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  • forest fire

    Forest fire, uncontrolled fire occurring in vegetation more than 6 feet (1.8 m) in height. These fires often reach the proportions of a major conflagration and are sometimes begun by combustion and heat from surface and ground fires. A big forest fire may crown—that is, spread rapidly through the

  • forest glass (glass)

    glassware: Germany: …forest vegetation and called therefore Waldglas (“forest glass”). From this material, often of great beauty of colour, were made shapes peculiar to Germany, notably a cylindrical beer glass studded with projecting bosses, or prunts (Krautstrunk, or “cabbage stalk”), and a wineglass (R?mer) with cup-shaped or ovoid bowl set on a…

  • Forest Heath (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Forest Heath, district, administrative and historic county of Suffolk, England. Mainly rural, it occupies the northwestern corner of Suffolk. The administrative centre is at Mildenhall. The district takes its name from the vegetation of the area, which is a mixture of heathlands and forest

  • Forest Hills (neighborhood, Queens, New York City, New York, United States)

    Forest Hills, residential section of the borough of Queens, New York City, southeastern New York, U.S., on Long Island. Originally part of a district called Whitepot, which was settled about 1652, it was named Forest Hills in about 1910 for its location on wooded heights. The stadium of the West

  • Forest Interior (painting by Whittredge)

    Worthington Whittredge: , Forest Interior (1881). Whittredge did not paint landscapes for nature’s sake alone but rather chose places he loved, giving his works a personal sensibility. By the late 1870s, Whittredge’s style changed under the influence of the then popular Hudson River school painters. He continued painting…

  • forest law (English history)

    Norman Conquest: Consequences of the conquest: …but restricted body of “forest law” and the introduction in criminal cases of the Norman trial by combat alongside the old Saxon ordeals. Increasing use was made of the inquest procedure—the sworn testimony of neighbours, both for administrative purposes and in judicial cases. A major change was William’s removal…

  • Forest Lawn (cemetery, California, United States)

    cemetery: …of the type is California’s Forest Lawn. In the United States there continue to be public cemeteries, cooperative cemeteries, church cemeteries, and large mutually owned cemeteries. In addition to state, county, and municipal cemeteries, the federal government operates a complex of national cemeteries in the United States and abroad for…

  • forest line (botany)

    tree: Tree lines: …closed, tightly spaced forest (forest line), the spacing between trees widens rapidly as tree height decreases (the kampf zone). This zone gives way to a region of low twisted and stunted trees called the krummholz. Together, the kampf zone and the krummholz constitute the transition zone. The end of…

  • Forest Maiden, The (work by Weber)

    Carl Maria von Weber: …first opera, Das Waldm?dchen (“The Forest Maiden”), which partially survives. Staged at Freiberg in 1800, it was a failure. On a return visit to Salzburg, Weber completed his first wholly surviving opera, Peter Schmoll und seine Nachbarn, which also failed when it was produced in Augsburg in 1803. Weber…

  • forest management (forestry)

    forestry: Silviculture: Silviculture is the branch of forestry concerned with the theory and practice of controlling forest establishment, composition, and growth. Like forestry itself, silviculture is an applied science that rests ultimately upon the more fundamental natural and social sciences. The immediate foundation of silviculture in the…

  • forest musk shrew (mammal)

    shrew: Form and function: …tropical species, such as the forest musk shrews (genus Sylvisorex) of Africa and white-toothed shrews (genus Crocidura) of Asia also forage and travel in bushes, vines, and small trees beneath the forest canopy. These species have long feet and toes and a tail much longer than the body.

  • Forest of a Thousand Daemons, The (work by Fagunwa)

    D.O. Fagunwa: …Ode Ninu Igbo Irunmale (1938; The Forest of a Thousand Daemons), was the first full-length novel published in the Yoruba language. His second novel, Igbo Olodumare (“The Forest of God”), was published in 1949. He also wrote Ireke Onibudo (1949; “The Sugarcane of the Guardian”), Irinkerindo Ninu Igbo Elegbeje (1954;…

  • Forest of Anger (novel by Gary)

    Romain Gary: …first work, L’éducation européenne (1945; Forest of Anger), won him immediate acclaim. Humanistic and optimistic despite its graphic depictions of the horrors of World War II, the novel was later revised and reissued in English as Nothing Important Ever Dies (1960).

  • Forest of Anyksciai, The (poem by Baranauskas)

    Antanas Baranauskas: …literature, Anyky??i? ?ilelis (1858–59; The Forest of Anyk??iai). The 342-line poem, written in East High Lithuanian dialect, describes the former beauty of a pine grove near his village and its despoliation under the Russians (“Hills with tree-stumps, bare slopes! Who would believe in your former beauty?”); it depicted in symbolic…

  • Forest of Dean (district, England, United Kingdom)

    Forest of Dean, district, administrative county of Gloucestershire, south-central England, in the western part of the county. Most of the district belongs to the historic county of Gloucestershire, but the villages of Staunton and Redmarley D’Abitot and the surrounding area belong to the historic

  • Forest of the Hanged, The (work by Rebreanu)

    Romanian literature: Between the wars: …best work, P?durea sp?nzura?ilor (1922; The Forest of the Hanged), was inspired by his brother’s fate during World War I. In it, he describes the tragedy of a Romanian soldier forced to turn against his own people as a member of the Austro-Hungarian army. He tries to flee but is…

  • Forest Physiography (work by Bowman)

    Isaiah Bowman: His Forest Physiography (1911), the first comprehensive work published on American physiographic divisions, and extensive field studies in the Andes mountains (1907, 1911, 1913) established him professionally.

  • Forest Region (plateau, Africa)

    Guinea Highlands, mountainous plateau extending from the southern Fouta Djallon highlands through southeastern Guinea, northern Sierra Leone and Liberia, and northwestern C?te d’Ivoire. The plateau is composed of granitic gneisses and quartzite and averages more than 1,500 feet (460 metres) in

  • forest reindeer (mammal)

    reindeer: …or ecotypes: tundra reindeer and forest (or woodland) reindeer. Tundra reindeer migrate between tundra and forest in huge herds numbering up to half a million in an annual cycle covering as much as 5,000 km (3,000 miles). Forest reindeer are much less numerous.

  • forest reserve

    National forest, in the United States, any of numerous forest areas set aside under federal supervision for the purposes of conserving water, timber, wildlife, fish, and other renewable resources and providing recreational areas for the public. The national forests are administered by the Forest

  • Forest Service (United States government agency)

    national forest: …forests are administered by the Forest Service in the Department of Agriculture. They numbered 156 by the 21st century and occupy a total area of almost 300,000 square miles (about 770,000 square km) in 40 states and Puerto Rico. They are managed according to the principle of multiple use, whereby…

  • forest soil

    Russia: Mixed and deciduous forest: …way to gray and brown forest soils, which are less acidic and have a much greater organic content and a higher natural fertility. A second zone of mixed forest occurs in the Amur-Ussuri-Zeya lowlands of southeastern Siberia and includes Asiatic species of oak, hornbeam, elm, and hazel.

  • forest spiny pocket mouse (rodent)

    pocket mouse: Natural history: The seven species of forest spiny pocket mice (genus Heteromys) are the largest, weighing from 37 to 85 grams and having 11- to 18-cm bodies and long scantily haired tails. Forest pocket mice range from southern Mexico to northern South America, where they live from sea level upward into…

  • forest tent caterpillar moth (insect)

    tent caterpillar moth: The forest tent caterpillar moth M. disstria is common in the southern United States.

  • Forest Yukaghir language

    Paleo-Siberian languages: Yukaghir: …of the Indigirka River; and Kolyma, or Forest, Yukaghir (also called Southern Yukaghir) along the bend of the Kolyma River. Extinct earlier dialects or languages related to Yukaghir are Omok and Chuvan (Chuvantsy); these were spoken south and southwest of the current Yukaghir area. Nivkh has about 1,000 speakers, roughly…

  • Forest, Lee de (American inventor)

    Lee de Forest, American inventor of the Audion vacuum tube, which made possible live radio broadcasting and became the key component of all radio, telephone, radar, television, and computer systems before the invention of the transistor in 1947. Although de Forest was bitter over the financial

  • forest-steppe (vegetation zone, Ukraine)

    Ukraine: Plant and animal life: The forest-steppe, which covers an area of about 78,000 square miles (202,000 square km), extends south from the Polissya. About two-thirds of this agricultural region is arable land; forests take up only about one-eighth of the area.

  • forest-tundra

    taiga: Distribution: …woodland or sparse taiga, and forest-tundra. The closed-canopy forest is the southernmost portion of the taiga. It contains the greatest richness of species, the warmest soils, the highest productivity, and the longest growing season within the boreal zone. North of the closed-canopy forest is the lichen woodland—a smaller parallel zone…

  • forestay (ship part)

    rigging: The mast is supported by stays and shrouds that are known as the standing rigging because they are made fast; the shrouds also serve as ladders to permit the crew to climb aloft. The masts and forestays support all the sails. The ropes by which the yards, on square riggers,…

  • forester (marsupial)

    kangaroo: Descriptions of selected species: Gray kangaroos can clear more than 9 metres (30 feet) at a bound—13.5 metres has been recorded—and can attain a speed of 55 km/hr (kilometres per hour; 34 mph [miles per hour]). Research has revealed a remarkable advantage to bipedal hopping. Although at low speeds…

  • forester moth (insect)

    Forester moth, (genus Procris or Ino), any of a group of moths in the family Zygaenidae (order Lepidoptera) that are closely related to the burnet moths. The adult forester moth has shining green forewings with a span of about 3 cm (1.2 inches), translucent, dark hind wings, and an iridescent body.

  • Forester, C. S. (British author)

    C.S. Forester, British historical novelist and journalist best known as the creator of the British naval officer Horatio Hornblower, whose rise from midshipman to admiral and peer during the Napoleonic Wars is told in a series of 12 novels, beginning with The Happy Return (1937; U.S. title Beat to

  • Forester, Cecil Scott (British author)

    C.S. Forester, British historical novelist and journalist best known as the creator of the British naval officer Horatio Hornblower, whose rise from midshipman to admiral and peer during the Napoleonic Wars is told in a series of 12 novels, beginning with The Happy Return (1937; U.S. title Beat to

  • Forestier Peninsula (peninsula, Tasmania, Australia)

    Forestier Peninsula, peninsula in southeastern Tasmania, Australia, measuring 12 by 9 miles (19 by 14 km) and bounded by the Tasman Sea (east) and by Norfolk Bay (west). To the north the promontory is connected to the mainland by a short isthmus, and to the south it is linked to the Tasman

  • Forestilling om det tyvende ?rhundrede (novel by H?eg)

    Peter H?eg: …om det tyvende ?rhundrede (1988; The History of Danish Dreams), established his reputation in Denmark. The work ranges over three and a half centuries and includes elements of magic realism, experimenting with the narrative voice and wreaking havoc with notions of time and materiality. H?eg followed his debut with Fort?llinger…

  • forestry

    Forestry, the management of forested land, together with associated waters and wasteland, primarily for harvesting timber. To a large degree, modern forestry has evolved in parallel with natural resource management. As a consequence, professional foresters have increasingly become involved in

  • Forests, Statement of Principles on (international agreement)

    United Nations Conference on Environment and Development: The Statement of Principles on Forests, aimed at preserving the world’s rapidly vanishing tropical rainforests, is a nonbinding statement recommending that nations monitor and assess the impact of development on their forest resources and take steps to limit the damage done to them.

  • Forêt interdite (work by Eliade)
  • Forever (work by Blume)

    Judy Blume: In Forever (1975), a story about unmarried teenagers Katherine and Michael experiencing love and sex for the first time, Blume addressed the topic of sex in a way that spoke to readers of the importance of responsibility—Katherine visits a clinic and is given a prescription for…

  • Forever (album by Spice Girls)

    Spice Girls: …Girls’ final album, ironically titled Forever, was released in 2000. It peaked at number two on the British album chart, but it barely entered the top 40 in Billboard. In February 2001 the band officially broke up, and the individual members pursued solo projects. Rumours of a reunion circulated for…

  • Forever Amber (film by Preminger [1947])

    Otto Preminger: Laura and costume dramas: In Forever Amber (1947) Darnell portrayed an ambitious 17th-century woman who overcomes her humble beginnings through a series of affairs. Because of the Production Code restrictions, the film captured little of the eroticism of the best seller by Kathleen Winsor, but it was still a box-office…

  • Forever Darling (film by Hall [1956])

    Alexander Hall: Later films: Hall’s last film was Forever Darling (1956), an amusing vehicle for Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, then at the height of their popularity. Hall retired thereafter.

  • Forever Female (film by Rapper [1953])

    Irving Rapper: Later films: … (1953), Rapper found success with Forever Female (1953), a sprightly comedy with Ginger Rogers as a mature stage actress who reluctantly admits that a younger actress (Pat Crowley) is more appropriate for the ingenue role they both covet. Rapper’s knowledge of the theatre (and its temperamental stars) supplied the film…

  • Forever: The Love Poems of Pablo Neruda (album by Lemper)

    Ute Lemper: …Pablo Neruda to music on Forever: The Love Poems of Pablo Neruda (2013); the album features songs in Spanish and English. She later wrote a song cycle based on Brazilian writer Paulo Coelho’s novel Manuscrito encontrado em Accra (2012; Manuscript Found in Accra), which she recorded, with Coelho’s collaboration, on…

  • forex market (economics)

    Foreign exchange market (forex, or FX, market), institution for the exchange of one country’s currency with that of another country. Foreign exchange markets are actually made up of many different markets, because the trade between individual currencies—say, the euro and the U.S. dollar—each

  • Forey, élie-Frédéric (French general)

    Mexico: French intervention: …command of the French general élie-Frédéric Forey. The Mexicans could not withstand French might, and on June 10, 1863, Forey rode as conqueror into Mexico City. The French rapidly secured much of central Mexico, forcing Juárez and his government to keep constantly on the move in the north.

  • Forez (region, France)

    Forez, former region of France lying on the eastern side of the Massif Central and included within the modern département of Loire. The name is derived from that of Feurs (Forum Segusiavorum in Roman times), a town midway between Roanne and Saint-étienne, in an agriculturally rich area watered by

  • Forfar (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Forfar, small burgh (town), council area and historic county of Angus, eastern Scotland, situated at the eastern end of Forfar Loch (lake) in the scenic valley of Strathmore. It was in existence by 1057, when an early Scottish Parliament met in the castle to confer titles on the nobility. The

  • Forfarshire (council area, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Angus, council area and historic county in eastern Scotland, bounded on the east by the North Sea and on the south by the Firth of Tay. The council area lies entirely within the historic county of Angus, which also includes the city of Dundee and a small area south of Coupar Angus in the Perth and

  • Forfarshire (ship)

    Grace Darling: …national attention after the steamship Forfarshire sank during a severe storm in September 1838. Nine people managed to find refuge on nearby rocks, and Darling and her father battled rough water to row to their rescue. The incident inspired numerous poems, paintings, and songs and made Darling a virtual cult…

  • forfeda (alphabetic script)

    ogham writing: …symbols, called in Irish tradition forfeda (“extra letters”), is seemingly a later development. The origin of ogham is in dispute; some scholars see a connection with the runic and, ultimately, Etruscan alphabets, while others maintain that it is simply a transformation of the Latin alphabet. The fact that it has…

  • Forfeit (novel by Francis)

    Dick Francis: …novels are Nerve (1964) and Forfeit (1968), which won an Edgar Award for its tale of a disaffected racing correspondent who discovers a South African syndicate.

  • forge (metallurgy)

    Forge, open furnace for heating metal ore and metal for working and forming. From earliest times, smiths heated iron in forges and formed it by hammering on an anvil. A bellows operated by an assistant or by a foot treadle provided the forced draft for raising the temperature of the fire. Later, a

  • Forge Valley (British Columbia, Canada)

    Vernon, city, southern British Columbia, Canada. It lies in Okanagan Lake country, 274 miles (441 km) northeast of Vancouver. Pioneers called the early settlement Priest’s Valley because of a missionary outpost maintained there by Paul Durieu. It was also known as Forge Valley (for its

  • forge welding (metallurgy)

    welding: Forge welding: This original fusion technique dates from the earliest uses of iron. The process was first employed to make small pieces of iron into larger useful pieces by joining them. The parts to be joined were first shaped, then heated to welding temperature in…

  • Forged Classics, The (work by Kang Youwei)

    Kang Youwei: …his reform movement, he wrote The Forged Classics (1891), which reveals that the Confucian Classics held sacrosanct as bases of the state cult had been tampered with in the Han period (206 bc–ad 220). This book was followed by Confucius as a Reformer (1897), which expounded Kang’s belief that Confucius…

  • forgery (law)

    Forgery, in law, making of a false writing with an intent to defraud. Writing, to be forgery, must either have legal significance or be commonly relied upon in business transactions. It need not be handwriting; the law of forgery covers printing, engraving, and typewriting as well. In most

  • forgery (art)

    Forgery, in art, a work of literature, painting, sculpture, or objet d’art that purports to be the work of someone other than its true maker. The range of forgeries extends from misrepresentation of a genuine work of art to the outright counterfeiting of a work or style of an artist. Forgery must

  • Forges et Ateliers du Creusot, Société des (French company)

    Le Creusot: … and Eugène Schneider founded the Société des Forges et Ateliers du Creusot (“Creusot Forge and Workshop Company”), which produced the first French locomotives as well as armour plate.

  • forget-me-not (plant)

    Forget-me-not, any of several dozen species of the plant genus Myosotis (family Boraginaceae), native to temperate Eurasia and North America and to mountains of the Old World tropics. Some are favoured as garden plants for their clusters of blue flowers. (For Chinese forget-me-not, see

  • forget-me-not family (plant family)

    Boraginaceae, borage or forget-me-not family of flowering plants, with 148 genera and more than 2,700 species. The taxonomy of this family has been contentious: the earlier Cronquist botanical classification system placed it in the order Lamiales, and the first version of the Angiosperm Phylogeny

  • forgetting (psychology)

    learning theory: Forgetting: Whether immediate and short-term data simply decay or are lost through interference is a matter of controversy. However, evidence is clearer that interference affects retention of information in long-term storage. Retention of the word happy (learned as a paired associate of table) seems to…

  • Forgetting Elena (novel by White)

    Edmund White: White published his first novel, Forgetting Elena, in 1973. It is a biting satire that uses the perspective of an innocent young man to reveal the intricate manners and rituals of homosexual life on Fire Island, New York. That effort and its successors established White as among the foremost voices…

  • Forgetting Sarah Marshall (film by Stoller [2008])

    Judd Apatow: …the Jason Segel-starring romantic comedies Forgetting Sarah Marshall (2008) and The Five-Year Engagement (2012). In a change for Apatow, the movie Bridesmaids (2011) and the HBO TV series Girls (2012–17), both of which he produced, focused primarily on female characters. He both produced and directed Trainwreck (2015), a

  • forging (technology)

    Forging, in metallurgy, process of shaping metal and increasing its strength by hammering or pressing. In most forging an upper die is forced against a heated workpiece positioned on a stationary lower die. If the upper die or hammer is dropped, the process is known as drop forging. To increase

  • Forgione, Francesco (Italian priest and saint)

    Padre Pio, ; canonized June 16, 2002; feast day September 23), Italian priest and saint of the Roman Catholic Church. Born into a devout Roman Catholic family, he consecrated himself to Jesus at age 5. At age 15 he joined the Capuchin order and took the name Pio in honour of St. Pius I. In 1910,

  • Forgotten Silver (film by Jackson and Botes [1995])

    Peter Jackson: The mock documentary Forgotten Silver (1995) and the ghost story The Frighteners (1996) followed.

  • Fori regni Valentiae (Spanish code of law)

    Spain: Aragonese institutions and society: …kingdom of Valencia with the Fori Regni Valentiae (1240), a code of law largely Roman in substance. In 1247 he promulgated the Code of Huesca, a compilation of the customary law of Aragon; the code, which originally defined Aragon’s territory, came to embody the criminal and civil legal code in…

  • Forillon National Park (national park, Quebec, Canada)

    Gaspé Peninsula: Forillon, a national park occupying 93 square miles (240 square km), is at the northeastern tip of the peninsula. Both sporting and local interests benefit from the excellent hunting and fishing; the peninsula is drained by several outstanding salmon rivers. Lumbering is also a main…

  • forint (Hungarian currency)

    Forint, monetary unit of Hungary. The Hungarian National Bank (Magyar Nezmeti Bank), which has the sole authority to issue currency, issues coins in denominations ranging from 1 to 100 forints and banknotes of 200 to 20,000 forints. The obverse of banknotes depicts historical rulers, including

  • Forio (Italy)

    Forio, resort town and seaport on the western coast of the volcanic island of Ischia, Campania region, southern Italy. It is the centre of a productive wine-making region. The wine is called Epomeo for Mount Epomeo, the extinct volcano that is at least partially responsible for the island’s fertile

  • Foriwa (play by Sutherland)

    Efua Sutherland: …her plays, including the well-known Foriwa (1962), a play which stresses the alliance of new ways and old traditions, and Edufa (1967), based on Alcestis by Euripides. The Marriage of Anansewa: A Storytelling Drama appeared in 1975.

  • fork (utensil)

    Fork, implement consisting of two or more prongs supported by a handle, used for cooking, serving, and eating food. Forks and spoons together are known as flatware

  • Fork in the Road, A (memoir by Brink)

    André Philippus Brink: Brink’s memoir, A Fork in the Road (2009), is a meditation on the evolution of his political consciousness and his decreasing faith in the government of his country.

  • fork moss (plant)

    Wind-blown moss, any plant of the genus Dicranum (subclass Bryidae), numbering 94 species distributed primarily throughout the Northern Hemisphere. They form dense cushions on soil, logs, or rocks. More than 20 species are native to North America. The most common is D. scoparium, sometimes called

  • fork-crowned lemur (primate)

    lemur: Lemur diversity: Fork-crowned lemurs inhabit the forests along Madagascar’s western coast and live on a diet of gum and insects.

  • fork-fingering (music)

    wind instrument: Flutes and reeds: …one, a technique known as cross-fingering. For example, to produce f rather than f?, the player uncovered the fifth hole with the second finger of his right hand while keeping the sixth hole (and the first through fourth holes) covered. (Because this arrangement of the fingers looked vaguely like the…

  • forked fungus beetle (insect)

    darkling beetle: The forked fungus beetle (Bolitotherus cornutus) is easily recognized by a pair of blunt hornlike projections on the head. The dark adult is 10 to 12 mm (0.4–0.5 inch) long and has wing covers that resemble pieces of bark. The larvae live in woody bracket fungi.

  • Forkel, Johann Nikolaus (German musicologist and writer)

    Johann Nikolaus Forkel, one of the first great musicologists and the first biographer of Johann Sebastian Bach. After brief legal studies, he became organist at the university church at G?ttingen, where, from 1778 until his death, he was musical director of the university. Forkel’s most important

  • forking fern family (plant family)

    Gleicheniaceae, the forking fern family (order Gleicheniales), containing 6 genera and about 125 species. This relatively primitive family has a long fossil record dating back to the Jurassic Period (201.3 million to 145.0 million years ago). The extant genera are Gleichenella (1 species),

  • forklift truck

    Forklift truck, specialized form of industrial truck (q.v.) for elevating or lowering a

  • Forkner Alphabet shorthand

    shorthand: Modern abbreviated longhand systems: Forkner Alphabet shorthand was first published in 1952 in the United States. The author, Hamden Forkner, spent 10 years in research before publishing the first edition of the new system, which uses a combination of conventional letters and a few symbols for the hard-to-write letters…

  • Forkner, Hamden (American stenographer)

    shorthand: Modern abbreviated longhand systems: The author, Hamden Forkner, spent 10 years in research before publishing the first edition of the new system, which uses a combination of conventional letters and a few symbols for the hard-to-write letters and sounds. For example, H is expressed by a short dash above the line.…

  • Forks National Historic Site (historic site, Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada)

    Winnipeg: The Forks National Historic Site, at the junction of the Red and Assiniboine rivers, commemorates the history of the Canadian West. Assiniboine Park includes a zoo and a conservatory. Also nearby are Bird’s Hill (northeast) and Beaudry (west) provincial parks. Winnipeg’s professional sports teams include the…

  • Forks, The (Ontario, Canada)

    Chatham-Kent, municipality, southern Ontario, Canada. It lies at the confluence of the north and east branches of the Sydenham River, 30 miles (50 km) northeast of Detroit, Michigan. The town was called The Forks until it was renamed Wallaceburg for Sir William Wallace, a medieval Scottish national

  • forktail (bird)

    Forktail, any of seven species of birds of the Asian, chiefly Himalayan, genus Enicurus. Forktails usually are placed among the Old World flycatchers Muscicapidae (order Passeriformes). Forktails pick insects from stones along mountain streams and have loud whistling calls. Most are strikingly

  • forktail (arthropod order)

    Dipluran, (order Diplura), any of a group of about 800 species of small primitive wingless insects, considered by some entomologists to have features similar to ancestral insects. Diplurans have two appendages, or cerci, extending backward from the last of their abdominal segments, for which they

  • Forlán, Diego (Uruguayan football player)

    Diego Forlán, Uruguayan football (soccer) player who was awarded the Golden Ball as the standout player at the 2010 World Cup. His father, Pablo Forlán, had played for Uruguay in the 1966 and 1974 World Cup tournaments, and his maternal grandfather, Juan Carlos Corazo, had been a player with Club

  • Forlandet Nasjonalpark (national park, Norway)

    Forlandet National Park, national park and bird sanctuary established in 1973 by Norway’s Environment Ministry for Svalbard. The Forlandet National Park has the greatest number of bird sanctuaries in the Svalbard archipelago: six in number, located throughout the southern and southeastern regions

  • Forlandet National Park (national park, Norway)

    Forlandet National Park, national park and bird sanctuary established in 1973 by Norway’s Environment Ministry for Svalbard. The Forlandet National Park has the greatest number of bird sanctuaries in the Svalbard archipelago: six in number, located throughout the southern and southeastern regions

  • Forlanini, Carlo (Italian physician)

    Giulio Bizzozero: …for inguinal hernia (Bassini’s operation); Carlo Forlanini, who introduced therapeutic pneumothorax in treating pulmonary tuberculosis; and Antonio Carle and Giorgio Rattone, who demonstrated the transmissibility of tetanus.

  • Forlanini, Enrico (Italian inventor)

    hydrofoil: …in Italy about 1900 by Enrico Forlanini. Hydrofoils were not widely used until the 1950s, when military and commercial models were built. By the 1970s hydrofoil craft were in operation in many places, and speeds of up to 80 knots (nautical miles per hour) had been achieved.

  • Forlì (Italy)

    Forlì, city, Emilia-Romagna regione, northern Italy, situated on the Montone River and the Via Aemilia, southeast of Bologna. Known to the Romans as Forum Livii, it is said to have been founded by the consul Livius Salinator in the 2nd century bc. As a 12th-century commune, it was in league with

  • Forlot, Maxime (French inventor)

    spearfishing: …gun invented by a Frenchman, Maxime Forlot, and a popular spear gun designed by his compatriot Georges Beuchat that was propelled by a rubber elastic band. Other guns were designed that used gunpowder, carbon dioxide, or compressed air to propel the spear; one of the latter type, invented in 1956…

  • form (crystallography)

    Form, in crystallography, all crystal faces having similar symmetry. Those forms that enclose space are called closed forms; those that do not, open forms. The faces that comprise a form will be similar in appearance, even though of different shapes and sizes; this similarity may be evident from

  • form (art)

    aesthetics: Relationship between form and content: …upon the given “appearance”—the “form.” It is this that holds our attention and that gives to the work of art its peculiar individuality. Because it addresses itself to our sensory appreciation, the work of art is essentially concrete, to be understood by an act of perception rather than by…

  • form (philosophy)

    Form, the external shape, appearance, or configuration of an object, in contradistinction to the matter of which it is composed; in Aristotelian metaphysics, the active, determining principle of a thing as distinguished from matter, the potential principle. The word form has been used in a number

  • form (biology)

    zoology: Historical background: …continuously evolving into highly adapted forms—required the rejection of the static view that all species are especially created and upset the Linnaean concept of species types. Darwin recognized that the principles of heredity must be known to understand how evolution works; but, even though the concept of hereditary factors had…

  • form

    Musical form, the structure of a musical composition. The term is regularly used in two senses: to denote a standard type, or genre, and to denote the procedures in a specific work. The nomenclature for the various musical formal types may be determined by the medium of performance, the technique

  • form class (linguistics)

    linguistics: Syntax: …syntax were the notions of form classes and constituent structure. (These notions were also relevant, though less central, in the theory of morphology.) Bloomfield defined form classes, rather imprecisely, in terms of some common “recognizable phonetic or grammatical feature” shared by all the members. He gave as examples the form…

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