You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience and security.
  • instrumentation (music)

    Instrumentation, in music, arrangement or composition for instruments. Most authorities make little distinction between the words instrumentation and orchestration. Both deal with musical instruments and their capabilities of producing various timbres or colours. Orchestration is somewhat the

  • instrumentation (technology)

    Instrumentation, in technology, the development and use of precise measuring equipment. Although the sensory organs of the human body can be extremely sensitive and responsive, modern science and technology rely on the development of much more precise measuring and analytical tools for studying,

  • instrumentation system (technology)

    Instrumentation, in technology, the development and use of precise measuring equipment. Although the sensory organs of the human body can be extremely sensitive and responsive, modern science and technology rely on the development of much more precise measuring and analytical tools for studying,

  • Instruments Laboratory (research laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States)

    Charles Stark Draper: The Instruments Laboratory (I-Lab), which he founded in 1934, became a centre for both academic and commercial research, a combination that was not unusual at the time. It was through the I-Lab that Draper established a relationship with the Sperry Gyroscope Company (now part of Unisys…

  • Insubres (people)

    Insubres, the most powerful Celtic people of Gallia Cisalpina (Cisalpine Gaul), in northern Italy. Despite their defeat at Clastidium (modern Casteggio) by Roman forces in 222 bc, they continued to be troublesome and aided the Carthaginian general Hannibal in the Second Punic War (218–201 bc). The

  • insula (architecture)

    Insula, (Latin: “island”), in architecture, block of grouped but separate buildings or a single structure in ancient Rome and Ostia. The insulae were largely tenements providing economically practical housing where land values were high and population dense. Distinct from the domus, the upper-class

  • Insulae (Roman province, Greece)

    Greece: Late Roman administration: Crete (Kríti), and the Islands (Insulae). Of the eight provinces, all except Rhodope and the Islands were a part of the larger diocese of Moesia, which extended to the Danube River in the north. (The word diocese originally referred to a governmental area governed by a Roman imperial vicar.…

  • Insulae Aeoliae (islands, Italy)

    Eolie Islands, volcanic island group in the Tyrrhenian Sea (of the Mediterranean) off the north coast of Sicily, Italy. The group, with a total land area of 34 square miles (88 square km), consists of seven major islands and several islets lying in a general “Y” shape. The base of the Y is formed

  • Insular (language)

    Portuguese language: Alentejo, and Algarve, (3) Insular, including the dialects of Madeira and the Azores, and (4) Brazilian. Standard Portuguese was developed in the 16th century, basically from the dialects spoken from Lisbon to Coimbra. Brazilian (Brasileiro) differs from the Portuguese spoken in Portugal in several respects, in syntax as well…

  • insular lobe (anatomy)

    human nervous system: Lobes of the cerebral cortex: …of the cerebrum is the insular, or central, lobe, an invaginated triangular area on the medial surface of the lateral sulcus; it can be seen in the intact brain only by separating the frontal and parietal lobes from the temporal lobe. The insular lobe is thought to be involved in…

  • Insular Possession, An (novel by Mo)

    English literature: Fiction: Particularly notable is An Insular Possession (1986), which vividly harks back to the founding of Hong Kong. Kazuo Ishiguro’s spare, refined novel An Artist of the Floating World (1986) records how a painter’s life and work became insidiously coarsened by the imperialistic ethos of 1930s Japan. Novelists such…

  • Insular script (calligraphy)

    Insular script, in calligraphy, any of several hands that developed in the British Isles after the Roman occupation of England and before the Norman Conquest. The foremost achievement of the combined Irish and English book artists, apart from their famous illumination, was the Insular half-uncial,

  • insular Southeast Asia (islands, Southeast Asia)

    East Indies, the islands that extend in a wide belt along both sides of the Equator for more than 3,800 miles (6,100 km) between the Asian mainland to the north and west and Australia to the south. Historically, the term East Indies is loosely applied to any of three contexts. The most restrictive

  • insulating board (electronics)

    printed circuit: In a basic implementation, an insulating board (e.g., epoxy mixed with fiberglass or paper fibres) is coated with copper, and a protective film is deposited and patterned photographically. The unprotected copper is then etched away in an acid bath. The remaining conductive copper is left intact in the desired pattern…

  • insulator (physics)

    Insulator, any of various substances that block or retard the flow of electrical or thermal currents. Although an electrical insulator is ordinarily thought of as a nonconducting material, it is in fact better described as a poor conductor or a substance of high resistance to the flow of electric

  • insulin

    Insulin, hormone that regulates the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood and that is produced by the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. Insulin is secreted when the level of blood glucose rises—as after a meal. When the level of blood glucose falls, secretion of insulin stops,

  • insulin coma therapy (psychiatry)

    Manfred J. Sakel: …neurophysiologist and psychiatrist who introduced insulin-shock therapy for schizophrenia.

  • insulin shock therapy (psychiatry)

    Manfred J. Sakel: …neurophysiologist and psychiatrist who introduced insulin-shock therapy for schizophrenia.

  • insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (medical disorder)

    immune system disorder: Type I (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus: Type I diabetes mellitus is the autoimmune form of diabetes and often arises in childhood. It is caused by the destruction of cells of the pancreatic tissue called the islets of Langerhans. Those cells normally produce insulin, the hormone that…

  • insulin-dependent hypoglycemia (pathology)

    hypoglycemia: Insulin-dependent hypoglycemia is caused by too much insulin (hyperinsulinemia), usually attributed to the intake of a sulfonylurea drug or to the presence of excess insulin in a patient with diabetes. Other, much less common causes of insulin-dependent hypoglycemia may include an insulin-secreting tumour of the…

  • Insulin-independent hypoglycemia (pathology)

    hypoglycemia: Insulin-independent hypoglycemia is caused by disorders that result in impaired glucose mobilization during fasting (defects in gluconeogenesis or glycogenolysis). Impaired glucose mobilization may be caused by adrenal insufficiency, severe liver disease, glycogen storage disease, severe infections, and starvation. Insulin-dependent hypoglycemia is

  • insulin-like growth factor (biochemistry)

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF), any of several peptide hormones that function primarily to stimulate growth but that also possess some ability to decrease blood glucose levels. IGFs were discovered when investigators began studying the effects of biological substances on cells and tissues outside

  • insulin-like growth factor 1 (biochemistry)

    insulin-like growth factor: There are two IGFs: IGF-1 and IGF-2. These two factors, despite the similarity of their names, are distinguishable in terms of specific actions on tissues because they bind to and activate different receptors. The major action of IGFs is on cell growth. Indeed, most of the actions of pituitary…

  • insulin-like growth factor 2 (biochemistry)

    cancer: Milestones in cancer science: …gene known as IGF2 (insulin-like growth factor 2), for instance, has been linked to an increased risk for certain types of cancer, including colorectal cancer and nephroblastoma. Other products of regulatory genes, such as micro-RNAs, have also been implicated in the malignant transformation of cells, and it is likely…

  • Insull, Samuel (American utilities magnate)

    Samuel Insull, British-born American public utilities magnate whose vast Midwest holding company empire collapsed in the 1930s. After working with one of Thomas A. Edison’s London representatives, Insull went to the United States in 1881 to become Edison’s private secretary. When the Edison General

  • insurable interest

    insurance: Limitations on amount recoverable: …amount of an insured person’s insurable interest. Thus, if a homeowner has only a one-half interest in a building, the recovery is limited to one-half of the insured loss. The co-owners would need to have arranged insurance for their interest.

  • insurable risk

    insurance: …standpoint of the insurer, an insurable risk must meet the following requirements:

  • insurance

    Insurance, a system under which the insurer, for a consideration usually agreed upon in advance, promises to reimburse the insured or to render services to the insured in the event that certain accidental occurrences result in losses during a given period. It thus is a method of coping with risk.

  • insurance contract

    insurance: Very often contracts can be drawn in such a way that an “uninsurable risk” can be turned into an “insurable” one through restrictions on losses, redefinitions of perils, or other methods.

  • insurance cover

    insurance: Homeowner’s insurance: Homeowner’s insurance covers individual, or nonbusiness, property. Introduced in 1958, it gradually replaced the older method of insuring individual property under the “standard fire policy.”

  • insurance policy

    insurance: Very often contracts can be drawn in such a way that an “uninsurable risk” can be turned into an “insurable” one through restrictions on losses, redefinitions of perils, or other methods.

  • insurance premium (insurance)

    insurance: …high as to require excessive premiums. What is “excessive” depends on individual circumstances, including the insured’s attitude toward risk. At the same time, the potential loss must be severe enough to cause financial hardship if it is not insured against. Insurable risks include losses to property resulting from fire, explosion,…

  • insurgency (politics)

    Insurgency, term historically restricted to rebellious acts that did not reach the proportions of an organized revolution. It has subsequently been applied to any such armed uprising, typically guerrilla in character, against the recognized government of a state or country. In traditional

  • Insurgent (novel by Roth)

    Veronica Roth: Insurgent, released in 2012, captured the number one spot on that list. Roth had clearly hit her stride at the right moment—the niche market for dystopian novels was blossoming, and her offerings came on the heels of the popular Twilight and Hunger Games young-adult series.…

  • insurgent (politics)

    Insurgency, term historically restricted to rebellious acts that did not reach the proportions of an organized revolution. It has subsequently been applied to any such armed uprising, typically guerrilla in character, against the recognized government of a state or country. In traditional

  • insuring clause (liability insurance)

    insurance: Liability insurance: One is the insuring clause, in which the insurer agrees to pay on behalf of the insured all sums that the insured shall become legally obligated to pay as damages because of bodily injury, sickness or disease, wrongful death, or injury to another person’s property. The liability policy…

  • insurrection (politics)

    collective violence: Coups, rebellions, and revolutions: A rebellion involves large-scale violence directed against the state by its own civilian population. Rebellions try to change the government or some of its policies but not the society itself. Intense government repression seems to deter rebellion, whereas mild repression tends to stimulate it. Thus, mild…

  • insurrectionary deed (law)

    anarchism: Anarchism as a movement, 1870–1940: …by Italian anarchists that “the insurrectionary deed destined to affirm socialist principles by acts, is the most efficacious means of propaganda.” The first acts were rural insurrections intended to arouse the illiterate masses of the Italian countryside. After the insurrections failed, anarchist activism tended to take the form of acts…

  • Insutōru (novel by Wataya)

    Wataya Risa: …age 17 with Insutōru (2001; Install; film 2004), for which she won the 2001 Bungei literary prize. The novel depicted a troubled high-school girl’s experience with the erotic world of adults through Internet chat rooms. Watya went on to attend Waseda University, studying Japanese literature and education. Her second novel,…

  • inswinger (cricket)

    cricket: Bowling: …swerves (curves) are the “inswinger,” which moves in the air from off to leg (into the batsman), and the “away swinger,” or “outswinger,” which swerves from leg to off (away from the batsman). A “googly” (coined by cricketer B.J.T. Bosanquet on the 1903–04 MCC tour) is a ball bowled…

  • intact dilation and evacuation

    health law: Termination of pregnancy: …was labeled by Congress as “partial-birth” abortion (a surgical abortion in which a late-term fetus is removed through the cervix). In a 5–4 opinion, the Supreme Court permitted Congress to entirely outlaw this procedure on the basis that Congress could determine that its use undercut medical ethics and that other…

  • intaglio (sculpture)

    Intaglio, in sculpture, engraving or incised figure in stone or other hard material such that all lines appear below the surface; it is thus the opposite of relief sculpture and is sometimes called “hollow relief.” When the technique is used in casting, the design is cut in reverse into a plaster

  • intaglio (printing)

    Intaglio, in visual arts, one of the four major classes of printmaking techniques, distinguished from the other three methods (relief printing, stenciling, and lithography) by the fact that the ink forming the design is printed only from recessed areas of the plate. Among intaglio techniques are

  • intake (air circulation)

    coal mining: Ventilation: …set of mine entries (called intakes) to all places where miners may be working. After passing through the workings, this air (now termed return air) is conducted back to the surface through another set of entries (called returns). The intake and return airstreams are kept separate. Miners generally work in…

  • intake manifold (engineering)

    gasoline engine: Carburetor: …throttle valve, and into the intake manifold. A throat is formed by the reduced diameter, and acceleration of the air through this smaller passage causes a decrease in pressure proportional to the amount of air flowing. This decrease in throat pressure results in fuel flow from the jet into the…

  • intake stroke (internal combustion)

    diesel engine: Diesel combustion: …the combustion chamber on its intake stroke. Diesel engines are typically constructed with compression ratios in the range 14:1 to 22:1. Both two-stroke and four-stroke engine designs can be found among engines with bores (cylinder diameters) less than 600 mm (24 inches). Engines with bores of greater than 600 mm…

  • intake valve (mechanics)

    diesel engine: Two-stroke and four-stroke engines: …the typical four-stroke-cycle engine, the intake and exhaust valves and the fuel-injection nozzle are located in the cylinder head (see figure). Often, dual valve arrangements—two intake and two exhaust valves—are employed.

  • intangible asset (accounting)

    corporate finance: …allocation function is concerned with intangible assets such as goodwill, patents, workers, and brand names.

  • intangible property (law)

    property: …had considerable difficulty in making intangible things the object of property. Some Western legal systems still deny the possibility of property in intangibles. In all Western legal systems, however, the great increase of wealth in the form of intangibles (stocks, bonds, bank accounts) has meant that property or property-like treatment…

  • intarsia (inlay work)

    Intarsia, Form of wood inlay. Italian intarsia, or inlaid mosaic of wood, which probably derived from East Asian ivory and wood inlay, found its richest expression during the Renaissance in Italy (c. 1400–1600). It was often used in panels over the backs of choir stalls and in private studies and

  • Intarsia glass (glassware)

    Steuben Glass Company: Another specialty was Intarsia glass, crystal glassware with soft, overlapping colour inlays. In the 1930s the firm began making glassware from a new colourless lead crystal developed by Corning. Steuben later manufactured fine glass products of cut, engraved, and free-blown designs made almost exclusively of that type of…

  • Intef II (king of Egypt)

    Intef II, third king of the 11th dynasty (2081–1938 bce) in ancient Egypt, who during his long reign successfully warred against the allies of the Heracleopolitans—rulers of Middle and Lower Egypt composing the 9th and 10th dynasties (see ancient Egypt: The First Intermediate period). In 2065 bce,

  • integer (mathematics)

    Integer, Whole-valued positive or negative number or 0. The integers are generated from the set of counting numbers 1, 2, 3, . . . and the operation of subtraction. When a counting number is subtracted from itself, the result is zero. When a larger number is subtracted from a smaller number, the

  • integral (mathematics)

    Integral, in mathematics, either a numerical value equal to the area under the graph of a function for some interval (definite integral) or a new function the derivative of which is the original function (indefinite integral). These two meanings are related by the fact that a definite integral of

  • Integral (satellite observatory)

    International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (Integral), European Space Agency–Russian–U.S. satellite observatory designed to study gamma rays emitted from astronomical objects. Integral was launched by Russia from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on October 17, 2002. It carried a gamma-ray

  • integral calculus (mathematics)

    Integral calculus, Branch of calculus concerned with the theory and applications of integrals. While differential calculus focuses on rates of change, such as slopes of tangent lines and velocities, integral calculus deals with total size or value, such as lengths, areas, and volumes. The two

  • integral discriminator (physics)

    radiation measurement: Counting systems: …electronic unit known as an integral discriminator to count only those pulses that are larger than a preset amplitude. This approach can eliminate small amplitude pulses that may be of no interest in the application. Alternatively, a differential discriminator (also known as a single-channel analyzer) will select only those pulses…

  • integral domain (mathematics)

    modern algebra: Structural axioms: …a set is called an integral domain. For example, the set of integers {…, ?2, ?1, 0, 1, 2, …} is a commutative ring with unity, but it is not a field, because axiom 10 fails. When only axiom 8 fails, a set is known as a division ring or…

  • integral equation (mathematics)

    Integral equation, in mathematics, equation in which the unknown function to be found lies within an integral sign. An example of an integral equation is in which f(x) is known; if f(x) = f(-x) for all x, one solution

  • integral nationalism (political doctrine)

    fascism: Volksgemeinschaft: …this doctrine, known as “integral nationalism,” were similarly illiberal, though not racist. The Japanese version, known as the “family-system principle,” maintained that the nation is like a family: it is strong only when the people obey their leaders in the same way children obey their parents.

  • integral protein (biology)

    cell membrane: …type of protein, called the intrinsic proteins. The intrinsic proteins, as their name implies, are firmly embedded within the phospholipid bilayer. In general, membranes actively involved in metabolism contain a higher proportion of protein.

  • integral transform (mathematics)

    Integral transform, mathematical operator that produces a new function f(y) by integrating the product of an existing function F(x) and a so-called kernel function K(x, y) between suitable limits. The process, which is called transformation, is symbolized by the equation f(y) = ∫K(x, y)F(x)dx.

  • Intégrales (work by Varese)

    counterpoint: The 20th century: …counterpoint purely of tone colours, Intégrales (1925) by Edgard Varèse presents 11-note “sound-clouds” in the wind instruments in opposition to the sounds of a large battery of percussion instruments. This approach probably grew directly out of earlier experiments with polytonality, but here tone colours, rather than keys or tones, are…

  • Integralist (Portuguese history)

    Portuguese literature: From monarchy to republic: …and poet António Sardinha, the Integralist school, which favoured the Roman Catholic monarchist tradition, reacted to such perceived excesses from 1914 onward. Such sentiment contributed to the eventual fall of Portugal’s First Republic in 1926.

  • Integralist (Roman Catholicism)

    Modernism: This group, known as Integralists (or Sodalitium Pianum, “Solidarity of Pius”), frequently employed overzealous and clandestine methods and hindered rather than helped the combating of Modernism. On June 29, 1908, Pius X publicly admitted that Modernism was a dead issue, but at the urging of Benigni on Sept. 1,…

  • Integralista (political party, Brazil)

    history of Latin America: Socialism, communism, fascism: …Brazil, whose green-shirted Integralistas (A??o Integralista Brasileira) emerged as the largest single national party in the mid-1930s until involvement in a foolhardy coup attempt led to their suppression. Hence the influence of fascism was more often exercised through homegrown authoritarians who were attracted to certain aspects of it but…

  • integraph (instrument)

    Integraph, mathematical instrument for plotting the integral of a graphically defined function. Two such instruments were invented independently about 1880 by the British physicist Sir Charles Vernon Boys and the Lithuanian mathematician Bruno Abdank Abakanowicz and were later modified and

  • integrated assessment model (economics)

    William Nordhaus: …economic climate system, later called integrated assessment models (IAMs), that incorporated basic theories and results from physics and chemistry and showed how the global economy and climate would evolve under different assumptions about the pace and mechanisms of global warming and the additional climate policies (e.g., carbon taxes or emission…

  • Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (FBI identification system)

    crime laboratory: Sections of crime laboratories: …have access to the FBI’s Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System, which is the largest biometric databases in the world, containing the fingerprints and criminal histories of more than 70 million criminals as well as more than 34 million civilian fingerprints.

  • integrated circuit (electronics)

    Integrated circuit (IC), an assembly of electronic components, fabricated as a single unit, in which miniaturized active devices (e.g., transistors and diodes) and passive devices (e.g., capacitors and resistors) and their interconnections are built up on a thin substrate of semiconductor material

  • integrated control (agriculture)

    Integrated pest management, Technique for agricultural disease- and pest-control in which as many pest-control methods as possible are used in an ecologically harmonious manner to keep infestation within manageable limits. Integrated pest management addresses the serious ecological problems created

  • Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (industrial process)

    coal utilization: Advanced combustion technologies: …utilizing coal, known as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle, involves gasifying the coal (described below) and burning the gas to produce hot products of combustion at 1,600 °C (2,900 °F). These gaseous products in turn run a gas turbine, and the exhaust gases from the gas turbine can then be…

  • integrated machinery plant (electronics)

    ship: Electric drive and integrated machinery plants: …giving rise to the term integrated machinery plant. Power for the propulsion motors passes through thyristor-based frequency changers; by changing propulsion frequency, these devices regulate propeller speed while all other power users continue to receive 60 hertz from the main system.

  • integrated magnitude (astronomy)

    star cluster: Globular clusters: Integrated magnitudes (measurements of the total brightness of the cluster), cluster diameters, and the mean magnitude of the 25 brightest stars made possible the first distance determinations on the basis of the assumption that the apparent differences were due entirely to distance. However, the two…

  • integrated pest management (agriculture)

    Integrated pest management, Technique for agricultural disease- and pest-control in which as many pest-control methods as possible are used in an ecologically harmonious manner to keep infestation within manageable limits. Integrated pest management addresses the serious ecological problems created

  • integrated product and process development (technology)

    aerospace industry: Design methods: …teams, is a method called integrated product and process development (IPPD). IPPD ensures that the needs of the users and those who bring the product to the customer through manufacturing and outside procurement are considered at the beginning of the design/build cycle. In cases in which maintenance plays a major…

  • integrated services digital network (communications)

    ISDN, all-digital high-speed network provided by telephone carriers that allows voice and data to be carried over existing telephone circuits. In the early 1980s ISDN was developed as an offshoot of efforts to upgrade the telephone network from analog to digital using fibre optics. The expense of

  • integration (mathematics)

    Integration, in mathematics, technique of finding a function g(x) the derivative of which, Dg(x), is equal to a given function f(x). This is indicated by the integral sign “∫,” as in ∫f(x), usually called the indefinite integral of the function. The symbol dx represents an infinitesimal

  • integration (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy)

    chemical compound: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy: …spectrometers have a feature, called integration, which, when selected by the user, calculates the area under each peak and plots the result as a line that is displaced vertically at a peak by an amount proportional to the area under the peak. The integration of the bromoethane spectrum, for example,…

  • integration by parts (mathematics)

    gamma function: …technique from calculus known as integration by parts, it can be proved that the gamma function has the following recursive property: if x > 0, then Γ(x + 1) = xΓ(x). From this it follows that Γ(2) = 1 Γ(1) = 1; Γ(3) = 2 Γ(2) = 2 × 1…

  • integration host factor (protein)

    nucleic acid: Site-specific recombination: …DNA binding protein called the integration host factor. A third protein, called excisionase, recognizes the hybrid sites formed on integration and, in conjunction with integrase, catalyzes an excision process whereby the λ chromosome is removed from the bacterial chromosome.

  • integration mode (radiation detection)

    radiation measurement: Integrating mode: There are circumstances in which the current from the detector is simply integrated during the time of exposure, and the accumulated total charge is measured at its completion. This integration mode of operation produces information that is related to the total exposure, but…

  • Integration of American Society, The (work by Angell)

    Robert Cooley Angell: …Family Encounters the Depression (1936); The Integration of American Society (1941); The Moral Integration of American Cities (1951); Free Society and Moral Crisis (1958); A Study of Values of Soviet and of American Elites (1963); Peace on the March (1969); and The Quest for World Order (1979).

  • integration principle (law)

    environmental law: The integration principle: Environmental protection requires that due consideration be given to the potential consequences of environmentally fateful decisions. Various jurisdictions (e.g., the United States and the EU) and business organizations (e.g., the U.S. Chamber of Commerce) have integrated environmental considerations into their decision-making processes through…

  • Integration, Cooperation, and Development, Treaty for (Argentina-Brazil [1988])

    Mercosur: The 1988 Treaty for Integration, Cooperation, and Development committed Argentina and Brazil to work toward the establishment of a common market within 10 years, and it invited other Latin American countries to join. Mercosur was created in 1991 by the Treaty of Asunción, which was signed by…

  • integration, economic

    Economic integration, process in which two or more states in a broadly defined geographic area reduce a range of trade barriers to advance or protect a set of economic goals. The level of integration involved in an economic regionalist project can vary enormously from loose association to a

  • integration, racial

    baseball: Integration: Several major league teams either discussed or attempted the racial integration of professional baseball in the 1940s. The interest in integration in the 1940s was sparked by several factors—the increasing economic and political influence of urban blacks, the success of black ballplayers in exhibition…

  • Integration, Society for (Japanese organization)

    burakumin: …rival national organization, Dōwakai (Society for Integration), was founded; it came to be led by Liberal Democratic politicians, some of whom were elected to the national Diet. A third organization, the Zenkoku Buraku Kaihō Undō (All-Japan Buraku Liberation Movement), was formed in 1976.

  • integration, theory of (mathematics)

    Joseph Liouville: This was followed by his theory of integration in finite terms (1832–33), the main goals of which were to decide whether given algebraic functions have integrals that can be expressed in finite (or elementary) terms. He also worked in differential equations and boundary value problems, and, together with Charles-Fran?ois Sturm—the…

  • Integrative Action of the Nervous System, The (work by Sherrington)

    Sir Charles Scott Sherrington: In his classic work, The Integrative Action of the Nervous System (1906), he distinguished three main groups of sense organs: exteroceptive, such as those that detect light, sound, odour, and tactile stimuli; interoceptive, exemplified by taste receptors; and proprioceptive, or those receptors that detect events occurring in the interior…

  • integrative agnosia (pathology)

    agnosia: Some persons are diagnosed with integrative agnosia, a form of visual agnosia in which symptoms of both associative and apperceptive disorders are present.

  • integrative bargaining (industry)

    industrial relations: Collective bargaining: In contrast, with an integrative bargaining approach the parties engage in cooperative problem solving in an effort to achieve a resolution from which each party benefits.

  • integrator (instrument)

    Integrator, instrument for performing the mathematical operation of integration, important for the solution of differential and integral equations and the generation of many mathematical functions. The earliest integrator was a mechanical instrument called the planimeter (q.v.). The illustration

  • integrity, data (computing)

    computer science: Information management: Data integrity refers to designing a DBMS that ensures the correctness and stability of its data across all applications that access the system. When a database is designed, integrity checking is enabled by specifying the data type of each column in the table. For example,…

  • integron (genetics)

    Enterobacter: …genetic element known as an integron. Integrons contain genes that confer antibiotic resistance capabilities and are incorporated into bacterial genomes via genetic recombination. They are efficiently exchanged and disseminated among circulating bacterial populations, such as those occurring in nosocomial environments. In E. cloacae resistance to the aminoglycoside gentamicin has been…

  • integument (biology)

    Integument, in biology, network of features that forms the covering of an organism. The integument delimits the body of the organism, separating it from the environment and protecting it from foreign matter. At the same time it gives communication with the outside, enabling an organism to live in a

  • integumentary system (biology)

    Integument, in biology, network of features that forms the covering of an organism. The integument delimits the body of the organism, separating it from the environment and protecting it from foreign matter. At the same time it gives communication with the outside, enabling an organism to live in a

  • Intel (American company)

    Intel, American manufacturer of semiconductor computer circuits. It is headquartered in Santa Clara, California. The company’s name comes from “integrated electronics.” Intel was founded in July 1968 by American engineers Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore. Unlike the archetypal Silicon Valley start-up

  • Intel 1103 (microprocessor)

    Intel: Early products: However, its sibling, the 1103, a one-kilobit dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) chip, was successful and the first chip to store a significant amount of information. It was purchased first by the American technology company Honeywell Incorporated in 1970 to replace the core memory technology in its computers. Because DRAMs…

  • Intel 4004 (microprocessor)

    computer: The Intel 4004: In 1969 Busicom, a Japanese calculator company, commissioned Intel Corporation to make the chips for a line of calculators that Busicom intended to sell. Custom chips were made for many clients, and this was one more such contract, hardly unusual at the time.

Check out Britannica's new site for parents!
Subscribe Today!
色色影院-色色影院app下载