You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Flower, Charles Edward (British theatre owner)

    Royal Shakespeare Company: …built through the efforts of Charles Edward Flower. This theatre was the site of an annual festival of Shakespeare’s plays, and its resident seasonal company was called the Shakespeare Memorial Company. In 1925 the company, which by then had become one of the most prestigious in Great Britain, was granted…

  • Flower, Lucy Louisa Coues (American welfare worker)

    Lucy Louisa Coues Flower, American welfare worker, a leader in efforts to provide services for poor and dependent children, to expand the offerings of public education, and to establish a juvenile court system. After a year at Packer Collegiate Institute in Brooklyn, New York, in 1856–57, Lucy

  • Flower, Sir William Henry (British zoologist)

    Sir William Henry Flower, British zoologist who made valuable contributions to structural anthropology and the comparative anatomy of mammals. Flower became a member of the surgical staff at Middlesex Hospital, London, after serving as an assistant surgeon in the Crimean War. He was subsequently

  • flowering (botany)

    Poaceae: Characteristic morphological features: …itself, peanutgrass burial begins before flowering.

  • flowering ash (tree)

    ash: Major species: The flowering ash (F. ornus) of southern Europe produces creamy white fragrant flowers, has leaves with seven leaflets, and reaches 21 metres (69 feet). The Chinese ash (F. chinensis) yields Chinese white wax.

  • flowering dogwood (plant)

    dogwood: Flowering dogwood (C. florida), a North American species, is widely grown as an ornamental for its showy petallike bracts (modified leaves) under the tiny flowers. Cornelian cherry (C. mas), a European species also grown as an ornamental, produces fruit that is eaten fresh or made…

  • flowering inch plant (plant)

    spiderwort: Major species: Flowering inch plant (T. cerinthoides), with leaves green and smooth above and purplish and fuzzy beneath, has purplish hairy blossoms. T.×andersoniana comprises a complex series of garden hybrids. Also grown in the garden is the common spiderwort, or widow’s tears (T. virginiana), an upright juicy-stemmed…

  • Flowering Judas (short story by Porter)

    Flowering Judas, short story by Katherine Anne Porter, published in Hound and Horn magazine in 1930. It is the title story of Porter’s first and most popular collection, which was published in the same year. When the collection was reissued in 1935, four stories were added to make a total of 10.

  • flowering maple (plant, Abutilon species)

    abutilon: Chinese lantern, also known as flowering maple (Abutilon ×hybridum), is planted outdoors in warm regions and grown in greenhouses elsewhere. It is a fast-growing shrub with attractive hanging flowers. Another species, sometimes known as redvein flowering maple (A. pictum), is a handsome variegated-leaf shrub reaching…

  • Flowering of the Cumberland (work by Arnow)

    Harriette Arnow: …on the Cumberland (1960) and The Flowering of the Cumberland (1963).

  • flowering plant (plant)

    Angiosperm, any of about 300,000 species of flowering plants, the largest and most diverse group within the kingdom Plantae. Angiosperms represent approximately 80 percent of all the known green plants now living. The angiosperms are vascular seed plants in which the ovule (egg) is fertilized and

  • flowering quince (plant)

    Flowering quince, (genus Chaenomeles), genus of three species of flowering plants in the rose family (Rosaceae), native to eastern Asia. Flowering quince is cultivated primarily as an ornamental for its showy flowers, though its astringent applelike fruit can be used in preserves and liqueurs and

  • flowering rush (plant)

    Flowering rush, (Butomus umbellatus), perennial freshwater plant native to Eurasia but now common throughout the north temperate zone as a weed. Butomus umbellatus is the only species of the family Butomaceae (order Alismatales). Flowering rushes can grow fully submerged but are most commonly found

  • flowering spurge (plant)

    spurge: Important as weeds are flowering spurge (E. corollata), of the middle and eastern United States; the leafy spurge (E. escula), naturalized from Europe in the northern United States and adjacent Canada; spotted spurge (E. maculata); prostrate spurge and the related European petty spurge (E. peplus); and sun spurge (E.…

  • flowering stone (plant)

    Lithops, (genus Lithops), genus of about 40 species of small succulent plants of the carpetweed family (Aizoaceae), native to southern Africa. The plants are generally found in rocky arid regions of southern Angola, Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa, and it is believed that their small rocklike

  • Flowering Tree, A (opera by Adams)

    Peter Sellars: … (1987), Doctor Atomic (2005), and A Flowering Tree (2006).

  • flowerpecker (bird)

    Flowerpecker, any of 44 species belonging to the songbird family Dicaeidae (sometimes placed with the sunbirds in family Nectariniidae), order Passeriformes, that have a double-tubed and brush-tipped tongue and finely serrated bill. Flowerpeckers occur in southern Asia, western Pacific islands, and

  • flowerpot snake (reptile)

    blind snake: …tropics; however, one species, the flowerpot snake (Ramphotyphlops braminus), now occurs on many oceanic islands and all continents except Antarctica. It gained its worldwide distribution through its presence in the soil of potted plants and because of parthenogenesis, a form of reproduction that does not require fertilization to produce offspring.…

  • Flowers and Shadows (novel by Okri)

    Ben Okri: His first novels, Flowers and Shadows (1980) and The Landscapes Within (1981), employ surrealistic images to depict the corruption and lunacy of a politically scarred country. Two volumes of short stories, Incidents at the Shrine (1986) and Stars of the New Curfew (1988), portray the essential link in…

  • Flowers and Trees (animated cartoon)

    animation: Walt Disney: …Dance, 1929), three-strip Technicolor (Flowers and Trees, 1932), and the illusion of depth with his multiplane camera (The Old Mill, 1937). With each step, Disney seemed to come closer to a perfect naturalism, a painterly realism that suggested academic paintings of the 19th century. Disney’s resident technical wizard was…

  • Flowers in the Dirt (album by McCartney)

    Paul McCartney: Wings and solo career: …critics loved his 1989 album, Flowers in the Dirt, which coincided with his return to live performance, and Flaming Pie (1997) was even more highly praised. In 1997 McCartney was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II “for services to music.” The next year Linda died of cancer. (In the 2000s McCartney…

  • Flowers of Evil, The (poetry by Baudelaire)

    Les Fleurs du mal, (French: “The Flowers of Evil”) collection of poems published in 1857 by Charles Baudelaire. A second edition, published in 1861, was greatly enlarged and enhanced but omitted six poems that had been banned. (These were first republished in 1866 in Belgium in the collection Les

  • flowers of tan (slime mold)

    Fuligo: Fuligo septica, the best-known species, is also called “flowers of tan,” from the frequent appearance of its yellow fruiting body in tan bark bits used for tanning hides.

  • Flowers of the Forest (ballad by Cockburn)

    Alicia Cockburn: …of the popular ballad “Flowers of the Forest.” Her lyrics beginning “I’ve seen the smiling of Fortune beguiling,” set to the old air of “Flowers of the Forest,” were probably written before 1731, although they were not published until 1765. They were occasioned by the failure of seven Selkirkshire…

  • Flowers of War, The (film by Zhang [2011])

    Zhang Yimou: …ling shi san chai (2011; The Flowers of War), he told the story of an American mortician (played by Christian Bale) who shelters a group of convent students and prostitutes during the Nanjing Massacre. Gui lai (2014; Coming Home) featured Gong as a woman whose marriage is destroyed when her…

  • Flowers, Revolution of the (Portuguese history)

    Portugal: Demographic trends: …that took place after the Revolution of the Carnations (April 25, 1974) inevitably had demographic repercussions on metropolitan Portugal because of the large number of people (mostly Portuguese) who left the former overseas provinces. Some one million refugees, most of whom came from Angola in part because of the civil…

  • Flowers, Thomas (British engineer)

    Tommy Flowers, British engineer who led the developers of Colossus, one of the first electronic digital computers, which broke complex codes used by the Germans during World War II and thus enabled the Allies to gain valuable military information; the use of Colossus was said to have shortened the

  • Flowers, Tommy (British engineer)

    Tommy Flowers, British engineer who led the developers of Colossus, one of the first electronic digital computers, which broke complex codes used by the Germans during World War II and thus enabled the Allies to gain valuable military information; the use of Colossus was said to have shortened the

  • Flowers, Vonetta (American athlete)

    bobsledding: …went to Jill Bakken and Vonetta Flowers of the United States. Flowers was the first black athlete to win an Olympic gold medal at the Winter Games.

  • flowstone (mineral deposit)

    Flowstone, mineral deposit found in “solution” caves in limestone. Flowing films of water that move along floors or down positive-sloping walls build up layers of calcium carbonate (calcite), gypsum, or other cave minerals. These minerals are dissolved in the water and are deposited when the water

  • Floyd Collins’ Crystal Cave (cave, Kentucky, United States)

    Flint Ridge Cave System: …system’s hub and gateway is Floyd Collins’ Crystal Cave, named for its discoverer (1917). Collins, whose family owned the land above the cave, tried for several years to turn the cave into a tourist attraction. In 1925 he was exploring nearby Sand Cave when he became trapped, and the unsuccessful…

  • Floyd, Charles Arthur (American gangster)

    Pretty Boy Floyd, American gunman whose violent bank robberies and run-ins with police made newspaper headlines. In 1911 Floyd moved with his family to Oklahoma, eventually settling in Akins. Originally a farmer, he was drawn into crime by poverty. After serving a term in prison (1925–29) for a

  • Floyd, Elaine (Welsh writer)

    Elaine Morgan, (Elaine Floyd), Welsh writer (born Nov. 7, 1920, Hopkinstown, near Pontypridd, Wales—died July 12, 2013, Mountain Ash, Wales), stepped outside her career as a BAFTA-winning television screenwriter to pursue an interest in evolutionary anthropology, which led her to expound on the

  • Floyd, John Buchanan (American politician)

    John Buchanan Floyd, American politician who served as governor of Virginia, secretary of war, and Confederate general. As a member of the Virginia state legislature (1847–48; 1855) and as a states’ rights Democratic governor (1849–52), Floyd opposed secession, but his growing belief in the

  • Floyd, John F. (American statesman)

    William Hepburn Russell: …appealed to Secretary of War John Floyd for additional funding to alleviate his mounting debt, but he was turned down. A shady deal with a clerk in the Department of the Interior who was related to Floyd, involving money borrowed illegally from the Indian Trust Fund, resulted in scandal and…

  • Floyd, Keith (British chef, restaurateur, and television personality)

    Keith Floyd, British chef, restaurateur, and television personality (born Dec. 28, 1943, near Reading, Somerset, Eng.—died Sept. 14, 2009, Bridport, Dorset, Eng.), starred in a score of TV programs, beginning with Floyd on Fish (1985), and created a more spontaneous, improvisational style of

  • Floyd, Pretty Boy (American gangster)

    Pretty Boy Floyd, American gunman whose violent bank robberies and run-ins with police made newspaper headlines. In 1911 Floyd moved with his family to Oklahoma, eventually settling in Akins. Originally a farmer, he was drawn into crime by poverty. After serving a term in prison (1925–29) for a

  • Floyd, Robert W (American computer scientist)

    Robert W Floyd, American computer scientist and winner of the 1978 A.M. Turing Award, the highest honour in computer science, for “helping to found the following important subfields of computer science: the theory of parsing, the semantics of programming languages, automatic program verification,

  • flu (disease)

    Influenza, an acute viral infection of the upper or lower respiratory tract that is marked by fever, chills, and a generalized feeling of weakness and pain in the muscles, together with varying degrees of soreness in the head and abdomen. Influenza is caused by any of several closely related

  • flu shot (medicine)

    influenza: Treatment and prevention: Individual protection against the flu may be bolstered by injection of a vaccine containing two or more circulating influenza viruses. These viruses are produced in chick embryos and rendered noninfective; standard commercial preparations ordinarily include the type B influenza virus and several of the A subtypes.…

  • Flubber (film by Mayfield [1997])

    Marcia Gay Harden: …First Wives Club (1996) and Flubber (1997), in which she played opposite Robin Williams, as well as in the drama Meet Joe Black (1998), loosely based on Death Takes a Holiday (1934), and in Clint Eastwood’s adventure movie Space Cowboys (2000). Harden’s performance as the gifted artist Lee Krasner

  • Flucht in die Finsternis (work by Schnitzler)

    Arthur Schnitzler: …Flucht in die Finsternis (1931; Flight into Darkness) he showed the onset of madness, stage by stage. In the play Professor Bernhardi (1912) and the novel Der Weg ins Freie (1908; The Road to the Open) he analyzed the position of the Jews in Austria. His other works include plays,…

  • Fluckey, Eugene Bennett (United States admiral)

    Eugene Bennett Fluckey, rear adm. (ret.), U.S. Navy (born Oct. 5, 1913, Washington, D.C.—died June 29, 2007 , Annapolis, Md.), was the daring submarine commander during World War II of the U.S.S. Barb and earned the moniker the “Galloping Ghost” because of his ability to pilot his submersibles

  • fluctuating variation (genetics)

    variation: Variations are classified either as continuous, or quantitative (smoothly grading between two extremes, with the majority of individuals at the centre, as height varies in human populations); or as discontinuous, or qualitative (composed of well-defined classes, as blood groups vary in humans). A discontinuous variation with several classes, none of…

  • fluctuation, economic

    Business cycle, periodic fluctuations in the general rate of economic activity, as measured by the levels of employment, prices, and production. Figure 1, for example, shows changes in wholesale prices in four Western industrialized countries over the period from 1790 to 1940. As can be seen, the

  • flucytosine (drug)

    antifungal drug: Other antifungal drugs: Flucytosine (5-FC) is unique in that it becomes active only when converted to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) by an enzyme, cytosine deaminase, found in fungi but not present in human cells. Flucytosine inhibits RNA and DNA synthesis. 5-FC is used primarily in the treatment of systemic cryptococcal…

  • Flud, Robert (British physician and philosopher)

    Robert Fludd, British physician, author, and mystical philosopher remembered for his occultist opposition to science. The son of Sir Thomas Fludd, he studied at St. John’s College, Oxford, before traveling in Europe for six years. On his return to Oxford he earned medical degrees (1605) and joined

  • Fludd (novel by Mantel)

    Hilary Mantel: …mystery set in 1950s England, Fludd (1989).

  • Fludd, Robert (British physician and philosopher)

    Robert Fludd, British physician, author, and mystical philosopher remembered for his occultist opposition to science. The son of Sir Thomas Fludd, he studied at St. John’s College, Oxford, before traveling in Europe for six years. On his return to Oxford he earned medical degrees (1605) and joined

  • flue (engineering)

    chimney: The flue, the main length of the chimney, is usually of masonry, often brick, and metal-lined. Vertical flues perform best, though a bend is sometimes included to reduce rain splash; bends are also necessary when several flues are united in a common outlet.

  • flue curing (agriculture)

    agricultural technology: Harvesting machinery: Flue-cured tobacco, a large plant that may stand three to four feet (90 to 120 centimetres) high, is harvested with machines that carry several workers who ride the lower platforms of the machines, cut the leaves, and place them on conveyor belts, where the leaves…

  • flue gas desulfurization (technology)

    air pollution control: Flue gas desulfurization: …of an absorption process called flue gas desulfurization (FGD). FGD systems may involve wet scrubbing or dry scrubbing. In wet FGD systems, flue gases are brought in contact with an absorbent, which can be either a liquid or a slurry of solid material. The sulfur dioxide dissolves in or reacts…

  • flue gas treatment (technology)

    Flue gas treatment, a process designed to reduce the amount of pollutants emitted from the burning of fossil fuels at an industrial facility, a power plant, or another source. Flue gas—the emitted material produced when fossil fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, or wood are burned for heat or

  • flue pipe (musical instrument)

    keyboard instrument: Flue pipes: There are two main categories of organ pipes: flue pipes and reed pipes. Flue pipes (made either of wood or metal; their construction is basically similar in principle) account for about four-fifths of the stops of an average organ. Figure 1 shows a…

  • flue stop (musical instrument)

    keyboard instrument: Germany: …not much louder than the flue stops, and the pedal 16-foot and 8-foot reeds were frequently drawn with the principal chorus for improved definition. When used in this way, they by no means caused the pedal to overwhelm the Hauptwerk. Such an instrument could deal with the requirements of all…

  • fluent (mathematics)

    mathematics: Newton and Leibniz: …was regarded as a “fluent,” a magnitude that flows with time; its derivative or rate of change with respect to time was called a “fluxion,” denoted by the given variable with a dot above it. The basic problem of the calculus was to investigate relations among fluents and their…

  • fluffy aggregate model (cometary nuclei)

    comet: Cometary nuclei: …that cometary nuclei are “fluffy aggregates,” first proposed by American astronomer Bertram Donn and British astronomer David Hughes in 1982, or “primordial rubble piles,” proposed by American astronomer Paul Weissman (the author of this article) in 1986, with low binding strength and high porosity. Key data supporting these models…

  • Flugasche (novel by Maron)

    German literature: The 1970s and ’80s: In Flugasche (Flight of Ashes), written in East Germany during the 1970s but not published until 1981 and then in West Germany, Monika Maron depicted the tension between inner and outer reality in the attempt of a young woman journalist to present unpleasant truths about the lives…

  • flügelhorn (musical instrument)

    Flügelhorn, brass musical instrument, the valved bugle used in European military bands. It has three valves, a wider bore than the cornet, and is usually pitched in B?, occasionally in C. It was invented in Austria in the 1830s. In the mid-20th century the flügelhorn found favour in some jazz

  • Flughunde (novel by Beyer)

    German literature: The turn of the 21st century: Flughunde) recounts the deaths of Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels’s children through the eyes of two narrators: the eldest daughter, Helga, and a sound technician who had worked for Goebbels. Long after the children’s deaths, the technician begins to recognize his own role in their…

  • Flugleidir (Icelandic company)

    Iceland: Services: Icelandair (Flugleidir), a major international air carrier, has helped make the tourist trade increasingly important to the national economy. Foreign tourists number more than 300,000 a year, and the tourist industry is an important earner of foreign exchange.

  • fluid (biology)

    Fluid, in physiology, a water-based liquid that contains the ions and cells essential to body functions and transports the solutes and products of metabolism. Water, the principal constituent of fluids in animals, including humans, is taken into the body orally in foods and liquids and, to a l

  • fluid (physics)

    Fluid, any liquid or gas or generally any material that cannot sustain a tangential, or shearing, force when at rest and that undergoes a continuous change in shape when subjected to such a stress. This continuous and irrecoverable change of position of one part of the material relative to another

  • fluid amplifier (device)

    fluidics: Principles of operation: …is meant by the term fluid amplifier. A supply of fluid entering a device becomes a stream forced to follow a chosen path through carefully designed internal shapes before giving an output. Input jets of far lower power are positioned to give the greatest possible effect on the stream, thereby…

  • fluid and electrolyte disorder (pathology)

    human disease: Fluid and electrolyte balance: Any abnormality in these concentrations can produce serious disease; for instance, the normal sodium concentration in the serum (the blood minus its cells and clotting factors) ranges from 136 to 142 milliequivalents per litre, while the normal potassium level in the serum is kept within the…

  • fluid balance (biology)

    human disease: Disease: signs and symptoms: Fluid and electrolyte imbalances may be further consequences of homeostatic failure and additional significant manifestations of disease. The causes of these abnormalities are complex. Edema, or swelling, results from shifts in fluid distribution within body tissues. Edema may be localized, as when the leg veins…

  • fluid catalytic cracking (chemical process)

    petroleum refining: Catalytic cracking: …was the commercialization of the fluid catalytic cracking process in 1942 that really established the foundation of modern petroleum refining. The process not only provided a highly efficient means of converting high-boiling gas oils into naphtha to meet the rising demand for high-octane gasoline, but it also represented a breakthrough…

  • fluid coupling (automobile mechanics)

    automatic transmission: …may be either a two-element fluid coupling or a three-element torque converter. When the car loses speed the transmission automatically shifts back from high to low gear.

  • fluid dynamics (physics)

    fluid mechanics: Hydrodynamics: Up to now the focus has been fluids at rest. This section deals with fluids that are in motion in a steady fashion such that the fluid velocity at each given point in space is not changing with time. Any flow pattern…

  • fluid flow (physics)

    fluid mechanics: …mechanics, science concerned with the response of fluids to forces exerted upon them. It is a branch of classical physics with applications of great importance in hydraulic and aeronautical engineering, chemical engineering, meteorology, and zoology.

  • fluid intelligence (psychology)

    human behaviour: Cognition: Fluid intelligence, measured by tests that minimize the role of cultural knowledge, reflects the degree to which the individual has developed unique qualities of thinking through incidental learning. Crystallized intelligence, measured by tests that maximize the role of cultural knowledge, reflects the degree to which…

  • fluid mechanics (physics)

    Fluid mechanics, science concerned with the response of fluids to forces exerted upon them. It is a branch of classical physics with applications of great importance in hydraulic and aeronautical engineering, chemical engineering, meteorology, and zoology. The most familiar fluid is of course

  • fluid power (engineering)

    Hydraulic power, power transmitted by the controlled circulation of pressurized fluid, usually a water-soluble oil or water–glycol mixture, to a motor that converts it into a mechanical output capable of doing work on a load. Hydraulic power systems have greater flexibility than mechanical and e

  • fluid pressure (physics)

    fluid mechanics: Basic properties of fluids: …arises when adjacent layers of fluid slip over one another. It follows that the shear stresses are everywhere zero in a fluid at rest and in equilibrium, and from this it follows that the pressure (that is, force per unit area) acting perpendicular to all planes in the fluid is…

  • fluid resistance training (exercise)

    resistance training: Fluid resistance: The classic example of fluid resistance training is swimming. The fluid resistance in that case is water. Fluid resistance is also a factor in activities such as cycling, baseball, and golf. Those activities are examples of air resistance. The resistance from water and air come in two forms, surface…

  • fluid-film lubricant (technology)

    lubrication: Fluid-film lubrication.: Interposing a fluid film that completely separates sliding surfaces results in this type of lubrication. The fluid may be introduced intentionally, as the oil in the main bearings of an automobile, or unintentionally, as in the case of water between a smooth rubber…

  • fluid-film lubrication (technology)

    lubrication: Fluid-film lubrication.: Interposing a fluid film that completely separates sliding surfaces results in this type of lubrication. The fluid may be introduced intentionally, as the oil in the main bearings of an automobile, or unintentionally, as in the case of water between a smooth rubber…

  • fluid-four formation (aerial formation)

    air warfare: Air superiority: One solution was the fluid-four, in which two fighters flying 300 yards apart would be trailed by another pair flying 2,000 to 3,000 yards to the side, 600 yards back, and 1,000 yards above. Separation of a mile or more would allow the trailing pair to cover the lead…

  • fluid-jet loom (device)

    textile: Modern looms: Fluid-jet looms, most recently developed of the shuttleless types, are produced and used on a much smaller scale than the two other types described above. They are of two kinds, one employing a jet of air, the other a water jet, to propel a measured…

  • fluidics (technology)

    Fluidics, the technology of using the flow characteristics of liquid or gas to operate a control system. One of the newest of the control technologies, fluidics has in recent years come to compete with mechanical and electrical systems. Although fluidic principles are fairly old, it was not until

  • fluidity (physics)

    cell: Membrane fluidity: One of the triumphs of cell biology during the decade from 1965 to 1975 was the recognition of the cell membrane as a fluid collection of amphiphilic molecules. This array of proteins, sterols, and phospholipids is organized into a liquid crystal, a structure that…

  • fluidized-bed combustion (technology)

    coal utilization: Fluidized bed: In fluidized-bed combustion, a bed of crushed solid particles (usually six millimetres or less) is made to behave like a fluid by an airstream passing from the bottom of the bed at sufficient velocity to suspend the material in it. The bed material—usually…

  • fluidized-bed freezer

    food preservation: Industrial freezers: Fluidized-bed freezers are used to freeze particulate foods such as peas, cut corn, diced carrots, and strawberries. The foods are placed on a mesh conveyor belt and moved through a freezing zone in which cold air is directed upward through the mesh belt and the…

  • fluidized-bed roaster (metallurgy)

    metallurgy: Roasters: Fluidized-bed roasters (see figure) have found wide acceptance because of their high capacity and efficiency. They can be used for oxidizing, sulfatizing, and volatilizing roasts. The roaster is a refractory-lined, upright cylindrical steel shell with a grate bottom through which air is blown in sufficient…

  • fluidized-bed roasting (metallurgy)

    metallurgy: Roasters: Fluidized-bed roasters (see figure) have found wide acceptance because of their high capacity and efficiency. They can be used for oxidizing, sulfatizing, and volatilizing roasts. The roaster is a refractory-lined, upright cylindrical steel shell with a grate bottom through which air is blown in sufficient…

  • fluke (anchor part)

    anchor: …place by means of a fluke or pointed projection that digs into the sea bottom.

  • fluke (flatworm)

    Fluke, any member of the invertebrate class Trematoda (phylum Platyhelminthes), a group of parasitic flatworms that probably evolved from free-living forms millions of years ago. There are more than 10,000 species of flukes. They occur worldwide and range in size from about 5 millimetres (0.2 inch)

  • fluke (whale anatomy)

    cetacean: Locomotor adaptations: Cetaceans have developed horizontal flukes that increase the propulsion area driven by the back muscles. Like fish, almost all cetaceans possess a dorsal fin that serves as a keel. The dorsal fin and flukes are composed of connective tissue, not bone. Other connective tissue, such as external ears, has…

  • Flumadine (drug)

    Rimantadine, drug used to treat infections caused by influenza type A virus, the most common cause of influenza epidemics. Rimantadine is a derivative of the antiviral agent amantadine. It is composed of an alicyclic compound called adamantane that contains a methyl group (CH3) attached to an

  • Flume, the (gorge, New Hampshire, United States)

    Franconia Notch: …includes at its southern end the Flume, a narrow gorge 70 feet (21 metres) deep that extends along the flank of Mount Liberty (4,460 feet [1,359 metres]). Cannon Mountain (4,186 feet [1,276 metres]) itself, which is 5 miles (8 km) south of Franconia village, has skiing facilities and an aerial…

  • Flumendosa River (river, Italy)

    Flumendosa River, river that rises in the Gennargentu Mountains in southeastern Sardinia, Italy, and flows 79 miles (127 km) west and southeast, entering the Tyrrhenian Sea near Muravera. The Ente Autonomo del Flumendosa, a dam and irrigation project, was established in 1946 to develop the

  • Flumendosa, Fiume (river, Italy)

    Flumendosa River, river that rises in the Gennargentu Mountains in southeastern Sardinia, Italy, and flows 79 miles (127 km) west and southeast, entering the Tyrrhenian Sea near Muravera. The Ente Autonomo del Flumendosa, a dam and irrigation project, was established in 1946 to develop the

  • Fluon (chemical compound)

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a strong, tough, waxy, nonflammable synthetic resin produced by the polymerization of tetrafluoroethylene. Known by such trademarks as Teflon, Fluon, Hostaflon, and Polyflon, PTFE is distinguished by its slippery surface, high melting point, and resistance to attack

  • fluor (molecule)

    radiation measurement: Organic scintillators: …liquid solutions of an organic fluor (fluorescent molecule) in a solvent such as toluene, or as a plastic, in which the fluor is dissolved in a monomer that is subsequently polymerized. Frequently, a third component is added to liquid or plastic scintillators to act as a wave shifter, which absorbs…

  • fluorapatite (mineral)

    Fluorapatite, common phosphate mineral, a calcium fluoride phosphate, Ca5(PO4)3F. It occurs as minute, often green, glassy crystals in many igneous rocks, and also in magnetite deposits, high-temperature hydrothermal veins, and metamorphic rocks; it also occurs as collophane in marine deposits.

  • fluorescein (dye)

    Fluorescein, organic compound of molecular formula C20H12O5 that has wide use as a synthetic colouring agent. It is prepared by heating phthalic anhydride and resorcinol over a zinc catalyst, and it crystallizes as a deep red powder with a melting point in the range of 314° to 316° C (597° to 601°

  • fluorescence (physics)

    Fluorescence, emission of electromagnetic radiation, usually visible light, caused by excitation of atoms in a material, which then reemit almost immediately (within about 10?8 seconds). The initial excitation is usually caused by absorption of energy from incident radiation or particles, such as

  • fluorescence detector (instrument)

    chromatography: Liquid chromatographic detectors: The fluorescence detector responds to these substances. Light bends or refracts on passing through an interface between air and a liquid or liquid solution. The degree of refraction depends on the nature of the liquid or the composition of the solution. The refractive index detector compares…

  • fluorescence in situ hybridization (medicine)

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), technique that employs fluorescent probes for the detection of specific deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences in chromosomes. FISH has a much higher rate of sensitivity and specificity than other genetic diagnostic tests such as karyotyping and thus can be

  • fluorescence photography

    Fluorescence photography, process that records the glow or visible light given off by certain substances when they are irradiated by ultraviolet rays. The exclusively ultraviolet irradiation is accomplished by means of a filter at the light source; another filter, placed over the camera lens,

Your preference has been recorded
Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载