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  • IPV (medicine)

    John Franklin Enders: …to the development of the Salk vaccine for polio in 1954. Similarly, their production in the late 1950s of a vaccine against the measles led to the development of a licensed vaccine in the United States in 1963. Much of Enders’ research on viruses was conducted at the Children’s Hospital…

  • IPY

    Antarctica: IGY and the Antarctic Treaty: …at that time to organize similar programs every 50 years. In 1932–33 the Second International Polar Year took place, with 34 nations participating, but no Antarctic expeditions were mounted.

  • IQ (psychology)

    IQ, (from “intelligence quotient”), a number used to express the relative intelligence of a person. It is one of many intelligence tests. IQ was originally computed by taking the ratio of mental age to chronological (physical) age and multiplying by 100. Thus, if a 10-year-old child had a mental

  • ?Iqāb, Battle of Al- (Spanish history)

    Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa, (July 16, 1212), major battle of the Christian reconquest of Spain in which the Almohads (a Muslim dynasty of North Africa and Spain) were severely defeated by the combined armies of Castile, Aragon, Navarre, and Portugal. The battle was fought about 40 miles (64 km)

  • ?iqāl (cord)

    dress: The Middle East from the 6th century: …on the head by the agal (igal, egal), a corded band decorated with beads or metallic threads.

  • Iqaluit (Nunavut, Canada)

    Iqaluit, city, capital of Nunavut territory and headquarters of Baffin region, Canada. It lies at the head of Frobisher Bay, on southeastern Baffin Island. Iqaluit is the largest community in the eastern Canadian Arctic. It was established as a trading post in 1914 and became an air base during

  • īqā? (Islamic music)

    īqā?āt , in Islamic music, rhythmic modes—i.e., patterns of strong, intermediate, and weak beats, separated by pauses of various lengths. A well-developed system of such modes was described by medieval theorists. Although six or eight basic modes are included in most treatises, many more have

  • īqā?āt (Islamic music)

    īqā?āt , in Islamic music, rhythmic modes—i.e., patterns of strong, intermediate, and weak beats, separated by pauses of various lengths. A well-developed system of such modes was described by medieval theorists. Although six or eight basic modes are included in most treatises, many more have

  • Iqbal (film by Kukunoor [2005])

    Girish Karnad: …Heggadithi (1999) and acting in Iqbal (2005), Life Goes On (2009), and 24 (2016), among others.

  • Iqbal, Javed (Pakistani serial killer)

    Javed Iqbal, Pakistani serial killer who murdered some 100 boys. His case attracted international attention not only because he was one of the deadliest serial killers in history but because, upon his conviction, he was sentenced to die in a manner similar to that in which he had tortured and

  • Iqbal, Sir Muhammad (poet and philosopher)

    Sir Muhammad Iqbal, poet and philosopher, known for his influential efforts to direct his fellow Muslims in British-administered India toward the establishment of a separate Muslim state, an aspiration that was eventually realized in the country of Pakistan. He was knighted in 1922. Iqbal was born

  • IQF method (food processing)

    vegetable processing: Freezing: …a technology known as the individually quick-frozen (IQF) method. IQF is a method that does not allow large ice crystals to form in vegetable cells. Also, since each piece is individually frozen, particles do not cohere, and the final product is not frozen into a solid block. Various freezing techniques…

  • IQSY (international scientific program)

    Antarctica: Post-IGY research: …worldwide projects, such as the International Years of the Quiet Sun (1964–65), the International Biological Programme (1964–74), and the World Climate Research Programme (begun in 1980). It also advises the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

  • iq?ā? (Islamic land grant)

    Iq?ā?, in the Islāmic empire of the Caliphate, land granted to army officials for limited periods in lieu of a regular wage. It has sometimes been erroneously compared to the fief of medieval Europe. The iq?ā? system was established in the 9th century ad to relieve the state treasury when

  • Iqti?ād fī al-l?tiqād, al- (work by al-Ghazālī)

    al-Ghazālī: …Spanish), al-Iqti?ād fī al-l?tiqād (The Just Mean in Belief ), was probably written before he became a mystic, but there is nothing in the authentic writings to show that he rejected these doctrines, even though he came to hold that theology—the rational, systematic presentation of religious truths—was inferior to…

  • Iquan (Chinese pirate)

    Zheng Zhilong, Chinese pirate leader who achieved great power in the transitional period between the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911/12) dynasties. As a boy, Zheng found employment with the Europeans in the Portuguese settlement at Macau, where he was baptized and given the Christian name of

  • Iquique (Chile)

    Iquique, city, northern Chile. It is located on a rocky peninsula in the Atacama Desert, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Its anchorage is protected from the open sea by the low, barren offshore island of Serrano, which is connected to the mainland by a stone causeway. Founded in the 16th century,

  • Iquique, Battle of

    Peru: The War of the Pacific (1879–83): At the Battle of Iquique (then in Peru, now in Chile), on May 21, 1879, the Peruvians suffered the loss of one of their best warships, the Independencia; then the Huáscar was captured on October 8, and this eventual surrender of control of the sea permitted a…

  • Iquitos (Peru)

    Iquitos, Amazon River port, northeastern Peru. It is located about 2,300 miles (3,700 km) upstream from the Atlantic Ocean and 640 miles (1,030 km) north-northeast of Lima. It was founded in 1864 at the site of an Indian village and became the chief shipping port for the region during the rubber

  • IR (chemical compound)

    polyisoprene: Cis-1,4 polyisoprene: Isoprene rubber (IR) is manufactured by the polymerization of synthetic isoprene, which is obtained from the thermal cracking of the naphtha fraction of petroleum. Polymerization is conducted in solution, using both anionic and Ziegler-Natta catalysts. The product is at most 98 percent cis-1,4 polyisoprene, and…

  • Ir (chemical element)

    Iridium (Ir), chemical element, one of the platinum metals of Groups 8–10 (VIIIb), Periods 5 and 6, of the periodic table. It is very dense and rare and is used in platinum alloys. A precious, silver-white metal, iridium is hard and brittle, but it becomes ductile and can be worked at a white heat,

  • ?Ir Yizre?el (Israel)

    ?Afula, largest city of the Plain of Esdraelon, or Valley of Jezreel (Hebrew: ?Emeq Yizre?el), northern Israel. Named for the Arab village of Al-?Affūla formerly at that site, it is sometimes called ?Ir Yizre?el (“City of Jezreel”). It was founded in 1925 on lands acquired by the American Zion

  • IR-8 (rice)

    Los Ba?os: …Research Institute, headquartered there, developed IR8, a high-yielding strain that significantly increased rice production. Pop. (2000) 82,027; (2010) 101,884.

  • IR8 (rice)

    Los Ba?os: …Research Institute, headquartered there, developed IR8, a high-yielding strain that significantly increased rice production. Pop. (2000) 82,027; (2010) 101,884.

  • IRA (Irish military organization)

    Irish Republican Army (IRA), republican paramilitary organization seeking the establishment of a republic, the end of British rule in Northern Ireland, and the reunification of Ireland. The IRA was created in 1919 as a successor to the Irish Volunteers, a militant nationalist organization founded

  • IRA Provos (Irish military organization)

    Irish Republican Army: …whereas the Provisionals, or “Provos,” believed that violence— particularly terrorism—was a necessary part of the struggle to rid Ireland of the British.

  • iraca (botany)

    Cyclanthaceae: Panama hat palm order of monocotyledonous flowering plants, which has 11 genera of mostly stemless, perennial, palmlike herbs, woody herbaceous shrubs, and climbing vines that are distributed in Central America and tropical South America.

  • irad-? cedid (Ottoman treasury)

    Ottoman Empire: Selim III and the nizam-? cedid: …entirely new treasury, called the irad-? cedid (“new revenue”), whose revenues came from taxes imposed on previously untaxed sources and from the confiscation of some timars whose holders were not fulfilling their military and administrative duties to the state. Under the guidance of European technicians, factories were erected to manufacture…

  • Iradah-yi milli (political party, Iran)

    Sayyid Zia od-Din Tabataba?i: …the pro-British, anticommunist political party Iradah-yi milli (“The National Will”), which was active until 1951, at which time Tabataba?i faded from the political scene.

  • Iradier, Eduardo Dato (premier of Spain)

    Eduardo Dato Iradier, Spanish statesman, leader of the Conservative Party from 1913 to 1921, and three-time premier. He instituted various reforms but proved unable to deal effectively with unrest or to heal the divisions within his party. As undersecretary in the Home Office in 1892 and as

  • Irakere (Cuban orchestra)

    Latin jazz: The Cuban orchestra Irakere was among the emblematic ensembles of this decade. Led by pianist Jesús (“Chucho”) Valdés (son of Bebo Valdés) and featuring soloists such as clarinetist-saxophonist Paquito D’Rivera and trumpeter Arturo Sandoval, the group was recognized for its innovative fusion of jazz, Western classical music, rock,…

  • Irákleio (Greece)

    Heraklion, largest city, a dímos (municipality), and principal port of the Greek island of Crete and capital of the pereferiakí enótita (regional unit) Heraklion (Irákleio). It lies on the island’s north coast along the Sea of Crete, just northwest of the ancient Minoan capital of Knossos. The

  • Iráklion (Greece)

    Heraklion, largest city, a dímos (municipality), and principal port of the Greek island of Crete and capital of the pereferiakí enótita (regional unit) Heraklion (Irákleio). It lies on the island’s north coast along the Sea of Crete, just northwest of the ancient Minoan capital of Knossos. The

  • Irala, Domingo Martínez de (Spanish explorer)

    Argentina: Discovery and settlement: …under Juan de Ayolas and Domingo Martínez de Irala, lieutenants of Mendoza, pushed a thousand miles up the Plata and Paraguay rivers. Ayolas was lost on an exploring expedition, but Irala founded Asunción (now in Paraguay) among the Guaraní, a largely settled agricultural people. In 1541 the few remaining inhabitants…

  • IRAM Pico Veleta Observatory (observatory, Pico Veleta, Spain)

    radio telescope: Filled-aperture telescopes: …de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique (IRAM) in Grenoble, France, operates a 30-metre (100-foot) antenna at an altitude of 2,850 metres (9,350 feet) on Pico Veleta in the Spanish Sierra Nevada for observations at wavelengths as short as 1 mm (0.04 inch). Several radio telescopes that operate at submillimetre wavelengths are…

  • Irāmāvatāram (work by Kampan)

    Kampan: …is the epic Irāmāvatāram (Rama’s Incarnation).

  • Iran

    Iran, a mountainous, arid, and ethnically diverse country of southwestern Asia. Much of Iran consists of a central desert plateau, which is ringed on all sides by lofty mountain ranges that afford access to the interior through high passes. Most of the population lives on the edges of this

  • Iran Air flight 655 (aviation disaster, over the Strait of Hormuz, Persian Gulf [1988])

    Iran Air flight 655, flight of an Iranian airliner that was shot down by the missile cruiser USS Vincennes on July 3, 1988, over the Strait of Hormuz, killing all 290 people on board. The passenger plane, which was in Iranian airspace, had been incorrectly identified as a fighter jet. In July 1988

  • Iran and Libya Sanctions Act (United States [1996])

    Iran: Overview: The Iran and Libya Sanctions Act of 1996 expanded an existing U.S. embargo on the import of Iranian petroleum products to encompass extensive bans on investment both by U.S. and non-U.S. companies in Iran. These prohibitions included bans on foreign speculation in Iranian petroleum development, the…

  • Iran hostage crisis (United States history)

    Iran hostage crisis, international crisis (1979–81) in which militants in Iran seized 66 American citizens at the U.S. embassy in Tehrān and held 52 of them hostage for more than a year. The crisis, which took place during the chaotic aftermath of Iran’s Islamic revolution (1978–79) and its

  • Iran in 2006: A Country at a Crossroads

    One spring afternoon in 1997, the telephone at the New York Times bureau in Istanbul rang. I was then serving as bureau chief, and the caller was my boss, the Times foreign editor. An election was soon to be held in Iran, he said, and he had chosen me to cover it. “Get yourself a visa,” he told me,

  • Iran nuclear deal (international agreement)

    Iran: Nuclear deal reached: Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action: …final agreement, known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), was reached in July 2015 that largely followed the terms of the earlier framework, requiring Iran to reduce its nuclear stockpile and allow the International Atomic Energy Agency to inspect its nuclear facilities in exchange for the progressive reduction…

  • Iran’s Power Dilemma

    Since the early 1990s but especially in the past two years, Iran’s policies of opposition to the Western powers had paid off handsomely and transfigured it from a pariah state into a successful leader of the Shi?ite Islamic world. Tehran’s ability to project regional and global influence was a

  • Iran, ancient

    Ancient Iran, historic region of southwestern Asia that is only roughly coterminous with modern Iran. The term Persia was used for centuries, chiefly in the West, to designate those regions where Persian language and culture predominated, but it more correctly refers to a region of southern Iran

  • Iran, flag of

    horizontally striped green-white-red national flag with a red design (a stylized coat of arms) in the centre and Arabic inscriptions along the edges of the stripes. The flag has a width-to-length ratio of 4 to 7.Iran’s Lion and Sun emblem was displayed on a flag as early as the 15th century, and in

  • Iran, history of

    Iran: History: This article discusses the history of Iran from 640 ce to the present. For the history of the region before the 7th century, see ancient Iran.

  • Iran-Contra Affair (American history)

    Iran-Contra Affair, 1980s U.S. political scandal in which the National Security Council (NSC) became involved in secret weapons transactions and other activities that either were prohibited by the U.S. Congress or violated the stated public policy of the government. The background to the scandal

  • Iran-Iraq War

    Iran-Iraq War, (1980–88), prolonged military conflict between Iran and Iraq during the 1980s. Open warfare began on September 22, 1980, when Iraqi armed forces invaded western Iran along the countries’ joint border, though Iraq claimed that the war had begun earlier that month, on September 4, when

  • Irani, Ray R. (American businessman)

    Occidental Petroleum Corporation: Following Hammer’s death in 1990, Ray R. Irani became president and chief executive officer. During his 20-year tenure, Irani reduced the company’s debt burden and refocused its operations on profitable oil and gas production. Occidental’s interests in meatpacking, agricultural products, coal mining, the North Sea, and gas pipelines acquired from…

  • Iranian alphabet

    Pahlavi alphabet, writing system of the Persian people that dates from as early as the 2nd century bce, some scholars believe, and was in use until the advent of Islam (7th century ce). The Zoroastrian sacred book, the Avesta, is written in a variant of Pahlavi called Avestan. The Pahlavi alphabet

  • Iranian architecture

    ancient Iran: Art: …in an eclectic art and architecture that in itself mirrored the empire and the Persians’ understanding of how that empire ought to function. Yet the whole was entirely Persian. Just as the Achaemenids were tolerant in matters of local government and custom as long as Persians controlled the general policy…

  • Iranian art (ancient art)

    Iranian art and architecture, the art and architecture of ancient Iranian civilizations. Any reservation about attributing to Iran primary status among the countries contributing to the art of the ancient Middle East must be associated with the discontinuity of its early history and the

  • Iranian highlands (mountains, Asia)

    Asia: West Asia: The Iranian highlands comprise mountain arcs (the Elburz, the Kopet-Dag, the mountains of Khorāsān, the Safīd Range, and the western Hindu Kush in the north; the Zagros, Makrān, Soleymān, and Kīrthar mountains in the south), together with the plateaus of the interior and the central Iranian,…

  • Iranian intermezzo (Iranian history)

    Iran: The Iranian intermezzo (821–1055): Ya?qūb ibn Layth’s movement differed from ?āhir ibn al-?usayn’s establishment of a dynasty of Iranian governors over Khorāsān in 821. The latter’s rise marks the caliph’s recognition, after the difficulties encountered in Iran by Hārūn al-Rashīd (reigned 786–809), that the best way for…

  • Iranian languages

    Iranian languages, subgroup of the Indo-Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family. Iranian languages are spoken in Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and parts of Iraq, Turkey, Pakistan, and scattered areas of the Caucasus Mountains. Linguists typically approach the Iranian languages in

  • Iranian literature

    Iranian literature, body of writings in the Iranian languages produced in an area encompassing eastern Anatolia, Iran, and parts of western Central Asia as well as Afghanistan and the western areas of Pakistan. The oldest surviving texts are contained in the Avesta, the sacred book of

  • Iranian low (meteorology)

    Asia: The polar front: Known as the South Asian (or Iranian) low, it appears in April and is fully developed from June to August. The onset of monsoon in India and mainland Southeast Asia is related to changes in the circulation pattern that occur by June—specifically, the disintegration of the southern jet…

  • Iranian plateau (plateau, Iran)

    Iran: Climate: …to the interior of the Iranian plateau, and low-pressure systems develop over the warm waters of the Caspian Sea, the Persian Gulf, and the Mediterranean Sea. In summer one of the world’s lowest-pressure centres prevails in the south. Low-pressure systems in Pakistan generate two regular wind patterns: the shamāl, which…

  • Iranian religion, ancient

    Ancient Iranian religion, diverse beliefs and practices of the culturally and linguistically related group of ancient peoples who inhabited the Iranian plateau and its borderlands, as well as areas of Central Asia from the Black Sea to Khotan (modern Hotan, China). The northern Iranians (referred

  • Iranian Revolution ([1978–1979])

    Iranian Revolution, popular uprising in Iran in 1978–79 that resulted in the toppling of the monarchy on February 11, 1979, and led to the establishment of an Islamic republic. The 1979 revolution, which brought together Iranians across many different social groups, has its roots in Iran’s long

  • Iranon (people)

    Maranao, largest of the Muslim cultural-linguistic groups of the Philippines. Numbering more than 840,000 in the late 20th century, they live around Lake Lanao on the southern island of Mindanao. Rice farming is their main livelihood, along with metalworking and woodworking handicrafts. Like the

  • Irapuato (Mexico)

    Irapuato, city, west-central Guanajuato estado (state), north-central Mexico. Situated in the fertile Bajío, a valley of the central plateau, the city lies along the Irapuato River, a tributary of the Lerma River, at 5,656 feet (1,724 metres) above sea level. It is south-southwest of Guanajuato

  • ?Iraq

    Iraq, country of southwestern Asia. During ancient times, lands that now constitute Iraq were known as Mesopotamia (“Land Between the Rivers”), a region whose extensive alluvial plains gave rise to some of the world’s earliest civilizations, including those of Sumer, Akkad, Babylon, and Assyria.

  • Iraq

    Iraq, country of southwestern Asia. During ancient times, lands that now constitute Iraq were known as Mesopotamia (“Land Between the Rivers”), a region whose extensive alluvial plains gave rise to some of the world’s earliest civilizations, including those of Sumer, Akkad, Babylon, and Assyria.

  • Iraq Museum (museum, Baghdad, Iraq)

    Iraq: Cultural institutions: The Iraq Museum (founded 1923), with its collection of antiquities, and the National Library (1961) are located in Baghdad. The city also has some fine buildings from the golden age of ?Abbāsid architecture in the 8th and 9th centuries and from the various Ottoman periods. In…

  • Iraq Petroleum Company (Iraqi company)

    Calouste Gulbenkian: (later Iraq Petroleum Co.) and became the first to exploit Iraqi oil; his 5% share made him one of the world’s richest men. From 1948 he negotiated Saudi Arabian oil concessions to U.S. firms. He amassed an outstanding art collection of some 6,000 works, now in…

  • Iraq Study Group

    Iraq War: A controversial war: In late 2006 the Iraq Study Group, an independent bipartisan panel cochaired by former U.S. secretary of state James A. Baker III and former U.S. congressman Lee Hamilton, issued a report that found the situation in Iraq to be “grave and deteriorating.” The report advocated regionwide diplomatic efforts to…

  • Iraq Survey Group (American-British fact-finding mission)

    George W. Bush: Operation Iraqi Freedom: In 2004 the Iraq Survey Group, a fact-finding mission comprising American and British experts, concluded that Iraq did not possess weapons of mass destruction or the capacity to produce them at the time of the invasion, though it found evidence that ?addām had planned to reconstitute programs for…

  • Iraq War (2003–2011)

    Iraq War, (2003–11), conflict in Iraq that consisted of two phases. The first of these was a brief, conventionally fought war in March–April 2003, in which a combined force of troops from the United States and Great Britain (with smaller contingents from several other countries) invaded Iraq and

  • ?Irāq ?ajamī (ancient region, Middle East)

    Iraq: Iraq from 1055 to 1534: , Persian) Iraq (?Irāq ?Ajamī) and was more or less identical with ancient Media or the Umayyad and ?Abbāsid province of Jibāl. Together these regions became known as “the Two Iraqs,” in contradistinction to the previous usage of the term in reference to the towns of…

  • ?Irāq ?arabī (ancient region, Middle East)

    Iraq: Iraq from 1055 to 1534: The first, qualified as Arabian Iraq (?Irāq ?Arabī), denoted the area roughly corresponding to ancient Mesopotamia or the modern nation of Iraq and consisted of Upper Iraq or Al-Jazīrah and Lower Iraq or Al-Sawād (“The Black [Lands]”). The town of Tikrīt was traditionally considered to mark the border between…

  • ?Irāq, Al-

    Iraq, country of southwestern Asia. During ancient times, lands that now constitute Iraq were known as Mesopotamia (“Land Between the Rivers”), a region whose extensive alluvial plains gave rise to some of the world’s earliest civilizations, including those of Sumer, Akkad, Babylon, and Assyria.

  • Iraq, flag of

    national flag consisting of three equal horizontal stripes of (from top to bottom) red, white, and black with the inscription in Kufic script “Allāhu akbar” (“God is great”) arranged horizontally in the centre of the white stripe. The flag has a width-to-length ratio of 2 to 3.Following World War

  • Iraq, history of

    Iraq: History: This discussion surveys the history of Iraq since the 7th century CE. For the earlier history, see Mesopotamia.

  • Iraq, Republic of

    Iraq, country of southwestern Asia. During ancient times, lands that now constitute Iraq were known as Mesopotamia (“Land Between the Rivers”), a region whose extensive alluvial plains gave rise to some of the world’s earliest civilizations, including those of Sumer, Akkad, Babylon, and Assyria.

  • Iraq-Gate (United States history)

    Iraqgate, media term for the scandal that emerged during the administration of U.S. President George H.W. Bush, in which it was alleged that U.S. agricultural loans made to Iraq during the Ronald Reagan administration were used to purchase weapons with the administration’s knowledge. However, no

  • Iraq-Iran War

    Iran-Iraq War, (1980–88), prolonged military conflict between Iran and Iraq during the 1980s. Open warfare began on September 22, 1980, when Iraqi armed forces invaded western Iran along the countries’ joint border, though Iraq claimed that the war had begun earlier that month, on September 4, when

  • Iraqgate (United States history)

    Iraqgate, media term for the scandal that emerged during the administration of U.S. President George H.W. Bush, in which it was alleged that U.S. agricultural loans made to Iraq during the Ronald Reagan administration were used to purchase weapons with the administration’s knowledge. However, no

  • ?Irāqī (Persian poet)

    ?Irāqī, one of the most outstanding poets of 13th-century Persia. Very little is known about ?Irāqī’s early life. There is evidence that he abandoned a teaching career to follow a group of wandering Sufis, or mystics, as far as India in search of higher mystical knowledge. After studying for 25

  • Iraqi Communist Party (political party, Iraq)

    Iraq: Iraqi foreign policy, 1958–68: …because Qāsim recruited among the Iraqi Communist Party for support and because he moved far closer to the Soviet Union diplomatically, the United States grew to see in him a would-be communist. However, despite a growing dispute with the Western oil companies over their investments in Iraq (stemming from Qāsim’s…

  • Iraqi Company for Oil Operations

    Iraq: Economic development to 1980: …and a national company, the Iraqi Company for Oil Operations, was established to operate the fields. In 1973, when the Yom Kippur War broke out, Iraq nationalized American and Dutch companies, and in 1975 it nationalized the remaining foreign interests in the Basra Petroleum Company.

  • Iraqi Council of Representatives (government of Iraq)

    flag of Iraq: 22, 2008, the Iraqi Council of Representatives (parliament) voted to adopt a modified version of that flag: the three green stars were removed from the white stripe, and the width-to-length ratio was restored to what it had been for the 1991–2004 flag. It became official on Jan. 28.

  • Iraqi Freedom, Operation (2003–2011)

    Iraq War, (2003–11), conflict in Iraq that consisted of two phases. The first of these was a brief, conventionally fought war in March–April 2003, in which a combined force of troops from the United States and Great Britain (with smaller contingents from several other countries) invaded Iraq and

  • Iraqi Governing Council (government of Iraq)

    flag of Iraq: On April 26, 2004, the Iraqi Governing Council announced a new national flag, its design consisting of four unequal horizontal stripes from top to bottom of white, blue, yellow, and blue and with a light blue crescent centred on the white stripe. The flag, almost universally rejected by Iraqis, was…

  • Iraqi invasion of Kuwait (1990-1991)

    Persian Gulf War, (1990–91), international conflict that was triggered by Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait on August 2, 1990. Iraq’s leader, Saddam Hussein, ordered the invasion and occupation of Kuwait with the apparent aim of acquiring that nation’s large oil reserves, canceling a large debt Iraq owed

  • Iraqi National Accord (political party, Iraq)

    Ayād ?Allāwī: …who was involved in the Iraqi National Accord, a party opposed to Saddam Hussein, and who later served as prime minister (2004–05) of the interim government in Iraq. He also was a vice president (2014–15; 2016– ).

  • Iraqi-Iranian War

    Iran-Iraq War, (1980–88), prolonged military conflict between Iran and Iraq during the 1980s. Open warfare began on September 22, 1980, when Iraqi armed forces invaded western Iran along the countries’ joint border, though Iraq claimed that the war had begun earlier that month, on September 4, when

  • Iraqiyyah, al (political party, Iraq)

    Ayād ?Allāwī: …who was involved in the Iraqi National Accord, a party opposed to Saddam Hussein, and who later served as prime minister (2004–05) of the interim government in Iraq. He also was a vice president (2014–15; 2016– ).

  • Iraqw (people)

    Tanzania: Ethnic groups: The Iraqw, the Mbugu, the Gorowa, and the Burungi have Cushitic origins. About 500 ce, iron-using Bantu agriculturalists arriving from the west and south started displacing or absorbing the San hunters and gatherers; at roughly the same time, Nilotic pastoralists entered the area from the southern…

  • IRAS (astronomy)

    Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), U.S.-U.K.-Netherlands satellite launched in 1983 that was the first space observatory to map the entire sky at infrared wavelengths. After a series of brief studies by infrared instruments carried on sounding rockets had detected about 4,000 celestial sources

  • Irazú Volcano (volcano, Costa Rica)

    Irazú Volcano, active volcano, in the Cordillera Central, east-central Costa Rica. Its name originates from the indigenous word for “thunder.” The highest mountain in the Cordillera Central, Irazú reaches an elevation of 11,260 feet (3,432 metres). It is a popular ascent for tourists, as its cone

  • Irazú Volcano National Park (national park, Costa Rica)

    Irazú Volcano: Irazú Volcano National Park is linked by paved road to Cartago. The volcano’s eruptions of 1963–65 produced ash that dammed a nearby small river, flooding the city of Cartago and causing serious damage to coffee crops. The ashfall created considerable inconvenience for residents of San…

  • IRB (sports organization)

    Danie Craven: …elevated to chairman of the International Rugby Football Board (IRB).

  • Irbid (Jordan)

    Irbid, town, northern Jordan. The town was built on successive Early Bronze Age settlements and was possibly the biblical Beth Arbel and the Arbila of the Decapolis, a Hellenistic league of the 1st century bce through the 2nd century ce. The population of Irbid swelled in the late 19th century, and

  • Irbīl (ancient city, Iraq)

    Erbil, city, capital of Erbil mu?āfa?ah (governorate), northern Iraq. The city is also the capital of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) in Iraq and is among the largest cities in that country. It is one of the most ancient cities in the world, dating back at least to 2300 bce. Erbil has long

  • IRBM (military technology)

    Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty: The INF Treaty defined intermediate-range ballistic missiles (IRBMs) and ground-launched cruise missiles (GLCMs) as those having ranges of 1,000 to 5,500 km (620 to 3,400 miles) and shorter-range ballistic missiles (SRBMs) as those having ranges from 500 to 1,000 km.

  • IRC (international organization)

    International Rescue Committee (IRC), international humanitarian aid organization based in the United States and Europe. Organized in 1933 at the request of Albert Einstein to assist German victims and enemies of Nazism, the IRC has since supported a wide variety of groups that are persecuted or

  • IRCAM (music centre, Paris, France)

    Pompidou Centre: …Pierre Boulez, known as the Centre for Musical and Acoustical Research (Ircam). The music centre comprises rehearsal rooms, studios, and a concert hall and presents concerts devoted primarily to modern music.

  • IRD (geology)

    iceberg: Iceberg scour and sediment transport: The presence of ice-rafted debris (IRD) in seabed-sediment cores is an indicator that icebergs, sea ice, or both have occurred at that location during a known time interval. (The age of the deposit is indicated by the depth in the sediment at which the debris is found.) Noting…

  • Irdisches Vergnügen in Gott (work by Brockes)

    Barthold Heinrich Brockes: …wrote nature poetry, such as Irdisches Vergnügen in Gott (1721–48; “Earthly Pleasure in God”), in which natural phenomena are described minutely and seen as aspects of God’s perfectly ordered universe. One of the first German poets to treat nature as a principal subject, he was the forerunner of the new…

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