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  • Irreplaceable You (film by Laing [2018])

    Christopher Walken: Walken’s other films included Irreplaceable You (2018) and The War with Grandpa (2019).

  • irreversibility (thermodynamics)

    colloid: …into two systems, reversible and irreversible. In a reversible system the products of a physical or chemical reaction may be induced to interact so as to reproduce the original components. In a system of this kind, the colloidal material may have a high molecular weight, with single molecules of colloidal…

  • irreversible process (thermodynamics)

    colloid: …into two systems, reversible and irreversible. In a reversible system the products of a physical or chemical reaction may be induced to interact so as to reproduce the original components. In a system of this kind, the colloidal material may have a high molecular weight, with single molecules of colloidal…

  • irreversible shock (medicine)

    cardiovascular disease: Refractory and irreversible shock: The terms refractory shock and irreversible shock are widely used by physicians and other medical workers to refer to types of shock that present particularly difficult problems. The term refractory shock is applied when, in spite of apparently adequate therapy, the shock state continues.…

  • irreversible toxic response (medicine)

    poison: Reversible versus irreversible toxic responses: Toxic responses differ in their eventual outcomes; the body can recover from some toxic responses, while others are irreversible. Irritation of the upper respiratory tract by inhaled formaldehyde gas, for example, is rapidly reversible in that as soon as the inhalation exposure…

  • IRRI (international agricultural organization)

    Asia: Agricultural technology: …international organizations, such as the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in the Philippines, and national agricultural research stations. Thus, in the case of rice, countries have adapted the IRRI strains to local conditions and have implemented their own seed improvement programs and extension (advisory) services to farmers. Access to a…

  • irrigation (agriculture)

    Irrigation and drainage, artificial application of water to land and artificial removal of excess water from land, respectively. Some land requires irrigation or drainage before it is possible to use it for any agricultural production; other land profits from either practice to increase production.

  • Irrigation Civilizations (work by Steward)

    Julian Steward: ” Similarly, his book Irrigation Civilizations (1955) illustrates how the collective labour and centralized authority required for irrigation in an arid climate resulted in increased social stratification and, ultimately, in the development of the state in various areas of the world.

  • irrigation method (sanitation engineering)

    wastewater treatment: Land treatment: In the slow-rate, or irrigation, method, effluent is applied onto the land by ridge-and-furrow spreading (in ditches) or by sprinkler systems. Most of the water and nutrients are absorbed by the roots of growing vegetation. In the rapid infiltration method, the wastewater is stored in large ponds…

  • irritability (physiology)

    nervous system: Stimulus-response coordination: …of the cell fluid called irritability. In simple organisms, such as algae, protozoans, and fungi, a response in which the organism moves toward or away from the stimulus is called taxis. In larger and more complicated organisms—those in which response involves the synchronization and integration of events in different parts…

  • irritable bowel syndrome (pathology)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), relatively common disorder of the intestines characterized by abdominal pain, intestinal gas, and altered bowel habits, including diarrhea, constipation, or both. Other symptoms may include abdominal pain that is relieved after defecation, mucus in the stools, or a

  • Irrumporai (people)

    India: Southern Indian kingdoms: …century ce referring to the Irrumporai clan have been found near Karur (Tiruchchirapalli district), identified with the Korura of Ptolemy. Cankam literature mentions the names of Cera chiefs who have been dated to the 1st century ce. Among them, Nedunjeral Adan is said to have attacked the Yavana ships and…

  • IRS (United States government agency)

    Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Agency of the U.S. Department of the Treasury charged with administering and enforcing federal tax laws, except those relating to alcohol, tobacco, firearms, and explosives. It issues rulings and regulations to supplement the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code;

  • IRS satellite (Indian satellite)

    Indian Space Research Organisation: …and disaster warning and the Indian Remote Sensing (IRS) satellites for resource monitoring and management. The first INSAT was launched in 1988, and the program expanded to include geosynchronous satellites called GSAT. The first IRS satellite was also launched in 1988, and the program developed more-specialized satellites, including the Radar…

  • Irthing (river, England, United Kingdom)

    River Eden: Above Carlisle it receives the Irthing, which collects the drainage from the fells lying north and south of the Tyne gap near the Northumberland border. Carlisle commands the lowest bridge from a defensive site on the south bank, flanked by left-bank tributaries, the Petteril and Caldew. Even below Carlisle the…

  • Irtysh River (river, Asia)

    Irtysh River, major river of west-central and western Asia. With a length of 2,640 miles (4,248 km), it is one of the continent’s longest rivers. The Irtysh and the Ob River, of which the Irtysh is the principal tributary, together constitute the world’s seventh longest river system. The Irtysh

  • Iru (people)

    Haya: …Nilotes, and the more agricultural Iru, descendants of the original Bantu. The Haya were traditionally organized in a series of 130 or so patrilineal clans, each having its own totem. They were formerly divided among eight small states, each under a ruler called the mukama. Traditionally, rulers appointed subordinate chiefs…

  • Irula language

    Dravidian languages: South Dravidian languages: South Dravidian languages—Toda, Kota, Irula, and Kurumba—are spoken by Scheduled Tribes (officially recognized indigenous peoples) in the Nilgiri Hills of southwestern Tamil Nadu, near Karnataka. Badaga, a dialect of Kannada, is also spoken in the Nilgiri Hills.

  • Iruma (Japan)

    Iruma, city, southern Saitama ken (prefecture), east-central Honshu, Japan. The city is located on the Iruma River in the Musashino uplands and the southern part of the Kaji hills. It borders Tokyo metropolis to the south. Iruma is renowned for the cultivation of Sayama green tea. It is the site of

  • Irun (Spain)

    Irun, city, Guipúzcoa provincia (province), in the Basque Country comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), northern Spain. It is situated on the left bank of the Bidasoa River. At Irun the river is bridged to Hendaye, France. Irun is the northern terminus of the Spanish Northern Railway and is

  • Irún (Spain)

    Irun, city, Guipúzcoa provincia (province), in the Basque Country comunidad autónoma (autonomous community), northern Spain. It is situated on the left bank of the Bidasoa River. At Irun the river is bridged to Hendaye, France. Irun is the northern terminus of the Spanish Northern Railway and is

  • Iru?a (Spain)

    Pamplona, capital of both the provincia (province) and the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Navarra, northeastern Spain. It lies on the western bank of the Arga River in the fertile La Cuenca region. Situated in an irrigated cereal-producing area, Pamplona is a flourishing agricultural

  • Irvin, Monford Merrill (American baseball player)

    Monte Irvin, (Monford Merrill Irvin), American baseball player (born Feb. 25, 1919, Haleburg, Ala.—died Jan. 11, 2016, Houston, Texas), was a star slugger for the Negro National League’s Newark Eagles before becoming (1949) one of the first two African American players on the MLB’s New York Giants

  • Irvin, Monte (American baseball player)

    Monte Irvin, (Monford Merrill Irvin), American baseball player (born Feb. 25, 1919, Haleburg, Ala.—died Jan. 11, 2016, Houston, Texas), was a star slugger for the Negro National League’s Newark Eagles before becoming (1949) one of the first two African American players on the MLB’s New York Giants

  • Irvine (California, United States)

    Irvine, city, Orange county, southern California, U.S. Adjacent to the city of Santa Ana (northwest), Irvine lies about 40 miles (60 km) southeast of Los Angeles. Originally inhabited by Tongva (or Gabrielino) Indians, the area was explored by Gaspar de Portolá in 1769. The land that would become

  • Irvine (Scotland, United Kingdom)

    Irvine, royal burgh (town), North Ayrshire council area, historic county of Ayrshire, southwestern Scotland, on the Firth of Clyde. The last of Scotland’s five “new towns,” Irvine was designated in 1966 in an attempt to rehouse population from Glasgow and provide a focus for the economic and

  • Irvine v. California (law case)

    Stanley F. Reed: Colorado (1949) and Irvine v. California (1954), both of which ruled that illegally obtained evidence may be admissible in state courts, and upheld the conviction of (and denial of speech rights to) American communists who were arrested for violating the prohibition against advocating the violent overthrow of the…

  • Irvine, Andrew (British explorer and mountaineer)

    George Mallory: …a young and less-experienced climber, Andrew Irvine, set off for an attempt on the summit. The two started out from their last camp at 26,800 feet (8,170 metres) on the morning of June 8. Another member of the expedition claimed to have caught a glimpse of the men climbing in…

  • Irvine, James (American rancher)

    Irvine: …Thomas Flint, Llewellyn Bixby, and James Irvine (for whom the city is named). By 1876 Irvine had purchased the entire tract of what became known as the Irvine Ranch. His son inherited the land and established the Irvine Company in 1894. Irvine subsequently developed into a farming community, with crops…

  • Irvine–Purdie methylation (biochemistry)

    methylation: …of chemical methylation, known as Irvine–Purdie methylation, hydroxyl groups on polysaccharides undergo methylation to yield monosaccharides.

  • Irving (city, Texas, United States)

    Irving, city, northeastern Texas, U.S. Established in 1903 and incorporated in 1914, the city developed into an industrial hub during the 1950s. A suburb of Dallas, it is the site of the University of Dallas and DeVry University. Pop. (2000) 191,615; Dallas-Plano-Irving Metro Division, 3,451,226;

  • Irving Colburn machine (technology)

    industrial glass: Flat glass: …Fourcault of Belgium; and the Irving Colburn machine, developed at the Libbey-Owens Glass Company in Charleston, W.Va., U.S. In the Fourcault process, a one- to two-metre-wide steel mesh bait was introduced into molten glass at the working end of the furnace. The cooled glass adhered to the bait and was…

  • Irving Independent School District v. Tatro (law case)

    Irving Independent School District v. Tatro, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on July 5, 1984, ruled (9–0) that, under the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975 (EAHCA; now known as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act), a school board in Texas had to provide

  • Irving, Clifford (American author)

    Orson Welles: Later films: Chimes at Midnight, The Other Side of the Wind, and F for Fake: …de Hory and his biographer Clifford Irving. As Welles started working on Reichenbach’s footage, Irving himself was unmasked as the forger of a fake autobiography of reclusive businessman Howard Hughes. Welles supplemented Reichenbach’s footage with much new additional material, drawing on his own fakes, such as the The War of…

  • Irving, Edward (Scottish minister)

    Edward Irving, Church of Scotland minister whose teachings became the basis of the religious movement known as Irvingism, later called the Catholic Apostolic Church. After working as a mathematics teacher and studying theology part time, Irving was called in 1822 to the Caledonian chapel in London

  • Irving, John (American author)

    John Irving, American novelist and short-story writer who established his reputation with the novel The World According to Garp (1978; film 1982). As is characteristic of his other works, it is noted for its engaging story line, colourful characterizations, macabre humour, and examination of

  • Irving, John Winslow (American author)

    John Irving, American novelist and short-story writer who established his reputation with the novel The World According to Garp (1978; film 1982). As is characteristic of his other works, it is noted for its engaging story line, colourful characterizations, macabre humour, and examination of

  • Irving, Kenneth Colin (Canadian industrialist)

    Kenneth Colin Irving, Canadian industrialist whose vast business empire dominated the province of New Brunswick, where he employed 1 out of every 12 workers. Irving was born in a small fishing village in New Brunswick, and, after attending college and serving in the Royal Flying Corps, he returned

  • Irving, Kyrie (American basketball player)

    Boston Celtics: …other assets for star guard Kyrie Irving in the off-season and also signed All-Star forward Gordon Hayward. Both players were limited by significant injuries during the regular season, but the remaining young Celtics core outperformed expectations, leading Boston to the second best record in the Eastern Conference and on an…

  • Irving, Miles (British official)

    India: The postwar years: …the district by Deputy Commissioner Miles Irving. When their followers tried to march to Irving’s bungalow in the camp to demand the release of their leaders, they were fired on by British troops. With several of their number killed and wounded, the enraged mob rioted through Amritsar’s old city, burning…

  • Irving, Sir Henry (British actor and theatrical manager)

    Sir Henry Irving, one of the most famous of English actors, the first of his profession to be knighted (1895) for services to the stage. He was also a celebrated theatre manager and the professional partner of the actress Ellen Terry for 24 years (1878–1902). Irving’s father, Samuel Brodribb, was a

  • Irving, Washington (American author)

    Washington Irving, writer called the “first American man of letters.” He is best known for the short stories “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” and “Rip Van Winkle.” The favourite and last of 11 children of an austere Presbyterian father and a genial Anglican mother, young, frail Irving grew up in an

  • Irvingia barteri (plant)

    dika nut: …nut, edible nut of the dika tree, which is also called the dika bread, or Gabon chocolate, tree (species Irvingia barteri), and is native to western Africa. The nut is used principally for food and oil.

  • Irvingia gabonensis (plant)

    wild mango: Irvingia gabonensis, or dika, and other species (such as I. wombolu) are notable for their edible yellow fruit, which somewhat resembles the mango. Dika seeds are rich in a fat used locally to make both bread and a type of butter. The wood is very hard and is…

  • Irvingiaceae (plant family)

    Malpighiales: Ungrouped families: Irvingiaceae contains 3 genera and 10 species of tropical trees found in Africa and from Southeast Asia to western Malesia. The leaves are rather distinctive with their longitudinal markings, large deciduous stipules that enclose the prominent pointed terminal bud, and closely parallel secondary venation. The…

  • Irvington (New Jersey, United States)

    Irvington, township (town), Essex county, northeastern New Jersey, U.S., bordering Newark to the east. Settled in 1666 as part of a land grant from Sir George Carteret, proprietor of New Jersey, it was known as Camptown until 1852, when it separated from Clinton township and was renamed in honour

  • Irwin, Baron (British statesman)

    Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st earl of Halifax, British viceroy of India (1925–31), foreign secretary (1938–40), and ambassador to the United States (1941–46). The fourth son of the 2nd Viscount Halifax, a well-known churchman and a leader of the Anglo-Catholic movement in Yorkshire, Wood was

  • Irwin, Bill (American actor)

    circus: Clowns: Two Americans, Bill Irwin and David Shiner, are perhaps the best-known among New Vaudeville clowns; their talents were featured in the Broadway production Fool Moon (1994). Also among the most renowned of modern clowns is David Larible, who descends from seven generations of Italian circus performers. During…

  • Irwin, Elisabeth Antoinette (American educator)

    Elisabeth Antoinette Irwin, American educator, psychologist, and one of the leaders of the progressive education movement. Irwin attended Smith College (B.A., 1903) and became involved in the social-settlement movement, working in New York City. From 1905 to 1909 she worked at odd jobs and as a

  • Irwin, George R. (American physicist)

    mechanics of solids: Stress concentrations and fracture: …the American engineer and physicist George R. Irwin, a major body of work on the mechanics of crack growth and fracture, including fracture by fatigue and stress corrosion cracking, starting in the late 1940s and continuing into the 1990s. This was driven initially by the cracking of a number of…

  • Irwin, Hale (American golfer)

    golf: The Senior PGA Tour: Palmer, Trevino, Rodriguez, and Irwin were no longer competing with the young men of the PGA Tour on a daily basis, they extended their competitive careers into the 21st century with this tour, demonstrating some excellent golf in the process.

  • Irwin, James B. (American astronaut)

    James B. Irwin, American astronaut, pilot of the Lunar Module on the Apollo 15 mission (July 26–Aug. 7, 1971), in which he and the mission commander, David R. Scott, spent almost three days on the Moon’s surface investigating the Hadley-Apennine site, 462 miles (744 km) north of the lunar equator.

  • Irwin, James Benson (American astronaut)

    James B. Irwin, American astronaut, pilot of the Lunar Module on the Apollo 15 mission (July 26–Aug. 7, 1971), in which he and the mission commander, David R. Scott, spent almost three days on the Moon’s surface investigating the Hadley-Apennine site, 462 miles (744 km) north of the lunar equator.

  • Irwin, May (American comedian)

    May Irwin, Canadian-born American comedian and music-hall performer who popularized such songs as “After the Ball” and “A Hot Time in the Old Town.” Ada Campbell was introduced to the theatrical world in 1875, after her father’s death had left the family in poverty. Her mother got her and her elder

  • Irwin, Robert (American painter and sculptor)

    Robert Irwin, American painter and sculptor known for pioneering the Light and Space movement, a variety of West Coast Minimalist art that was concerned with the visual impact of light on geometric forms and on the viewer’s sensory experience of the work. In 1984 he became the first artist to

  • Irwin, Stephen Robert (Australian wildlife conservationist and television personality)

    Steve Irwin, Australian wildlife conservationist, television personality, and educator who achieved worldwide fame as the exuberant host of The Crocodile Hunter (1992–2006) television series and related documentaries. With frenetic energy and an engaging boyish enthusiasm, Irwin led his viewers on

  • Irwin, Steve (Australian wildlife conservationist and television personality)

    Steve Irwin, Australian wildlife conservationist, television personality, and educator who achieved worldwide fame as the exuberant host of The Crocodile Hunter (1992–2006) television series and related documentaries. With frenetic energy and an engaging boyish enthusiasm, Irwin led his viewers on

  • Iryānī, ?Abd al-Ra?mān al- (president of Yemen Arab Republic)

    Yemen: Two Yemeni states: ?Abd al-Ra?mān al-Iryānī. Two years later, with the blessing of the two major foreign participants—Egypt and Saudi Arabia—the leaders of North Yemen agreed upon the Compromise of 1970, which established a republican government in which some major positions were assigned to members of the royalist…

  • Irydion (play by Krasiński)

    Zygmunt Krasiński: In his second important play, Irydion (1836; Eng. trans. Irydion)—the story of a Greek named Irydion who seeks vengeance on imperial Rome—Krasiński denies the validity of hatred as a source of righteous action.

  • Irzykowski, Karol (Polish author and critic)

    Karol Irzykowski, Polish novelist and literary critic well known for his rejection of Realism, which he considered a pretense. Educated at the University of Lwów (now the University of Lviv), Irzykowski moved in 1908 to Kraków, where he joined the editorial board of Nowa Reforma, a liberal

  • IS (international organization)

    Situationist International (SI), group of artists, writers, and social critics (1957–72) that aimed to eliminate capitalism through the revolutionization of everyday life. Instead of focusing on traditional sites of economic and social change, such as the factory, the Situationist International

  • Is it Possible? (work by Wyatt)

    envelope: …in Sir Thomas Wyatt’s “Is it Possible?”:

  • IS machine (technology)

    industrial glass: Containers: … are usually formed by the Individual Section (IS) machine. In this machine a stream of molten glass is pushed out of an orifice at the end of the forehearth by a rotating bowl and is subsequently cut to gobs of glass. The gobs travel down chutes to a mold in…

  • Is Paris Burning? (book by Collins and Lapierre)

    Dietrich von Choltitz: …source for a best-selling popularization, Is Paris Burning? (1965), by Larry Collins and Dominique Lapierre.

  • Is Sex Necessary? (work by White and Thurber)

    E.B. White: collaborated with James Thurber on Is Sex Necessary? (1929), a spoof of contemporary sex manuals. In a monthly column (1938–43) for Harper’s magazine, he wrote essays about rural life.

  • Is That All There Is? (song by Leiber and Stoller)

    Leiber and Stoller: …1969, was the world-weary “Is That All There Is?” (by Peggy Lee). In 1987 the pair was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

  • Is There a Cure for HIV?

    In 2013 the world learned that a two-year-old child and two adults had been cured of HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. The news seemed to hail the beginning of HIV’s end, but within the medical community, there was doubt and confusion over the implications. Was there something unique about the

  • Is There an Ecological Ethic? (work by Rolston III)

    Holmes Rolston III: Rolston’s article “Is There an Ecological Ethic?” was rejected by several journals before it was finally published in Ethics in 1975. It was the first article in a major philosophical journal to challenge the idea that nature is value-free and that all values stem from human perspectives;…

  • Is This Desire? (album by Harvey)

    PJ Harvey: The next PJ Harvey album, Is This Desire? (1998), was deliberately subdued, an exercise in art song. In 2000, however, Harvey came out with Stories from the City, Stories from the Sea, a return to anthemic rock with pop aspirations and an unlikely twist: for the first time, Polly Jean…

  • Is This It (album by the Strokes)

    the Strokes: Is This It hit the shelves in the United Kingdom in the summer of 2001, with an American release following several months later (the controversial track “New York City Cops” was removed from the American version of the album as a gesture of respect in…

  • Is This Your Son, My Lord? (work by Gardener)

    Helen Hamilton Gardener: In 1890 Gardener published Is This Your Son, My Lord?, an outspoken and lurid novel whose attack on the double standard gave it a wide sale. She followed it with A Thoughtless Yes (1890), Pray You, Sir, Whose Daughter? (1892), Pushed by Unseen Hands (1892), and An Unofficial Patriot…

  • IS-MCA (international organization)

    computational aesthetics: History: In the early 1990s the International Society for Mathematical and Computational Aesthetics (IS-MCA) was founded, specializing in design with emphasis on functionality and aesthetics and attempting to be a bridge between science and art. By the beginning of the 21st century, computational aesthetics had become sufficiently established to sustain its…

  • IS54 cellular system (communications)

    telecommunication: Time-division multiple access: In the IS54 cellular system, three digital signals are interleaved using TDMA and then transmitted in a 30-kilohertz frequency slot that would be occupied by one analog signal in AMPS. Buffering digital signals and interleaving them in time causes some extra delay, but the delay is so…

  • IS95 cellular system (communications)

    telecommunication: Code-division multiple access: The IS95 cellular system employs the CDMA technique. In IS95 an analog speech signal that is to be sent to a cell site is first quantized and then organized into one of a number of digital frame structures. In one frame structure, a frame of 20…

  • ISA (sports organization, United States)

    surfing: Professional surfing: (The International Surfing Association [ISA] superseded the federation in 1976.) In 1982 the General Association of International Sports Federations recognized the ISA as the world’s governing body of surfing. Thirteen years later, in 1995, the International Olympic Committee granted the ISA provisional recognition. The IOC confirmed…

  • ISA (international organization)

    International Seabed Authority (ISA), international organization established in 1994 to regulate mining and related activities in the international seabed beyond national jurisdiction, an area that includes most of the world’s oceans. The ISA came into existence upon the entry into force of the

  • ?Isā

    Jesus, religious leader revered in Christianity, one of the world’s major religions. He is regarded by most Christians as the Incarnation of God. The history of Christian reflection on the teachings and nature of Jesus is examined in the article Christology. Ancient Jews usually had only one name,

  • isa Bey (Ottoman prince)

    Mehmed I: Thus, Mehmed ruled in Amasya, ?sa in Bursa, and Süleyman in Rumelia (Balkan lands under Ottoman control). Mehmed defeated ?sa and seized Bursa (1404–05) and then sent another brother, M?sa, against Süleyman. M?sa was victorious over Süleyman (1410) but then declared himself sultan in Edirne and undertook the reconquest of…

  • Isa Eghirren (river, Africa)

    Niger River, principal river of western Africa. With a length of 2,600 miles (4,200 km), it is the third longest river in Africa, after the Nile and the Congo. The Niger is believed to have been named by the Greeks. Along its course it is known by several names. These include the Joliba (Malinke:

  • ?Isā ibn Hishām (literary character)

    al-Hamadhānī: …the encounters of the narrator ?Isā ibn Hishām with Abū al-Fat? al-Iskandarī, a witty orator and talented poet who roams in search of fortune unencumbered by Islamic conventions of honour.

  • ?Isā ibn Maryam

    Jesus, religious leader revered in Christianity, one of the world’s major religions. He is regarded by most Christians as the Incarnation of God. The history of Christian reflection on the teachings and nature of Jesus is examined in the article Christology. Ancient Jews usually had only one name,

  • ?Isā ibn Mūsā (Islamic military leader)

    ?Isā ibn Mūsā, nephew of the first two ?Abbāsid caliphs, military leader, and at one time presumptive heir to the caliphate. The caliph as-Saffā? nominated his brother al-Man?ūr and, after him, ?Isā, as heirs. On the accession of al-Man?ūr, ?Isā was governor of Kūfah. The new caliph sent him to

  • ?īsā ibn ?āli? (Oman political leader)

    āl Bū Sa?īd dynasty: …the mountains in 1901 by ?īsā ibn ?āli? threatened the āl Bū Sa?īd family until a treaty, known as the Treaty of Al-Sib (September 25, 1920), was signed between Imam ?īsā ibn ?āli? and Sultan Taymūr ibn Fay?al (reigned 1913–32), by virtue of which Sultan Taymūr ruled over the coastal…

  • ?Isā ibn Sulmān al-Khalīfah (emir of Bahrain)

    Sheikh Isa ibn Sulman al-Khalifah, Bahraini chief of state (born June 3, 1933, Manama, Bahrain—died March 6, 1999, Manama), served as leader of his country for 37 years, including 27 as emir, a title he received when Bahrain became independent in 1971. He guided the country through a series of e

  • Isa Town (Bahrain)

    Madīnah ?īsā, planned community in the state and emirate of Bahrain, north-central Bahrain island, in the Persian Gulf. Conceived and underwritten by the Bahraini government as a residential settlement, it was laid out on an uninhabited site by British town planners in the early 1960s; the first

  • Isaac (Hebrew patriarch)

    Isaac, in the Old Testament (Genesis), second of the patriarchs of Israel, the only son of Abraham and Sarah, and father of Esau and Jacob. Although Sarah was past the age of childbearing, God promised Abraham and Sarah that they would have a son, and Isaac was born. Later, to test Abraham’s

  • Isaac ben Abraham (Spanish theosophist)

    Judaism: School of Isaac the Blind: Another theosophic tendency in Languedoc developed concurrently with—but independently of—the Sefer ha-bahir. The two movements would take only about 30 years to converge, constituting what may conveniently (though not quite precisely) be called classical Kabbala. The second school flourished in Languedoc during…

  • Isaac ben Moses of Vienna (European scholar)

    Isaac ben Moses Of Vienna, medieval codifier of Jewish law (Halakha) whose vast compilation, Or Zaru?a (“Light Is Sown”), was widely quoted in later Halakhic works. Or Zaru?a is also valued by historians for its descriptions of Jewish life in medieval France, Germany, and Italy. By his own t

  • Isaac ben Samuel of Acre (Palestinian Kabbalist)

    Moses De León: …he met a Palestinian Kabbalist, Isaac ben Samuel of Acre; to him (as recorded in Isaac’s diary), Moses confided that he possessed the centuries-old, original manuscript of the Zohar, copies of which he had been circulating since the 1280s. He promised to show it to Isaac at his home in…

  • Isaac ben Sid (Spanish astronomer)

    Alfonsine Tables: …Jehuda ben Moses Cohen and Isaac ben Sid. Although no Castilian version survives, internal evidence—they were calculated for 1252, the initial year of the reign of Alfonso, and at the meridian of Toledo—supports the introduction. The tables were not widely known, however, until a Latin version was prepared in Paris…

  • Isaac Blessing Jacob (painting by Flinck)

    Govert Flinck: …as, for example, in his Isaac Blessing Jacob (1638). Later he developed a more florid and oratorical manner, in which he appears to have been influenced by Peter Paul Rubens, as in the Allegory in Memory of Prince Frederick Henry (1654). Flinck’s most successful works were portraits, and he was…

  • Isaac I (Byzantine prince)

    Crusades: The Third Crusade: …Byzantine ruler, a rebel prince, Isaac Comnenus. Isaac underestimated Richard’s strength and attacked. Not only did Richard defeat and capture him, but he proceeded to conquer Cyprus, an important event in the history of the Crusades. The island would remain under direct Latin rule for the next four centuries and…

  • Isaac I Comnenus (Byzantine emperor)

    Isaac I Comnenus , Byzantine emperor who restored economic stability at home and built up the neglected military defenses of the empire. Isaac was a son of Manuel Comnenus, an officer of the Byzantine emperor Basil II. On his deathbed, Manuel commended Isaac and his other son, John, to the

  • Isaac I Komnenos (Byzantine emperor)

    Isaac I Comnenus , Byzantine emperor who restored economic stability at home and built up the neglected military defenses of the empire. Isaac was a son of Manuel Comnenus, an officer of the Byzantine emperor Basil II. On his deathbed, Manuel commended Isaac and his other son, John, to the

  • Isaac ibn Barun (Spanish-Jewish scholar)

    Hebrew literature: The golden age in Spain, 900–1200: …ibn Kuraish (about 900) and Isaac ibn Barun (about 1100). Judah Hayyuj, a disciple of Menahem ben Saruk, recast Hebrew grammar, and, in the form given to it by David Kimhi of Narbonne (died c. 1235), the new system was taken over by the Christian humanists and through them by…

  • Isaac II Angelus (Byzantine emperor)

    Isaac II Angelus , Byzantine emperor, who, although incapable of stemming administrative abuses, partly succeeded, by his defeat of the Serbians in 1190, in retrieving imperial fortunes in the Balkans. In September 1185 Isaac was unexpectedly proclaimed emperor by the Constantinople mob that had

  • Isaac of Antioch (Syrian theologian and writer)

    Isaac of Antioch, Syrian writer, probably a priest of an independent Syrian Christian church and author of a wealth of theological literature and historical verse describing events in Rome and Asia Minor. According to 5th-century Byzantine chroniclers, Isaac was a native of Amida, near modern

  • Isaac of Nineveh (Syrian bishop)

    Isaac of Nineveh, Syrian bishop, theologian, and monk whose writings on mysticism became a fundamental source for both Eastern and Western Christians. Born in Qatar, Isaac became a monk of Bet-Qatraje in Kurdistan, northern Iraq, and was consecrated bishop of Nineveh, near modern Mosul, Iraq, c. 6

  • Isaac of Ravenna (Byzantine viceroy)

    Severinus: Meanwhile, the exarch Isaac of Ravenna, supported by Roman soldiers, occupied the Lateran Palace in Rome and seized the church’s treasure, hoping to force Severinus to conform to imperial demands. Severinus was steadfast, and his legates eventually secured Heraclius’s confirmation. Consecrated on May 28, 640, he promptly declared…

  • Isaac of Stella (English philosopher and theologian)

    Isaac Of Stella, monk, philosopher, and theologian, a leading thinker in 12th-century Christian humanism and proponent of a synthesis of Neoplatonic and Aristotelian philosophies. After studies in England and Paris, Isaac entered the abbey of C?teaux, near Dijon, in the midst of the Cistercian m

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