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  • Florida State College for Women (university, Tallahassee, Florida, United States)

    Florida State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S. It is part of the State University System of Florida and consists of eight schools and eight colleges, including a college of engineering that is jointly operated with Florida Agricultural

  • Florida State University (university, Tallahassee, Florida, United States)

    Florida State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Tallahassee, Florida, U.S. It is part of the State University System of Florida and consists of eight schools and eight colleges, including a college of engineering that is jointly operated with Florida Agricultural

  • Florida Technological University (university, Orlando, Florida, United States)

    University of Central Florida, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Orlando, Florida, U.S. It is part of the State University System of Florida. It consists of a main campus in Orlando and branch campuses in Cocoa (Brevard campus) and Daytona Beach, as well as two additional

  • Florida torreya (tree)

    Stinking yew, (species Torreya taxifolia), an ornamental evergreen conifer tree of the yew family (Taxaceae), limited in distribution to western Florida and southwestern Georgia, U.S. The stinking yew, which grows to 13 metres (about 43 feet) in height in cultivation, carries an open pyramidal head

  • Florida v. Jardines (law case)

    Antonin Scalia: Judicial philosophy: …a suspect’s front door (Florida v. Jardines [2013]). Another of Scalia’s opinions that upset many conservatives was his ruling for the majority in Employment Division v. Smith (1990), which reduced the level of scrutiny that courts needed to apply in considering the validity of government restrictions on the free…

  • Florida water rat (rodent)

    muskrat: The Florida water rat (Neofiber alleni) is sometimes called the round-tailed muskrat. It resembles a small muskrat (up to 38 cm in total length), but its tail is round rather than flat. This animal is less aquatic than Ondatra and lives in the grassy marshes and…

  • Florida worm lizard (reptile)

    Florida worm lizard, (Rhineura floridana), pale or pinkish wormlike lizard characterized by the absence of limbs, external eyes, or ear openings, representing the only living member of the amphisbaenian family Rhineuridae. (Amphisbaenians are a group of burrowing, limbless lizards with concealed

  • Florida, Calle (street, Buenos Aires, Argentina)

    Buenos Aires: Transportation: …many years, two major streets, Calle Florida and Calle Lavalle, were traditionally closed to motor traffic during part of the day to allow for a free flow of pedestrians. Now, however, Calle Florida is reserved for pedestrians at all times. Traffic-calming measures, such as speed bumps and closed streets, have…

  • Florida, flag of (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of a white field (background) with a red saltire (diagonal cross) and, in the centre, the state seal.The first flag of Florida was hoisted on June 25, 1845, at the inauguration of its first governor, William D. Moseley. It had five horizontal stripes (blue, orange, red,

  • Florida, La (pyramid, Lima, Peru)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The Initial Period: Examples include La Florida, a huge pyramid in Lima that formed the nucleus of a yet-unmapped building complex. The Tank site at Ancón consists of a series of stone-faced platforms on a hill. Las Haldas has a platform and three plazas; two smaller similar sites are also…

  • Florida, Purchase of (Spain-United States [1819])

    Transcontinental Treaty, (1819) accord between the United States and Spain that divided their North American claims along a line from the southwestern corner of what is now Louisiana, north and west to what is now Wyoming, and thence west along the latitude 42° N to the Pacific. Thus, Spain ceded

  • Florida, Straits of (strait, North America)

    Straits of Florida, passage connecting the Gulf of Mexico with the Atlantic Ocean. It is about 93 miles (150 km) at its narrowest width, between the Florida Keys, U.S., on the north and Cuba on the south, and it extends east to The Bahamas. The straits mark the area where the Florida Current, the

  • Florida, University of (university, Florida, United States)

    University of Florida, public coeducational institution of higher learning in Gainesville, Florida, U.S. It is a comprehensive research university with land-grant status and is part of the State University System of Florida. The university awards bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, and professional

  • Floridablanca, José Mo?ino y Redondo, conde de (Spanish statesman)

    José Mo?ino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca, Spanish statesman and minister who became identified with the reform program of King Charles III. Mo?ino y Redondo was a leading advocate in Madrid when he was appointed fiscal of the council of Castile in 1766. Having cooperated in the expulsion of

  • Floridae (genus of red algae)

    Gustave-Adolphe Thuret: …cycle of the red alga Floridae. Thuret’s two important works, études phycologiques (1878) and Notes algologiques (1876–80), were published posthumously.

  • Floridean starch

    algae: Nutrient storage: …type of starch molecule (Floridean starch) that is more highly branched than amylopectin. Floridean starch is stored as grains outside the chloroplast.

  • Floridor (French actor)

    Floridor, French leading actor who headed the important troupe of the Théatre de l’H?tel de Bourgogne, in Paris, where he created many roles in plays by the French masters Pierre Corneille and Jean Racine. The son of a German father, he entered the French army and was promoted to ensign but later r

  • florigen (hormone)
  • florin, gold (coin)

    coin: Italy and Sicily: …famous and profuse series of fiorini d’oro, or gold florins. The lily continued as the civic type, together with the standing figure of the Baptist. Regular weight (about 3.50 grams, 54 grains) and fineness won the fiorino universal fame and wide imitation; double florins were introduced in 1504. Venice in…

  • Flórina (Greece)

    Flórina, city and dímos (municipality), West Macedonia (Modern Greek: Dytikí Makedonía) periféreia (region), northwestern Greece. Originally a Byzantine foundation, it later passed to Ottoman control; by the 18th century, its population was chiefly Turkish and Albanian. In the 19th century, Flórina

  • Florinda (work by Gálvez)

    Spanish literature: Women writers: …Nobodies”) ridicules pedantry; her tragedy Florinda (1804) attempts to vindicate the woman blamed for Spain’s loss to the Muslims; and her biblical drama Amnón (1804) recounts the biblical rape of Tamar by her brother Amnon. Neoclassical poet Manuel José Quintana praised Gálvez’s odes and elegies and considered her the best…

  • Florio, Giovanni (English lexicographer)

    John Florio, English lexicographer and translator of Montaigne. Son of a Protestant refugee of Tuscan origin, Florio studied at Oxford. From 1604 to 1619 Florio was groom of the privy chamber to Queen Anne. In 1580 he translated, as Navigations and Discoveries (1580), Giovanni Battista Ramusio’s

  • Florio, John (English lexicographer)

    John Florio, English lexicographer and translator of Montaigne. Son of a Protestant refugee of Tuscan origin, Florio studied at Oxford. From 1604 to 1619 Florio was groom of the privy chamber to Queen Anne. In 1580 he translated, as Navigations and Discoveries (1580), Giovanni Battista Ramusio’s

  • Floris and Blancheflur (French romantic tale)

    Floire et Blancheflor, French metrical romance known in two versions from the 12th and 13th centuries and thought to be of Greco-Byzantine or Moorish origin. Its theme of separation and reunion of young lovers is the same as that treated in Aucassin et Nicolette, though the roles and religion of

  • Floris and Blauncheflur (Middle English work)

    English literature: Verse romance: Floris and Blauncheflour is more exotic, being the tale of a pair of royal lovers who become separated and, after various adventures in eastern lands, reunited. Not much later than these is The Lay of Havelok the Dane, a tale of princely love and adventure…

  • Floris der Keerlen God (count of Holland)

    Floris V, count of Holland (1256–96) and Zeeland, son of the German king William of Holland. Under him the territory of Holland greatly expanded and prospered. Floris succeeded his father as count of Holland when he was less than two years old and did not come of age until 1266. The county was e

  • Floris the God of the Commoners (count of Holland)

    Floris V, count of Holland (1256–96) and Zeeland, son of the German king William of Holland. Under him the territory of Holland greatly expanded and prospered. Floris succeeded his father as count of Holland when he was less than two years old and did not come of age until 1266. The county was e

  • Floris V (count of Holland)

    Floris V, count of Holland (1256–96) and Zeeland, son of the German king William of Holland. Under him the territory of Holland greatly expanded and prospered. Floris succeeded his father as count of Holland when he was less than two years old and did not come of age until 1266. The county was e

  • Floris, Cornelis II (Flemish artist)

    Cornelis II Floris, Flemish sculptor, engraver, and medalist whose Antwerp workshop contributed significantly to the Northern Renaissance by disseminating 16th-century Italian art styles. In the 1540s Floris, along with his brother Frans I Floris, studied in Rome, and he returned to Flanders with

  • Floris, Frans I (Flemish artist)

    Frans I Floris, Flemish painter, draftsman, and etcher who helped spread 16th-century Italian art styles and greatly influenced the Northern Renaissance. In the 1540s he studied in Rome along with his brother Cornelis II Floris, who became a successful sculptor, engraver, and medalist. Returning to

  • Florissant (Missouri, United States)

    Florissant, city, St. Louis county, east-central Missouri, U.S. A northern suburb of St. Louis, it lies in a valley near the confluence of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. Settled by the French in about 1785, it was called St. Ferdinand by the Spanish and was officially renamed Florissant (from

  • Florissant Formation (geology)

    Florissant Formation, division of middle and upper Oligocene rocks in central Colorado, U.S. (The Oligocene Epoch lasted from 33.7 to 23.8 million years ago.) It overlies the White River Group. Named for the nearby town of Florissant (French: “flowering”), which was so named by an early settler for

  • Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument (monument, Colorado, United States)

    Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, fossil-rich mountain valley in central Colorado, U.S. It is located in the Rocky Mountains west of Pikes Peak and Colorado Springs. The monument preserves the fossil beds of the Florissant Formation, which consist of light gray shales dating from the

  • florist
  • florist’s cyclamen (plant)

    Cyclamen: The florist’s cyclamen (Cyclamen persicum), the best-known species, is notable as an indoor plant cultivated for its attractive white to pink to deep red flowers. A number of other species of Cyclamen are grown outside.

  • florist’s fern (plant)

    asparagus: Other species: Florist’s fern (A. setaceus) is not a true fern and has feathery sprays of branchlets often used in corsages and in other plant arrangements. Sprenger’s fern (A. aethiopicus), African asparagus fern (or bridal creeper, A. asparagoides), and asparagus fern (A. densiflorus) are grown for their…

  • florist’s geranium (plant)

    Geraniales: The florist’s geranium (Pelargonium ×domesticum) is a favourite house plant and is available in many varieties. These cultivars (horticultural varieties) originated from plants native to South Africa. Geranium robertianum (herb Robert) is a well-known garden plant, as are some species of Erodium. Erodium cicutarium (pin-clover), a Mediterranean species…

  • floristic kingdom (ecological area)

    Floristic region, any of six areas of the world recognized by plant geographers for their distinctive plant life. These regions, which coincide closely with the faunal regions as mapped by animal geographers, are often considered with them as biogeographic regions. The chief difference is the

  • floristic region (ecological area)

    Floristic region, any of six areas of the world recognized by plant geographers for their distinctive plant life. These regions, which coincide closely with the faunal regions as mapped by animal geographers, are often considered with them as biogeographic regions. The chief difference is the

  • florists cineraria (plant)

    groundsel: mikanoides) and florist’s cineraria (S. cruentus) are popular houseplants. Some botanists now prefer to divide this large and diverse genus into a number of segregated genera.

  • Florists Transworld Delivery (American company)

    Meg Whitman: …offer to become CEO of Florists Transworld Delivery (FTD), a federation of commercial florists. There Whitman encountered opposition from staff members and member florists, who strongly objected to FTD’s transformation into a privately held firm. She resigned from FTD in 1997 and became general manager of the Playskool division of…

  • Florizel (fictional character)

    The Winter's Tale: …been discovered by Polixenes’ son Florizel. Needless to say, her true status is eventually discovered once she and Florizel have arrived at Leontes’ court in Sicilia. In a climactic ending, Hermione is discovered to be alive after all. She had been sequestered by Paulina for some 16 years until the…

  • Florus, Gessius (Roman procurator)

    Herod Agrippa II: In 66 the procurator Gessius Florus permitted a massacre of Jews in Jerusalem, and the Zealots there rose in revolt. When Agrippa supported Florus, urging moderation, the Zealots gained the upper hand, and the case became hopeless.

  • Florus, Publius Annius (Roman historian)

    Publius Annius Florus, historian of Rome and poet, important as the first of a number of African writers who exercised considerable influence on Latin literature in the 2nd century. He was also the first of the “new-fashioned” poets of Hadrian’s reign, whose special characteristic was the use of

  • Flory, Paul J. (American chemist)

    Paul J. Flory, American polymer chemist who was awarded the 1974 Nobel Prize for Chemistry “for his fundamental achievements, both theoretical and experimental, in the physical chemistry of macromolecules.” Flory was born of Huguenot-German parentage. His father, Ezra Flory, was a Brethren

  • Flory, Paul John (American chemist)

    Paul J. Flory, American polymer chemist who was awarded the 1974 Nobel Prize for Chemistry “for his fundamental achievements, both theoretical and experimental, in the physical chemistry of macromolecules.” Flory was born of Huguenot-German parentage. His father, Ezra Flory, was a Brethren

  • floss flower (plant)

    ageratum: The common garden ageratum (A. houstonianum), also known as floss flower and blue mink, is frequently cultivated as an ornamental annual. Several dwarf varieties are commonly used as edging plants.

  • floss-silk tree

    Floss-silk tree, (Ceiba speciosa), thorny flowering tree of the mallow family (Malvaceae), native to South America but cultivated as an ornamental in other regions. It grows to a height of about 15 metres (50 feet). The large pink flowers yield a vegetable silk used in upholstery. It was formerly

  • Flosse, Gaston (president of French Polynesia)

    French Polynesia: History: …before losing to his predecessor, Gaston Flosse, who at that time was opposed to independence. Over the next decade, the presidency rotated among several politicians—including Temaru, Flosse, and Gaston Tong Sang, who served multiple times each—representing different visions of French Polynesia’s future in relation to France.

  • Flossenbürg (concentration camp, Germany)

    Flossenbürg, Nazi German concentration camp, established in 1937 in the market town of Flossenbürg, near the Czech border in Bavaria, Germany. It was originally used for political prisoners but, by World War II, had become an important forced-labour centre, housing 30,000 to 40,000 worker-prisoners

  • FLOSY (political organization, Yemen [Aden])

    Aden: …rival nationalist organizations, the Egyptian-supported Front for the Liberation of Occupied South Yemen (FLOSY) and the Marxist-oriented National Liberation Front (NLF), for eventual control of the country. It was as a part of the NLF-ruled People’s Republic of Southern Yemen that Aden achieved its independence on Nov. 30, 1967, and…

  • flota (Spanish fleet)

    Cuba: Conquest and colonial life: …and strategically because of the flota (“fleet”) system of regularly scheduled maritime trade between Spain and its American colonies. In addition, ranching, smuggling, and tobacco farming occupied the colonists. The colony’s administrative costs depended, however, on irregular subsidies from New Spain until 1808.

  • flotation (ore dressing)

    Flotation, in mineral processing, method used to separate and concentrate ores by altering their surfaces to a hydrophobic or hydrophilic condition—that is, the surfaces are either repelled or attracted by water. The flotation process was developed on a commercial scale early in the 20th century to

  • flotation (physics)

    Archimedes' principle: buoyancy, discovered by the ancient Greek mathematician and inventor Archimedes, stating that any body completely or partially submerged in a fluid (gas or liquid) at rest is acted upon by an upward, or buoyant, force the magnitude of which is equal to the weight of…

  • Fl?te (musical instrument)

    Flute, wind instrument in which the sound is produced by a stream of air directed against a sharp edge, upon which the air breaks up into eddies that alternate regularly above and below the edge, setting into vibration the air enclosed in the flute. In vertical, end-vibrated flutes—such as the

  • flotilla (military unit)

    military unit: …squadrons in turn form a flotilla, several of which in turn form a fleet. For operations, however, many navies organize their vessels into task units (3–5 ships), task or battle groups (4–10 ships), task forces (2–5 task groups), and fleets (several task forces).

  • Flotow, Friedrich, Freiherr von (German composer)

    Friedrich von Flotow, German composer, active mainly in France, who was best known for his opera Martha (1847). Originally intended for a diplomatic career, from age 16 Flotow studied music in Paris with Anton Reicha. Forced to leave Paris during the July Revolution of 1830, he went home but

  • flotsamfish (fish)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Stromateidae, Centrolophidae, Nomeidae, Ariommidae, Amarsipidae, and Tetragonuridae Eocene to present; slender to ovate, deep-bodied fishes; dorsal fin continuous or spinous portion set off from soft portion by deep notch; in the most generalized species, which resemble Kyphosidae, the soft dorsal is preceded by about 6 low, stoutish…

  • FLOTUS (United States title)

    First lady, wife of the president of the United States. Although the first lady’s role has never been codified or officially defined, she figures prominently in the political and social life of the nation. Representative of her husband on official and ceremonial occasions both at home and abroad,

  • Fl?tzgebirge (geology)

    geochronology: Classification of stratified rocks: …an intermediate category, or the Secondary (Fl?tzgebirge), composed of layered or stratified rocks containing fossils, and (3) a final or successionally youngest sequence of alluvial and related unconsolidated sediments (Angeschwemmtgebirge) thought to represent the most recent record of the Earth’s history.

  • flounder (fish)

    Flounder, any of numerous species of flatfishes belonging to the families Achiropsettidae, Pleuronectidae, Paralichthyidae, and Bothidae (order Pleuronectiformes). The flounder is morphogenetically unusual. When born it is bilaterally symmetrical, with an eye on each side, and it swims near the

  • Flounder, The (work by Grass)

    Günter Grass: …Vietnam War; Der Butt (1977; The Flounder), a ribald fable of the war between the sexes from the Stone Age to the present; Das Treffen in Telgte (1979; The Meeting at Telgte), a hypothetical “Gruppe 1647” meeting of authors at the close of the Thirty Years’ War; Kopfgeburten; oder, die…

  • flour (food)

    Flour, finely ground cereal grains or other starchy portions of plants, used in various food products and as a basic ingredient of baked goods. Flour made from wheat grains is the most satisfactory type for baked products that require spongy structure. In modern usage, the word flour alone usually

  • flour beetle (insect)

    life: Temperature and desiccation: …kangaroo rat (a mammal) and Tribolium (the flour beetle) imbibe no water at all in the liquid state. They rely entirely on metabolic water—that is, on water released from chemical bonds through the metabolism of food. A variety of plants, including Spanish moss, live without contact with groundwater. They extract…

  • flour corn (cereal)

    corn: Flour corn, composed largely of soft starch, has soft, mealy, easily ground kernels. Sweet corn has wrinkled translucent seeds; the plant sugar is not converted to starch as in other types. Popcorn, an extreme type of flint corn characterized by small hard kernels, is devoid…

  • flour moth (insect)

    Flour moth, (Ephestia kuehniella), species of moth in the subfamily Phycitinae (family Pyralidae, order Lepidoptera) that is a cosmopolitan pest of cereal products and other stored foods. Sometimes also called Anagasta kuehniella, the flour moth requires vitamins A and B and the larvae cannot live

  • Flourens, Gustave (French revolutionary)

    Gustave Flourens, French radical intellectual and a leader of the Paris Commune revolt of 1871. Flourens was the son of a famous physiologist, Marie-Jean-Pierre Flourens, and was a promising young scientist. As an academic he wrote such distinguished works as Histoire de l’homme (1863; “History of

  • Flourens, Marie-Jean-Pierre (French physiologist)

    Marie-Jean-Pierre Flourens, French physiologist who was the first to demonstrate experimentally the general functions of the major portions of the vertebrate brain. After receiving his medical degree from the University of Montpellier, Flourens went to Paris, where the renowned French naturalist

  • Floury-2 (corn hybrid)

    cereal processing: Corn: These corns, called Opaque-2 and Floury-2, possess certain drawbacks. They are generally lower in yield than dent hybrids, are subject to more kernel damage when combine-harvested, and may be more difficult to process. Nevertheless, these new hybrid corns are expected to become widely cultivated, and the principles involved in their…

  • flow (mechanics)

    deformation and flow: flow, in physics, alteration in shape or size of a body under the influence of mechanical forces. Flow is a change in deformation that continues as long as the force is applied.

  • flow (geology)

    landslide: Types of landslides: …viscous fluid is called a flow. The most important fluidizing agent is water, but trapped air is sometimes involved. Contact between the flowing mass and the underlying material can be distinct, or the contact can be one of diffuse shear. The difference between slides and flows is gradational, with variations…

  • flow (mathematics)

    analysis: Dynamical systems theory and chaos: …differential equations, otherwise known as dynamical systems theory, which seeks to establish general properties of solutions from general principles without writing down any explicit solutions at all. Dynamical systems theory combines local analytic information, collected in small “neighbourhoods” around points of special interest, with global geometric and topological properties of…

  • flow (industrial engineering)

    production system: Underlying principles: …may be further characterized by flows (channels of movement) in the process: both the physical flow of materials, work in the intermediate stages of manufacture (work in process), and finished goods; and the flow of information and the inevitable paperwork that carry and accompany the physical flow. The physical flows…

  • flow control (computing)

    computer science: Networking and communication: Network protocols also include flow control, which keeps a data sender from swamping a receiver with messages that it has no time to process or space to store, and error control, which involves transmission error detection and automatic resending of messages to correct such errors. (For some of the…

  • flow control (air-traffic control)

    traffic control: Traffic elements: …Administration instituted a policy of flow controls. These controls required an aircraft to remain at its origin airport unless a landing opportunity was estimated to be available at the destination airport at the estimated arrival time. This results in a significantly reduced workload for the terminal air traffic controllers at…

  • flow diagram

    Flowchart, graphical representation of a process, such as a manufacturing operation or computer operation, indicating the various steps that are taken as the product moves along the production line or the problem moves through the computer. Individual operations can be represented by closed boxes

  • flow law of ice (geophysics)

    glacier: Glacier flow: …as the flow law or constitutive law of ice: the rate of shear strain is approximately proportional to the cube of the shear stress. Often called the Glen flow law by glaciologists, this constitutive law is the basis for all analyses of the flow of ice sheets and glaciers.

  • flow limitation (pathology)

    chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: …as difficulty in exhaling (called flow limitation), which causes increased lung volume and manifests as breathlessness. Other early symptoms of the condition include a “smokers cough” and daily sputum production. Coughing up blood is not a feature of COPD and when present raises concern about a second, tobacco-related condition, particularly…

  • flow meter (device)

    Flow meter, Device that measures the velocity of a gas or liquid. It has applications in medicine as well as in chemical engineering, aeronautics, and meteorology. Examples include pitot tubes, venturi tubes, and rotameters (tapered graduated tubes with a float inside that is supported by the

  • flow rate (cell physiology)

    nervous system: Uncharged molecules: …of time is called the flow rate, or flux rate. Diffusion continues until the concentrations on both sides of the membrane are equal. A condition of no net flux is then established with an equal, random diffusion of molecules in both directions. This is called the equilibrium state.

  • flow rate (physics)

    fluid mechanics: …mechanics, science concerned with the response of fluids to forces exerted upon them. It is a branch of classical physics with applications of great importance in hydraulic and aeronautical engineering, chemical engineering, meteorology, and zoology.

  • flow structure (geology)

    igneous rock: Flow structures: These are planar or linear features that result from flowage of magma with or without contained crystals. Various forms of faintly to sharply defined layering and lining typically reflect compositional or textural inhomogeneities, and they often are accentuated by concentrations or preferred orientation…

  • Flow, my teares (song by Dowland)

    John Dowland: His famous Lachrimae, or Seaven Teares Figured in Seaven Passionate Pavans (1604), became one of the most widely known compositions of the time. In his chromatic fantasies, the finest of which are “Forlorne Hope Fancye” and “Farewell,” he developed this form to a height of intensity unequaled…

  • Flow-matic (computer language)

    computer: COBOL: Flow-matic used a more English-like syntax and vocabulary:

  • flow-till (geology)

    glacial landform: Glacial deposition: …resulting deposit is called a flow-till by some authors. On the other hand, the debris may be laid down more or less in place as the ice melts away around and beneath it. Such deposits are referred to as melt-out till, and sometimes as ablation till. In many cases, the…

  • flowbox (papermaking)

    papermaking: Formation of paper sheet by machines: …headbox, more commonly called a flowbox or breastbox, consisted of a rectangular wooden vat that extended across the full width of the machine behind the Fourdrinier breast roll. The box was provided with baffles to mix and distribute the stock. A flat metal plate extending across the machine (knife slice)…

  • flowchart

    Flowchart, graphical representation of a process, such as a manufacturing operation or computer operation, indicating the various steps that are taken as the product moves along the production line or the problem moves through the computer. Individual operations can be represented by closed boxes

  • flower (plant anatomy)

    Flower, the characteristic reproductive structure of angiosperms. As popularly used, the term “flower” especially applies when part or all of the reproductive structure is distinctive in colour and form. In their range of colour, size, form, and anatomical arrangement, flowers present a seemingly

  • Flower and the Leaf, The (English poem)

    English literature: Courtly poetry: …apocryphal trifles such as “The Flower and the Leaf” and “The Assembly of Ladies” (both c. 1475), the former, like a surprising quantity of 15th-century verse of this type, purportedly written by a woman. The stock figures of the ardent but endlessly frustrated lover and the irresistible but disdainful…

  • flower arrangement

    Floral decoration, art of arranging living or dried plant material for adornment of the body or home or as a part of public ceremonies, festivals, and religious rituals. Since the earliest days of civilization, humans have used floral decorations, composed of living or dried cut-plant materials or

  • flower bug (insect)

    Flower bug, (family Anthocoridae), any of at least 400 species of small insects in the true bug order, Heteroptera, that are black with white markings and are usually found on flowers, under loose bark, or in leaf litter. Flower bugs range in size from 2 to 5 mm (0.08 to 0.2 inch) in length. Their

  • flower cards (cards)

    Hanafuda, (Japanese: “flower cards”), deck of 48 cards divided into 12 suits of four cards. Each suit is named for a month of the year and pictures a flower identified with that month. The cards are tiny, only 218 by 114 inches (5.4 by 3.2 cm), but about three times thicker than Western cards.

  • flower chafer (insect)

    Flower chafer, (subfamily Cetoniinae), any of a group of beetles in the family Scarabaeidae (insect order Coleoptera) that are distributed worldwide and are brilliantly coloured, with the majority of the iridescent species occurring in the tropics. Most measure less than 12 mm (0.5 inch), although

  • flower child (subculture)

    Hippie, member, during the 1960s and 1970s, of a countercultural movement that rejected the mores of mainstream American life. The movement originated on college campuses in the United States, although it spread to other countries, including Canada and Britain. The name derived from “hip,” a term

  • Flower Decoration in the House (work by Jekyll)

    floral decoration: 20th century: The book Flower Decoration in the House (1907) greatly influenced the development of 20th-century floral decoration as an art. The author was Gertrude Jekyll, already notable in the gardening world. For a long time, floral decoration in big houses had been the charge of the head gardeners…

  • flower fly (insect)

    Hover fly, (family Syrphidae), any member of a family that contains about 6,000 species of insects in the fly order, Diptera. Their various common names refer to the behaviour of hovering around flowers. Hover flies, with their yellow markings, resemble wasps or bees but do not bite or sting. They

  • flower garden (horticulture)

    gardening: Flower gardens: Though flower gardens in different countries may vary in the types of plants that are grown, the basic planning and principles are nearly the same, whether the gardens are formal or informal. Trees and shrubs are the mainstay of a well-designed flower garden.…

  • Flower of My Secret, The (film by Almodovar [1995])

    history of the motion picture: European cinema: …flor de mi secreto (1995; The Flower of My Secret), Carne trémula (1997; Live Flesh), Todo sobre mi madre (1999; All About My Mother), and Habla con ella (2002; Talk to Her). Oliveira—who was born in 1908, made his first films in the 1930s, and was artistically restricted for years…

  • flower painting (art)

    Chinese painting: Flower painting: Flower painting, previously associated chiefly with Buddhist art, came into its own as a separate branch of painting in the Five Dynasties. At Chengdu, the master Huang Quan brought to maturity the technique of mogu hua (“boneless painting”), in which he applied light colours with…

  • flower stalk (plant part)

    inflorescence: Indeterminate inflorescence.: …a short stalk, called a pedicel. An example of a raceme is found in the snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus).

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