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  • ion transport (biology)

    nervous system: Ion transport: As is stated above, the lipid bilayer of the neuronal membrane tends to repel electrically charged, hydrated ions, making virtually impossible the movement across the membrane that is necessary for the generation of nerve impulses. The transmembrane movement of ions is actually carried…

  • ion trap (physics)

    quantum computer: …atoms using an electromagnetic “trap.” After confining the ions in a linear arrangement, a laser cooled the particles almost to absolute zero and synchronized their spin states. Finally, a laser was used to entangle the particles, creating a superposition of both spin-up and spin-down states simultaneously for all four…

  • ion-beam scanning (chemistry)

    mass spectrometry: Ion-beam analysis: The separation of ions according to their mass is accomplished with static magnetic fields, time-varying electric fields, or methods that clock the speeds of ions having the same energies—the time-of-flight method. Static electric fields cannot separate ions by their mass but…

  • ion-chamber dosimeter (measurement instrument)

    dosimeter: The ion-chamber dosimeter, like the thermoluminescent one, is reusable, but it is self-reading for immediate determination of exposure.

  • ion-deposition printer

    information processing: Printers: Ion-deposition printers make use of technology similar to that of photocopiers for producing electrostatic images. Another type of nonimpact printer, the ink-jet printer, sprays electrically charged drops of ink onto the print surface.

  • ion-exchange capacity (chemistry)

    Ion-exchange capacity, measure of the ability of an insoluble material to undergo displacement of ions previously attached and loosely incorporated into its structure by oppositely charged ions present in the surrounding solution. Zeolite minerals used in water softening, for example, have a large

  • ion-exchange chromatography (chemistry)

    dating: Technical advances: …by using the methods of ion-exchange chromatography. In this process, ions are variously adsorbed from solution onto materials with ionic charges on their surface and separated from the rest of the sample. After the dating elements have been isolated, they are loaded into a mass spectrometer and their relative isotopic…

  • ion-exchange membrane (chemistry)

    ion-exchange reaction: Ion-exchange procedures: …same time permeable; development of ion-exchange membranes has been slow for this reason. Ion-exchange membranes are used, however, to separate the electrodes of fuel cells and to remove salts from water by the physical processes termed reverse osmosis and electrodialysis. The former is a kind of filtration process—water is squeezed…

  • ion-exchange reaction (chemical reaction)

    Ion-exchange reaction, any of a class of chemical reactions between two substances (each consisting of positively and negatively charged species called ions) that involves an exchange of one or more ionic components. Ions are atoms, or groups of atoms, that bear a positive or negative electric

  • ion-exchange resin (chemical compound)

    Ion-exchange resin, any of a wide variety of organic compounds synthetically polymerized and containing positively or negatively charged sites that can attract an ion of opposite charge from a surrounding solution. The resins commonly consist of a styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer (high molecular

  • ion–molecule reaction (physics)

    radiation: Purely physical effects: …in what is called an ion–molecule reaction. In either case new chemical species are created. These transformed ions and radicals, as well as the electrons, parent ions, and excited states, are capable of reacting with themselves and with molecules of the medium, as well as with a solute (a dissolved…

  • ion-selective electrode

    chemical analysis: Ion-selective electrodes: The second category of potentiometric indicator electrodes is the ion-selective electrode. Ion-selective electrodes preferentially respond to a single chemical species. The potential between the indicator electrode and the reference electrode varies as the concentration or activity of that particular species varies. Unlike the…

  • ion-trap mass spectrometry (chemistry)

    mass spectrometry: Ion-trap methods: It is possible to configure electric and magnetic fields so that ions can be held in stable orbits for a period of time long enough to perform useful measurements on them. Two forms of mass spectrometers are derived from this idea, the omegatron…

  • ion-velocity spectrometer (instrument)

    mass spectrometry: Ion-velocity spectrometers: The energy of an ion is proportional to the square of its velocity, so ions of constant energy can be separated through the use of fields that vary with time. In the United States William R. Smythe first proposed such a device in…

  • Iona (island, Inner Hebrides, Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Iona, island of the Inner Hebrides, Strathclyde region, Scotland. It is 3 miles (5 km) long by 1.5 miles (2.4 km) wide, with its highest point just under 330 feet (100 m) above sea level, and is separated by the Sound of Iona (0.7 miles [1.1 km] wide) from the large island of Mull. Most of the

  • Iona (Russian Orthodox metropolitan)

    Jonas, first independent metropolitan of Moscow, elected in 1448. Until the 15th century the Orthodox Church had depended upon the patriarch of Constantinople to choose its ecclesiastical head, usually a Greek, to fill the position of metropolitan of Kiev (later metropolitan of Moscow). In 1448,

  • Iona Community (religious community, Scotland)

    Iona Community, ecumenical group of Christian clergy and laypersons within the Church of Scotland that was founded in 1938 by George MacLeod. MacLeod, a parish minister in Glasgow, was convinced that the wide gap between theology and actual life should be closed and that, as in the ancient Celtic

  • Ionesco, Eugène (French dramatist)

    Eugène Ionesco, Romanian-born French dramatist whose one-act “antiplay” La Cantatrice chauve (1949; The Bald Soprano) inspired a revolution in dramatic techniques and helped inaugurate the Theatre of the Absurd. Elected to the Académie Fran?aise in 1970, Ionesco remains among the most important

  • Ionescu, Eugen (French dramatist)

    Eugène Ionesco, Romanian-born French dramatist whose one-act “antiplay” La Cantatrice chauve (1949; The Bald Soprano) inspired a revolution in dramatic techniques and helped inaugurate the Theatre of the Absurd. Elected to the Académie Fran?aise in 1970, Ionesco remains among the most important

  • Ionia (ancient region, Turkey)

    Ionia, ancient region comprising the central sector of the western coast of Anatolia (now in Turkey). It was bounded by the regions of Aeolis on the north and Caria on the south and included the adjacent islands. Ionia consisted of a coastal strip about 25 miles (40 km) wide that extended from

  • Iónia Nisiá (islands, Greece)

    Ionian Islands, island group off the west coast of Greece, stretching south from the Albanian coast to the southern tip of the Peloponnese (Modern Greek: Pelopónnisos), and often called Heptanesos (“Seven Islands”). The islands are Corfu (Kérkyra), Cephallenia (Kefaloniá), Zacynthus (Zákynthos),

  • Ionian (people)

    Ionian, any member of an important eastern division of the ancient Greek people, who gave their name to a district on the western coast of Anatolia (now Turkey). The Ionian dialect of Greek was closely related to Attic and was spoken in Ionia and on many of the Aegean islands. The Ionians are said

  • Ionian Basin (basin, Mediterranean Sea)

    Mediterranean Sea: Natural divisions: The Ionian Basin, in the area known as the Ionian Sea, lies to the south of Italy, Albania, and Greece, where the deepest sounding in the Mediterranean, about 16,000 feet (4,900 metres), has been recorded. A submarine ridge between the western end of Crete and Cyrenaica…

  • Ionian Islands (islands, Greece)

    Ionian Islands, island group off the west coast of Greece, stretching south from the Albanian coast to the southern tip of the Peloponnese (Modern Greek: Pelopónnisos), and often called Heptanesos (“Seven Islands”). The islands are Corfu (Kérkyra), Cephallenia (Kefaloniá), Zacynthus (Zákynthos),

  • Ionian mode (music)

    Ionian mode, in Western music, the melodic mode with a pitch series corresponding to that of the major scale. The Ionian mode was named and described by the Swiss humanist Henricus Glareanus in his music treatise Dodecachordon (1547). In that work Glareanus expanded the standing system of eight

  • Ionian revolt (Anatolian history [499–494 BC])

    Ionian revolt, uprising (499–494 bce) of some of the Ionian cities of Asia Minor against their Persian overlords. The cities deposed their own tyrants and, with help from Athens, tried unsuccessfully to throw off Persian domination. Darius I of Persia used Athens’s involvement as a pretext for his

  • Ionian school (philosophy)

    Ionian school, school of Greek philosophers of the 6th to 5th century bc, including Thales, Anaximander, Anaximenes, Heracleitus, Anaxagoras, Diogenes of Apollonia, Archelaus, and Hippon. Although Ionia was the original centre of their activity, they differed so greatly from one another in their

  • Ionian Sea (sea, Mediterranean Sea)

    Ionian Sea, part of the Mediterranean Sea, lying between Albania (northeast), Greece (east), Sicily (southwest), and Italy (west and northwest). Though considered by ancient authors to be part of the Adriatic Sea, the Ionian Sea is now seen as a separate body of water. In the Ionian Sea, south of G

  • Ionian Stage (geology)

    Ionian Stage, third of four stages of the Pleistocene Series, encompassing all rocks deposited during the Ionian Age (781,000 to 126,000 years ago) of the Pleistocene Epoch in the Quaternary Period. No established Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) defining the base of the Ionian Stage has

  • ionic acid (chemical compound)

    acid–base reaction: The Br?nsted–Lowry definition: …molecular acids, two classes of ionic acids emerge from the new definition. The first comprises anions derived from acids containing more than one acidic hydrogen—e.g., the bisulfate ion (HSO4?) and primary and secondary phosphate ions (H2PO4? and HPO42?) derived from phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The second and more interesting class consists…

  • Ionic alphabet

    Ionic alphabet, most important variety of the eastern form of the ancient Greek alphabet, developed late in the 5th century bc. In 403 the Ionic alphabet used in the Anatolian city of Miletus was adopted for use in Athens, and by the middle of the 4th century the Ionic had become the common,

  • ionic bond (chemistry)

    Ionic bond, type of linkage formed from the electrostatic attraction between oppositely charged ions in a chemical compound. Such a bond forms when the valence (outermost) electrons of one atom are transferred permanently to another atom. The atom that loses the electrons becomes a positively

  • ionic carbide (chemical compound)

    carbide: Ionic carbides: Ionic carbides have discrete carbon anions of the forms C4?, sometimes called methanides since they can be viewed as being derived from methane, (CH4); C22?, called acetylides and derived from acetylene (C2H2); and C34?, derived from allene (C3H4). The

  • ionic compound (chemistry)

    amide: Ionic, or saltlike, amides are strongly alkaline compounds ordinarily made by treating ammonia, an amine, or a covalent amide with a reactive metal such as sodium.

  • ionic conduction (physics)

    conductive ceramics: Ionic conduction consists of the transit of ions (atoms of positive or negative charge) from one site to another via point defects called vacancies in the crystal lattice. At normal ambient temperatures very little ion hopping takes place, since the atoms are at relatively low…

  • ionic crystal (crystallography)

    chemical bonding: Ionic solids: The structures of ionic solids have already been described in some detail. They consist of individual ions that are stacked together in such a way that the assembly has the lowest possible energy. These ions may be monatomic (as in sodium chloride, which…

  • Ionic dialect (dialect)

    Ionic dialect, any of several Ancient Greek dialects spoken in Euboea, in the Northern Cyclades, and from approximately 1000 bc in Asiatic Ionia, where Ionian colonists from Athens founded their cities. Attic and Ionic dialects together form a dialect group. The artificial dialect of the Homeric

  • ionic dissociation (chemistry)

    acid–base reaction: Hydrogen and hydroxide ions: …with the advent of the electrolytic dissociation theory propounded by Wilhelm Ostwald and Svante August Arrhenius (both Nobel laureates) in the 1880s. The principal feature of this theory is that certain compounds, called electrolytes, dissociate in solution to give ions. With the development of this theory it was realized that…

  • ionic foot (prosody)

    Ionic foot, in prosody, a foot of verse that consists of either two long and two short syllables (also called major ionic or a maiore) or two short and two long syllables (also called minor ionic or a

  • ionic mobility (chemistry)

    chemoreception: Signal transduction: … of cell membranes depend on ionic movement, cells will be affected by ion concentrations in the medium that bathes them. It is very likely that when humans and other animals ingest common salt (sodium chloride), sodium enters the receptor cells directly through sodium channels in the cell membrane. This has…

  • Ionic numeral (number system)

    numerals and numeral systems: Ciphered numeral systems: These Ionic, or alphabetical, numerals, were simply a cipher system in which nine Greek letters were assigned to the numbers 1–9, nine more to the numbers 10, …, 90, and nine more to 100, …, 900. Thousands were often indicated by placing a bar at the…

  • Ionic order (architecture)

    Ionic order, one of the orders of classical architecture. Its distinguishing feature is the twin volutes, or spiral scrolls, of its capital. See

  • ionic regulation (physiology)

    excretion: Regulation of water and salt balance: Ionic regulation is the maintenance of the concentrations of the various ions in the body fluids relative to one another. There is no consistent distinction between the two processes; organs that participate in one process at the same time participate in the other.

  • ionic solid (crystallography)

    chemical bonding: Ionic solids: The structures of ionic solids have already been described in some detail. They consist of individual ions that are stacked together in such a way that the assembly has the lowest possible energy. These ions may be monatomic (as in sodium chloride, which…

  • ionic solvation energy (chemistry)

    acid–base reaction: The effect of molecular structure: …atomic nucleus for electrons), and ionic solvation energy, of which the first is the most important. When a hydride is able to lose two or more protons, the loss of the second is always more difficult because of the increased negative charge on the base—e.g., H2S ? HS? (pK 7),…

  • Ionic-Attic (ancient Greek language)

    Greek literature: Archaic period, to the end of the 6th century bc: …the Aegean Islands and of Ionia on the coast of Asia Minor. Archilochus of Paros, of the 7th century bc, was the earliest Greek poet to employ the forms of elegy (in which the epic verse line alternated with a shorter line) and of personal lyric poetry. His work was…

  • ionic-covalent resonance (chemistry)

    chemical bonding: The polarity of molecules: …would be in terms of ionic-covalent resonance:

  • Iónioi Nísoi (islands, Greece)

    Ionian Islands, island group off the west coast of Greece, stretching south from the Albanian coast to the southern tip of the Peloponnese (Modern Greek: Pelopónnisos), and often called Heptanesos (“Seven Islands”). The islands are Corfu (Kérkyra), Cephallenia (Kefaloniá), Zacynthus (Zákynthos),

  • Ionisation (work by Varèse)

    instrumentation: Post-Romanticism in the 20th century and beyond: …Varèse composed an important work, Ionisation, for 13 percussion players, a landmark in the emergence of percussion instruments as equal partners in music.

  • ionium (chemical isotope)

    ionium-thorium dating: Ionium-thorium dating, method of establishing the time of origin of marine sediments according to the amount of ionium and thorium they contain.

  • ionium-thorium dating (physics)

    Ionium-thorium dating, method of establishing the time of origin of marine sediments according to the amount of ionium and thorium they contain. Because uranium compounds are soluble in seawater, while thorium compounds are quite insoluble, the thorium isotopes produced by the decay of uranium in

  • ionization (chemistry and physics)

    Ionization, in chemistry and physics, any process by which electrically neutral atoms or molecules are converted to electrically charged atoms or molecules (ions). Ionization is one of the principal ways that radiation, such as charged particles and X rays, transfers its energy to matter. In

  • ionization chamber

    Ionization chamber, radiation detector used for determining the intensity of a beam of radiation or for counting individual charged particles. The device may consist of a gas-filled, cylindrical container in which an electric field is maintained by impressing a voltage that keeps the wall negative

  • ionization density (physics)

    radiation: Range: The ionization density (number of ions per unit of path length) produced by a fast charged particle along its track increases as the particle slows down. It eventually reaches a maximum called the Bragg peak close to the end of its trajectory. After that, the ionization…

  • ionization energy (chemistry)

    Ionization energy, in chemistry, the amount of energy required to remove an electron from an isolated atom or molecule. There is an ionization energy for each successive electron removed; the ionization energy associated with removal of the first (most loosely held) electron, however, is most

  • ionization isomerism (chemistry)

    coordination compound: Ionization isomerism: Certain isomeric pairs occur that differ only in that two ionic groups exchange positions within (and without) the primary coordination sphere. These are called ionization isomers and are exemplified by the two compounds, pentaamminebromocobalt sulfate, [CoBr(NH3)5]SO4, and pentaamminesulfatocobalt bromide, [Co(SO4)(NH3)5]Br. In the former…

  • ionization potential (chemistry)

    Ionization energy, in chemistry, the amount of energy required to remove an electron from an isolated atom or molecule. There is an ionization energy for each successive electron removed; the ionization energy associated with removal of the first (most loosely held) electron, however, is most

  • ionization track (physics)

    radiation: Heavy charged particles: …energy along their paths, or tracks. If the medium is sufficiently thick, the velocity of the charged particle is reduced to near zero so that its energy is all but totally absorbed and is totally utilized in producing physical, chemical, and, in viable (living) matter, biologic changes. If the sample…

  • ionized hydrogen cloud (astronomy)

    H II region, interstellar matter consisting of ionized hydrogen atoms. The energy that is responsible for ionizing and heating the hydrogen in an emission nebula comes from a central star that has a surface temperature in excess of 20,000 K. The density of these clouds normally ranges from 10 to

  • ionizing radiation

    Ionizing radiation, flow of energy in the form of atomic and subatomic particles or electromagnetic waves that is capable of freeing electrons from an atom, causing the atom to become charged (or ionized). Ionizing radiation includes the more energetic end of the electromagnetic spectrum (X-rays

  • ionizing radiation injury

    Ionizing radiation injury, tissue destruction or changes caused by deeply penetrating electromagnetic waves of high frequency or subatomic particles that form positively and negatively charged particles in the tissues, including individual cells that receive the radiation. Sources for radiation may

  • ionone (chemistry)

    citral: Ionone and methylionone, made from citral, are used in perfumery; ionone is also converted into synthetic vitamin A.

  • ionopause (astrophysics)

    Venus: Interaction with the solar wind: …the ionosphere, known as the ionopause, lies at a much lower altitude on the dayside of Venus than on the nightside owing to the pressure exerted by the solar wind. The density of the ionosphere is also far greater on the dayside of the planet than on the nightside.

  • ionosphere (atmospheric region)

    ionosphere and magnetosphere: Ionosphere: Discovery of the ionosphere extended over nearly a century. As early as 1839, the German mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss speculated that an electrically conducting region of the atmosphere could account for observed variations of Earth’s magnetic field. The notion of…

  • ionosphere and magnetosphere (atmospheric science)

    Ionosphere and magnetosphere, regions of Earth’s atmosphere in which the number of electrically charged particles—ions and electrons—are large enough to affect the propagation of radio waves. The charged particles are created by the action of extraterrestrial radiation (mainly from the Sun) on

  • ionospheric dynamo (atmospheric science)

    geomagnetic field: The ionospheric dynamo: Above Earth’s surface is the next source of magnetic field, the ionospheric dynamo—an electric current system flowing in the planet’s ionosphere. Beginning at about 50 kilometres and extending above 1,000 kilometres with a maximum at 400 kilometres, the ionosphere is formed primarily by…

  • ionospheric reflection (physics)

    telecommunications media: Reflected propagation: …off land or water, and ionospheric reflection, where the wave is reflected off an upper layer of the Earth’s ionosphere (as in shortwave radio; see below The radio-frequency spectrum: HF).

  • Ionospheric Research Instrument (instrument)

    HAARP: The main instrument is the Ionospheric Research Instrument (IRI), an array of 180 radio antennas spread over an area of 0.13 square kilometer (33 acres).

  • iora (bird)

    Iora, smallest of the fairy bluebird species. See fairy

  • Iorga, Nicolae (prime minister of Romania)

    Nicolae Iorga, scholar and statesman, Romania’s greatest national historian, who also served briefly as its prime minister (1931–32). Appointed professor of universal history at Bucharest (1895), Iorga early established his historical reputation with his two-volume Geschichte des rum?nischen Volkes

  • Iorwerth, Book of (Welsh law)

    Welsh law: …three groups, generally called the Book of Iorwerth, the Book of Blegywryd, and the Book of Cyfnerth. The oldest manuscripts are those of the Book of Iorwerth, though the Book of Cyfnerth—which is attributed to Morgenau and his son Cyfnerth, members of the most famous family of lawyers in Gwynedd—reflects…

  • IOS (American company)

    Robert L. Vesco: …of the Swiss-based mutual-fund empire Investors Overseas Services (IOS). The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission accused Vesco and his associates of looting the IOS of $224 million, defrauding thousands of investors by diverting assets from mutual funds. In 1973 Vesco was indicted for making illegal contributions totaling $250,000 to the…

  • Ioseliani, Nana (Georgian chess player)

    Susan Polgar: Hungarian years: Maya Chiburdanidze and the runner-up Nana Ioseliani, with whom she was required to play a match for the right to face Xie. Their eight-game match, which was played in 1993 in Monaco, ended with two wins apiece and three draws, forcing a two-game extension that was split, leading to yet…

  • Ioshkar-Ola (Russia)

    Yoshkar-Ola, city and capital of Mari El republic, western Russia, on the Malaya (little) Kokshaga River. Yoshkar-Ola was founded in 1578, and in 1584 the fortress of Tsaryovokokshaysk was built there by Tsar Boris Godunov. Its remoteness from lines of communication prevented any development. In

  • IoT (electronic network)

    information system: Telecommunications: A massive “Internet of things” has emerged, as sensors and actuators have been widely distributed in the physical environment and are supplying data, such as acidity of a square yard of soil, the speed of a driving vehicle, or the blood pressure of an individual. The availability…

  • Iouernia

    Hibernia, in ancient geography, one of the names by which Ireland was known to Greek and Roman writers. Other names were Ierne, Iouernia and (H)iberio. All these are adaptations of a stem from which Erin and Eire are also derived. The island was known to the Romans through the reports of traders,

  • Iovine, Jimmy (American record producer)

    Dr. Dre: In 2008 he and Jimmy Iovine, a music executive, formally established Beats Electronics, which sold headphones, earphones, and speakers, among other items. Six years later they launched Beats Music, a music-streaming service. The two companies were purchased by Apple for $3 billion in 2014.

  • Iovis (Roman god)

    Jupiter, the chief ancient Roman and Italian god. Like Zeus, the Greek god with whom he is etymologically identical (root diu, “bright”), Jupiter was a sky god. One of his most ancient epithets is Lucetius (“Light-Bringer”); and later literature has preserved the same idea in such phrases as sub

  • Iovkov, Iordan (Bulgarian author)

    Yordan Yovkov, Bulgarian short-story writer, novelist, and dramatist whose stories of Balkan peasant life and military experiences show a fine mastery of prose. Yovkov grew up in the Dobruja region and, after studying in Sofia, returned there to teach. He later worked in the Bulgarian legation in

  • Iowa (people)

    Iowa, North American Indian people of Siouan linguistic stock who migrated southwestward from north of the Great Lakes to the general area of what is now the state of Iowa, U.S., before European settlement of the so-called New World. The Iowa are related to the Oto and the Missouri. Living at the

  • Iowa (state, United States)

    Iowa, constituent state of the United States of America. It was admitted to the union as the 29th state on December 28, 1846. As a Midwestern state, Iowa forms a bridge between the forests of the east and the grasslands of the high prairie plains to the west. Its gently rolling landscape rises

  • Iowa Agricultural College and Model Farm (university, Ames, Iowa, United States)

    Iowa State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Ames, Iowa, U.S. The university comprises colleges of agriculture, business, design, education, engineering, family and consumer sciences, liberal arts and sciences, and veterinary medicine. The Graduate College offers a

  • Iowa caucuses (electoral event, Iowa, United States)

    Iowa caucuses, political party meetings taking place in the state of Iowa to select the U.S. presidential candidate. Traditionally placed first among the nomination contests, the Iowa caucuses are widely regarded as an important indicator of a candidate’s likely success. Since 1976, when former

  • Iowa City (Iowa, United States)

    Iowa City, city, seat (1839) of Johnson county, east-central Iowa, U.S., on the Iowa River, 27 miles (43 km) south of Cedar Rapids. Founded as territorial capital of Iowa in 1839, it lost the state capital to Des Moines in 1857 but retained the University of Iowa (1847). With the arrival of the

  • Iowa crab (tree)
  • Iowa Great Lakes (resort area, Iowa, United States)

    Iowa Great Lakes, popular resort area in Dickinson county, northwestern Iowa, U.S., just south of the Minnesota border. Included are Spirit (or Big Spirit), West Okoboji, East Okoboji, and Silver lakes, all of which are of glacial origin. Spirit Lake, the largest—4 miles (6 km) long and 3 miles (5

  • Iowa precinct caucuses (electoral event, Iowa, United States)

    Iowa caucuses, political party meetings taking place in the state of Iowa to select the U.S. presidential candidate. Traditionally placed first among the nomination contests, the Iowa caucuses are widely regarded as an important indicator of a candidate’s likely success. Since 1976, when former

  • Iowa River (river, Iowa, United States)

    Iowa River, river flowing through the centre of Iowa, U.S. It rises as two headstreams, the East Branch Iowa and West Branch Iowa rivers, in the north-central part of the state; the Iowa proper is formed by their confluence near Belmond in Wright county. The river then flows generally southeastward

  • Iowa State Agricultural College (university, Ames, Iowa, United States)

    Iowa State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Ames, Iowa, U.S. The university comprises colleges of agriculture, business, design, education, engineering, family and consumer sciences, liberal arts and sciences, and veterinary medicine. The Graduate College offers a

  • Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts (university, Ames, Iowa, United States)

    Iowa State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Ames, Iowa, U.S. The university comprises colleges of agriculture, business, design, education, engineering, family and consumer sciences, liberal arts and sciences, and veterinary medicine. The Graduate College offers a

  • Iowa State Normal School (university, Cedar Falls, Iowa, United States)

    University of Northern Iowa, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Cedar Falls, Iowa, U.S. It includes colleges of business administration, education, humanities and fine arts, natural sciences, and social and behavioral sciences. In addition to undergraduate studies, the

  • Iowa State Teachers College (university, Cedar Falls, Iowa, United States)

    University of Northern Iowa, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Cedar Falls, Iowa, U.S. It includes colleges of business administration, education, humanities and fine arts, natural sciences, and social and behavioral sciences. In addition to undergraduate studies, the

  • Iowa State University (university, Ames, Iowa, United States)

    Iowa State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Ames, Iowa, U.S. The university comprises colleges of agriculture, business, design, education, engineering, family and consumer sciences, liberal arts and sciences, and veterinary medicine. The Graduate College offers a

  • Iowa State University of Science and Technology (university, Ames, Iowa, United States)

    Iowa State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Ames, Iowa, U.S. The university comprises colleges of agriculture, business, design, education, engineering, family and consumer sciences, liberal arts and sciences, and veterinary medicine. The Graduate College offers a

  • Iowa Tests (education)

    Laboratory Schools of the University of Iowa: The Iowa Tests of Basic Skills and the Iowa Tests of Educational Development, originating in the laboratory schools and adapted by the American College Testing Program, were widely applied to test skill and achievement levels of elementary and secondary school students. Language teaching on the elementary…

  • Iowa Writers’ Workshop (American organization)

    Wilbur Schramm: …and Norman Foerster founded the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, which developed into one of the most prestigious creative writing programs in the United States.

  • Iowa, flag of (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of vertical blue, white, and red stripes bearing a flying bald eagle and a blue ribbon above the name of the state.At the beginning of the 20th century, many U.S. states adopted their first official flags. As various chapters had done in a number of other states, the

  • Iowa, University of (university, Iowa City, Iowa, United States)

    University of Iowa, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Iowa City, Iowa, U.S. It comprises colleges of business administration, dentistry, law, public health, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, education, engineering, and liberal arts and schools of journalism and mass communication,

  • IP address (computing)

    IP address, Number that uniquely identifies each computer on the Internet. A computer’s IP address may be permanently assigned or supplied each time that it connects to the Internet by an Internet service provider. In order to accommodate the extraordinary growth in the number of devices connected

  • IPA (linguistics)

    International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), an alphabet developed in the 19th century to accurately represent the pronunciation of languages. One aim of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) was to provide a unique symbol for each distinctive sound in a language—that is, every sound, or phoneme,

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