigen (1933), and the T?ss River footbridge near Wulflingen (1934). The Felsegg bridge has a 68-metre (226-foot) span and features for the first time two parallel arches, both three-hinged. Like the Salginatobel Bridge, the Felsegg bridge features X-shaped abutment…

  • Felsenau Viaduct (bridge, Bern, Switzerland)

    bridge: Christian Menn: For the high, curving Felsenau Viaduct (1974) over the Aare River in Bern, spans of up to 154 metres (512 feet) were built using the cantilever method from double piers. The trapezoidal box girder, only 11 metres (36 feet) wide at the top, haunches at the supports and carries…

  • felsenmeer (geology)

    Felsenmeer, (German: “sea of rock”), exposed rock surfaces that have been quickly broken up by frost action so that much rock is buried under a cover of angular shattered boulders. These mantles principally occur in Arctic regions and high mountain areas. Their continuity and depth varies with

  • felsic rock (igneous rock)

    Felsic and mafic rocks, division of igneous rocks on the basis of their silica content. Chemical analyses of the most abundant components in rocks usually are presented as oxides of the elements; igneous rocks typically consist of approximately 12 major oxides totaling over 99 percent of the rock.

  • Felsina (ancient city, Italy)

    Felsina, city founded by Etruscans c. 510 bc on the site of modern Bologna, Italy, an area rich in Villanovan Iron Age remains. By the mid-4th century Felsina had fallen to invading Gauls (Boii tribe), who called it Bononia. Captured by Rome in 196 bc, it was colonized seven years later. Before

  • felsite (igneous rock)

    Felsic and mafic rocks, division of igneous rocks on the basis of their silica content. Chemical analyses of the most abundant components in rocks usually are presented as oxides of the elements; igneous rocks typically consist of approximately 12 major oxides totaling over 99 percent of the rock.

  • felt (fibre)

    Felt, a class of fabrics or fibrous structures obtained through the interlocking of wool, fur, or some hair fibres under conditions of heat, moisture, and friction. Other fibres will not felt alone but can be mixed with wool, which acts as a carrier. Several industries manufacture goods through the

  • felt bush (plant)

    kalanchoe: Major species: marmorata); velvet leaf, or felt bush (K. beharensis); and devil’s backbone, or mother of thousands (K. daigremontiana). A range of attractive potted plants, commonly known as florist’s kalanchoe and distinguished by their colourful flowers, have been derived from K. blossfeldiana; they are marketed widely in the…

  • Felt, Mark (United States government official)

    Mark Felt, American government official who served as the associate director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the early 1970s and in 2005 captured public attention when he revealed in an interview with Vanity Fair magazine that he was “Deep Throat,” the anonymous informant at the

  • Felt, William Mark, Sr. (United States government official)

    Mark Felt, American government official who served as the associate director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) in the early 1970s and in 2005 captured public attention when he revealed in an interview with Vanity Fair magazine that he was “Deep Throat,” the anonymous informant at the

  • felt-leaf ceanothus (tree)

    Ceanothus: arboreus, called Catalina, or felt-leaf, ceanothus, an evergreen tree occurring on the islands off the coast of California, has leaves with a dark green upper surface and a dense white pubescence beneath. The tree, 5–8 m high, bears fragrant blue flowers in the early spring.

  • felt-tip pen (instrument)

    pen: Soft-tip pens that use points made of porous materials became commercially available during the 1960s. In such pens a synthetic polymer of controlled porosity transfers ink from the reservoir to the writing surface. These fibre-tipped pens can be used for lettering and drawing as well…

  • felting (textiles)

    Felting, consolidation of certain fibrous materials by the application of heat, moisture, and mechanical action, causing the interlocking, or matting, of fibres possessing felting properties. Such fibres include wool, fur, and certain hair fibres that mat together under appropriate conditions

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