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  • Industrial Relations Act (United Kingdom [1971])

    organized labour: Trade unionism after World War II: An erosion of strength: …new legal code in the Industrial Relations Act of 1971, which included laws on unfair industrial practices and on legally binding agreements. These and various other provisions were to be enforced by a special Industrial Relations Court—in effect reversing the entire British tradition of legal abstention. Even then, unions refused…

  • Industrial Relations Court (British labour)

    organized labour: Trade unionism after World War II: An erosion of strength: …be enforced by a special Industrial Relations Court—in effect reversing the entire British tradition of legal abstention. Even then, unions refused to be contained within the tight legal framework that had been created, and this government was besieged by a renewed industrial militancy that not only rendered its legislation inoperable…

  • industrial reseller (economics)

    marketing: Business marketing: Industrial resellers are middlemen—essentially wholesalers but in some cases retailers—who distribute goods to user customers, to original-equipment manufacturers, and to other middlemen. Industrial-goods wholesalers include mill-supply houses, steel warehouses, machine-tool dealers, paper jobbers, and chemical distributors.

  • Industrial Revolution

    Industrial Revolution, in modern history, the process of change from an agrarian and handicraft economy to one dominated by industry and machine manufacturing. This process began in Britain in the 18th century and from there spread to other parts of the world. Although used earlier by French

  • Industrial Revolution, The (work by Toynbee)

    Arnold Toynbee: …his lectures, published posthumously as The Industrial Revolution in 1884, was one of the first economic histories of Britain’s industrial development in the 18th and 19th centuries.

  • industrial robot

    automation: Industrial robotics: Industrial robotics is an automation technology that has received considerable attention since about 1960. This section will discuss the development of industrial robotics, the design of the robot manipulator, and the methods of programming robots. The applications of robots are examined below in…

  • industrial safety (condition)

    Safety, those activities that seek either to minimize or to eliminate hazardous conditions that can cause bodily injury. Safety precautions fall under two principal headings, occupational safety and public safety. Occupational safety is concerned with risks encountered in areas where people work:

  • industrial school (penology)

    Reformatory, correctional institution for the treatment, training, and social rehabilitation of young offenders. In England in the mid-19th century, the House of Refuge movement prompted the establishment of the first reformatories, which were conceived as an alternative to the traditional practice

  • industrial sewage (waste management)

    wastewater treatment: Types of sewage: industrial sewage, and storm sewage. Domestic sewage carries used water from houses and apartments; it is also called sanitary sewage. Industrial sewage is used water from manufacturing or chemical processes. Storm sewage, or storm water, is runoff from precipitation that is collected in a system…

  • industrial ship

    ship: Industrial ships: Industrial ships are those whose function is to carry out an industrial process at sea. A fishing-fleet mother ship that processes fish into fillets, canned fish, or fish meal is an example. Some floating oil drilling or production rigs are built in ship…

  • industrial society

    Industrialization, the process of converting to a socioeconomic order in which industry is dominant. A brief treatment of industrialization follows. For fuller treatment, see modernization. How or why some agrarian societies have evolved into industrial states is not always fully understood. What

  • Industrial Training Act (United Kingdom [1964])

    employee training: The Industrial Training Act, which came into force in Great Britain in 1964, provided for the establishment of an Industrial Training Board for each industry to make specific recommendations concerning the form and content of training courses and the standards to be set, and to recommend…

  • Industrial Training Board (British government agency)

    employee training: …for the establishment of an Industrial Training Board for each industry to make specific recommendations concerning the form and content of training courses and the standards to be set, and to recommend appropriate further education. By the 1990s it had been replaced with a network of 82 Training and Enterprise…

  • industrial truck

    Industrial truck, carrier designed to transport materials within a factory area with maximum flexibility in making moves. Most industrial trucks permit mechanized pickup and deposit of the loads, eliminating manual work in lifting as well as transporting. Depending on their means of locomotion,

  • industrial union (trade union)

    Industrial union, trade union that combines all workers, both skilled and unskilled, who are employed in a particular industry. At the heart of industrial unionism is the slogan “one shop, one union.” Excluded from the early unions of skilled craftsmen, the semiskilled and unskilled workers in the

  • Industrial Workers of the World (labour organization)

    Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), labour organization founded in Chicago in 1905 by representatives of 43 groups. The IWW opposed the American Federation of Labor’s acceptance of capitalism and its refusal to include unskilled workers in craft unions. Among the founders of the IWW were William

  • industrial-organizational psychology

    Industrial-organizational psychology, application of concepts and methods from several subspecialties of the discipline (such as learning, motivation, and social psychology) to business and institutional settings. The study of industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology originated in the United

  • industrialization

    Industrialization, the process of converting to a socioeconomic order in which industry is dominant. A brief treatment of industrialization follows. For fuller treatment, see modernization. How or why some agrarian societies have evolved into industrial states is not always fully understood. What

  • Industries, Confederation of (Italian business association)

    Italy: Later economic trends: …from the employers’ association, the Confederation of Industries (Confindustria). This was reflected in a sharp fall in inflation to 12 percent in 1984 and down to 4.2 percent in 1986. However, a three-year contract signed in 1987 between Confindustria and trade unions representing all civil servants and some private industrial…

  • Industrious Bee (Russian magazine)

    history of publishing: Continental Europe: …the British Spectator, was called “Industrious Bee” and began in 1759. Catherine II used her Vsiakaia Vsiachina (1769–70), also modeled on the Spectator, to attack opponents, among them Nikolay Novikov, whose “Drone” (1769–70) and “Windbag” (1770) were suspended and whose “Painter” (1770–72) escaped only by being dedicated to the Empress.

  • industry

    Industry, a group of productive enterprises or organizations that produce or supply goods, services, or sources of income. In economics, industries are customarily classified as primary, secondary, and tertiary; secondary industries are further classified as heavy and light. This sector of a

  • Industry and Idleness (work by Hogarth)

    William Hogarth: Return to prints: Industry and Idleness (1747) contains, in addition to its obvious moral message, a good deal of self-dramatization, depicting the virtuous apprentice made good in a hostile world. In these years Hogarth’s uncertainty and frustration expressed themselves in a number of unfinished paintings. In several spontaneous…

  • Indy 500 (automobile race)

    Indianapolis 500, U.S. automobile race held annually from 1911, except for the war years 1917–18 and 1942–45. The race is always run at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Speedway, a suburban enclave of Indianapolis, Indiana. Drawing crowds of several hundred thousand people, the race is among the

  • Indy Racing League (American racing organization)

    Indianapolis 500: …owner Tony George formed the Indy Racing League (IRL) to counteract the influence of CART. The IRL has overseen the 500 since 1997. CART went bankrupt in 2003 and was re-formed the following year as Champ Car. In 2008 the IRL merged with Champ Car, unifying the two leagues under…

  • Indy, Paul-Marie-Theodore-Vincent d’ (French composer)

    Vincent d’Indy, French composer and teacher, remarkable for his attempted, and partially successful, reform of French symphonic and dramatic music along lines indicated by César Franck. D’Indy studied under Albert Lavignac, Antoine Marmontel, and Franck (for composition). In 1874 he was admitted to

  • Indy, Vincent d’ (French composer)

    Vincent d’Indy, French composer and teacher, remarkable for his attempted, and partially successful, reform of French symphonic and dramatic music along lines indicated by César Franck. D’Indy studied under Albert Lavignac, Antoine Marmontel, and Franck (for composition). In 1874 he was admitted to

  • Ine (king of Wessex)

    Ine, Anglo-Saxon king of the West Saxons, or Wessex, from 688 to 726. One of the most powerful West Saxon rulers before Alfred the Great, Ine was the first West Saxon king to issue a code of laws, which are an important source for the structure of early English society. Ine succeeded to the throne

  • Ineffabilis Deus (bull by Pope Pius IX)

    Immaculate Conception: …solemnly declared in the bull Ineffabilis Deus that the doctrine was revealed by God and hence was to be firmly believed as such by all Catholics. The feast of the Immaculate Conception is celebrated on December 8 and is usually a holy day of obligation (on which Catholics are required…

  • inégalité (music)

    musical performance: The 17th and 18th centuries: …a specifically French tradition of inégalité: performing certain evenly written notes unequally, with alternately longer and shorter values.

  • inelastic collision (physics)

    plasma: Plasma oscillations and parameters: In an inelastic collision, a fraction of the kinetic energy is transferred to the internal energy of the colliding particles. In an atom, for example, the electrons have certain allowed (discrete) energies and are said to be bound. During a collision, a bound electron may be excited—that…

  • inelastic impact (physics)

    plasma: Plasma oscillations and parameters: In an inelastic collision, a fraction of the kinetic energy is transferred to the internal energy of the colliding particles. In an atom, for example, the electrons have certain allowed (discrete) energies and are said to be bound. During a collision, a bound electron may be excited—that…

  • inelastic neutron scattering (physics)

    Bertram N. Brockhouse: …a variant technique known as inelastic neutron scattering, in which the relative energies of the scattered neutrons are measured to yield additional data. He used inelastic neutron scattering in his pioneering examination of phonons, which are units of the lattice vibrational energy expended by the scattered neutrons. He also developed…

  • inelastic scattering (physics)

    Bertram N. Brockhouse: …a variant technique known as inelastic neutron scattering, in which the relative energies of the scattered neutrons are measured to yield additional data. He used inelastic neutron scattering in his pioneering examination of phonons, which are units of the lattice vibrational energy expended by the scattered neutrons. He also developed…

  • inelastic strain (mechanics)

    metallurgy: Testing mechanical properties: …until it begins to undergo plastic strain (i.e., strain that is not recovered when the sample is unloaded). This stress is called the yield stress. It is a property that is the same for various samples of the same alloy, and it is useful in designing structures since it predicts…

  • inequality (mathematics)

    Inequality, In mathematics, a statement of an order relationship—greater than, greater than or equal to, less than, or less than or equal to—between two numbers or algebraic expressions. Inequalities can be posed either as questions, much like equations, and solved by similar techniques, or as

  • Inequality: What Can Be Done? (work by Atkinson)

    Tony Atkinson: …1980) and his last book, Inequality: What Can Be Done? (2015). Atkinson received (1966) a bachelor’s degree from Churchill College, Cambridge. He became (1971) a professor of economics at the University of Essex and later taught at University College London (1976–79), the London School of Economics and Political Science (1980–92),…

  • inequigranular rock (geology)

    igneous rock: Fabric: Rocks that are unevenly grained, or inequigranular, are generally characterized either by a seriate fabric, in which the variation in grain size is gradual and essentially continuous, or by a porphyritic fabric, involving more than one distinct range of grain sizes. Both of these kinds of texture are…

  • Inermiidae (fish family)

    perciform: Annotated classification: Family Inermiidae (bonnetmouths) Teeth absent on jaws, vomer and palatine; dorsal fins separated by a deep notch; Marine, western tropical Atlantic Ocean. 2 monotypic genera. Family Centropomidae (snooks, or robalos) Eocene to present. Elongated basslike fishes; head long and

  • inerrancy (biblical criticism)

    Christian fundamentalism: Origins: …of faith and morals) but inerrant (correct when it spoke on any matters, including history and science).

  • inert gas (chemical elements)

    Noble gas, any of the seven chemical elements that make up Group 18 (VIIIa) of the periodic table. The elements are helium (He), neon (Ne), argon (Ar), krypton (Kr), xenon (Xe), radon (Rn), and oganesson (Og). The noble gases are colourless, odourless, tasteless, nonflammable gases. They

  • inert indicator electrode

    chemical analysis: Inert-indicator-electrode potentiometry: Inert-indicator-electrode potentiometry utilizes oxidation-reduction reactions. The potential of a solution that contains an oxidation-reduction couple (e.g., Fe3+ and Fe2+) is dependent on the identity of the couple and on the activities of the oxidized and reduced chemical species in the couple. For a…

  • inertia (physics)

    Inertia, property of a body by virtue of which it opposes any agency that attempts to put it in motion or, if it is moving, to change the magnitude or direction of its velocity. Inertia is a passive property and does not enable a body to do anything except oppose such active agents as forces and

  • inertia, law of (physics)

    Law of inertia, postulate in physics that, if a body is at rest or moving at a constant speed in a straight line, it will remain at rest or keep moving in a straight line at constant speed unless it is acted upon by a force. The law of inertia was first formulated by Galileo Galilei for horizontal

  • inertia, moment of (physics)

    Moment of inertia, in physics, quantitative measure of the rotational inertia of a body—i.e., the opposition that the body exhibits to having its speed of rotation about an axis altered by the application of a torque (turning force). The axis may be internal or external and may or may not be fixed.

  • inertial bone conduction (physiology)

    human ear: Transmission of sound by bone conduction: …of transmission is known as inertial bone conduction. In otosclerosis the fixed stapes interferes with inertial, but not with compressional, bone conduction.

  • inertial confinement fusion (physics)

    fusion reactor: Principles of inertial confinement: In an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor, a tiny solid pellet of fuel—such as deuterium-tritium (D-T)—would be compressed to tremendous density and temperature so that fusion power is produced in the few nanoseconds before the pellet blows apart. The compression is accomplished by focusing an intense laser…

  • inertial force (physics)

    Inertial force, any force invoked by an observer to maintain the validity of Isaac Newton’s second law of motion in a reference frame that is rotating or otherwise accelerating at a constant rate. For specific inertial forces, see centrifugal force; Coriolis force; d’Alembert’s p

  • inertial frame of reference (physics)

    reference frame: …known as a Newtonian, or inertial reference, frame. The laws are also valid in any set of rigid axes moving with constant velocity and without rotation relative to the inertial frame; this concept is known as the principle of Newtonian or Galilean relativity. A coordinate system attached to the Earth…

  • inertial guidance system

    Inertial guidance system, electronic system that continuously monitors the position, velocity, and acceleration of a vehicle, usually a submarine, missile, or airplane, and thus provides navigational data or control without need for communicating with a base station. The basic components of an

  • inertial mass (physics)

    gravity: Gravitational fields and the theory of general relativity: Inertial mass is a mass parameter giving the inertial resistance to acceleration of the body when responding to all types of force. Gravitational mass is determined by the strength of the gravitational force experienced by the body when in the gravitational field g. The E?tv?s…

  • inertial measurement unit (technology)

    lidar: …Positioning System (GPS) equipment and inertial measurement units (IMUs) in the late 1980s that accurate lidar data were possible.

  • inertial navigator

    Inertial guidance system, electronic system that continuously monitors the position, velocity, and acceleration of a vehicle, usually a submarine, missile, or airplane, and thus provides navigational data or control without need for communicating with a base station. The basic components of an

  • inertial reference frame (physics)

    reference frame: …known as a Newtonian, or inertial reference, frame. The laws are also valid in any set of rigid axes moving with constant velocity and without rotation relative to the inertial frame; this concept is known as the principle of Newtonian or Galilean relativity. A coordinate system attached to the Earth…

  • Inertial Upper Stage (spacecraft)

    Boeing Company: History of Boeing Company: …was selected to develop the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS), a two-stage payload delivery vehicle that can be taken into space by either a space shuttle or a launcher such as the Titan. In 1993 NASA selected Boeing as the prime contractor for the ISS, and two years later the company…

  • inertinite (maceral group)

    coal: Macerals: The inertinite group makes up 5 to 40 percent of most coals. Their reflectance values are usually the highest in a given sample. The most common inertinite maceral is fusinite, which has a charcoal-like appearance with obvious cell texture. The cells may be either empty or…

  • inertness (chemistry)

    coordination compound: Lability and inertness: In considering the mechanisms of substitution (exchange) reactions, Canadian-born American chemist Henry Taube distinguished between complexes that are labile (reacting completely in about one minute in 0.1 M solution at room temperature [25 °C, or 77 °F]) and those that are inert (under the…

  • Inés del alma mía (novel by Allende)

    Isabel Allende: …Inés del alma mía (2006; Inés of My Soul) tells the fictionalized story of Inés Suárez, the mistress of conquistador Pedro de Valdivia. La isla bajo el mar (2009; The Island Beneath the Sea) uses the 1791 slave revolt in Haiti as a backdrop for a story about a mulatto…

  • Inés of My Soul (novel by Allende)

    Isabel Allende: …Inés del alma mía (2006; Inés of My Soul) tells the fictionalized story of Inés Suárez, the mistress of conquistador Pedro de Valdivia. La isla bajo el mar (2009; The Island Beneath the Sea) uses the 1791 slave revolt in Haiti as a backdrop for a story about a mulatto…

  • inescutcheon (heraldry)

    heraldry: Ordinaries: …as a charge is an inescutcheon and often is used to bear the arms of an heraldic heiress (a daughter of a family of no sons). The quarter occupies one-fourth of the shield; the canton, smaller than the quarter, is one-third of the chief. Checky, or chequy, describes the field…

  • inex period (astronomy)

    eclipse: Cycles of eclipses: …series are separated by the inex, a period of 29 years minus 20 days—that is, 358 synodic months—after which time the new moon has come from one node to the opposite node. A group of inex periods lasts about 23,000 years, with about 70 groups coexisting at any one time,…

  • Inextinguishable Fire, The (film by Farocki)

    Harun Farocki: In 1969 Farocki created Nicht l?schbares Feuer (The Inextinguishable Fire), a 25-minute agitprop film that explored and criticized the use of napalm during the Vietnam War. Typifying what would become his characteristic film-essay structure, the film built an argument from found film clips and photographic images. Farocki incorporated footage…

  • Inextinguishable, The (work by Nielsen)

    Symphony No. 4, Op. 29, symphony for orchestra by Danish composer Carl Nielsen in which he set out to capture in music the idea of an “inextinguishable” life force that runs through all creation. The work premiered on February 1, 1916. In a letter to a friend, Nielsen stated that in this symphony

  • INF (arms designation)

    20th-century international relations: Renewal of arms control: …to link Pershing deployment with intermediate nuclear forces (INF) talks with the U.S.S.R. Reagan tried to seize the moral high ground with his “zero-option” proposal for complete elimination of all such missiles from Europe and a call for new Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START) to negotiate real reductions in the…

  • INF Treaty (United States-Soviet Union [1987])

    Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, nuclear arms-control accord reached by the United States and the Soviet Union in 1987 in which those two nations agreed to eliminate their stocks of intermediate-range and shorter-range (or “medium-range”) land-based missiles (which could carry nuclear

  • infallibility decree (Indian history)

    India: Evolution of a nonsectarian state: …1579 a public edict (ma??ar) declaring his right to be the supreme arbiter in Muslim religious matters—above the body of Muslim religious scholars and jurists. He had by then also undertaken a number of stern measures to reform the administration of religious grants, which were now available to learned…

  • infallibility, papal (Roman Catholicism)

    Papal infallibility, in Roman Catholic theology, the doctrine that the pope, acting as supreme teacher and under certain conditions, cannot err when he teaches in matters of faith or morals. As an element of the broader understanding of the infallibility of the church, this doctrine is based on the

  • infamia (law)

    Infamy, public disgrace or loss of reputation, particularly as a consequence of criminal conviction. In early common law, conviction for an infamous crime resulted in disqualification to testify as a witness. The criterion for considering a crime infamous was whether or not it stamped the offender

  • Infamous (film by McGrath [2006])

    Peter Bogdanovich: The 1980s and beyond: Jealousy (1997), Infamous (2006), and While We’re Young (2014). His notable roles on television included that of a psychiatrist on the HBO series The Sopranos.

  • infamy (law)

    Infamy, public disgrace or loss of reputation, particularly as a consequence of criminal conviction. In early common law, conviction for an infamous crime resulted in disqualification to testify as a witness. The criterion for considering a crime infamous was whether or not it stamped the offender

  • Infancia (work by Ramos)

    Graciliano Ramos: His memoirs, Infancia (1945; “Childhood”), describe the hazards of his family’s fortunes in the drought-stricken area, his meagre schooling, and the education he pieced together for himself by reading the works of émile Zola, José Maria de E?a de Queirós, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, and Maxim Gorky.

  • infancy

    Infancy, among humans, the period of life between birth and the acquisition of language approximately one to two years later. A brief treatment of infancy follows. For a full treatment of human mental development during infancy, see human behaviour: Development in infancy. The average newborn

  • Infancy and Human Growth (work by Gesell)

    Arnold Gesell: In Infancy and Human Growth (1928), he presented a developmental schedule based on this theory, using 195 items of behaviour to evaluate infants of ages between 3 and 30 months. In 1938 Gesell and Helen Thompson produced a revised developmental schedule for evaluating infants as early…

  • infancy narrative (religion)

    biblical literature: The Gospel According to Matthew: …chapters 1–2, in which the birth narrative relates Jesus’ descent (by adoption according to the will of God) through Joseph into the Davidic royal line. Though a virgin birth is mentioned, it is not capitalized upon theologically in Matthew. The story includes a flight into Egypt (recalling a Mosaic tradition).…

  • infant (law)

    Minor, person below the legal age of majority or adulthood. The age of majority varies in different countries, and even in different jurisdictions within a country. It also differs with the type of activity concerned, such as marrying, purchasing alcohol, or driving an automobile. Twenty-one years

  • infant and toddler development

    Infant and toddler development, the physical, emotional, behavioral, and mental growth of children from ages 0 to 36 months. Different milestones characterize each stage of infant (0 to 12 months) and toddler (12 to 36 months) development. Although most healthy infants and toddlers reach each

  • infant and toddler health

    Infant and toddler health, area of medicine concerned with the well-being and prevention of disease among children ages 0 to 36 months. One of the most important factors in promoting infant health is breast-feeding, which provides strong health protection for infants and has the advantage of being

  • infant betrothal (marriage custom)

    Australian Aboriginal peoples: Kinship, marriage, and the family: Infant betrothal was common. If arranged before the birth of one or both of the prospective spouses, it was a tentative arrangement subject to later ratification, mainly through continued gift giving to the girl’s parents. In some Aboriginal societies parents of marriageable girls played one…

  • infant botulism (pathology)

    botulism: Infant botulism, which may result from feeding infants honey contaminated with the clostridial spores, exhibits symptoms such as constipation, poor feeding, and a weak cry; children under the age of one year should not be given honey because of this risk.

  • Infant Custody Bill (United Kingdom [1839])

    Caroline Norton: …were instrumental in introducing the Infant Custody Bill, which was finally carried in 1839. In 1855 she was again involved in a lawsuit because her husband not only refused to pay her allowance but demanded the proceeds of her books. Her eloquent letters of protest to Queen Victoria (English Laws…

  • infant development

    Infant and toddler development, the physical, emotional, behavioral, and mental growth of children from ages 0 to 36 months. Different milestones characterize each stage of infant (0 to 12 months) and toddler (12 to 36 months) development. Although most healthy infants and toddlers reach each

  • infant formula (food)

    infant mortality rate: Breastfeeding controversies: The use of infant formula has come under attack in both developing countries and LDCs as well as in the industrialized world. Many forms of infant formula start as powders that must be mixed with water to be used. The World Health Organization (WHO) has questioned the use…

  • infant industry (international trade)

    international trade: The infant-industry argument: Advocates of protection often argue that new and growing industries, particularly in less-developed countries, need to be shielded from foreign competition. They contend that costs decline with growth and that some industries must reach a minimum size before they are able to compete…

  • Infant Joy (poem by Blake)

    William Blake: Blake as a poet: …are written for children—in “Infant Joy” only three words have as many as two syllables—and they represent the innocent and the vulnerable, from babies to beetles, protected and fostered by powers beyond their own. In “The Chimney Sweeper,” for example,

  • infant mortality rate

    Infant mortality rate, measure of human infant deaths in a group younger than one year of age. It is an important indicator of the overall physical health of a community. Preserving the lives of newborns has been a long-standing issue in public health, social policy, and humanitarian endeavours.

  • infant perception

    Infant perception, process by which a human infant (age 0 to 12 months) gains awareness of and responds to external stimuli. At birth, infants possess functional sensory systems; vision is somewhat organized, and audition (hearing), olfaction (smell), and touch are fairly mature. However, infants

  • Infant Phenomenon (fictional character)

    Infant Phenomenon, fictional character, a child performer who appears in the novel Nicholas Nickleby (1838–39) by Charles Dickens. Ninetta is the beloved eight-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Crummles, the manager-actors of a troupe of strolling players in which Nicholas Nickleby is a

  • infant school (educational division)

    Kindergarten, (German: “children’s garden”, ) educational division, a supplement to elementary school intended to accommodate children between the ages of four and six years. Originating in the early 19th century, the kindergarten was an outgrowth of the ideas and practices of Robert Owen in Great

  • infant stimulation program (therapy)

    Infant stimulation program, approach to sensory enrichment for very young children, particularly those who are ill or who are otherwise deprived of typical sensory experiences. Infant stimulation is a process of providing supplemental sensory stimulation in any or all of the sensory modalities

  • infanta (Spanish and Portuguese title)

    Infante, the title borne from the 13th century by the children of the Spanish and Portuguese monarchs. The title infante was borne by the sons of the sovereign, and the title infanta was given to the daughters and to the wife of an infante. From the reign of John I of Castile (1379–90) there began

  • infante (Spanish and Portuguese title)

    Infante, the title borne from the 13th century by the children of the Spanish and Portuguese monarchs. The title infante was borne by the sons of the sovereign, and the title infanta was given to the daughters and to the wife of an infante. From the reign of John I of Castile (1379–90) there began

  • Infante de Antequera, El (king of Aragon)

    Ferdinand I, king of Aragon from 1412 to 1416, second son of John I of Castile and Eleanor, daughter of Peter IV of Aragon. Because his elder brother, Henry III, was an invalid, Ferdinand took the battlefield against the Muslims of Granada. When Henry III died in 1406, his son John II was an infant

  • Infante, Rio de (river, South Africa)

    Great Fish River, river in the Cape Midlands, Eastern Cape province, southern South Africa. The Great Fish River has a length of 430 miles (692 km) and a drainage area of 11,900 square miles (30,800 square km). Its main northern tributary, the Great Brak River, rises in 7,000-foot- (2,100-metre-)

  • infanticide (human behaviour)

    Infanticide, the killing of the newborn. It has often been interpreted as a primitive method of birth control and a means of ridding a group of its weak and deformed children; but most societies actively desire children and put them to death (or allow them to die) only under exceptional

  • infanticide (animal behaviour)

    bonobo: Furthermore, the phenomena of infanticide, cannibalism, and lethal invasion seen among chimps have never been observed among the bonobo. Relationships between separate communities also differ—individuals often intermingle. Adult males do not intermingle but, unlike chimpanzees, are not hostile. The egalitarian and peaceful bonobo society might have evolved as a…

  • infantile amnesia (psychology)

    memory: Amnesia: Known as infantile amnesia, this universal phenomenon implies that the brain systems required to encode and retrieve specific events are not adequately developed to support long-term memory before age three. Another theory points to developmental changes in the means by which memories are formed and retrieved after early…

  • infantile cortical hyperostosis (pathology)

    Caffey syndrome, a hereditary disease of infants, characterized by swellings of the periosteum (the bone layer where new bone is produced) and the bone cortex of the upper arms, shoulder girdle, and lower jaw. The disease is accompanied by fever and irritability; after a series of periodic

  • infantile cystinosis (pathology)

    cystinosis: …three distinct forms of cystinosis—nephropathic (infantile), intermediate (adolescent), and nonnephropathic (benign, or ocular)—which differ with respect to clinical presentation, progression, and severity.

  • infantile hemangioma (pathology)

    Infantile hemangioma, a congenital benign tumour made up of endothelial cells (the cells lining the inner surface of a blood vessel) that form vascular spaces, which then become filled with blood cells. Infantile hemangiomas are the most commonly occurring tumours in infants and are only rarely

  • infantile neurosis (psychoanalysis)

    Oedipus complex: …however, there occurs an “infantile neurosis” that is an important forerunner of similar reactions during the child’s adult life. The superego, the moral factor that dominates the conscious adult mind, also has its origin in the process of overcoming the Oedipus complex. Freud considered the reactions against the Oedipus…

  • infantile Refsum disease (pathology)

    metabolic disease: Peroxisomal disorders: adrenoleukodystrophy, hyperpipecolic acidemia, and infantile Refsum disease. Patients may have severely decreased muscle tone (hypotonia), cerebral malformations, seizures, and an enlarged liver in infancy. Many develop eye abnormalities, in particular a defect in retinal pigment. Patients with Zellweger syndrome also may have small kidney cysts and cranial abnormalities.

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