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  • Ibn al-Kalbī (Iraqi genealogist)

    Arabian religion: Sources of modern knowledge: …al-A?nām), by the Iraqi genealogist Ibn al-Kalbī (8th–9th century ad), and in “The Crown” (Al-Iklīl), by the Yemeni encyclopaedist and geographer al-Hamdānī (9th–10th century ad), which describes the pre-Islāmic antiquities of Yemen.

  • Ibn al-Kha?īb (Muslim writer)

    Ibn Khaldūn: Education and diplomatic career: …prime minister, the brilliant writer Ibn al-Kha?īb, was a good friend. Ibn Khaldūn was then 32 years old.

  • Ibn al-Mudabbir (Egyptian official)

    Egypt: The ?ūlūnid dynasty (868–905): …of ?āmil filled by one Ibn al-Mudabbir, who over a period of years had gained control of Egyptian finances, enriching himself in the process, and was therefore reluctant to acknowledge A?mad’s authority. A struggle for power soon broke out between the two, which ended four years later with the transfer…

  • Ibn al-Muqaffa? (Muslim writer)

    Arabic literature: The concept of adab: …who adopted the Arabic name Ibn al-Muqaffa?. He translated from the Persian a collection of animal fables about kingship, the Panchatantra (a work of Indian origin), which he titled in Arabic Kalīlah wa Dimnah (“Kalīlah and Dimnah”); its narrative method and its particular style were among its contributions to the…

  • Ibn al-Mu?tazz (?Abbāsid caliph and poet)

    Arabic literature: Hunt poetry: The caliph, poet, and critic Ibn al-Mu?tazz clearly reflects his personal interests and experience in his own contributions to the hunt poem:

  • Ibn al-Nadīm (Muslim bookseller)

    Islamic arts: Development of literary prose: … (“Index”), compiled by the bookseller Ibn al-Nadīm in 988, gave a full account of the Arabic literature extant in the 10th century. It covered all kinds of literature, from philology to alchemy, but most of these works unfortunately have been lost. In those years manuals of composition (inshā?) were written…

  • Ibn al-Raqā (Jahwarid vizier)

    Jahwarid dynasty: …authority to his own vizier, Ibn al-Raqā. When ?Abd al-Malik, al-Rashīd’s jealous son, assassinated the vizier in 1058, his father rewarded him with virtually caliphal standing and authority in the state. Extremely unpopular, ?Abd al-Malik and his father were handed over to the ?Abbādids by the Cordobans themselves when the…

  • Ibn al-Rūmī (Arab poet [9th-century])

    Arabic literature: Elegy: …elegy of the 9th-century poet Ibn al-Rūmī on the fall of Al-Ba?rah to an army of slave labourers is a case in point:

  • Ibn al-Zubayr (Companion of Mu?ammad)

    ?Abd Allāh ibn al-Zubayr, leader of a rebellion against the Umayyad dynasty in the early Islamic period and the most prominent representative of the second generation of Muslim families in Mecca, who resented the Umayyad assumption of caliphal authority. As a youth, Ibn al-Zubayr went on many of

  • Ibn al-?Arabī (Muslim mystic)

    Ibn al-?Arabī, celebrated Muslim mystic-philosopher who gave the esoteric, mystical dimension of Islamic thought its first full-fledged philosophic expression. His major works are the monumental Al-Futū?āt al-Makkiyyah (“The Meccan Revelations”) and Fu?ū? al-?ikam (1229; “The Bezels of Wisdom”).

  • Ibn al-?Awwām (Islamic author)

    Ibn al-?Awwām, agriculturist who wrote the Arabic treatise on agriculture, Kitāb al-filā-?ah, the outstanding medieval work on the subject. The Spanish translation, published in the early 1800s, consists of 35 chapters dealing with agronomy, cattle and poultry raising, and beekeeping. It deals with

  • Ibn al-?Ibrī (Syrian philosopher)

    Bar Hebraeus, medieval Syrian scholar noted for his encyclopaedic learning in science and philosophy and for his enrichment of Syriac literature by the introduction of Arabic culture. Motivated toward scholarly pursuits by his father, a Jewish convert to Christianity, Bar Hebraeus emigrated to

  • Ibn an-Nafīs (Muslim physician)

    Ibn an-Nafīs, Arab physician who first described the pulmonary circulation of the blood. In finding that the wall between the right and left ventricles of the heart is solid and without pores, he disputed Galen’s view that the blood passes directly from the right to the left side of the heart. I

  • Ibn as-Sitrī (Arab calligrapher)

    Ibn al-Bawwāb, Arabic calligrapher of the ?Abbāsid Age (750–1258) who reputedly invented the cursive ray?ānī and mu?aqqaq scripts. He refined several of the calligraphic styles invented a century earlier by Ibn Muqlah, including the naskhī and tawqī scripts, and collected and preserved for his s

  • Ibn ash-Shā?ir (Islamic mathematician)

    mathematics: Islamic mathematics to the 15th century: …the astrolabe of the Syrian Ibn al-Shā?ir (1305–75), a mathematical tool that could be used to solve all the standard problems of spherical astronomy in five different ways.

  • Ibn Bābawayh (Muslim theologian)

    Ibn Bābawayh, Islamic theologian, author of one of the “Four Books” that are the basic authorities for the doctrine of Twelver (Ithnā ?Ashāri) Shī?ah. Little is known about Ibn Bābawayh’s life. According to legend he was born as the result of special prayers to the mahdī (the expected one). In 966

  • Ibn Babūyā (Muslim theologian)

    Ibn Bābawayh, Islamic theologian, author of one of the “Four Books” that are the basic authorities for the doctrine of Twelver (Ithnā ?Ashāri) Shī?ah. Little is known about Ibn Bābawayh’s life. According to legend he was born as the result of special prayers to the mahdī (the expected one). In 966

  • ibn Badis, ?Abd al-Hamid (Algerian leader)

    North Africa: Nationalist movements: …Arab Islamic nationalist movement of Sheik ?Abd al-Hamid Ben Badis. After the war the French were on the defensive, conceding independence to Tunisia and Morocco in 1956 in order to concentrate their efforts on Algeria, where a full-scale rebellion led by the National Liberation Front (FLN) broke out in 1954.…

  • Ibn Bājjah (Spanish Muslim philosopher)

    Avempace, earliest known representative in Spain of the Arabic Aristotelian–Neoplatonic philosophical tradition and forerunner of the polymath scholar Ibn ?ufayl and of the philosopher Averro?s. Avempace’s chief philosophical tenets seem to have included belief in the possibility that the human

  • Ibn Battuta (Muslim explorer and writer)

    Ibn Battuta, the greatest medieval Muslim traveler and the author of one of the most famous travel books, the Ri?lah (Travels). His great work describes his extensive travels covering some 75,000 miles (120,000 km) in trips to almost all of the Muslim countries and as far as China and Sumatra (now

  • ibn Daud, Abraham ben David Halevi (Jewish physician and historian)

    Abraham ben David Halevi ibn Daud, physician and historian who was the first Jewish philosopher to draw on Aristotle’s writings in a systematic fashion. He is probably more esteemed today for his history Sefer ha-kabbala (“Book of Tradition”) than for his major philosophic work, Sefer ha-emuna

  • Ibn Dā?ūd (Muslim theologian)

    Islamic arts: The new style: …expounded by the ?āhirī theologian Ibn Dā?ūd (died 910) in his poetic anthology Kitāb al-zahrah (The Book of the Flower). This theme was central to the ghazal poetry of the following centuries. Although at first completely secular, it was later taken over as a major concept in mystical love poetry.…

  • Ibn Durayd (Arab philologist)

    Ibn Durayd, Arab philologist who wrote a large Arabic dictionary, Jamharat al-lughah (“Collection of Language”). Ibn Durayd traced his descent to an Arab tribe of Oman, and in 871, to avoid the Zanj (black African) slave rebellion, during which Basra was sacked, he moved to Oman. He stayed there

  • ibn Ezra, Abraham ben Meir (Spanish-Jewish scholar)

    Abraham ben Meir ibn Ezra, poet, grammarian, traveller, Neoplatonic philosopher, and astronomer, best known as a biblical exegete whose commentaries contributed to the Golden Age of Spanish Judaism. As a young man, he lived in Muslim Spain. Not much is known about his early life. He was on friendly

  • ibn Ezra, Moses ben Jacob ha-Salla? (Spanish-Jewish poet)

    Moses ibn Ezra, Hebrew poet and critic, one of the finest poets of the golden age of Spanish Jewry (900–1200). He was one of the first Jewish poets to write secular verse; his surname, “ha-Salla?” (Hebrew: Writer of Penitential Poems), however, was bestowed because of his penitential prayers

  • Ibn Falaquera (Jewish philosopher)

    Ibn Falaquera, Spanish-born Jewish philosopher and translator who propagated a reconciliation between Jewish Orthodoxy and philosophy and defended Maimonides’ Guide of the Perplexed against the attacks of the traditionalists. His numerous works include Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Man of P

  • ibn Falaquera, Shemtob ben Joseph (Jewish philosopher)

    Ibn Falaquera, Spanish-born Jewish philosopher and translator who propagated a reconciliation between Jewish Orthodoxy and philosophy and defended Maimonides’ Guide of the Perplexed against the attacks of the traditionalists. His numerous works include Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Man of P

  • Ibn Faraj (Islāmic poet)

    Spain: Literature: In the 10th century Ibn Faraj of Jaén deemed himself to possess sufficient background to compose the Kitāb al-?adā?iq (“Book of Orchards”)—the first anthology of Andalusian poets. This anthology was soon followed by one by the physician Ibn al-Kattānī.

  • Ibn Gabirol (Jewish poet and philosopher)

    Ibn Gabirol, one of the outstanding figures of the Hebrew school of religious and secular poetry during the Jewish Golden Age in Moorish Spain. He was also an important Neoplatonic philosopher. Born in Málaga about 1022, Ibn Gabirol received his higher education in Saragossa, where he joined the

  • Ibn Hāni? (Islamic poet)

    Arabic literature: Panegyric: The Andalusian poet Ibn Hāni? undoubtedly enraged the ?Abbāsid caliph in Baghdad when he referred to the capture of Cairo by the Fā?imid dynasty:

  • Ibn Haukal (Arab geographer)

    map: The Middle Ages: Ibn Haukal wrote a Book of Ways and Provinces illustrated with maps, and al-Idrīsī constructed a world map in 1154 for the Christian king Roger of Sicily, showing better information on Asian areas than had been available theretofore. In Baghdad astronomers used the compass long…

  • Ibn ?ayyān (Spanish Muslim historian)

    Spain: Literature: …the preeminent Spanish historian is Ibn ?ayyān of Córdoba (died 1076), whose mostly preserved Muqtabis is an anthology of historical texts collected from the works of his predecessors; however, he also wrote an original chronicle, the Matīn. Of human interest are the Memoirs of the king Zīrī ?Abd Allāh, who…

  • Ibn ?azm (Spanish Muslim scholar)

    Ibn ?azm, Muslim litterateur, historian, jurist, and theologian of Islamic Spain, famed for his literary productivity, breadth of learning, and mastery of the Arabic language. One of the leading exponents of the ?āhirī (Literalist) school of jurisprudence, he produced some 400 works, covering

  • Ibn Hishām (Arab author)

    Muhammad: Biographical sources: …which the best known is ?Abd al-Malik ibn Hishām’s (died 833–834) Sīrat Mu?ammad rasūl Allāh (“Life of Muhammad, the Messenger of God”). Ibn Is?āq’s original book was not his own composition but rather a compilation of autonomous reports about specific events that took place during the life of Muhammad and…

  • Ibn ?ithlayn (Arab leader)

    Ikhwān: …deposed Ibn ?umayd, ad-Dawīsh, and Ibn ?ithlayn, the leaders of the revolt. A massacre of Najd merchants by Ibn ?umayd in 1929, however, forced Ibn Sa?ūd to confront the rebellious Ikhwān militarily, and, in a major battle fought in March on the plain of as-Sabalah (near al-Ar?āwīyah), Ibn ?umayd was…

  • Ibn ?umayd (Arab leader)

    Ikhwān: …Sa?ūd in October 1928 deposed Ibn ?umayd, ad-Dawīsh, and Ibn ?ithlayn, the leaders of the revolt. A massacre of Najd merchants by Ibn ?umayd in 1929, however, forced Ibn Sa?ūd to confront the rebellious Ikhwān militarily, and, in a major battle fought in March on the plain of as-Sabalah (near…

  • Ibn Is?āq (Arab author)

    Ibn Is?āq, Arab biographer of the Prophet Mu?ammad whose book, in a recension by Ibn Hishām, is one of the most important sources on the Prophet’s life. Ibn Is?āq was the grandson of an Arab prisoner captured by Muslim troops in Iraq and brought to Medina, where he was freed after accepting Islām.

  • Ibn Ja??āf (chief magistrate of Valencia)

    El Cid: Conquest of Valencia: …when the qā?ī (chief magistrate), Ibn Ja??āf, with Almoravid political support rebelled and killed al-Qādir. The Cid responded by closely besieging the rebel city. The siege lasted for many months; an Almoravid attempt to break it failed miserably (December 1093). In May 1094 Ibn Ja??āf at last surrendered, and the…

  • Ibn Jāmi? (Islamic musician)

    Islamic arts: The Umayyad and ?Abbāsid dynasties: classical Islamic music: …the proponents of modernism were Ibn Jāmi? and the celebrated singer Prince Ibrāhīm ibn al-Mahdī.

  • Ibn Janā? (Spanish-Jewish grammarian)

    Ibn Janā?, perhaps the most important medieval Hebrew grammarian and lexicographer. Known as the founder of the study of Hebrew syntax, he established the rules of biblical exegesis and clarified many difficult passages. Trained as a physician, Ibn Janāh practiced medicine, but, out of profound

  • Ibn Jubayr (Spanish Muslim author)

    Ibn Jubayr, Spanish Muslim known for a book recounting his pilgrimage to Mecca. The son of a civil servant, Ibn Jubayr became secretary to the Almohad governor of Granada, but he left that post for his pilgrimage, which was begun in 1183 and ended with his return to Granada in 1185. He wrote a

  • Ibn Kathīr (Muslim scholar)

    Ibn Kathīr, Muslim theologian and historian who became one of the leading intellectual figures of 14th-century Syria. Ibn Kathīr was educated in Damascus and upon completion of his studies obtained his first official appointment in 1341, when he joined an inquisitorial commission formed to

  • Ibn Kemal (Turkish historian)

    Kemalpa?azade, historian, poet, and scholar who is considered one of the greatest Ottoman historians. Born into an illustrious military family, as a young man he served in the army of ?brahim Pa?a, vezir (minister) to Sultan Bayezid II. He later studied under several famous religious scholars and

  • Ibn Kemal Pa?a (Turkish historian)

    Kemalpa?azade, historian, poet, and scholar who is considered one of the greatest Ottoman historians. Born into an illustrious military family, as a young man he served in the army of ?brahim Pa?a, vezir (minister) to Sultan Bayezid II. He later studied under several famous religious scholars and

  • Ibn Khafājah (Muslim poet)

    Islamic arts: The new style: …garden and landscape poetry of Ibn Khafājah (died 1139) displayed an even higher degree of elegance and sensitivity than that of his Eastern predecessors.

  • Ibn Khaldūn (Muslim historian)

    Ibn Khaldūn, the greatest Arab historian, who developed one of the earliest nonreligious philosophies of history, contained in his masterpiece, the Muqaddimah (“Introduction”). He also wrote a definitive history of Muslim North Africa. Ibn Khaldūn was born in Tunis in 1332; the Khaldūniyyah quarter

  • Ibn Khaldun Center for Development Studies (Egyptian organization)

    Sa?d al-Dīn Ibrāhīm: In 1988 he founded the Ibn Khaldun Center for Development Studies, which soon became a leading institution in the Muslim world for the study of human rights, civil society, and minority rights.

  • Ibn Khallikān (Muslim jurist)

    Ibn Khallikān, Muslim judge and author of a classic Arabic biographical dictionary. Ibn Khallikān studied in Irbīl, Aleppo, and Damascus. Ibn Khallikān was an assistant to the chief judge of Egypt until 1261, when he became qā?ī al-qu?āt (chief judge) of Damascus. He adhered to the Shāfi?ī branch o

  • Ibn Khallikan’s Biographical Dictionary (work by Ibn Khallikān)

    Ibn Khallikān: by Baron de Slane, Ibn Khallikan’s Biographical Dictionary, 1842–74). He began arranging material for it in 1256 and worked on it until 1274, continuing to improve it with marginal notes. He excluded the Prophet Mu?ammad, the caliphs, and other subjects about whom adequate information already existed. Ibn Khallikān selected…

  • Ibn Killis (Jewish vizier)

    Egypt: Islamization: …a Jewish convert to Islam, Ibn Killis, was the first Fā?imid vizier and is credited with laying the foundations of the Fā?imid administrative system, in which the viziers exercised great power. Christians and Jews even managed to survive the reign of the so-called mad caliph, al-?ākim (reigned 996–1021), who ordered…

  • Ibn Mājāh (Muslim scholar)

    ?ilm al-?adīth: 892), Ibn Mājāh (d. 886), and an-Nasā?ī (d. 915)—came to be recognized as canonical in orthodox Islam, though the books of al-Bukhārī and Muslim enjoy a prestige that virtually eclipses the other four.

  • Ibn Mardanish (ruler of Murcia and Valencia)

    Spain: The Almohads: Of these states, those under Ibn Mardanīsh (1147–72)—who was successful with Christian help in becoming the master of Valencia, Murcia, and Jaén and in securing Granada and Córdoba—especially stood out.

  • Ibn Masarrah (Muslim mystic)

    Islam: The teachings of Ibn al-?Arabī: The Andalusian mystic Ibn Masarrah (9th–10th centuries) is reported to have championed pseudo-Empedoclean doctrines, and Ibn al-?Arabī (who studied under some of his followers) quotes Ibn Masarrah on a number of occasions. This philosophic tradition is distinct from the one followed by the Ismā?īlī theologians, who explained the…

  • Ibn Misja? (Persian musician)

    Islamic arts: The Umayyad and ?Abbāsid dynasties: classical Islamic music: …of the Umayyad era was Ibn Misja?, often honoured as the father of Islamic music. Born in Mecca of a Persian family, he was a musical theorist and a skilled singer and lute player. Ibn Misja? traveled to Syria and Persia, learning the theory and practice of Byzantine and Persian…

  • Ibn Miskawayh (Islamic scholar)

    Ibn Miskawayh, Persian scientist, philosopher, and historian whose scholarly works became models for later generations of Islamic thinkers. Little is known of Ibn Miskawayh’s personal life. It is believed he converted to Islam from Zoroastrianism, the religion of pre-Islamic Iran. His interests

  • Ibn Muhammad, Abdallahi (Sudanese ruler)

    Battle of Omdurman: …was observed with concern by Khalifa Abdullah, leader of the Mahdists. He ordered an army to attack Kitchener’s force at Atbara in early April, but they were routed by a preemptive counterattack mounted by the British. The Mahdists then fell back to wait for the invaders at their capital, Omdurman,…

  • Ibn Mu?riz (Persian musician)

    Islamic arts: The Umayyad and ?Abbāsid dynasties: classical Islamic music: …musicians of the period were Ibn Mu?riz, of Persian ancestry; Ibn Surayj, son of a Persian slave and noted for his elegies and improvisations (murtajal); his pupil al-Gharī?, born of a Berber family; and the Negro Ma?bad. Like Ibn Surayj, Ma?bad cultivated a special personal style adopted by following generations…

  • Ibn Muqlah (Islamic calligrapher)

    Ibn Muqlah, one of the foremost calligraphers of the ?Abbāsid Age (750–1258), reputed inventor of the first cursive style of Arabic lettering, the naskhī script, which replaced the angular Kūfic as the standard of Islamic calligraphy. In the naskhī script Ibn Muqlah introduced the rounded forms and

  • ibn Palquera, Shemtob ben Joseph (Jewish philosopher)

    Ibn Falaquera, Spanish-born Jewish philosopher and translator who propagated a reconciliation between Jewish Orthodoxy and philosophy and defended Maimonides’ Guide of the Perplexed against the attacks of the traditionalists. His numerous works include Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Man of P

  • ibn Paquda, Bahya ben Joseph (Jewish philosopher)

    Bahya ben Joseph ibn Pakuda, dayyan—i.e., judge of a rabbinical court—in Muslim Spain and author of a highly influential and popular work of ethical guidance. About 1080 Bahya wrote, in Arabic, Al-Hidāyah ilā-farā? id al-qulūb (“Duties of the Heart”). In a rather inaccurate 12th-century translation

  • Ibn Qutaybah (Muslim author)

    Ibn Qutaybah, writer of adab literature—that is, of literature exhibiting wide secular erudition—and also of theology, philology, and literary criticism. He introduced an Arabic prose style outstanding for its simplicity and ease, or “modern” flavour. Little is known of Ibn Qutaybah’s life. Of

  • Ibn Quzmān (Muslim poet)

    Islamic arts: Poetry: Its master was Ibn Quzmān of Córdoba (died 1160), whose lifestyle was similar to that of Western troubadours. His approach to life as expressed in these melodious poems, together with their mixed idiom, suggests an interrelationship with the vernacular troubadour poetry of Spain and France.

  • Ibn Rashīd (Arab ruler)

    Ibn Saud: The young leader: …out by their rivals, the Rashīds, became penniless exiles in Kuwait. In 1901 Ibn Saud, then 21, set out from Kuwait with 40 camel men in a bold attempt to regain his family’s lands.

  • Ibn Rashīq (Muslim author)

    Arabic literature: Compilations and manuals: …another important piece of synthesis, Ibn Rashīq’s Al-?Umdah fī ma?āsin al-shi?r wa adabihi wa naqdihi (“The Mainstay Concerning Poetry’s Embellishments, Correct Usage, and Criticism”). The comprehensive coverage that this work provided of previous writings on the various subfields of poetics—prosody and poetic genres and devices, for example—and the critical insights…

  • Ibn Rushd (Muslim philosopher)

    Averro?s, influential Islamic religious philosopher who integrated Islamic traditions with ancient Greek thought. At the request of the Almohad caliph Abū Ya?qūb Yūsuf, he produced a series of summaries and commentaries on most of Aristotle’s works (1169–95) and on Plato’s Republic, which exerted

  • ibn Salman ibn ?Abd al-Aziz, Ahmed, Prince (Saudi Arabian businessman)

    Prince Ahmed Bin Salman, (Prince Ahmed ibn Salman ibn ?Abd al-Aziz), Saudi businessman and racehorse owner (born Nov. 17, 1958, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia—died July 22, 2002, Riyadh), fulfilled a lifelong goal when his recently purchased horse War Emblem won the 2002 Kentucky Derby; he lost his bid for a

  • Ibn Saud (Saudi king and religious leader)

    Ibn Saud, tribal and Muslim religious leader who formed the modern state of Saudi Arabia and initiated the exploitation of its oil. The Sauds ruled much of Arabia from 1780 to 1880, but, while Ibn Saud was still an infant, his family, driven out by their rivals, the Rashīds, became penniless exiles

  • Ibn Sa?ūd (Saudi king and religious leader)

    Ibn Saud, tribal and Muslim religious leader who formed the modern state of Saudi Arabia and initiated the exploitation of its oil. The Sauds ruled much of Arabia from 1780 to 1880, but, while Ibn Saud was still an infant, his family, driven out by their rivals, the Rashīds, became penniless exiles

  • ibn Shem Tov, Joseph ben Shem Tov (Jewish philosopher and physician)

    Joseph ben Shem Tov ibn Shem Tov, Jewish philosopher and Castilian court physician who attempted to mediate the disdain shown for philosophy by contemporary Jewish scholars by undertaking a reconciliation of Aristotelian ethical philosophy with Jewish religious thought, best exemplified by his

  • Ibn Shuhayd (Islamic author)

    Spain: Literature: Ibn Shuhayd (c. 1035) was the author of a work that lent inspiration to Abū al-?Alā? al-Ma?arrī for his Risālat al-ghufrān (“Epistle of Pardon”). The prolific Ibn ?azm of Córdoba (died 1064) wrote the delightful ?awq al-?amāmah (“The Ring of the Dove”), which dealt with…

  • Ibn Sīnā (Persian philosopher and scientist)

    Avicenna, Muslim physician, the most famous and influential of the philosopher-scientists of the medieval Islamic world. He was particularly noted for his contributions in the fields of Aristotelian philosophy and medicine. He composed the Kitāb al-shifā? (Book of the Cure), a vast philosophical

  • Ibn Sīnā Peak (mountain, Central Asia)

    Lenin Peak, highest summit (23,406 feet [7,134 metres]) of the Trans-Alai Range on the frontier of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Once thought to be the highest mountain in what was then the Soviet Union, Lenin Peak was relegated to third place by the discovery in 1932–33 that Stalin Peak (after 1962

  • Ibn Surayj (Persian musician)

    Islamic arts: The Umayyad and ?Abbāsid dynasties: classical Islamic music: …Ibn Mu?riz, of Persian ancestry; Ibn Surayj, son of a Persian slave and noted for his elegies and improvisations (murtajal); his pupil al-Gharī?, born of a Berber family; and the Negro Ma?bad. Like Ibn Surayj, Ma?bad cultivated a special personal style adopted by following generations of singers.

  • Ibn Tāshufīn, Yūsuf (Almoravid ruler)

    Yūsuf ibn Tāshufīn, Almoravid ruler who, during his reign from 1061 to 1106, expanded Almoravid land holdings from a small, insecurely held area in the Maghrib into a huge empire that included major portions of present-day Morocco and Algeria, Muslim Spain as far north as Fraga, and the islands of

  • Ibn Taymīyah (Muslim theologian)

    Ibn Taymiyyah, one of Islam’s most forceful theologians, who, as a member of the ?anbalī school founded by A?mad ibn ?anbal, sought the return of the Islamic religion to its sources: the Qur?ān and the Sunnah, revealed writing and the prophetic tradition. He is also the source of the Wahhābiyyah, a

  • Ibn Taymiyyah (Muslim theologian)

    Ibn Taymiyyah, one of Islam’s most forceful theologians, who, as a member of the ?anbalī school founded by A?mad ibn ?anbal, sought the return of the Islamic religion to its sources: the Qur?ān and the Sunnah, revealed writing and the prophetic tradition. He is also the source of the Wahhābiyyah, a

  • ibn Tibbon, Jacob ben Machir (Jewish astronomer, physician, and translator)

    Jacob ben Machir ibn Tibbon, French Jewish physician, translator, and astronomer whose work was utilized by Copernicus and Dante. He was highly regarded as a physician and served as regent of the faculty of medicine at the University of Montpellier. He was the grandson of the renowned translator

  • ibn Tibbon, Judah ben Saul (Jewish physician and translator)

    Judah ben Saul ibn Tibbon, Jewish physician and translator of Jewish Arabic-language works into Hebrew; he was also the progenitor of several generations of important translators. Persecution of the Jews forced Judah to flee Granada in 1150, and he settled in Lunel, in southern France, where he

  • ibn Tibbon, Moses ben Samuel (Jewish physician and translator)

    Moses ben Samuel ibn Tibbon, Jewish physician like his father, Samuel ben Judah ibn Tibbon, and his paternal grandfather, Judah ben Saul ibn Tibbon, and an important translator of Arabic-language works into Hebrew. His translations served to disseminate Greek and Arab culture throughout Europe.

  • ibn Tibbon, Samuel ben Judah (Jewish physician and translator)

    Samuel ben Judah ibn Tibbon, Jewish translator and physician whose most significant achievement was an accurate and faithful rendition from the Arabic into Hebrew of Maimonides’ classic Dalālat al-?ā?irīn (Hebrew More nevukhim; English The Guide of the Perplexed). From his father, Judah ben Saul

  • Ibn ?ufayl (Moorish philosopher and physician)

    Ibn ?ufayl, Moorish philosopher and physician who is known for his ?ayy ibn Yaq?ān (c. 1175; Eng. trans. by L.E. Goodman, ?ayy ibn Yaq?an by Ibn ?ufayl, 1972), a philosophical romance in which he describes the self-education and gradual philosophical development of a man who passes the first 50

  • Ibn ?ūlūn, A?mad (governor of Egypt)

    A?mad ibn ?ūlūn, the founder of the ?ūlūnid dynasty in Egypt and the first Muslim governor of Egypt to annex Syria. As a child A?mad was taken into slavery and placed in the private service of the ?Abbāsid caliph at the new capital of Sāmarrā?. Later he studied theology in the city of Tarsus (now

  • Ibn Tūmart (Berber Muslim leader)

    Ibn Tūmart, Berber spiritual and military leader who founded the al-Muwa??idūn confederation in North Africa (see Almohads). The doctrine he taught combined a strict conception of the unity of God with a program of juridical and puritanical moral reform, based on a study of the Qur?ān and of t

  • Ibn Verga, Solomon (Jewish writer)

    Judaism: Conflicts and new movements: …work of history (1550) by Solomon ibn Verga (1460–1554), who regarded the Jewish problem as a sociopolitical one to which theological answers were futile. Such guarded rationalism was entertained by a number of courageous thinkers in 16th-century Italy, where, despite the policy of ghettoization (the segregation of the Jewish community…

  • Ibn Wahb (Islamic leader)

    Khārijite: …?arūrā? under the leadership of Ibn Wahb and, when arbitration proved disastrous to ?Alī, were joined near Nahrawān by a larger group.

  • Ibn Wa?shīyah (Middle Eastern agriculturalist)

    Ibn Wa?shīyah , Middle Eastern agriculturist and toxicologist alleged to have written al-Fillā?ah an-Naba?īyah (“Nabatean Agriculture”), a major treatise dealing with plants, water sources and quality, weather conditions, the causes of deforestation, soils and their improvement, crop cultivation,

  • Ibn Yūnus (Egyptian astronomer)

    eclipse: Medieval Islamic: …recorded by the Cairo astronomer Ibn Yūnus:

  • Ibn Zaydūn (Muslim poet)

    Islamic arts: Poetry: …lyric poets of Spain was Ibn Zaydūn of Córdoba (died 1071), who was of noble birth. After composing some charming love songs dedicated to the Umayyad princess Wallādah, he turned his hand to poetic epistles. He is the author of a beautiful muwashsha? about his hometown, which many later poets…

  • Ibn Zaylā (Islamic author)

    Islamic arts: The Umayyad and ?Abbāsid dynasties: classical Islamic music: …ibn Qurrah, and Avicenna’s pupil Ibn Zaylā. The last important theorist to emerge during the ?Abbāsid period was ?afī al-Dīn, who codified the elements of the modal practice as it was then known into a highly sophisticated system. His achievement became the chief model for subsequent generations. In the numerous…

  • Ibn Ziyād (Ziyādid ruler)

    Ziyādid Dynasty: The first Ziyādid, Mu?ammad ibn Ziyād, firmly established himself along the Yemeni coast (Tihāmah) with the support of a Khorāsānian army and cavalry; he was also recognized by the tribal chiefs along the edges of the highlands. ?an?ā? in the interior, however, remained under ?Abbāsid control, and, when…

  • Ibn Zuhr (Spanish Muslim physician)

    Ibn Zuhr, one of medieval Islam’s foremost thinkers and the greatest medical clinician of the western caliphate. An intensely practical man, Ibn Zuhr disliked medical speculation; for that reason, he opposed the teachings of the Persian master physician Avicenna. In his Taysīr fī al-mudāwāt wa

  • Ibn ?Abbād (Islamic theologian)

    Ibn ?Abbād, Islamic theologian who became the leading mystical thinker of North Africa in the 14th century. Attracted to Morocco by the famous madrasas (religious colleges), Ibn ?Abbād immigrated there at an early age. He abandoned legal studies in a quest for mystical knowledge. In 1359 he settled

  • Ibn ?Abbās (Companion of Mu?ammad)

    ?Abd Allāh ibn al-?Abbās, a Companion of the prophet Mu?ammad, one of the greatest scholars of early Islām, and the first exegete of the Qur?ān. In the early struggles for the caliphate, Ibn ?Abbās supported ?Alī and was rewarded with the governorship of Ba?ra. Subsequently he defected and withdrew

  • Ibn ?Abd Rabbih (Muslim poet)

    Al-Mu?allaqāt: …as standard was recorded by Ibn ?Abd Rabbih and names poems by Imru? al-Qays, ?arafah, Zuhayr, Labīd, ?Antarah, ?Amr ibn Kulthum, and al-?ārith ibn ?illiza. Such authorities as Ibn Qutaybah, however, count ?Abid ibn al-Abras as one of the seven, while Abū ?Ubaydah replaces

  • Ibn ?Ammār (?Abbādid vizier)

    ?Abbādid dynasty: …held it again, 1078–91, while Ibn ?Ammār, his vizier and fellow poet, conquered Murcia.

  • Ibn ?Aqīl (Muslim theologian)

    Ibn ?Aqīl, Islamic theologian and scholar of the ?anbalī school, the most traditionalist of the schools of Islamic law. His thoughts and teachings represent an attempt to give a somewhat more liberal direction to ?anbalism. In 1055–66 Ibn ?Aqīl received instruction in Islamic law according to the

  • Ibo (people)

    Igbo, people living chiefly in southeastern Nigeria who speak Igbo, a language of the Benue-Congo branch of the Niger-Congo language family. The Igbo may be grouped into the following main cultural divisions: northern, southern, western, eastern or Cross River, and northeastern. Before European

  • iboga (drug)

    Ibogaine, hallucinogenic drug and the principal iboga alkaloid, found in the stems, leaves, and especially in the roots of the African shrub Tabernanthe iboga. Ibogaine was isolated from the plant in 1901 and was synthesized in 1966. In small doses it acts as a stimulant. The peoples of West Africa

  • ibogaine (drug)

    Ibogaine, hallucinogenic drug and the principal iboga alkaloid, found in the stems, leaves, and especially in the roots of the African shrub Tabernanthe iboga. Ibogaine was isolated from the plant in 1901 and was synthesized in 1966. In small doses it acts as a stimulant. The peoples of West Africa

  • Ibold, Mark (American musician)

    Sonic Youth: Enlisting Pavement bassist Mark Ibold (b. 1962, Cincinnati, Ohio) for the album and subsequent tour, The Eternal recalled Sonic Youth’s early 1990s rock sound. It proved to be a final statement. In 2011 the 27-year marriage of Gordon and Moore dissolved, which effectively brought an end to the…

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