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  • Fierstein, Harvey (American actor and playwright)

    Harvey Fierstein, American comedian, author, and playwright who was best known as the author of The Torch Song Trilogy, which centres on gay families. He often spoke out about gay rights issues. Fierstein was born into a strict Jewish family. He graduated from the Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, with a

  • Fierstein, Harvey Forbes (American actor and playwright)

    Harvey Fierstein, American comedian, author, and playwright who was best known as the author of The Torch Song Trilogy, which centres on gay families. He often spoke out about gay rights issues. Fierstein was born into a strict Jewish family. He graduated from the Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, with a

  • Fiery Angel, The (opera by Prokofiev)

    opera: Russian opera: …hallucination, Angel of Fire or The Fiery Angel (radio premiere 1954; Ognenn?y angel, his own libretto after a story by Valery Yakovlevich Bryusov). Of Prokofiev’s Soviet-period operas, the most winning is the cheerful Betrothal in a Monastery, also known as The Duenna (1946; Obrucheniye v monast?re or Duen’ya, libretto by…

  • Fiery Furnace (geological formation, Utah, United States)

    Arches National Park: The Windows Section, Delicate Arch, Fiery Furnace (so named because it glows in the setting sun), and Devils Garden. Landscape Arch, measuring about 290 feet (88 metres) long from base to base, is one of the longest natural freestanding spans of rock in the world; since 1991 large pieces of…

  • fiery war (Roman history)

    ancient Rome: Roman expansion in the western Mediterranean: Labeled a “fiery war” (really wars), these struggles acquired a reputation for extreme cruelty; they brought destruction to the native population (e.g., 20,000 Vaccaei were killed in 151 after giving themselves up to Lucius Licinius Lucullus) and made recruiting legionaries in Italy difficult. In Further Spain the…

  • fiery-billed aracari (bird)

    toucan: …as the chestnut-mandibled toucan, the fiery-billed aracari, and the yellow-ridged toucan, describe their beaks, which are often brightly coloured in pastel shades of green, red, white, and yellow. This coloration is probably used by the birds for species recognition, as many toucans have similar body patterns and coloration—mainly black with…

  • Fieschi family (Genoese family)

    Fieschi Family, a noble Genoese family whose members played an important role in Guelf (papal party) politics in medieval Italy. The Fieschi allied with the Angevin kings of Sicily and later with the kings of France; the family produced two popes, 72 cardinals, and many generals, admirals, and

  • Fieschi, Caterina (Italian mystic)

    Saint Catherine of Genoa, ; canonized 1737; feast day September 15), Italian mystic admired for her work among the sick and the poor. Catherine was born into a distinguished family and received a careful education. Her early aspirations to become a nun were frustrated by an arranged marriage to

  • Fieschi, Gian Luigi, Il Giovanne (Italian noble)

    Gian Luigi Fieschi the Younger, Genoese nobleman whose conspiracy against the Doria family is the subject of much literature. The Fieschi family was one of the greatest families of Liguria. Sinibaldo Fieschi, Gian Luigi’s father, had been a close friend of Andrea Doria and had rendered many

  • Fieschi, Gian Luigi, the Younger (Italian noble)

    Gian Luigi Fieschi the Younger, Genoese nobleman whose conspiracy against the Doria family is the subject of much literature. The Fieschi family was one of the greatest families of Liguria. Sinibaldo Fieschi, Gian Luigi’s father, had been a close friend of Andrea Doria and had rendered many

  • Fieschi, Giuseppe Maria (French conspirator)

    Giuseppe Maria Fieschi, French republican conspirator who on July 28, 1835, unsuccessfully attempted to assassinate King Louis-Philippe. As a youth Fieschi served in the Neapolitan army. After returning to Corsica, he was imprisoned for theft for 10 years, from 1816 to 1826. Making his way to Paris

  • Fieschi, Ottobono (pope)

    Adrian V, pope for about five weeks in 1276. His uncle Pope Innocent IV appointed him cardinal. He was legate to England (1265–68), charged with establishing peace between the English king Henry III and the rebellious barons in 1265. Elected as successor to Innocent V on July 11, he died a little

  • Fieschi, Sinibaldo (pope)

    Innocent IV, one of the great pontiffs of the Middle Ages (reigned 1243–54), whose clash with Holy Roman emperor Frederick II formed an important chapter in the conflict between papacy and empire. His belief in universal responsibility of the papacy led him to attempt the evangelization of the East

  • Fiesco; or, the Genoese Conspiracy (play by Schiller)

    Friedrich Schiller: Early years and plays: …des Fiesko zu Genua (1783; Fiesco; or, the Genoese Conspiracy), subtitled “a republican tragedy”: the drama of the rise and fall of a would-be dictator, set in 16th-century Genoa, picturing, in Schiller’s own phrase, “ambition in action, and ultimately defeated.”

  • Fieseler Fi 156 Storch (aircraft)

    Gerhard Fieseler: …he became most famous, the Fi 156 Storch. Some 3,000 were manufactured, of which several are still flying.

  • Fieseler, Gerhard (German aviator)

    Gerhard Fieseler, pioneering German aviator, aerobatic flyer, and aircraft designer. At the outbreak of World War I, Fieseler volunteered for flying duties, which included front-line service in Romania. In July 1917, he transferred to Fighter Squadron 25 for service on the Macedonian front, where

  • Fiesole (Italy)

    Fiesole, town and episcopal see of Florence provincia, Tuscany regione, north-central Italy. It is situated on a hill overlooking the Arno and Mugnone valleys just northeast of Florence. A chief city of the Etruscan confederacy, it probably dates from the 9th–8th century bc, but its first record

  • Fiesole, Mino da (Italian sculptor)

    Mino da Fiesole, early Renaissance sculptor notable for his well-characterized busts, which are among the earliest Renaissance portrait sculptures. Mino was trained in Florence, possibly by Antonio Rossellino. While in Rome, where he was active in 1454 and 1463 and from roughly 1473 to 1480, he

  • Fiesta (novel by Hemingway)

    The Sun Also Rises, first major novel by Ernest Hemingway, published in 1926. Titled Fiesta in England, the novel captures the moods, feelings, and attitudes of a hard-drinking, fast-living group of disillusioned expatriates in postwar France and Spain. The Sun Also Rises follows a group of young

  • fiesta (social and religious event)

    Guam: Cultural life: Fiestas held in commemoration of patron saints were great social and religious events of the year for each village and brought together people from many parts of the island. Fiesta customs are still observed in Guam. However, changes in the social life and institutions of…

  • Fiesta Bowl (football game)

    Fiesta Bowl, annual American college postseason gridiron football game held at the University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona, beginning in 2007, after having been played at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona, for the first 35 years of its existence. It is one of six bowls (along with the

  • fiesta del chivo, La (work by Vargas Llosa)

    Latin American literature: Post-boom writers: …La fiesta del chivo (2000; The Feast of the Goat), dealing with Rafael Trujillo’s dictatorship in the Dominican Republic. Both are remarkable not only because of their literary quality but also because their authors ventured beyond their own countries (Mexico and Peru, respectively) to find their historical themes. García Márquez,…

  • Fiesta del Milagro (festival, Salta, Argentina)

    Salta: Salta’s Fiesta del Milagro (“Miracle Fiesta”), which is held each September, commemorates the aftermath of a particularly severe earthquake in 1692 when religious icons were paraded through the streets. A celebration on June 17 honours General Martín Güemes, a gaucho leader who opposed the Spanish in…

  • fièvre boutonneuse (pathology)

    Boutonneuse fever, a mild typhuslike fever caused by the bacterium Rickettsia conorii and transmitted by ticks, occurring in most of the Mediterranean countries and Crimea. Available evidence suggests that the diseases described as Kenya typhus and South African tick-bite fever are probably

  • fièvre exanthématique (pathology)

    Boutonneuse fever, a mild typhuslike fever caused by the bacterium Rickettsia conorii and transmitted by ticks, occurring in most of the Mediterranean countries and Crimea. Available evidence suggests that the diseases described as Kenya typhus and South African tick-bite fever are probably

  • FIFA (electronic game series)

    FIFA, football (soccer) electronic game series developed by EA Sports, a division of the American gaming company Electronic Arts, and licensed from the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). EA Sports began the FIFA series in 1993, hoping to develop a hold on football in the same

  • FIFA (sports organization)

    Football Association: It later joined the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) to formulate rules of international competition.

  • FIFA Corruption Scandal, The

    In 2016 FIFA, the international governing body of Association football (soccer), struggled with the ongoing repercussions triggered when the protracted suspicion of fraudulent dealings, racketeering, and money laundering involving high-ranking FIFA officials was confirmed. It was hoped by many that

  • FIFA Women’s World Cup (association football competition)

    Women’s World Cup, international football (soccer) competition that determines the world champion among women’s national teams. Like the men’s World Cup, the Women’s World Cup is governed by the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) and takes place every four years. The field for

  • FIFA Women’s World Cup, The

    On July 5, 2015, a crowd of 53,341 association football (soccer) fans at the BC Place Stadium in Vancouver and a record American soccer audience of 25.4 million TV viewers watched the U.S. defeat defending champion Japan 5–2 in the final of a memorably exciting seventh FIFA Women’s World Cup. The

  • FIFA World Cup (football tournament)

    World Cup, in football (soccer), quadrennial tournament that determines the sport’s world champion. It is likely the most popular sporting event in the world, drawing billions of television viewers every tournament. The first competition for the cup was organized in 1930 by the Fédération

  • FIFA World Cup 2006

    On July 9, 2006, a crowd of 69,000 spectators at the Olympic Stadium in Berlin and an estimated television audience of one billion association Football (soccer) fans watched Italy beat France 5–3 on penalties after the Fédération Internationale de Football (FIFA) World Cup final had ended 1–1 in

  • FIFA World Cup 2010

    On July 11, 2010, a crowd of 84,490 spectators at the Soccer City Stadium in Johannesburg and an estimated television audience of 700 million association football (soccer) fans watched Spain beat the Netherlands 1–0 in the Fédération Internationale de Football (FIFA) World Cup final, the first

  • FIFA World Cup 2014

    On July 13, 2014, a crowd of 74,738 spectators at the Estádio do Maracan? in Rio de Janeiro and a global television audience of more than 900 million Association football (soccer) fans watched Germany beat Argentina 1–0 in AET (after extra time, or overtime) in the 20th FIFA World Cup final. Two

  • FIFA World Cup Trophy (soccer)

    World Cup: …a new trophy called the FIFA World Cup was put up for competition. Many other sports have organized “World Cup” competitions.

  • Fife (council area, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Fife, council area and historic county of eastern Scotland, covering a peninsula bounded on the north by the Firth of Tay, on the east by the North Sea, on the south by the Firth of Forth, and on the west by Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire council areas. Fife council area covers the same

  • fife (musical instrument)

    Fife, small transverse (side-blown) flute with six finger holes and a narrow cylindrical bore that produces a high pitch and shrill tone. The modern fife, pitched to the A? above middle C, is about 15.5 inches (39 cm) long and often has an added E? hole covered by a key. Its compass is about two

  • Fife Player, The (painting by Manet)

    édouard Manet: Mature life and works: The following year, The Fife Player (1866), after having been rejected by the Salon jury under the pretext that its modeling was flat, was displayed along with others in Manet’s studio in Paris.

  • Fife, Duncan (American furniture designer)

    Duncan Phyfe, Scottish-born American furniture designer, a leading exponent of the Neoclassical style, sometimes considered the greatest of all American cabinetmakers. The Fife family went to the United States in 1784, settling in Albany, New York, where Duncan worked as an apprentice cabinetmaker

  • Fifi (storm [1974])

    San Pedro Sula: Hurricane Fifi in 1974 badly damaged the agricultural hinterland and certain industries. An industrial free trade zone opened in 1976.

  • Fifine at the Fair (work by Bantock)

    Granville Bantock: …Dante and Beatrice (1910) and Fifine at the Fair (1912); and the massive Omar Khayyam for solo voices, chorus, and orchestra (1906–09).

  • Fifinella (racehorse)

    Fifinella, (foaled 1913), English racehorse (Thoroughbred) who in 1916 won the Derby, and two days later the Oaks; she was the last horse to win both events in one year. Fifinella, sired by Polymelus and foaled by Silver Fowl, was owned by Edward Hulton and trained by Richard Dawson at Newmarket.

  • FIFO (accounting)

    accounting: Cost of goods sold: …main inventory costing methods: (1) first-in, first-out (FIFO), (2) last-in, first-out (LIFO), or (3) average cost. The LIFO method is widely used in the United States, where it is also an acceptable costing method for income tax purposes; companies in most other countries measure inventory cost and the cost of…

  • fifteen (number)

    number symbolism: 15: As the product of two sacred numbers (3 × 5), 15 naturally has religious significance. In ancient Nineveh the goddess Ishtar was served by 15 priests, and the city had 15 gates. The 3 × 3 magic square has 15 as its magic constant,…

  • Fifteen Puzzle (game)

    Fifteen Puzzle, puzzle consisting of 15 squares, numbered 1 through 15, which can be slid horizontally or vertically within a four-by-four grid that has one empty space among its 16 locations. The object of the puzzle is to arrange the squares in numerical sequence using only the extra space in the

  • Fifteen Rebellion (British history)

    Jacobite: Fifteen Rebellion, was a serious affair. In the summer of 1715 John Erskine, 6th earl of Mar, an embittered ex-supporter of the Revolution, raised the Jacobite clans and the Episcopal northeast for “James III and VIII” (James Edward, the Old Pretender). A hesitant leader, Mar…

  • fifteen schoolgirl problem (mathematics)

    combinatorics: BIB (balanced incomplete block) designs: Kirkman as a recreational problem. There are υ girls in a class. Their teacher wants to take the class out for a walk for a number of days, the girls marching abreast in triplets. It is required to arrange the walk so that any two girls march abreast in…

  • Fifteen Years of a Dancer’s Life (work by Fuller)

    Loie Fuller: …published in English translation as Fifteen Years of a Dancer’s Life in 1913. After World War I she danced infrequently, but from her school in Paris she sent out touring dance companies to all parts of Europe. In 1926 she last visited the United States, in company with her friend…

  • Fifteen Years’ War (Hungary-Ottoman history)

    Hungary: Royal Hungary and the rise of Transylvania: In the Fifteen Years’ War, imperial troops entered Transylvania, and their commander, George Basta, behaved there (and in northern Hungary) with such insane cruelty toward the Hungarian Protestants that a Transylvanian general, István Bocskay, formerly a Habsburg supporter, revolted. His army of wild freebooters (hajdúk) drove out…

  • Fifteenth Amendment (United States Constitution)

    Fifteenth Amendment, amendment (1870) to the Constitution of the United States that guaranteed that the right to vote could not be denied based on “race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” The amendment complemented and followed in the wake of the passage of the Thirteenth and Fourteenth

  • fifth (music)

    East Asian arts: Theoretical systems: This cycle of fifths produced 12 pitches that were mathematically correct, but the 13th pitch did not match the 1st pitch. In the West this so-called “Pythagorean comma” became bothersome as Western music oriented toward vertical sounds called harmony in which the distance between pitches in chords needed…

  • Fifth Amendment (United States Constitution)

    Fifth Amendment, amendment (1791) to the Constitution of the United States, part of the Bill of Rights, that articulates procedural safeguards designed to protect the rights of the criminally accused and to secure life, liberty, and property. For the text of the Fifth Amendment, see below. Similar

  • Fifth Book of Peace, The (work by Kingston)

    Maxine Hong Kingston: The Fifth Book of Peace (2003) combines elements of fiction and memoir in the manner of a Chinese talk-story, a tradition in which elements of both the real and imagined worlds become interpolated. I Love a Broad Margin to My Life (2011) is a “memoir-in-verse.”

  • Fifth Business (novel by Davies)

    Fifth Business, first of a series of novels known collectively as the Deptford trilogy by Robertson

  • fifth column (military tactic)

    Fifth column, clandestine group or faction of subversive agents who attempt to undermine a nation’s solidarity by any means at their disposal. The term is conventionally credited to Emilio Mola Vidal, a Nationalist general during the Spanish Civil War (1936–39). As four of his army columns moved on

  • Fifth Column, The (play by Hemingway)

    Ernest Hemingway: …he wrote a play called The Fifth Column (1938), which is set in besieged Madrid. As in many of his books, the protagonist of the play is based on the author. Following his last visit to the Spanish war, he purchased Finca Vigía (“Lookout Farm”), an unpretentious estate outside Havana,…

  • Fifth Council of the Lateran ([1512–1517])

    Fifth Lateran Council, (1512–17), the 18th ecumenical council, convoked by Pope Julius II and held in the Lateran Palace in Rome. The council was convened in response to a council summoned at Pisa by a group of cardinals who were hostile to the pope. The pope’s council had reform as its chief

  • fifth cranial nerve (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Trigeminal nerve (CN V or 5): The trigeminal nerve is the largest of the cranial nerves. It has both motor and sensory components, the sensory fibres being general somatic afferent and the motor fibres being special visceral efferent. Most of the cell bodies of sensory…

  • Fifth Crusade (European history)

    Crusades: The Fifth Crusade: The Children’s Crusade revealed that, despite repeated failures, Europeans were still committed to recapturing Jerusalem and rescuing the True Cross. Almost immediately after the Fourth Crusade, Innocent III began planning for another expedition to the East. Although delayed by controversies involving the imperial…

  • fifth degree, equation of the (mathematics)

    évariste Galois: …impossibility of solving the general quintic equation by radicals. Ruffini’s effort was not wholly successful, but in 1824 the Norwegian mathematician Niels Abel gave a correct proof.

  • Fifth Dimension, the (American musical group)

    Laura Nyro: …songs she had written, notably the Fifth Dimension (“Wedding Bell Blues” and “Stoned Soul Picnic”), Barbra Streisand (“Stoney End”), Three Dog Night (“Eli’s Coming”), and Blood, Sweat and Tears (“And When I Die”). A wayward yet reclusive artist, Nyro resisted pressure to streamline her songs for mass consumption. She

  • Fifth District Normal School (university, Maryville, Missouri, United States)

    Northwest Missouri State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Maryville, Mo., U.S., 90 miles (145 km) north of Kansas City. It comprises colleges of arts and sciences, education and human services, and business and professional studies. In addition to undergraduate

  • Fifth Element, The (film by Besson [1997])

    Gary Oldman: …the Luc Besson-directed sci-fi extravaganza The Fifth Element (1997) and schemed against a liberal vice presidential nominee as a corrupt senator in The Contender (2000). In the Ridley Scott-helmed Silence of the Lambs sequel Hannibal (2001), he disappeared under layers of prostheses to play Hannibal Lecter’s former patient and nemesis,…

  • Fifth Estate, The (film by Condon [2013])

    Benedict Cumberbatch: From Star Trek to Alan Turing: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in The Fifth Estate; a well-intentioned slave owner in 12 Years a Slave, an adaptation of Solomon Northup’s narrative (1853) of his life in captivity; and a hapless young man in August: Osage County, based on the play by Tracy Letts. He also lent his posh…

  • Fifth Generation Cinema (Chinese art)

    China: The arts: China’s “Fifth Generation Cinema,” for example, is known for such outstanding film directors as Zhang Yimou and Chen Kaige, who have highlighted themes of social and political oppression.

  • Fifth Monarchy Men (religious sect)

    Fifth Monarchy Men, an extreme Puritan sect that came into prominence in England during the Commonwealth and Protectorate. They were so called from their belief that the time of the fifth monarchy was at hand—that is, the monarchy that (according to a traditional interpretation of parts of the

  • Fifth of May, The (work by Manzoni)

    Alessandro Manzoni: …“Il cinque maggio” (1822; “The Napoleonic Ode”), was considered by Goethe, one of the first to translate it into German, as the greatest of many written to commemorate the event.

  • fifth position (ballet)

    assemblé: …with the feet usually in fifth position demi-plié (feet crossed, knees bent). There are many variations of an assemblé, which can involve turning or traveling across the floor and executing small, battu (“beaten”) steps.

  • Fifth Republic (South Korean history)

    South Korea: The Fifth Republic: In August 1980 Chun Doo-Hwan was elected president by the NCU. A new constitution, under which the president was limited to one seven-year term, was approved in October, ushering in the Fifth Republic. Martial law was lifted in January 1981, and in February…

  • Fifth Republic (French history)

    Fifth Republic, system of government in France from 1958. Under the constitution crafted by Charles de Gaulle with the help of Michel Debré, executive power was increased at the expense of the National Assembly. In 1959 de Gaulle was inaugurated as the first president of the Fifth Republic, with

  • Fifth Symphony (symphony by Beethoven)

    Symphony No. 5 in C Minor, Op. 67, orchestral work by German composer Ludwig van Beethoven, widely recognized by the ominous four-note opening motif—often interpreted as the musical manifestation of “fate knocking at the door”—that recurs in various guises throughout the composition. The symphony

  • fifth wheel (mechanics)

    truck: Types and definitions: A device called a fifth wheel is used to connect a truck tractor to a semitrailer and to permit articulation between the units. It generally includes a lower half, consisting of a trunnion (pivot assembly) plate and latching mechanism, mounted on the truck tractor for connection with a kingpin…

  • fifth-generation language (computing)

    artificial intelligence programming language: Known as fifth-generation languages, these are in use on nonnumerical parallel computers developed at the Institute.

  • fifths, circle of (music)

    key: The circle of fifths is an efficient way to visualize keys, key signatures, and relationships between keys. Beginning at C, the top position, and proceeding clockwise, the keynotes ascend by perfect fifths (as in the tonic–dominant relationship). Each advance adds a sharp to the key—or, equivalently,…

  • Fifty Comedies and Tragedies Written by Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (work by Fletcher and Beaumont)

    John Fletcher: …52 plays in the folio Fifty Comedies and Tragedies… (1679); but any consideration of the canon must omit one play from the 1679 folio (James Shirley’s Coronation) and add three not to be found in it (Henry VIII, Sir John van Olden Barnavelt, A Very Woman). Of these 54 plays…

  • Fifty Shades Darker (film by Foley [2017])

    Kim Basinger: …Guys (2016), she appeared in Fifty Shades Darker (2017) and Fifty Shades Freed (2018), both of which were based on E.L. James’s series of erotic novels.

  • Fifty Shades Darker (novel by James)

    E.L. James: …offline, and her second book, Fifty Shades Darker, was released in September 2011. The third book in the series, Fifty Shades Freed, was published in January 2012, and in February James signed a contract with the major international publisher Knopf Doubleday. In June 2015 James issued Grey: Fifty Shades of…

  • Fifty Shades Freed (film by Foley [2018])

    Kim Basinger: …Fifty Shades Darker (2017) and Fifty Shades Freed (2018), both of which were based on E.L. James’s series of erotic novels.

  • Fifty Shades Freed (novel by James)

    E.L. James: …third book in the series, Fifty Shades Freed, was published in January 2012, and in February James signed a contract with the major international publisher Knopf Doubleday. In June 2015 James issued Grey: Fifty Shades of Grey As Told by Christian; the earlier installments had been from Steele’s perspective.

  • Fifty Shades of Grey (film by Taylor-Johnson [2015])

    Marcia Gay Harden: …appeared in film adaptations (2015, 2017, and 2018) of the Fifty Shades series of erotic novels by E.L. James.

  • Fifty Shades of Grey (novel by James)

    E.L. James: …author best known for the Fifty Shades series of erotic novels.

  • Fifty Works of English and American Literature We Could Do Without (work by Brophy, Levey and Osborne)

    Brigid Brophy: …Osborne, Brophy wrote the controversial Fifty Works of English and American Literature We Could Do Without (1967), which attacked many eminent literary figures and criticized such works as Hamlet and Huckleberry Finn. Her other nonfiction includes critical portraits—such as Mozart the Dramatist (1964) and Black and White: A Portrait of…

  • Fifty-four Forty or Fight (United States history)

    James K. Polk: Early life and career: …54°40′ with the campaign slogan “Fifty-four forty or fight.” His election was close, but it was decisive—a popular plurality of about 38,000 votes and 170 electoral votes against 105 for Clay.

  • Fifty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment (United States military)

    54th Regiment, Massachusetts infantry unit made up of African Americans that was active during the American Civil War (1861–65). The 54th Regiment became famous for its fighting prowess and for the great courage of its members. Its exploits were depicted in the 1989 film Glory. The abolitionist

  • fifty-move rule (chess)

    chess: Object of the game: …moved within a period of 50 moves.

  • Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido (work by Hiroshige)

    Hiroshige: His print series Fifty-three Stations of the Tōkaidō (1833–34) is perhaps his finest achievement.

  • fig (plant and fruit)

    Fig, (Ficus carica), plant of the mulberry family (Moraceae) and its edible fruit. The common fig is indigenous to an area extending from Asiatic Turkey to northern India, but natural seedlings grow in most Mediterranean countries; it is cultivated in warm climates. In the Mediterranean region the

  • FIG (sports organization)

    gymnastics: History: In 1881 the Fédération Internationale Gymnastique (FIG) was founded to supervise international competition. The 1896 Olympic Games fostered interest in gymnastics, and the FIG World Championships in gymnastics were organized for men in 1903, for women in 1934.

  • fig (plant genus)

    Ficus, (genus Ficus), genus of about 900 species of trees, shrubs, and vines in the family Moraceae, many of which are commonly known as figs. Native primarily to tropical areas of East Asia, they are distributed throughout the world’s tropics. Many are tall forest trees that are buttressed by

  • Fig for Momus, A (work by Lodge)

    Thomas Lodge: In A Fig for Momus (1595), he introduced classical satires and verse epistles (modeled after those of Juvenal and Horace) into English literature for the first time. Aside from Rosalynde: Euphues Golden Legacie (1590), which provided the plot for Shakespeare’s comedy, Lodge’s most important romance was…

  • fig insect (insect)

    Fig wasp, (family Agaonidae), any of about 900 species of tiny wasps responsible for pollinating the world’s 900 species of figs (see Ficus). Each species of wasp pollinates only one species of fig, and each fig species has its own wasp species to pollinate it. This extraordinary diversity of

  • fig shell (gastropod family)

    gastropod: Classification: … (Bursidae), triton shells (Cymatiidae), and fig shells (Ficidae); frog and triton shells often live in rocky areas; most species large in size. Suborder Neogastropoda (Stenoglossa) Carnivorous or scavengers with rachiglossate (with 3 denticles) or taxoglossate (with 2 denticles) radula; shell often with long siphonal canal; proboscis well developed and often…

  • fig tree (plant genus)

    Ficus, (genus Ficus), genus of about 900 species of trees, shrubs, and vines in the family Moraceae, many of which are commonly known as figs. Native primarily to tropical areas of East Asia, they are distributed throughout the world’s tropics. Many are tall forest trees that are buttressed by

  • Fig Tree microfossils (paleontology)

    Fig Tree microfossils, assemblage of microscopic structures uncovered in the Fig Tree Series, a rock layer at least three billion years old, exposed in South Africa. They apparently represent several organisms—among the oldest known—including a rod-shaped bacterium named Eobacterium isolatum and a

  • Fig Tree Series (geology)

    black shale: 2-billion-year-old Fig Tree Series of South Africa. The Green River formation, an oil-shale formation in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, is a potentially valuable source of synthetic crude oil. In eastern Germany and Poland the Kupferschiefer, a bituminous shale, is mined for copper, lead, and zinc.

  • fig wasp (insect)

    Fig wasp, (family Agaonidae), any of about 900 species of tiny wasps responsible for pollinating the world’s 900 species of figs (see Ficus). Each species of wasp pollinates only one species of fig, and each fig species has its own wasp species to pollinate it. This extraordinary diversity of

  • fig-marigold (plant)
  • fig-marigold family (plant family)

    Caryophyllales: Economic importance: Aizoaceae includes ice plants, sea figs (also called beach apples), and living stones (lithops). Stem or leaf succulents in Cactaceae and Aizoaceae are commonly collected and used in rock gardens.

  • Figari, Pedro (Uruguayan artist)

    Uruguay: The arts: The Post-Impressionist painter Pedro Figari achieved international renown for his pastel studies of subjects in Montevideo and the countryside. Blending elements of art and nature, the work of the landscape architect Leandro Silva Delgado has also earned international prominence.

  • Fígaro (Spanish writer)

    Mariano José de Larra, Spanish journalist and satirist who attacked contemporary society for its social habits, literary tastes, and political ineptitude. Larra’s family was forced to move to France in 1814 owing to public resentment against his father for having collaborated with the French during

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