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  • Indian’s plume (plant genus)

    Monarda, genus of 12 North American plants variously known as bergamot, horsemint, and bee balm, belonging to the mint family (Lamiaceae), order Lamiales. The flowers are red, rose, lavender, yellow, or white; tubular; two-lipped; and in clusters surrounded by leaflike bracts. M. fistulosa,

  • Indian-Australian Plate (geology)

    Cenozoic Era: Geologic processes: …formed some time after the Indian Plate collided with the Eurasian Plate. These lofty mountains marked the culmination of the great uplift that occurred during the late Cenozoic when the Indian Plate drove many hundreds of kilometres into the underbelly of Asia. They are the product of the low-angle underthrusting…

  • Indian-crested swift (bird)

    crested swift: A widespread species is the crested tree swift (Hemiprocne longipennis), ranging from Southeast Asia eastward to the Celebes. It is about 20 cm (8 inches) long and has pale blue-gray upperparts, dark brown wings and tail, and reddish cheeks. The 29-centimetre-long whiskered tree swift (H. mystacea) of Southeast Asia is…

  • Indiana (novel by Sand)

    George Sand: …new pseudonym, George Sand, for Indiana, a novel in which Sandeau had had no part. That novel, which brought her immediate fame, is a passionate protest against the social conventions that bind a wife to her husband against her will and an apologia for a heroine who abandons an unhappy…

  • Indiana (county, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Indiana, county, west-central Pennsylvania, U.S., bounded to the south by the Conemaugh River. It consists of a hilly region on the Allegheny Plateau that rises to the Allegheny Mountains in the southeast and is drained by Crooked, Yellow, Two Lick, Blacklick, and Little Mahoning creeks. Other

  • Indiana (state, United States)

    Indiana, constituent state of the United States of America. The state sits, as its motto claims, at “the crossroads of America.” It borders Lake Michigan and the state of Michigan to the north, Ohio to the east, Kentucky to the south, and Illinois to the west, making it an integral part of the

  • Indiana (Pennsylvania, United States)

    Indiana, borough (town), seat of Indiana county, west-central Pennsylvania, U.S., in the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains, 46 miles (74 km) northeast of Pittsburgh. Settled about 1764, it was laid out in 1805 on land donated for a county seat by George Clymer of Philadelphia, a signer of the

  • Indiana Asbury University (university, Greencastle, Indiana, United States)

    DePauw University, private, coeducational institution of higher learning in Greencastle, Ind., U.S., 40 miles (64 km) west of Indianapolis. It is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Strictly an undergraduate university, DePauw offers a curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences as well as

  • Indiana banana (fruit)

    Magnoliales: Fruit: …fruits are referred to as Indiana bananas). An alcoholic beverage may be made from the fruit.

  • Indiana brown bat (mammal)

    white nose syndrome: Future impacts and management: …bat (Myotis lucifugus), the endangered Indiana bat (M. sodalis), and the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). The disease has since been detected in other species, several of which are endangered. However, more than 20 bat species found in the contiguous United States and Canada hibernate and, therefore, presumably are susceptible…

  • Indiana College (university system, Indiana, United States)

    Indiana University, state system of higher education consisting of the campuses in Bloomington (main), Gary (known as Northwest), South Bend, Kokomo, New Albany (known as Southeast), and Richmond (known as East), as well as schools operated in cooperation with Purdue University at Fort Wayne (known

  • Indiana Dunes (state park and national lakeshore, Indiana, United States)

    Indiana Dunes, area of sand dunes, woodlands, wetlands, and other environments located on the southern shore of Lake Michigan in northwestern Indiana, U.S. Much of the region is within Indiana Dunes National Park, which includes Indiana Dunes State Park. The national park extends almost 25 miles

  • Indiana Jones (fictional character)

    Indiana Jones, American film character, an archaeologist and adventurer featured in a series of popular movies. The film Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), set in 1936, introduced Dr. Henry (“Indiana”) Jones, a young professor of archaeology and history at fictional Marshall College, whose

  • Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (film by Spielberg [2008])

    Cate Blanchett: Hepburn, Dylan, and Academy Awards: …Irina Spalko in Steven Spielberg’s Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008), another addition to the series of action-adventure films following the dashing archaeologist. In 2008 she also starred opposite Brad Pitt in The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, a drama about a man who ages backward.…

  • Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (film by Spielberg [1989])

    Steven Spielberg: Commercial success: …closed out the 1980s with Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989) and Always (1989), an adaptation of the 1943 film A Guy Named Joe. Although Indiana Jones was a hit, Always failed to find an audience.

  • Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (film by Spielberg [1984])

    Steven Spielberg: Commercial success: After directing Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984), Spielberg adapted Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Color Purple (1985). The film explores an African American woman’s almost unbearably harsh, yet ultimately fulfilling, life. Color was roundly criticized for downplaying the novel’s lesbian element, for perpetuating…

  • Indiana Normal School (university, Valparaiso, Indiana, United States)

    Valparaiso University, private, coeducational institution of higher education in Valparaiso, Ind., U.S. It is affiliated with the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod. It grants associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and professional degrees. The college of arts and sciences is the largest academic division,

  • Indiana Pacers (American basketball team)

    Indiana Pacers, American professional basketball team based in Indianapolis that plays in the Eastern Conference of the National Basketball Association (NBA). While playing in the American Basketball Association (ABA), the Pacers won three league championships (1970, 1972, 1973). The franchise was

  • Indiana Seminary (university system, Indiana, United States)

    Indiana University, state system of higher education consisting of the campuses in Bloomington (main), Gary (known as Northwest), South Bend, Kokomo, New Albany (known as Southeast), and Richmond (known as East), as well as schools operated in cooperation with Purdue University at Fort Wayne (known

  • Indiana Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument (monument, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States)

    Indianapolis: The contemporary city: 5-foot (87-metre) Indiana Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument. The Indiana War Memorial Plaza (1927) is a five-block area just to the north that honours the state’s war dead and includes the American Legion National Headquarters building. The State Capitol (1878–88), just west of the circle, is constructed of…

  • Indiana State College (university, Indiana, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Indiana University of Pennsylvania, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Indiana, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. The university comprises the Eberly College of Business and colleges of Education, Fine Arts, Health and Human

  • Indiana State Fairgrounds (area, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States)

    Indianapolis: The contemporary city: The Indiana State Fairgrounds, with more than 55 permanent buildings, including the Art Deco-style Pepsi Coliseum (1939), is a focus of trade and social activities. The annual state fair (August) attracts large crowds, as do the Indiana Black Expo Summer Celebration (July) and the Indy Jazz…

  • Indiana State Normal School (university, Terre Haute, Indiana, United States)

    Indiana State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Terre Haute, Ind., U.S. It comprises colleges of arts and sciences, business, education, nursing, technology, and health and human performance and a graduate school. The university offers a range of undergraduate and

  • Indiana State Normal School, Eastern Division (university, Muncie, Indiana, United States)

    Ball State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning located in Muncie, Ind., U.S. The university comprises the colleges of applied sciences and technology, sciences and humanities, fine arts, architecture and planning, communication, information, and media, and business as

  • Indiana State University (university, Terre Haute, Indiana, United States)

    Indiana State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Terre Haute, Ind., U.S. It comprises colleges of arts and sciences, business, education, nursing, technology, and health and human performance and a graduate school. The university offers a range of undergraduate and

  • Indiana Territory (historical region, United States)

    William Henry Harrison: Early years: …governor of the newly created Indiana Territory, which comprised, until 1809, a much larger area than the present state of Indiana. He would serve as governor for 12 years. In 1803 Harrison also became a special commissioner charged with negotiating with Native Americans “on the subject of boundary or lands.”…

  • Indiana University (university system, Indiana, United States)

    Indiana University, state system of higher education consisting of the campuses in Bloomington (main), Gary (known as Northwest), South Bend, Kokomo, New Albany (known as Southeast), and Richmond (known as East), as well as schools operated in cooperation with Purdue University at Fort Wayne (known

  • Indiana University of Pennsylvania (university, Indiana, Pennsylvania, United States)

    Indiana University of Pennsylvania, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Indiana, Pennsylvania, U.S. It is part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. The university comprises the Eberly College of Business and colleges of Education, Fine Arts, Health and Human

  • Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (university, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States)

    Indiana: Education: …Terre Haute in 1865, and Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), which is Indiana’s major urban university campus. IUPUI was founded in 1969 as a collaboration between Indiana and Purdue universities; the institution is managed by Indiana University. IUPUI began to show especially rapid growth in the 1980s, and by the…

  • Indiana War Memorial Plaza (plaza, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States)

    Indianapolis: The contemporary city: The Indiana War Memorial Plaza (1927) is a five-block area just to the north that honours the state’s war dead and includes the American Legion National Headquarters building. The State Capitol (1878–88), just west of the circle, is constructed of Indiana limestone and has a central…

  • Indiana, flag of (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of a dark blue field (background) with a gold or buff (light tan) torch surrounded by 19 stars.In 1916, the centennial of Indiana statehood, the Daughters of the American Revolution held a flag design competition. The winning design, by Paul Hadley, was approved as the

  • Indiana, Robert (American artist)

    Robert Indiana, American artist who was a central figure in the Pop art movement beginning in the 1960s. The artist spent his childhood in and around Indianapolis. After military service, he attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago on the G.I. Bill, graduating in 1953 with a fellowship

  • Indianapolis (United States Navy heavy cruiser)

    USS Indianapolis, U.S. Navy heavy cruiser that was sunk by a Japanese submarine on July 30, 1945, shortly after delivering the internal components of the atomic bombs that were later dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Up to 900 men initially survived the sinking, but many succumbed to shark

  • Indianapolis (Indiana, United States)

    Indianapolis, city, seat (1822) of Marion county and capital of Indiana, U.S. It lies on the White River at its confluence with Fall Creek, near the centre of the state. The city is built on a level plain surrounded by low, gently sloping hills. It is a planned municipality, its layout resembling

  • Indianapolis 500 (automobile race)

    Indianapolis 500, U.S. automobile race held annually from 1911, except for the war years 1917–18 and 1942–45. The race is always run at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, a suburban enclave of Indianapolis, Indiana. Drawing crowds of several hundred thousand people, the race is among the

  • Indianapolis Brickyard 400 (stock-car race)

    Jeff Gordon: …year he won the inaugural Brickyard 400, the first major stock-car race held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, and in 1995 claimed his first season points championship. During the 1997 season Gordon became the youngest driver to win the sport’s premier event, the Daytona 500, and the first to win…

  • Indianapolis Clowns (American baseball team)

    Negro league: Decline of the Negro leagues: …Barons) and Hank Aaron (Indianapolis Clowns) and old stars such as Satchel Paige left to play in the major leagues. A few teams tried the integration route by signing a handful of white players, and during the 1950s two teams, the Indianapolis Clowns and Kansas City Monarchs, had female…

  • Indianapolis Colts (American football team)

    Indianapolis Colts, American professional gridiron football team based in Indianapolis that plays in the American Football Conference (AFC) of the National Football League (NFL). The franchise, originally known as the Baltimore (Maryland) Colts (1953–84), has won three NFL championships (1958,

  • Indianapolis Motor Speedway (racetrack, Indianapolis, Indiana, United States)

    Indianapolis 500: …race is always run at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, a suburban enclave of Indianapolis, Indiana. Drawing crowds of several hundred thousand people, the race is among the world’s best-attended single-day sporting events. It is held on the weekend of the country’s Memorial Day holiday.

  • indianische Blume (motif)

    pottery: Faience, or tin-glazed ware: ) Brilliant indianische Blumen (flower motifs that were really Japanese in origin but that were thought to be Indian because the decorated porcelain was imported by the East India companies) were painted in a palette that included a carmine similar to the Chinese overglaze rose (“purple of…

  • Indianista novel (Brazilian literary genre)

    Indianista novel, Brazilian literary genre of the 19th century that idealizes the simple life of the South American Indian. The tone of the Indianista novel is one of languid nostalgia and saudade, a brooding melancholy and reverence for nature. The Indian had appeared as a fictional character in

  • Indianola (Iowa, United States)

    Indianola, city, Warren county, south-central Iowa, U.S., 17 miles (27 km) south of Des Moines. Founded in 1849 as the county seat, its name was taken from a newspaper account of a Texas town of the same name. The economy is based on feed milling, diversified manufactures (agricultural supplies,

  • Indias Occidentales (island group, Atlantic Ocean)

    West Indies, crescent-shaped group of islands more than 2,000 miles (3,200 km) long separating the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, to the west and south, from the Atlantic Ocean, to the east and north. From the peninsula of Florida on the mainland of the United States, the islands stretch

  • Indic languages

    Indo-Aryan languages, subgroup of the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. In the early 21st century, Indo-Aryan languages were spoken by more than 800 million people, primarily in India, Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Linguists generally recognize three major

  • Indic writing systems

    Indic writing systems, writing systems that include the syllabic Kharosthi and semialphabetic Brahmi scripts of ancient India. No systems of writing subsequently developed from the Kharosthi script. Brahmi, however, is thought to be the forerunner of all of the scripts used for writing the

  • Indica (work by Arrian)

    Nearchus: …which is included in Arrian’s Indica (2nd century ad). Nearchus was unable to play any significant role in the struggles following Alexander’s death (323); the statement of a late source that he recovered his former satrapies is doubtful.

  • Indica (work by Megasthenes)

    origins of agriculture: Early historic period: In his four-volume Indica, he wrote:

  • indicated horsepower

    horsepower: …sizes, is often expressed as indicated horsepower, which is determined from the pressure in the cylinders. Brake or shaft horsepower is less than indicated horsepower by the amount of power lost to friction within the engine itself, which may amount to 10 percent or more of the indicated horsepower. Electric…

  • indicative mood (grammar)

    mood: …distinguish grammatically three moods: the indicative, the imperative, and the subjunctive. The indicative is generally used for factual or neutral situations, as in English “John did his work” and Spanish “Juan hizo su trabajo.” The imperative conveys commands or requests—for example, “Do your work.” It is distinguished by the absence…

  • indicative planning (economics)

    dirigisme: …dirigisme took the form of indicative planning, which entailed government credit policies and subsidies, developing new technologies, and the regulation of employment overseen by a special planning commission, the Commissariat au Plan. The French government also embarked on ambitious projects, encouraging the formation of national champions in large industry groups,…

  • indicative vote (political science)

    United Kingdom: Indicative votes, May’s pledge to resign, a third defeat for her plan, and a new deadline: …in order to hold “indicative votes” on alternative proposals to May’s plan. Eight of those proposals were put to a vote on March 27, but none was able to gain the support of the majority, though a plan to seek to create a “permanent and comprehensive U.K.-wide customs union…

  • Indicative World Plan for Agricultural Development, An (UN report)

    Food and Agriculture Organization: In 1969 the organization published An Indicative World Plan for Agricultural Development, which analyzed the main problems in world agriculture and suggested strategies for solving them. The 1974 World Food Conference, held in Rome during a period of food shortages in the southern Sahara, prompted the FAO to promote programs…

  • Indicator (British weekly periodical)

    La Belle Dame sans merci: …10, 1820, issue of the Indicator. The poem, whose title means “The Beautiful Lady Without Pity,” describes the encounter between a knight and a mysterious elfin beauty who ultimately abandons him. It is written in the style of a folk ballad, with the first three stanzas a query to the…

  • indicator

    Chemical indicator, any substance that gives a visible sign, usually by a colour change, of the presence or absence of a threshold concentration of a chemical species, such as an acid or an alkali in a solution. An example is the substance called methyl yellow, which imparts a yellow colour to an

  • indicator electrode

    chemical analysis: Potentiometry: The potential of the indicator electrode varies, depending on the concentration of the analyte, while the potential of the reference electrode is constant. Potentiometry is probably the most frequently used electroanalytical method. It can be divided into two categories on the basis of the nature of the indicator electrode.…

  • Indicator indicator (bird)

    ratel: …calls of a bird, the greater, or black-throated, honey guide (Indicator indicator); the ratels break open the bees’ nests to feed on the honey, and the birds in return obtain the remains of the nest. Ratels are strong, fearless fighters but in captivity can become tame and playful. A litter…

  • indicator species (ecology)

    Indicator species, organism—often a microorganism or a plant—that serves as a measure of the environmental conditions that exist in a given locale. For example, greasewood indicates saline soil; mosses often indicate acid soil. Tubifex worms indicate oxygen-poor and stagnant water unfit to drink.

  • indicator variable (probability theory)

    probability theory: Random variables: …random variable is 1[A], the indicator variable of the event A, which equals 1 if A occurs and 0 otherwise. A “constant” is a trivial random variable that always takes the same value regardless of the outcome of the experiment.

  • indicator, economic

    Economic indicator, statistic used, along with other indicators, in an attempt to determine the state of general economic activity, especially in the future. A “leading indicator” is one of a statistical series that fairly reliably turn up or down before the general economy does. Common leading

  • Indicatoridae (bird)

    Honey guide, any of about 17 species of birds constituting the family Indicitoridae (order Piciformes). The honey guide gets its name from two African species, the greater, or black-throated, honey guide (Indicator indicator) and the scaly-throated honey guide (I. variegatus), that exhibit a unique

  • Indicopleustes (Egyptian geographer)

    Cosmas, merchant, traveler, theologian, and geographer whose treatise Topographia Christiana (c. 535–547; “Christian Topography”) contains one of the earliest and most famous of world maps. In this treatise, Cosmas tried to prove the literal accuracy of the Biblical picture of the universe,

  • Indictable Offences Bill (United Kingdom [1870s])

    Sir James Fitzjames Stephen, 1st Baronet: His Indictable Offences Bill (late 1870s), though never enacted in Great Britain, has continued to influence attempts to recast the criminal law of Commonwealth nations and other English-speaking countries.

  • indiction (chronology)

    Indiction, in ancient Rome, the fiscal year. During the inflation of the 3rd century ad the Roman government supplied court and army employees by ordering the requisition, or by compulsory purchase (indictio), of food and clothing. Such indictiones were irregular, often oppressive, and inequitable.

  • indictment (law)

    Indictment, in the United States, a formal written accusation of crime affirmed by a grand jury and presented by it to a court for trial of the accused. The grand jury system was eliminated in England in 1933, and current law there provides for a bill of indictment to be presented to the court when

  • Indie Cindy (album by Pixies)

    Pixies: Subsequent albums included Indie Cindy (2014) and Head Carrier (2016).

  • indie film (cinema)

    motion picture: Films of art and the art cinema: For want of a better term, interpretation may be used to describe the type of motion picture in which a play, a ballet, an opera, or some other work of another art form is kept virtually intact and…

  • Indies Association (political organization, Indonesia)

    Perhimpunan Indonesia, an Indonesian students’ organization in the Netherlands, formed in the early 1920s in Leiden, which provided a source of intellectual leadership for the Indonesian nationalist movement. This association originated in 1908 as the Indische Vereeniging (Indies Association),

  • Indies Party (political party, Indonesia)

    Indonesia: The rise of nationalism: In 1912 the Indies Party (Indische Partij)—primarily a Eurasian party—was founded by E.F.E. Douwes Dekker; banned a year later, it was succeeded by another Eurasian party, calling itself Insulinde, a poetic name for the East Indies. In 1914 the Dutchman Hendricus Sneevliet founded the Indies Social Democratic Association,…

  • Indies Social Democratic Association (political party, Indonesia)

    Indonesia: The rise of nationalism: …1920 and adopted the name Indonesian Communist Party (Partai Komunis Indonesia; PKI) in 1924.

  • Indies, Council of the (Spanish history)

    Council of the Indies, supreme governing body of Spain’s colonies in America (1524–1834). Composed of between 6 and 10 councillors appointed by the king, the council prepared and issued all legislation governing the colonies in the king’s name, approved all important acts and expenditures by

  • Indies, Laws of the (Spanish history)

    Laws of the Indies, the entire body of law promulgated by the Spanish crown during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries for the government of its kingdoms (colonies) outside Europe, chiefly in the Americas; more specifically, a series of collections of decrees (cedulas) compiled and published by

  • indifference (mathematics)

    Indifference, in the mathematical theory of probability, a classical principle stated by the Swiss mathematician Jakob Bernoulli and formulated (and named) by the English economist John Maynard Keynes in A Treatise on Probability (1921): two cases are equally likely if no reason is known why either

  • indifference curve (economics)

    Indifference curve, in economics, graph showing various combinations of two things (usually consumer goods) that yield equal satisfaction or utility to an individual. Developed by the Irish-born British economist Francis Y. Edgeworth, it is widely used as an analytical tool in the study of consumer

  • Indifferent Children, The (novel by Auchincloss)

    Louis Auchincloss: For his first novel, The Indifferent Children (1947), Auchincloss used the pseudonym Andrew Lee, but by 1950 he was publishing stories under his own name. Noted for his stylistic clarity and skill at characterization, he became the prolific chronicler of life in the rarefied world of corporate boardrooms and…

  • indifferenti, Gli (work by Moravia)

    Alberto Moravia: His first novel, Gli indifferenti (1929; Time of Indifference), is a scathingly realistic study of the moral corruption of a middle-class mother and two of her children. It became a sensation. Some of his more important novels are Agostino (1944; Two Adolescents); La Romana (1947; The Woman of…

  • indifferentism (Roman Catholiocism)

    Leo XII: He condemned (May 1825) indifferentism, a doctrine advocating the equality of all religions, and Freemasonry, because of its secret practices that he considered pagan. That year he also revived the practice of holding jubilees, periodic observances in which all the faithful are invited to prayer and works of charity…

  • Indigenismo (Latin American movement)

    Indigenismo, movement in Latin America advocating a dominant social and political role for Indians in countries where they constitute a majority of the population. A sharp distinction is drawn by its members between Indians and Europeans, or those of European ancestry, who have dominated the Indian

  • indigenization (Soviet social policy)

    Ukraine: The New Economic Policy and Ukrainization: …1923 a policy of “indigenization” was announced, including the promotion of native languages in education and publishing, at the workplace, and in government; the fostering of national cultures; and the recruitment of cadres from the indigenous populations. In Ukraine this program inaugurated a decade of rapid Ukrainization and cultural…

  • indigenous American (people)

    American Indian, member of any of the aboriginal peoples of the Western Hemisphere. Eskimos (Inuit and Yupik/Yupiit) and Aleuts are often excluded from this category, because their closest genetic and cultural relations were and are with other Arctic peoples rather than with the groups to their

  • Indigenous Australians (peoples)

    The quality of life for Indigenous Australians in the 21st century: In the 2010s Australia’s Indigenous population constituted approximately 3 percent of the country’s total population, with some 745,000 people identifying themselves as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin. This total represented a considerable increase over the comparable figure from the turn of the…

  • indigenous governance

    Indigenous governance, patterns and practices of rule by which indigenous people govern themselves in formal and informal settings. Indigenous peoples are the original inhabitants of geographic regions. The term indigenous peoples is often used to refer to those native inhabitants who were

  • indigenous people

    The Difference Between a Tribe and a Band: Although many indigenous peoples, particularly those of Canada, have adopted the word nation in order to emphasize their sovereign political status, others continue to use the words tribe and band. Are all these terms interchangeable, or do they have specific meanings? To some extent, the

  • indigenous religion

    creation myth: Nature and significance: …expression in archaic or “primitive” societies, often related to ritual presentation, is modelled on the structure of the cosmogonic myth. The masks, dances, and gestures are, in one way or another, aspects of the structure of the cosmogonic myth. This meaning may also extend to the tools that people…

  • indigestion (pathology)

    Indigestion, any or all of the symptoms—abdominal discomfort, belching, flatulence, aversion to eating, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, heartburn—associated with the malfunctioning of the digestive system. Indigestion may be caused by disease, but it primarily occurs because of stress,

  • Indigetes (Roman religion)

    Roman religion: The earliest divinities: Di Indigetes was a name given collectively to these forebears, as well as to other deified powers or spirits who likewise controlled the destiny of Rome. For example, the name Indiges is applied to Aeneas, whose mythical immigration from Troy led to the eventual foundation of…

  • Indigirka River (river, Russia)

    Indigirka River, river, Sakha republic (Yakutia), far eastern Russia. It is one of the major rivers of northeastern Siberia. The Indigirka rises in the Verkhoyansk Mountains and flows 1,072 miles (1,726 km) north through the Chersky Range into the broad Indigirka lowland, most of which is in

  • Indigites (Roman religion)

    Roman religion: The earliest divinities: Di Indigetes was a name given collectively to these forebears, as well as to other deified powers or spirits who likewise controlled the destiny of Rome. For example, the name Indiges is applied to Aeneas, whose mythical immigration from Troy led to the eventual foundation of…

  • indignados (Spanish protestors)

    Spain: The Rajoy administration: Dubbed the indignados (“angry ones”) by the media, the protesters were predominantly young people who were dissatisfied with the pace of economic and political reform. With the unemployment rate still topping 20 percent (more than 40 percent for job seekers under age 25) and the Spanish bond…

  • Indignation (novel by Roth)

    Philip Roth: Indignation (2008; film 2016) is narrated from the afterlife by a man who died at age 19. The Humbling (2009; film 2014) revisits Everyman’s mortality-obsessed terrain, this time through the lens of an aging actor who, realizing that he has lost his talent, finds himself…

  • Indignation (film by Schamus [2016])

    Philip Roth: Indignation (2008; film 2016) is narrated from the afterlife by a man who died at age 19. The Humbling (2009; film 2014) revisits Everyman’s mortality-obsessed terrain, this time through the lens of an aging actor who, realizing that he has lost his talent, finds himself unable to…

  • indigo (dye)

    Indigo, an important and valuable vat dyestuff, obtained until about 1900 entirely from plants of the genera Indigofera and Isatis. Indigo was known to the ancients of Asia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Britain, and Peru. It is used in the United States mainly for dyeing cotton for work clothes; for a long

  • indigo (plant genus)

    Indigo, (genus Indigofera), large genus of more than 750 species of shrubs, trees, and herbs in the pea family (Fabaceae). Some species, particularly true indigo (Indigofera tinctoria) and Natal indigo (I. arrecta), were once an important source of indigo dye. The cultivation of indigo plants and

  • indigo snake (reptile)

    Indigo snake, (Drymarchon corais), docile, nonvenomous member of the family Colubridae found from the southeastern United States to Brazil. It is the largest snake in the United States—record length is 2.6 metres (8.5 feet)—and one of the largest of all colubrids. In the United States its colour is

  • Indigofera (plant genus)

    Indigo, (genus Indigofera), large genus of more than 750 species of shrubs, trees, and herbs in the pea family (Fabaceae). Some species, particularly true indigo (Indigofera tinctoria) and Natal indigo (I. arrecta), were once an important source of indigo dye. The cultivation of indigo plants and

  • Indigofera arrecta (plant)

    indigo: …true indigo (Indigofera tinctoria) and Natal indigo (I. arrecta), were once an important source of indigo dye. The cultivation of indigo plants and the extraction of the dyestuff were an important industry in India up to the beginning of the 20th century. Synthetic indigo, developed about that time, gradually replaced…

  • Indigofera tinctoria (plant)

    indigo: Some species, particularly true indigo (Indigofera tinctoria) and Natal indigo (I. arrecta), were once an important source of indigo dye. The cultivation of indigo plants and the extraction of the dyestuff were an important industry in India up to the beginning of the 20th century. Synthetic indigo, developed…

  • Indigreat (Maine, United States)

    Portland, city, seat (1760) of Cumberland county, southwestern Maine, U.S. The state’s largest city, it is the hub of a metropolitan statistical area that includes the cities of South Portland and Westbrook and the towns of Falmouth, Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland, Freeport, Gorham, Scarborough,

  • indinavir (drug)

    protease inhibitor: include ritonavir, saquinavir, and indinavir.

  • Indio (California, United States)

    Indio, city, Riverside county, southern California, U.S. Located in the Coachella Valley, Indio lies between Palm Springs (northwest) and the Salton Sea (southeast). The area was originally inhabited by Cahuilla Indians and was the site of Spanish and Mexican exploration in the late 18th century;

  • indio desnudo (plant)

    tree: Tree bark: …smooth, copper-coloured covering of the gumbo-limbo (Bursera simaruba) to the thick, soft, spongy bark of the punk, or cajeput, tree (Melaleuca leucadendron). Other types of bark include the commercial cork of the cork oak (Quercus suber) and the rugged, fissured outer coat of many other oaks; the flaking, patchy-coloured barks…

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