You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • Fourteen Sonnets (work by Bowles)

    William Lisle Bowles: …clergyman, noted principally for his Fourteen Sonnets (1789), which expresses with simple sincerity the thoughts and feelings inspired in a mind of delicate sensibility by the contemplation of natural scenes.

  • fourteener (prosody)

    Fourteener, a poetic line of 14 syllables; especially, such a line consisting of seven iambic feet. The form is also called a heptameter or septenary. It was used in Greek and Latin prosody and flourished in Elizabethan English narrative verse but since then has been used only rarely. When each

  • Fourteenth Amendment (United States Constitution)

    Fourteenth Amendment, amendment (1868) to the Constitution of the United States that granted citizenship and equal civil and legal rights to African Americans and slaves who had been emancipated after the American Civil War, including them under the umbrella phrase “all persons born or naturalized

  • fourth (music)

    harmony: …octave, the fifth, and the fourth. (An octave, as from C to the C above it, encompasses eight white notes on a piano keyboard, or a comparable mixture of white and black notes. A fifth, as from C to G, encompasses five white notes; a fourth, as from C to…

  • Fourth Amendment (United States Constitution)

    Fourth Amendment, amendment (1791) to the Constitution of the United States, part of the Bill of Rights, that forbids unreasonable searches and seizures of individuals and property. For the text of the Fourth Amendment, see below. Introduced in 1789, what became the Fourth Amendment struck at the

  • Fourth Angel, The (novel by Rechy)

    John Rechy: …the nature of evil, and The Fourth Angel (1972) records the adventures of four thrill-seeking adolescents.

  • Fourth Arab-Israeli War (Middle East [1973])

    Yom Kippur War, damaging inconclusive war and the fourth of the Arab-Israeli wars. The war was initiated by Egypt and Syria on October 6, 1973, on the Jewish holy day of Yom Kippur and during Ramadan, the month of fasting in Islam, and it continued until October 26, 1973. The war, which eventually

  • Fourth Book of Moses (Old Testament)

    Numbers, the fourth book of the Bible. The English title is a translation of the Septuagint (Greek) title referring to the numbering of the tribes of Israel in chapters 1–4. The book is basically the sacred history of the Israelites as they wandered in the wilderness following the departure from S

  • Fourth Coalition, War of the (European history)

    Germany: Period of French hegemony in Germany: They finally declared war against the French in October 1806, after Austria had been forced to surrender, Russia had decided to retreat, and the secondary states had become the vassals of Paris. Yet public opinion in the Prussian capital remained confident that the army of Frederick the Great…

  • fourth contact (astronomy)

    eclipse: Solar eclipse phenomena: …later the eclipse ends with fourth contact, when the last encroachment made by the Moon on the Sun’s rim disappears.

  • Fourth Council of the Lateran ([1215])

    Fourth Lateran Council, (1215), the 12th ecumenical council, generally considered the greatest council before Trent. The council was years in preparation as Pope Innocent III desired the widest possible representation. More than 400 bishops, 800 abbots and priors, envoys of many European kings, and

  • fourth cranial nerve (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Trochlear nerve (CN IV or 4): The fourth cranial nerve is unique for three reasons. First, it is the only cranial nerve to exit the dorsal side of the brainstem. Second, fibres from the trochlear nucleus cross in the midbrain before they exit, so that…

  • Fourth Crusade (European history)

    Crusades: The Fourth Crusade and the Latin empire of Constantinople: Pope Innocent III was the first pope since Urban II to be both eager and able to make the Crusade a major papal concern. In 1198 he called a new Crusade through legates and encyclical letters. In…

  • fourth degree (law)

    criminal law: Degrees of participation: The fourth and last degree of participation is that of accessory after the fact, who is punishable for receiving, concealing, or comforting one whom that person knows to have committed a crime so as to obstruct the criminal’s apprehension or to otherwise obstruct justice. In continental…

  • Fourth Dimension of a Poem, and Other Essays, The (work by Abrams)

    M.H. Abrams: The Fourth Dimension of a Poem, and Other Essays (2012)—the title of which referred to the oral recitation of poetry—collected ruminations on poetic and literary interpretation. The volume was augmented by a series of recordings of Abrams reading poetry, accessible to the reader online. He…

  • Fourth Duma (Russian assembly)

    Duma: The Fourth Duma was also conservative. But as World War I progressed, it became increasingly dissatisfied with the government’s incompetence and negligence, especially in supplying the army. By the spring of 1915 the Duma had become a focal point of opposition to the imperial regime. At…

  • fourth figure (syllogistic)

    history of logic: Syllogisms: But there is plainly a fourth possibility, that β is predicated of α and γ of β. Many later logicians recognized such syllogisms as belonging to a separate, fourth figure. Aristotle explicitly mentioned such syllogisms but did not group them under a separate figure; his failure to do so has…

  • Fourth Five-Year Plan (Soviet history)

    Ukraine: The last years of Stalin’s rule: The fourth five-year plan, as in the prewar years, stressed heavy industry to the detriment of consumer needs. By 1950, Ukraine’s industrial output exceeded the prewar level. In agriculture, recovery proceeded much more slowly, and prewar levels of production were not reached until the 1960s. A…

  • Fourth Generation (Italian literary movement)

    Italian literature: Poetry after World War II: Poets of the so-called Fourth Generation—from the title of a 1954 anthology of postwar verse edited by Pietro Chiara and Luciano Erba—include Erba himself and the poet and filmmaker Nelo Risi, both of them Milanese, as well as the Italian Swiss Giorgio Orelli. All three are from northern Italy…

  • Fourth Gospel (New Testament)

    Gospel According to John, fourth of the four New Testament narratives recounting the life and death of Jesus Christ. John’s is the only one of the four not considered among the Synoptic Gospels (i.e., those presenting a common view). Although the Gospel is ostensibly written by St. John the

  • Fourth Industrial Revolution

    The Need for a Futurist Mind-Set: …massive social, technological, and economic changes continue to unfold over the coming decades, our single greatest challenge will be to compose a new civilizational story line that will guide the evolution of our species. Just as religious narratives led humanity through the agrarian era, and capitalism has been the central…

  • Fourth International Polar Year ([2007-2008])

    Antarctica: Post-Protocol Developments: The fourth International Polar Year (2007–08) brought renewed attention to Earth’s polar regions and their role in the global system. It led to new investments in research infrastructure and programs in Antarctica and further expanded the scope of Antarctic scientific programs, especially in terms of understanding…

  • fourth law of thermodynamics

    Lars Onsager: …has been described as the “fourth law of thermodynamics.”

  • Fourth of August, Regime of the The (Greek military regime)

    Greece: The Metaxas regime and World War II: …Italian Fascism, but the “Regime of the Fourth of August 1936” simply lacked their dynamism. The government led by Metaxas did not seek alliances with the European dictatorships. On the contrary, with the support of the king, Metaxas strove to maintain the country’s traditional alignment toward Britain. The dictator,…

  • Fourth Partition of Poland (World War II)

    World War II: The campaign in Poland, 1939: Against northern Poland, General Fedor von Bock commanded an army group comprising General Georg von Küchler’s 3rd Army, which struck southward from East Prussia, and General Günther von Kluge’s 4th Army, which struck eastward across the base of the Corridor. Much stronger in troops and in tanks,…

  • Fourth Party (British history)

    Lord Randolph Churchill: …what became known as the Fourth Party, which advocated a set of views announced as “Tory Democracy.”

  • Fourth Pluvial Stage (paleontology)

    Africa: Pleistocene and Holocene developments: During the Gamblian, or Fourth, Pluvial, which occurred from approximately 30,000 to 15,000 years ago, three distinct humid phases are separated by drier intervals. During those phases the dimensions of Lake Chad and those of the glaciers of Mount Kenya and of Kilimanjaro diminished rapidly. The postpluvial

  • fourth position (ballet)

    ballet position: In the fourth position, one foot rests about 12 inches in advance of the other, both are turned out, and the weight is divided between them. Like the second position, fourth has its equivalent en l’air. In the fifth position, the feet are turned out and pressed…

  • Fourth Republic (South Korean history)

    South Korea: The Yushin order (Fourth Republic): In December 1971, shortly after his inauguration to a third presidential term, Park declared a state of national emergency, and 10 months later (October 1972) he suspended the constitution and dissolved the legislature. A new constitution, which would permit the reelection of the…

  • Fourth Republic (French history)

    Fourth Republic, government of the French Republic from 1946 to 1958. The postwar provisional president Charles de Gaulle resigned in 1946, expecting that public support would bring him back to power with a mandate to impose his constitutional ideas. Instead, the constituent assembly chose the

  • Fourth style (Roman art)

    Western painting: Pagan Roman paintings: The Fourth style, which runs from the close of the Augustan Age to the destruction of Pompeii and its fellow Campanian cities in bc 79, is less homogeneous than its predecessors and exhibits three main variants: first, an architectural design soberer and more realistic but still…

  • fourth wall (theatrical concept)

    theatre: The new Naturalism: …the concept of the “fourth wall” separating the stage from the audience. Behind this “wall”—invisible to the audience, opaque to the actors—the environment portrayed was to be as authentic as possible. Antoine himself designed rooms and then decided which wall would be “removed.” In The Butchers, he hung animal…

  • Fourth World

    Arctic: Relations with the encompassing nation-states: …the notion of the “Fourth World,” uniting all such indigenous minorities encompassed within the boundaries of modern nation-states. Though the notion is intended to be of global application, its force has been felt above all in relation to the peoples of the north, in northwestern Europe and North America,…

  • fourth-class mail (communications)

    postal system: United States: …less than one pound, and fourth-class mail is either merchandise or printed matter that weighs one pound or more. The addition of these classes allowed the post office to adopt more complicated rate structures that would take into account factors affecting handling costs—such as the weight of the piece and…

  • fourth-degree burn (medicine)

    burn: Such burns are of the fourth degree, also called black (because of the typical colour of the burn), or char, burns. Fourth-degree burns are of grave prognosis, particularly if they involve more than a small portion of the body. In these deep burns toxic materials may be released into the…

  • fourth-generation computer

    computer: Integrated circuits: …using them are sometimes called fourth-generation computers. The invention of the microprocessor was the culmination of this trend.

  • fourth-generation data network

    mobile telephone: Development of cellular systems: …led to the development of 4G technology. In 2008 the ITU set forward a list of requirements for what it called IMT-Advanced, or 4G; these requirements included data rates of 1 gigabit per second for a stationary user and 100 megabits per second for a moving user. The ITU in…

  • fourth-generation language (computer language)

    Fourth-generation language (4GL), Fourth-generation computer programming language. 4GLs are closer to human language than other high-level languages and are accessible to people without formal training as programmers. They allow multiple common operations to be performed with a single

  • fourth-wave feminism

    feminism: The fourth wave of feminism: Although debated by some, many claim that a fourth wave of feminism began about 2012, with a focus on sexual harassment, body shaming, and rape culture, among other issues. A key component was the use of social media to highlight and…

  • Fous de Bassan, Les (novel by Hébert)

    Anne Hébert: …Les Fous de Bassan (1982; In the Shadow of the Wind; filmed 1987), which won France’s Prix Fémina, one of the narrators is a murdered teenage girl. The novel L’Enfant chargé de songes (1992; Burden of Dreams) won her a third Governor General’s Award. Also in 1992, Hébert saw the…

  • foussa (mammal species, Cryptoprocta ferox)

    Fossa, (Cryptoprocta ferox), largest carnivore native to Madagascar, a catlike forest dweller of the civet family, Viverridae. The fossa grows to a length of about 1.5 metres (5 feet), including a tail about 66 centimetres (26 inches) long, and has short legs and sharp, retractile claws. The fur is

  • Fouta (region, Senegal)

    Fouta, semidesert region flanking the middle course of the Sénégal River and lying north of the Ferlo region, in northern Senegal. The banks of the Sénégal River are well-watered and fertile in the Fouta region, yet the thin, sandy clay of the region’s interior plains is infertile and porous. Water

  • Fouta Djallon (region, Guinea)

    Fouta Djallon, mountainous region of west-central Guinea. Consisting of a series of stepped sandstone plateaus with many picturesque trenches and gorges, the region serves as the watershed for some of western Africa’s greatest rivers. The Fouta Djallon covers an area of 30,000 square miles (

  • Fouta-Toro (region, Senegal)

    Fouta, semidesert region flanking the middle course of the Sénégal River and lying north of the Ferlo region, in northern Senegal. The banks of the Sénégal River are well-watered and fertile in the Fouta region, yet the thin, sandy clay of the region’s interior plains is infertile and porous. Water

  • Fouts, Dan (American football player)

    Bill Walsh: …he was credited with turning Dan Fouts into a Hall of Fame quarterback. In two seasons (1977–78) as head coach at Stanford University (California), he led the team to two victories in bowl games.

  • fovea centralis retinae (anatomy)

    retina: …concentrate at two sites: the fovea centralis, a pit at the rear of the retina, which contains no rods and has the densest concentration of cones in the eye, and the surrounding macula lutea, a circular patch of yellow-pigmented tissue about 5 to 6 mm (0.2 to 0.24 inch) in…

  • fovea of retina (anatomy)

    retina: …concentrate at two sites: the fovea centralis, a pit at the rear of the retina, which contains no rods and has the densest concentration of cones in the eye, and the surrounding macula lutea, a circular patch of yellow-pigmented tissue about 5 to 6 mm (0.2 to 0.24 inch) in…

  • foveal pit (anatomy)

    retina: …concentrate at two sites: the fovea centralis, a pit at the rear of the retina, which contains no rods and has the densest concentration of cones in the eye, and the surrounding macula lutea, a circular patch of yellow-pigmented tissue about 5 to 6 mm (0.2 to 0.24 inch) in…

  • Foveaux (novel by Tennant)

    Kylie Tennant: …in the slums of Sydney—Foveaux (1939), Ride On, Stranger (1943), and Tell Morning This (1967)—Tennant lived in poor areas of the city and took jobs ranging from social worker to barmaid. In preparation for The Battlers (1941), about migrant workers, Tennant traveled for months with the unemployed along the…

  • foveola gastricae (anatomy)

    human digestive system: Gastric mucosa: …surface epithelium, small pits, called foveolae gastricae, may be observed with a magnifying glass. There are approximately 90 to 100 gastric pits per square millimetre (58,000 to 65,000 per square inch) of surface epithelium. Three to seven individual gastric glands empty their secretions into each gastric pit. Beneath the gastric…

  • Fowey (English Channel port, England, United Kingdom)

    Fowey, English Channel port, Cornwall unitary authority, southwestern England. Fowey lies on the west bank of the sheltered Fowey estuary near the river’s outlet into the English Channel. It held a leading position among Cornish ports from the 14th to the 16th century because of its export of tin.

  • fowl (bird group)

    anseriform: … (in the United States) or wildfowl (in Europe). The three species of screamers are quite different from waterfowl in general appearance. They are moderately long-legged birds about the size of a turkey, with chickenlike beaks and exceptionally large feet.

  • fowl (bird)

    Waterfowl, in the United States, all varieties of ducks, geese, and swans; the term is sometimes expanded to include some unrelated aquatic birds such as coots, grebes (see photograph), and loons. In Britain the term refers only to domesticated swans, geese, and ducks kept for ornamental purposes,

  • fowl (animal)

    Bird, (class Aves), any of the more than 10,400 living species unique in having feathers, the major characteristic that distinguishes them from all other animals. A more-elaborate definition would note that they are warm-blooded vertebrates more related to reptiles than to mammals and that they

  • fowl (agriculture)

    Poultry, in animal husbandry, birds raised commercially or domestically for meat, eggs, and feathers. Chickens, ducks, turkeys, and geese are of primary commercial importance, while guinea fowl and squabs are chiefly of local interest. See also poultry

  • fowl pest (bird disease)

    bird flu: Subtypes of bird flu virus: …the latter form is called fowl plague. Mutation of the virus causing the mild form is thought to have given rise to the virus causing the severe form. The infectious agents of bird flu are any of several subtypes of type A influenza virus, which is classified as an orthomyxovirus.…

  • fowl plague (bird disease)

    bird flu: Subtypes of bird flu virus: …the latter form is called fowl plague. Mutation of the virus causing the mild form is thought to have given rise to the virus causing the severe form. The infectious agents of bird flu are any of several subtypes of type A influenza virus, which is classified as an orthomyxovirus.…

  • Fowler, Bud (American baseball player)

    baseball: Segregation: …when Fleet Walker, second baseman Bud Fowler, pitcher George Stovey, pitcher Robert Higgins, and Frank Grant, a second baseman who was probably the best black player of the 19th century, were on rosters of clubs in the International League, one rung below the majors. At least 15 other black players…

  • Fowler, Clara Ann (American singer)

    Patti Page, (Clara Ann Fowler), American singer (born Nov. 8, 1927, Claremore, Okla.—died Jan. 1, 2013, Encinitas, Calif.), generated record sales in excess of 100 million copies during a career that included her renditions of such novelty pop songs as “Boogie Woogie Santa Claus” (1950) and “(How

  • Fowler, Eliza (British author)

    Eliza Haywood, prolific English writer of sensational romantic novels that mirrored contemporary 18th-century scandals. Haywood mentions her marriage in her writings, though little is known about it. She supported herself by writing, acting, and adapting works for the theatre. She then turned to

  • Fowler, Francis George (British lexicographer)

    H.W. Fowler: …collaboration with his younger brother Francis George Fowler.

  • Fowler, H. W. (British lexicographer)

    H.W. Fowler, English lexicographer and philologist whose works on the use and style of the English language had far-reaching influence. He was a man of moral and intellectual strength whose wit and grace were evident throughout his writings. Fowler was educated at Balliol College, Oxford (B.A. and

  • Fowler, Henry Hamill (American government official)

    Henry Hamill Fowler, American government official (born Sept. 5, 1908, Roanoke, Va.—died Jan. 3, 2000, Alexandria, Va.), created Special Drawing Rights, a reserve currency sometimes called “paper gold,” while serving as U.S. secretary of the treasury (1965–68) under Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson; he h

  • Fowler, Henry Watson (British lexicographer)

    H.W. Fowler, English lexicographer and philologist whose works on the use and style of the English language had far-reaching influence. He was a man of moral and intellectual strength whose wit and grace were evident throughout his writings. Fowler was educated at Balliol College, Oxford (B.A. and

  • Fowler, John (British engineer)

    John Fowler, English engineer who helped to develop the steam-hauled plow. He began his career in the grain trade but later trained as an engineer. In 1850 he joined Albert Fry in Bristol to found a works to produce steam-hauled implements. Later, with Jeremiah Head, he produced a steam-hauled

  • Fowler, Katherine (English poet)

    Katherine Philips, English poet who, as Orinda, the central figure in a literary group in Cardigan, Wales, wrote lyrics on friendship that represent a transition from courtly poetry to the Augustan style typical of Restoration

  • Fowler, Kevin Spacey (American actor)

    Kevin Spacey, American actor on stage and screen, especially known for his dynamic roles in dark comedies. When Spacey was a young boy, his family moved frequently, ultimately settling in southern California. In high school he began taking drama classes and subsequently appeared in numerous school

  • Fowler, Lydia Folger (American physician, writer and educator)

    Lydia Folger Fowler, physician, writer, and reformer, one of the first American women to hold a medical degree and to become a professor of medicine in an American college. Lydia Folger attended the Wheaton Seminary in Norton, Massachusetts, from 1838 to 1839 and taught there from 1842 to 1844. In

  • Fowler, Mark (American government official)

    Television in the United States: Reorganization and deregulation: Mark Fowler and Dennis Patrick, both FCC chairmen appointed by Reagan, advocated free-market philosophies in the television industry. Fowler frankly described modern television as a business rather than a service. In 1981 he stated that “television is just another appliance. It’s a toaster with pictures.”…

  • Fowler, Ralph Howard (British mathematician)

    Hans Bethe: Education: …Cambridge under the aegis of Ralph Fowler and a semester at the University of Rome working with Enrico Fermi.

  • Fowler, Sir John, 1st Baronet (British engineer)

    Sir John Fowler, 1st Baronet, English civil engineer who helped design and build the underground London Metropolitan Railway and was joint designer of the Forth Bridge in Scotland. Fowler established himself in London in 1844 as a consulting engineer, laying out many small railway systems later

  • Fowler, William (American astrophysicist)

    William Fowler, American nuclear astrophysicist who, with Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1983 for his role in formulating a widely accepted theory of element generation. Fowler studied at the Ohio State University (B.S., 1933) and at the California Institute of

  • Fowler, William Alfred (American astrophysicist)

    William Fowler, American nuclear astrophysicist who, with Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1983 for his role in formulating a widely accepted theory of element generation. Fowler studied at the Ohio State University (B.S., 1933) and at the California Institute of

  • Fowler, William Warde (British historian)

    religious experience: Objective intention, or reference: As William Warde Fowler, a British historian, showed in his classic Religious Experience of the Roman People (1911), the task of elucidating the role of religion in Roman society can be accomplished without settling the question of the validity or cognitive import of the religious feelings,…

  • Fowles, John (British author)

    John Fowles, English novelist, whose allusive and descriptive works combine psychological probings—chiefly of sex and love—with an interest in social and philosophical issues. Fowles graduated from the University of Oxford in 1950 and taught in Greece, France, and Britain. His first novel, The

  • Fowles, John Robert (British author)

    John Fowles, English novelist, whose allusive and descriptive works combine psychological probings—chiefly of sex and love—with an interest in social and philosophical issues. Fowles graduated from the University of Oxford in 1950 and taught in Greece, France, and Britain. His first novel, The

  • fowling piece (historical firearm)

    shotgun: …loaded with shot were the “fowling pieces” that appeared in 16th-century Europe. In the early 17th century, the barrels were made as long as 6 feet (1.8 m) in an attempt to gain maximum accuracy.

  • Fox (people)

    Fox, an Algonquian-speaking tribe of North American Indians who called themselves Meshkwakihug, the “Red-Earth People.” When they first met French traders in 1667, the tribe lived in the forest zone of what is now northeastern Wisconsin. Tribes to their east referred to them as “foxes,” a custom

  • fox (mammal)

    Fox, any of various members of the dog family (Canidae) resembling small to medium-sized bushy-tailed dogs with long fur, pointed ears, and a narrow snout. In a restricted sense, the name refers to the 10 or so species classified as “true” foxes (genus Vulpes), especially the red, or common, fox

  • Fox and the Wolf, The (Middle English work)

    English literature: Verse romance: …in the 13th century with The Fox and the Wolf, taken indirectly from the Old French Roman de Renart. In the same manuscript with this work is Dame Sirith, the earliest English fabliau. Another sort of humour is found in The Land of Cockaygne, which depicts a utopia better than…

  • fox bat (mammal)

    Flying fox, (genus Pteropus), any of about 65 bat species found on tropical islands from Madagascar to Australia and Indonesia and mainland Asia. They are the largest bats; some attain a wingspan of 1.5 metres (5 feet), with a head and body length of about 40 cm (16 inches). Flying foxes are Old

  • Fox Broadcasting Company (American company)

    Fox Broadcasting Company, American television broadcasting company founded in 1986 by media magnate Rupert Murdoch. It is a subsidiary of the media conglomerate 21st Century Fox. Its headquarters are in Beverly Hills, California. With the considerable financial backing of Murdoch, the network began

  • Fox Chase Cancer Center (medical facility, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Aaron J. Ciechanover: …Rose worked together at the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, where much of their prizewinning research was done. The process that they discovered involves a series of carefully orchestrated steps by which cells degrade, or destroy, the proteins that no longer serve any useful purpose. In the first step…

  • Fox Film Corporation (American motion-picture studio)

    20th Century Fox, major American film studio formed in 1935 by the merger of Twentieth Century Pictures and the Fox Film Corporation. Since 2019 it has been a subsidiary of the Disney Company. Headquarters are in Los Angeles. William Fox was a New York City exhibitor who began distributing films in

  • fox grape (plant)

    Vitaceae: vinifera) and the North American fox grape (V. labrusca), the parent species of most of the cultivated slipskin American grapes. The Boston ivy (q.v.; Parthenocissus tricuspidata) and the Virginia creeper (q.v.; P. quinquefolia) are well-known woody vines common in the eastern United States.

  • Fox Hunt, The (painting by Homer)

    Winslow Homer: Final years and legacy: …the human subject entirely in The Fox Hunt of 1893. A fox ventures forth to forage for berries on the snow-covered land, and a sinister line of starved black crows converges to attack him. The ensuing life-and-death struggle will be over quickly, but the pulse of nature that drives the…

  • fox hunting

    Foxhunting, the chase of a fox by horsemen with a pack of hounds. In England, the home of the sport, foxhunting dates from at least the 15th century. In its inception, it was probably an adjunct to stag and hare hunting, with the same hounds used to chase each quarry. Modern foxhunting took shape

  • Fox Islands (islands, Alaska, United States)

    Fox Islands, easternmost group of the Aleutian Islands, southwestern Alaska, U.S. The islands extend about 300 miles (500 km) southwest from the Alaska Peninsula and are part of the extensive Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. The island group includes Akutan, Unalaska, and Umnak; Unimak

  • Fox language
  • Fox News Channel (American company)

    Fox News Channel, American cable television news and political commentary channel launched in 1996. The network operated under the umbrella of the Fox Entertainment Group, the film and television division of Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox (formerly News Corporation). Having experienced success

  • Fox Project (anthropological study)

    Sol Tax: …was also known for the Fox Project, a study of the culture of the Fox and Sauk Indians.

  • Fox Quesada, Vicente (president of Mexico)

    Vicente Fox, Mexican businessman and politician who was president of Mexico from 2000 to 2006. His term in office marked the end of 71 years of uninterrupted rule by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). Fox, the second of nine children, was raised on a 1,100-acre (445-hectare) ranch in the

  • Fox River (river, Illinois and Wisconsin, United States)

    Farnsworth House: 5 metres) above the Fox River, which lies just 100 feet (30 metres) to the south. A third of the slab is an open-air porch (which Farnsworth had screened in after the house was finished), and the only operable windows are two small hopper units (which are hinged at…

  • fox shark (shark species)

    Fox shark, species of thresher shark

  • fox snake (reptile)

    rat snake: The fox snake (E. vulpina), chiefly of farmlands of Wisconsin to Missouri, is yellowish or pale brown above, with strong dark blotches, and yellow below, with black checkering. Its head may be quite reddish.

  • fox sparrow (bird)

    sparrow: …sparrow (Melospiza melodia) and the fox sparrow (Passerella iliaca), heavily streaked skulkers in woodlands; and the white-crowned sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys) and the white-throated sparrow (Z. albicollis), larger species with black-and-white crown stripes. The rufous-collared sparrow (Z. capensis) has an exceptionally wide breeding distribution: from Mexico and Caribbean

  • fox terrier (type of dog)

    Fox terrier, breed of dog developed in England to drive foxes from their dens. The two varieties of fox terrier, wirehaired and smooth-haired, are structurally similar but differ in coat texture and in ancestry. The wirehaired, or wire, variety was developed from a rough-coated black-and-tan

  • Fox, Carol (American opera impresario)

    Carol Fox, American opera lover who cofounded the Lyric Theatre of Chicago (1954; now Lyric Opera of Chicago) and served as its general manager for more than 25 years (1954–80). After taking voice lessons in Italy under the Italian tenor Giovanni Martinelli, Fox returned to the United States, and

  • Fox, Catherine (American medium)

    Margaret Fox and Catherine Fox: …by many, including Margaret and Catherine, and soon the curious, the gullible, and the skeptical alike were coming in droves to observe for themselves. Their sensational reputation spread rapidly. An elder sister, Ann Leah Fish of Rochester, New York, quickly began managing regular public demonstrations of her sisters’ mediumistic gifts.…

  • Fox, Charles James (British politician)

    Charles James Fox, Britain’s first foreign secretary (1782, 1783, 1806), a famous champion of liberty, whose career, on the face of it, was nevertheless one of almost unrelieved failure. He conducted against King George III a long and brilliant vendetta; for this reason he was almost always in

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载