You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • infundibulum (anatomy)

    animal development: The brain and spinal cord: …forms a funnel-shaped depression, the infundibulum, which becomes connected with the pituitary, or hypophysis, the most important gland of internal secretion (i.e., endocrine gland) in vertebrates. Indeed, the posterior lobe of the hypophysis is actually derived from the floor of the diencephalon. Tissues of the infundibulum and the posterior lobe…

  • infused contemplation (Roman Catholicism)

    Christianity: Christian mysticism: …the help of grace, and infused contemplation, which was a pure and unmerited gift, framed much of this discussion. Other Roman Catholic theologians, such as Cuthbert Butler in Western Mysticism (1922) and Anselm Stolz in Theologie der Mystik (1936), broke with Neoscholasticism to consider the wider scriptural and patristic tradition.…

  • infusorigen (biology)

    mesozoan: …into minute organisms known as infusorigens; these are reduced hermaphroditic individuals that remain in the axial cell of the rhombogen and form sperm and egg cells. Following fertilization within the rhombogen, the zygotes develop into ciliated infusoriform larvae, which escape from the parent rhombogen and from the cephalopod. It is…

  • Ing (Norse mythology)

    Freyr, in Norse mythology, the ruler of peace and fertility, rain, and sunshine and the son of the sea god Nj?rd. Although originally one of the Vanir tribe, he was included with the Aesir. Gerd, daughter of the giant Gymir, was his wife. Worshiped especially in Sweden, he was also well-known in

  • ING Groep NV (Dutch company)

    ING Group NV, global financial institution of Dutch origin that provides services in banking, insurance, and asset management. It is the Netherlands’ largest financial services company. Headquarters are in Amsterdam. ING Group was created as Internationale Nederlanden Groep (“International

  • ING Group NV (Dutch company)

    ING Group NV, global financial institution of Dutch origin that provides services in banking, insurance, and asset management. It is the Netherlands’ largest financial services company. Headquarters are in Amsterdam. ING Group was created as Internationale Nederlanden Groep (“International

  • Ing. C. Olivetti & C. SpA (Italian manufacturer)

    Olivetti & C. SpA, Italian multinational firm that manufactures office equipment and information systems. Headquarters are in Ivrea, Italy. Founded by Camillo Olivetti (1868–1943), an electrical engineer, the company began making typewriters in 1908. In 1925 Olivetti dispatched his son Adriano

  • Inga Falls (rapids, Democratic Republic of the Congo)

    Inga Falls, rapids on the lower Congo River and site of one of the world’s largest hydroelectric-dam projects, in western Democratic Republic of the Congo, about 25 miles (40 km) above the port of Matadi. At a sharp bend in the river between Sikila Island and the mouth of the Bundi River (a Congo

  • InGaA (materials science)

    nanotechnology: Bottom-up approach: Indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) dots can be formed by growing thin layers of InGaAs on GaAs in such a manner that repulsive forces caused by compressive strain in the InGaAs layer results in the formation of isolated quantum dots. After the growth of multiple layer…

  • InGaAsP (materials science)

    gallium: …GaN, gallium arsenide, GaAs, and indium gallium arsenide phosphide, InGaAsP—that have valuable semiconductor and optoelectronic properties. Some of these compounds are used in solid-state devices such as transistors and rectifiers, and some form the basis for light-emitting diodes and semiconductor lasers. GaN nanowires have been synthesized and used in electronic…

  • Ingaevone (Germanic mythology)

    Germanic peoples: …were divided into three groups—the Ingaevones, the Herminones, and the Istaevones—but the basis for this grouping is unknown. Tacitus records a variant form of the genealogy according to which Mannus had a larger number of sons, who were regarded as the ancestors of the Suebi, the Vandals, and others. At…

  • Ingalik (people)

    Deg Xinag, Athabaskan-speaking North American Indian tribe of interior Alaska, in the basins of the upper Kuskokwim and lower Yukon rivers. Their region is mountainous, with both woodlands and tundra, and is fairly rich in fish, caribou, bear, moose, and other game on which the Deg Xinag

  • Ingalls Building (building, Cincinnati, Ohio, United States)

    construction: The invention of reinforced concrete: Examples include the 16-story Ingalls Building (1903) in Cincinnati, which was 54 metres (180 feet) tall, and the 11-story Royal Liver Building (1909), built in Liverpool by Hennebique’s English representative, Louis Mouchel. The latter structure was Europe’s first skyscraper, its clock tower reaching a height of 95 metres (316…

  • Inganji Karinga (work by Kagame)

    Alexis Kagame: Kagame’s major books include Inganji Karinga (1943; “The Victorious Drums”), a history of the ancient Rwandans; Isoko y’Am?jyambere, 3 vol. (1949–51; “Sources of Progress”), an epic poem; La Poésie dynastique au Rwanda (1951; “Dynastic Poetry of Rwanda”); Introduction aux grands genres lyriques de l’ancien Rwanda (1969; “Introduction to the…

  • Ingarden, Roman (Polish philosopher)

    aesthetics: The ontology of art: Still others, notably the phenomenologist Roman Ingarden, argue that the work of art exists on several levels, being identical not with physical appearance but with totality of interpretations that secure the various formal and semantic levels that are contained in it.

  • Ingathering (English festival)

    Harvest Home, traditional English harvest festival, celebrated from antiquity and surviving to modern times in isolated regions. Participants celebrate the last day of harvest in late September by singing, shouting, and decorating the village with boughs. The cailleac, or last sheaf of corn

  • Ingathering, Feast of (Judaism)

    Sukkoth: The Bible refers to ?ag ha-asif (“Feast of the Ingathering,” Exodus 23:16), when grains and fruits were gathered at the harvest’s end, and to ?ag ha-sukkot (“Feast of Booths,” Leviticus 23:34), recalling the days when the Israelites lived in huts (sukkot) during their years of wandering in the wilderness…

  • Inge I Haraldsson (king of Norway)

    Inge I Haraldsson, king of Norway (1136–61), who maintained his claim to the throne against the illegitimate sons of his father, the Norwegian king Harald IV Gille (reigned 1130–36), and represented the interests of the higher nobles and clergy in the second part of the Norwegian civil wars. The

  • Inge Krokrygg (king of Norway)

    Inge I Haraldsson, king of Norway (1136–61), who maintained his claim to the throne against the illegitimate sons of his father, the Norwegian king Harald IV Gille (reigned 1130–36), and represented the interests of the higher nobles and clergy in the second part of the Norwegian civil wars. The

  • Inge the Hunchback (king of Norway)

    Inge I Haraldsson, king of Norway (1136–61), who maintained his claim to the throne against the illegitimate sons of his father, the Norwegian king Harald IV Gille (reigned 1130–36), and represented the interests of the higher nobles and clergy in the second part of the Norwegian civil wars. The

  • Inge, William (American playwright)

    William Inge, American playwright best known for his plays Come Back, Little Sheba (1950; filmed 1952); Picnic (1953; filmed 1956), for which he won a Pulitzer Prize; and Bus Stop (1955; filmed 1956). Inge was educated at the University of Kansas at Lawrence and at the George Peabody College for

  • Inge, William Motter (American playwright)

    William Inge, American playwright best known for his plays Come Back, Little Sheba (1950; filmed 1952); Picnic (1953; filmed 1956), for which he won a Pulitzer Prize; and Bus Stop (1955; filmed 1956). Inge was educated at the University of Kansas at Lawrence and at the George Peabody College for

  • Inge, William Ralph (British theologian)

    William Ralph Inge, British divine, Christian Platonist, and dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral, London. He was noted for his keen intellect and for his pessimistic views, which earned him the title “gloomy dean.” Inge was educated at Eton and at King’s College, Cambridge. He became assistant master at

  • Ingeborg (queen consort of France)

    Philip II: Internal affairs: …of Hainaut, he had married Ingeborg, sister of the Danish king Canute IV, on August 14, 1193, and on the next day, for a private reason, had resolved to separate from her. Having procured the annulment of his marriage by an assembly of bishops in November 1193, he took a…

  • Ingegneri, Marcantonio (Italian musician)

    Claudio Monteverdi: Early career: …of music at Cremona cathedral, Marcantonio Ingegneri, a well-known musician who wrote church music and madrigals of some distinction in an up-to-date though not revolutionary style of the 1570s. Monteverdi was obviously a precocious pupil, since he published several books of religious and secular music in his teens, all of…

  • Ingelger (count of Anjou)

    Anjou: First dynasty of counts: …was entrusted to a certain Ingelger, who became the founder of the first Angevin dynasty. Ingelger’s son Fulk I the Red rid the country of the Normans and enlarged his domains by taking part of Touraine. He died in 942, and under his successor, Fulk II the Good, the destruction…

  • Ingelow, Jean (British poet and novelist)

    Jean Ingelow, English poet and novelist popular in her own day and remembered for her narrative poem “The High Tide on the Coast of Lincolnshire, 1571” (1863), which reveals considerable command of language and a power to evoke feeling. The friend of many leading painters and writers, Ingelow was

  • Ingemann, Bernhard Severin (Danish author)

    Bernhard Severin Ingemann, historical novelist and poet whose works glorifying Denmark’s medieval past were popular for generations. Most of Ingemann’s many works have not won enduring acclaim, but his simple morning and evening songs (1837–38) are much admired in Denmark. The title of his

  • Ingenhousz, Jan (Dutch scientist)

    Jan Ingenhousz, Dutch-born British physician and scientist who is best known for his discovery of the process of photosynthesis, by which green plants in sunlight absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen. As a physician in London (1765–68), Ingenhousz was an early proponent of variolation, or the

  • Ingeniería y Tecnología, Universidad de (university, Lima, Peru)

    Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara: …followed, including the campus of Universidad de Ingeniería y Tecnología (UTEC) Lima (2015); the Toulouse School of Economics at the Université Toulouse 1 Capitole (2019), France; and the Institut Mines-Télécom (2019), Paris. The sloping concrete UTEC building recalls Lima’s seaside cliffs and Le Corbusier’s concrete works for Chandigarh, India. The…

  • ingenioso hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha, El (novel by Cervantes)

    Don Quixote, novel published in two parts (part 1, 1605, and part 2, 1615) by Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes, one of the most widely read classics of Western literature. Originally conceived as a parody of the chivalric romances that had long been in literary vogue, it describes realistically

  • Ingenious Britain: Making the UK the Leading High Tech Exporter in Europe (work by Dyson)

    Sir James Dyson: …replied in March 2010 with Ingenious Britain: Making the UK the Leading High Tech Exporter in Europe, a report that suggested, among other ideas, more freedom for universities to design unconventional engineering curricula and more collaboration between universities and technology companies.

  • Ingermanland (region, Russia)

    Russia: Peter’s youth and early reign: Russia’s acquisition of Ingria and Livonia (and later of Kurland) brought into the empire a new national and political minority: the German elites—urban bourgeoisie and landowning nobility—with their corporate privileges, harsh exploitation of native (Estonian and Latvian) servile peasantry, and Western culture and administrative practices. Eventually these elites…

  • Ingersoll, Laura (Canadian loyalist)

    Laura Secord, Canadian loyalist in the War of 1812. She moved to Canada with her family in the 1780s. On learning of an impending U.S. attack on the British outpost of Beaver Dams (1813), she walked through U.S. lines to warn the British commander; with the advance information, the British were

  • Ingersoll, Robert G. (American politician)

    Robert G. Ingersoll, American politician and orator known as “the great agnostic” who popularized the higher criticism of the Bible, as well as a humanistic philosophy and a scientific rationalism. Although he had little formal education, Ingersoll was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1854, and he

  • Ingersoll, Robert Green (American politician)

    Robert G. Ingersoll, American politician and orator known as “the great agnostic” who popularized the higher criticism of the Bible, as well as a humanistic philosophy and a scientific rationalism. Although he had little formal education, Ingersoll was admitted to the Illinois bar in 1854, and he

  • Ingersoll, Sarah Brown (American educator)

    Sarah Brown Ingersoll Cooper, American educator, a vital force in the 19th-century kindergarten movement, who promulgated her own model in numerous U.S. schools and internationally. Sarah Ingersoll, a cousin of orator and agnostic Robert G. Ingersoll, was educated at Cazenovia Seminary in 1850–53.

  • ingestion (physiology)

    digestion: Ingestion: As already explained, the nutrients obtained by most green plants are small inorganic molecules that can move with relative ease across cell membranes. Heterotrophic organisms such as bacteria and fungi, which require organic nutrients yet lack adaptations for ingesting bulk food, also rely on…

  • Ingham (Queensland, Australia)

    Ingham, town, northeastern Queensland, Australia, 19 miles (31 km) upstream from the mouth of the Herbert River. Founded in 1864, it was gazetted a shire in 1879. On a rail line and the Bruce Highway from Brisbane (745 miles [1,199 km] southeast), the town serves important sugarcane plantations,

  • Ingi I Haraldsson (king of Norway)

    Inge I Haraldsson, king of Norway (1136–61), who maintained his claim to the throne against the illegitimate sons of his father, the Norwegian king Harald IV Gille (reigned 1130–36), and represented the interests of the higher nobles and clergy in the second part of the Norwegian civil wars. The

  • Inglefield, Sir Edward Augustus (British admiral)

    Ellesmere Island: …was named in 1852 by Sir Edward A. Inglefield’s Expedition (which navigated the coast in the Isabel) for Francis Egerton, 1st Earl of Ellesmere.

  • Inglehart, Ronald (American social scientist)

    postmaterialism: …coined by American social scientist Ronald Inglehart in The Silent Revolution: Changing Values and Political Styles Among Western Publics (1977).

  • inglenook (furniture)

    Inglenook, wooden seat or settle built into the space on either side of the wide fireplaces common in 17th-century English houses and cottages. The word is of Scottish origin, “ingle” meaning a housefire burning on a hearth. This type of built-in furniture fell out of favour upon the introduction

  • inglés de los güesos, El (work by Lynch)

    Benito Lynch: …novel generally considered his best, El inglés de los güesos (1924; “The Englishman of the Bones”), a tragic story of love between a young English anthropologist and a gaucho girl. Lynch also wrote several collections of short stories.

  • Inglewood (California, United States)

    Inglewood, city, Los Angeles county, California, U.S. It lies southwest of downtown Los Angeles. Settled in 1873 by Daniel Freeman, who named the city for his hometown in Canada, it was laid out by the Centinela-Inglewood Land Company in 1887 and became a poultry-raising centre. Inglewood developed

  • Inglin, Meinrad (Swiss author)

    Meinrad Inglin, Swiss novelist and short-story writer who powerfully portrayed rural and small town life and values and warned against the influences of modern mass civilization. Educated at the universities of Neuchatel, Geneva, and Bern, he was awarded (1948) the Schiller Prize of the Swiss

  • Inglis, Charles (Canadian bishop)

    Charles Inglis, Canadian clergyman and educator who became the first Anglican bishop of Nova Scotia. Inglis went to North America and became a master in a church school in Lancaster, Pa., in 1757. In 1758, in England, he was ordained deacon and priest. Sent to Dover, Del., he undertook evangelical

  • Inglis, Charles Edward (British mathematician)

    mechanics of solids: Stress concentrations and fracture: …in 1914 the British engineer Charles Edward Inglis, derived the analogous solution for stresses around an elliptical hole. Their solution showed that the concentration of stress could become far greater, as the radius of curvature at an end of the hole becomes small compared with the overall length of the…

  • Inglis, Esther (Scottish calligrapher)

    Esther Inglis, Scottish calligrapher born in London to French parents, who produced about 55 miniature manuscript books between 1586 and 1624 and whose work was much admired and collected in her lifetime. Esther Inglis was a daughter of Nicholas Langlois and his wife, Marie Presot, French Huguenots

  • Inglis, James (American clergyman)

    Christian fundamentalism: Origins: Initiated by James Inglis, a New York City Baptist minister, shortly before his death in 1872, the conference continued under James H. Brookes (1830–97), a St. Louis, Missouri, Presbyterian minister and editor of the influential millennial periodical The Truth. Other early millennial leaders included George C. Needham…

  • Inglourious Basterds (film by Tarantino [2009])

    Quentin Tarantino: Inglourious Basterds (2009), set during World War II, follows a group of Jewish American soldiers trained to kill Nazis in German-occupied France. Django Unchained (2012), set in the antebellum American South, tells the lively tale of a freed slave attempting to rescue his wife from…

  • Ingoldestadt (Germany)

    Ingolstadt, city, Bavaria Land (state), southern Germany. It lies along the Danube and Schutter rivers, southwest of Regensburg. First mentioned in 806 as a crown estate, villa Ingoldestat, it was chartered in 1250 and became a ducal seat in 1392. The duchy of Bavaria-Ingolstadt passed to the

  • Ingolstadt (Germany)

    Ingolstadt, city, Bavaria Land (state), southern Germany. It lies along the Danube and Schutter rivers, southwest of Regensburg. First mentioned in 806 as a crown estate, villa Ingoldestat, it was chartered in 1250 and became a ducal seat in 1392. The duchy of Bavaria-Ingolstadt passed to the

  • Ingombe Ilede (historical site, Africa)

    Zambia: Archaeology and early history: …beads near Kalomo and at Ingombe Ilede, near the confluence of the Zambezi and Kafue rivers. The latter burials also included gold beads, copper ingots, and iron bells of a kind later associated with chieftainship. Those metals would have come from south of the Zambezi, but they were probably being…

  • ingot (metallurgy)

    Ingot, mass of metal cast into a size and shape such as a bar, plate, or sheet convenient to store, transport, and work into a semifinished or finished product; it also refers to a mold in which metal is so cast. Gold, silver, and steel, particularly, are cast into ingots for further processing.

  • Ingqumbo Yeminyanya (work by Jordan)

    A.C. Jordan: His novel Ingqumbo yeminyanya (1940; The Wrath of the Ancestors) goes much beyond earlier Xhosa novels in its attempt to reveal the workings of a modern black African mind in its fight against conservative tribal forces. In developing his theme of the conflict between traditional and Western ways, Jordan denies…

  • Ingraham v. Wright (law case)

    Ingraham v. Wright, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on April 19, 1977, ruled (5–4) that corporal punishment in public schools did not violate constitutional rights. The case centred on James Ingraham, an eighth-grade student at a public junior high school in Florida, who in 1970 was paddled by

  • Ingraham, Hubert (prime minister of The Bahamas)

    Hubert Ingraham, Bahamian political leader who served three terms as prime minister (1992–2002; 2007–12). Ingraham was educated at local schools in the Bahamas. He became a member of the bar in 1972 and entered into a private law practice. He served on various public agencies and during the 1970s

  • Ingraham, Hubert Alexander (prime minister of The Bahamas)

    Hubert Ingraham, Bahamian political leader who served three terms as prime minister (1992–2002; 2007–12). Ingraham was educated at local schools in the Bahamas. He became a member of the bar in 1972 and entered into a private law practice. He served on various public agencies and during the 1970s

  • Ingraham, Prentiss (American writer)

    Alexander Majors: …Cody arranged for dime novelist Prentiss Ingraham to help Majors write his autobiography, Seventy Years on the Frontier (1893).

  • ingrain (carpet)

    floor covering: Nomenclature and types: …the construction method, such as ingrain or Brussels.

  • ingrain dye

    Ingrain dye, any of a group of azo dyes that are produced within the fibre from chemical precursors and attach themselves by an irreversible chemical change, so that the dyeing shows improved fastness. Usually, the bonding of the dye molecules occurs through the hydroxyl or amino groups of the

  • Ingraj Bazar (India)

    Ingraj Bazar, city, north-central West Bengal state, northeastern India. It lies on the west bank of the Mahananda River. The city was chosen as the site of the British East India Company’s silk factories (trading stations) in 1676. The Dutch and French also had settlements there. It was

  • Ingram, Herbert (British publisher)

    history of publishing: Illustrated magazines: …was a newsagent in Nottingham, Herbert Ingram, who moved to London in 1842 and began publishing The Illustrated London News, a weekly consisting of 16 pages of letterpress and 32 woodcuts. It was successful from the start, winning the approval of the Archbishop of Canterbury and hence that of the…

  • Ingram, John Kells (Irish economist)

    John Kells Ingram, Irish economic historian who also achieved fame as a scholar and poet. Ingram graduated from Trinity College in Dublin in 1843. He showed considerable promise in both mathematics and classics and achieved early popularity as a poet. In 1852 he became a professor of oratory at

  • Ingram, Vernon Martin (American biochemist)

    Vernon Martin Ingram, (Werner Adolf Martin Immerwahr), American biochemist (born May 19, 1924, Breslau, Ger. [now Wroclaw, Pol.]—died Aug. 17, 2006, Boston, Mass.), was hailed as the father of molecular medicine for having discovered in the mid-1950s that the alteration of a single amino acid in t

  • Ingrams’s Peace (British and Yemeni history)

    Yemen: The age of imperialism: …who negotiated the famous “Ingrams’s Peace” among the more than 1,400 tribes and clans that had been feuding in that district for decades.

  • Ingrams, Harold (British official)

    Yemen: The age of imperialism: …the labours of British diplomat Harold Ingrams, who negotiated the famous “Ingrams’s Peace” among the more than 1,400 tribes and clans that had been feuding in that district for decades.

  • INGRES (database)

    Michael Stonebraker: …tenure at Berkeley, he invented INGRES (Interactive Graphics and Retrieval System) in 1974 and Postgres (Post INGRES) in 1986. INGRES was among the first relational databases (collections of information in which data are represented in tabular form and individual records are stored as one row of the table). Postgres improved…

  • Ingres period (art)

    Pierre-Auguste Renoir: Rejection of Impressionism: …signify their vague similarity to Ingres’s techniques) or the “harsh,” or “dry,” period. Renoir’s experiments with Impressionism were not wasted, however, because he retained a luminous palette. Nevertheless, in paintings from this period, such as The Umbrellas (c. 1881–86) and many depictions of bathers, Renoir emphasized volume, form, contours, and…

  • Ingres, J.-A.-D. (French painter)

    J.-A.-D. Ingres, painter and icon of cultural conservatism in 19th-century France. Ingres became the principal proponent of French Neoclassical painting after the death of his mentor, Jacques-Louis David. His cool, meticulously drawn works constituted the stylistic antithesis of the emotionalism

  • Ingres, Jean-Auguste-Dominique (French painter)

    J.-A.-D. Ingres, painter and icon of cultural conservatism in 19th-century France. Ingres became the principal proponent of French Neoclassical painting after the death of his mentor, Jacques-Louis David. His cool, meticulously drawn works constituted the stylistic antithesis of the emotionalism

  • ingress (astronomy)

    Ingress, in astronomy, the apparent entrance of a smaller body upon the disk of a larger one as the smaller passes between the larger and the observer—e.g., the entrance of a satellite or its shadow on the disk of a planet. The term is also applied to the Moon’s entrance into the Earth’s shadow at

  • Ingria (region, Russia)

    Russia: Peter’s youth and early reign: Russia’s acquisition of Ingria and Livonia (and later of Kurland) brought into the empire a new national and political minority: the German elites—urban bourgeoisie and landowning nobility—with their corporate privileges, harsh exploitation of native (Estonian and Latvian) servile peasantry, and Western culture and administrative practices. Eventually these elites…

  • Ingrian (people)

    Finno-Ugric religion: The Finno-Ugric peoples: …Greek Orthodox Votes and Izhora Ingrians, both nearly extinct groups living near the head of the Gulf of Finland in an area once called Ingria, the Veps (living near Lake Onega), and the Karelians (living in central Russia, Karelia, and Finland), as well as the Ludes in Olonets, who speak…

  • Ingrian language

    Finno-Ugric languages: (including Olonets), Ludic, Veps, Ingrian, Livonian, and Votic. The Permic group consists of Komi (Zyryan), Permyak, and Udmurt (Votyak). The three remaining groups are the individual languages Mari (formerly Cheremis), Mordvin, and Sami (formerly Lapp). Mari and Mordvin, however, are frequently classified together as the Volga-

  • Ingrid (queen of Denmark)

    Ingrid, (Princess Ingrid Victoria Sofia Louise Margareta), Swedish-born Danish royal (born March 28, 1910, Stockholm, Swed.—died Nov. 7, 2000, Fredensborg, Den.), was queen of Denmark from 1947 to 1972, after which she was known as Queen Mother Ingrid. Ingrid was the only daughter of King Gustaf V

  • Ingrid Babendererde: Reifeprüfung 1953 (novel by Johnson)

    Uwe Johnson: …to publish his first novel, Ingrid Babendererde: Reifeprüfung 1953 (published posthumously in 1985; “Ingrid Babendererde: School-Leaving Exam 1953”), but it was refused by several East German publishers when he declined to alter it to suit their ideology. He eventually found a West German publisher for his second novel, Mutmassungen über…

  • Ingstad, Helge (Norwegian adventurer and writer)

    Helge Marcus Ingstad, Norwegian writer and adventurer (born Dec. 30, 1899, Meraaker, Nor.—died March 29, 2001, Oslo, Nor.), proved the long-debated theory that Vikings established a settlement in North America in about ad 1000. From the early 1950s Ingstad and his wife, archaeologist Anne Stine, e

  • Ingstad, Helge Marcus (Norwegian adventurer and writer)

    Helge Marcus Ingstad, Norwegian writer and adventurer (born Dec. 30, 1899, Meraaker, Nor.—died March 29, 2001, Oslo, Nor.), proved the long-debated theory that Vikings established a settlement in North America in about ad 1000. From the early 1950s Ingstad and his wife, archaeologist Anne Stine, e

  • Inguar the Boneless (Viking chieftain)

    Ivar the Boneless, Viking chieftain, of Danish origin, whose life story is suffused with legend. He is best known for his exploits on the British Isles, most notably his invasion, in the company of two brothers, of several Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. Unlike previous Viking raiders who came only to

  • inguinal amplexus

    Anura: Breeding behaviour: …and around the waist (inguinal amplexus), whereas in the more advanced frogs (neobatrachians) the position is shifted anteriorly to the armpits (axillary amplexus). The latter position brings the cloacae of the amplectic pair into closer proximity and presumably ensures more efficient fertilization.

  • inguinal canal (anatomy)

    animal reproductive system: Testes: …the abdominal cavity by an inguinal canal lined with the peritoneal membrane. The canals are the path of descent (and retraction) of the testes to the sacs. In descending, the testes carry along a spermatic duct, blood and lymphatic vessels, and a nerve supply wrapped in peritoneum and constituting, collectively,…

  • inguinal gland (biology)

    artiodactyl: Scent glands: Inguinal (belly) glands are found in bovids, there being two in sheep, saiga, chiru, gazelles, duikers, and blackbuck, and four in members of the tribes Reduncini and Tragelaphini. Carpal (wrist) glands are present in some pigs, some gazelles and allies, and the oribi (Ourebia ourebi).…

  • Ingund (Frankish princess)

    St. Hermenegild: In 579 he married Ingund, the daughter of Sigebert I of Austrasia and a zealous orthodox Catholic. He was given a separate command at his father’s siege of Byzantine-held Sevilla (Seville), where he was converted through the efforts of his wife and the bishop of Sevilla, St. Leander. Hermenegild…

  • ingungu (musical instrument)

    African music: Membranophones: …occasionally found, such as the ingungu used in Zulu girls’ nubility rites. Except in the extreme south, drums of contrasting pitch and timbre are frequently played in ensembles, with or without other instruments, to accompany dancing. Though the role of drums is usually rhythmic, the entenga drum chime in Uganda,…

  • Inguri Dam (dam, Georgia)

    Inguri Dam, world’s highest arch dam (completed 1980), located on the Inguri River in western Georgia near the point at which the river leaves the Caucasus Mountains on its way to the Black Sea. It is a huge 892-foot- (272-metre-) tall double-curvature arch dam with a crest length of 2,231 feet

  • Ingush (people)

    Chechnya: People: …with minorities of Russians and Ingush. The Chechens and the Ingush are both Muslim and are two of the many Caucasian mountain peoples whose language belongs to the Nakh group. Fiercely independent, the Chechens and other Caucasian tribes mounted a prolonged resistance to Russian conquest from the 1830s through the…

  • Ingush language

    Caucasian languages: Nakho-Dagestanian languages: …consist of Chechen (890,000 speakers), Ingush (210,000), and Bats (or Tsova-Tushian, about 3,000 speakers). The Chechens and Ingush live in Chechnya and Ingushetiya; the Bats dwell in the village Zemo-Alvani in the Akhmeta district of northeastern Georgia. Both Chechen and Ingush, which are fairly similar to one another, are written.…

  • Ingushetia (republic, Russia)

    Ingushetiya, republic in southwestern Russia. The crest line of the Greater Caucasus range forms its southern boundary with Georgia; the Russian republic of Chechnya lies to the east, and that of North Ossetia–Alania (formerly North Ossetia) to the west and north. In 2002 the capital was moved from

  • Ingushetiya (republic, Russia)

    Ingushetiya, republic in southwestern Russia. The crest line of the Greater Caucasus range forms its southern boundary with Georgia; the Russian republic of Chechnya lies to the east, and that of North Ossetia–Alania (formerly North Ossetia) to the west and north. In 2002 the capital was moved from

  • Ingvar (Russian prince)

    Igor, grand prince of Kiev and presumably the son of Rurik, prince of Novgorod, who is considered the founder of the dynasty that ruled Kievan Rus and, later, Muscovy until 1598. Igor, successor to the great warrior and diplomat Oleg (reigned c. 879–912), assumed the throne of Kiev in 912. Depicted

  • INH (drug)

    Isoniazid, drug used in the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis. Isoniazid commonly is used in combination with other drugs, such as rifampin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide, or streptomycin; these drugs are used with isoniazid in order to prevent, or at least delay, the development of

  • Inhabitants, The (work by Morris)

    Wright Morris: …excellent example of these is The Inhabitants (1946), which has Morris’s running commentary on Henry David Thoreau juxtaposed with his photographs of buildings expressive of history and character.

  • inhalant chamber (mollusk anatomy)

    bivalve: Internal features: …the gill (the infrabranchial, or inhalant, chamber) to that area above it (the suprabranchial, or exhalant, chamber). The anus and the urogenital pores also open into the exhalant chamber so that all waste products exit the animal in the exhalant stream. The paired labial palps in the mantle cavity are…

  • inhalation (respiratory system)

    speech: Respiratory mechanisms: …and synchrony of inhalation (inspiration) and exhalation (expiration). Inspiration and expiration are equally long, equally deep, and transport the same amount of air during the same period of time, approximately half a litre (one pint) of air per breath at rest in most adults. Recordings (made with a device…

  • inhalational anesthetic (drug)

    anesthetic: General anesthetics: Inhalational anesthetics are administered in combination with oxygen, and most are excreted by the lungs with little or no metabolism by the body. Except for the naturally occurring gas nitrous oxide (laughing gas), all the major inhalational anesthetics are hydrocarbons, compounds formed of carbon and…

  • inhaler (medical device)

    pharmaceutical industry: Specialized dosage forms: Usually, the metered-dose aerosol or inhaler is placed in the mouth for use. When the release valve is activated, a predetermined dose of drug is expelled. The patient inhales the expelled drug, delivering it to the bronchial airways. Patches are dosage forms intended to deliver drug across the skin and…

  • Inhambane (Mozambique)

    Inhambane, town, southeastern Mozambique. The town is a commercial seaport on Inhambane Bay, an inlet of the Mozambique Channel (Indian Ocean). It is a market centre, and industry consists mainly in the processing of cashew nuts. The surrounding region, with its subtropical climate and its

  • Inhamissengo River (river, Mozambique)

    Zambezi River: Physiography: …western channel forms both the Inhamissengo River and the smaller Melambe River. North of the main delta the Chinde River separates from the Zambezi’s main stream to form a navigable channel leading to a shallow harbour.

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载