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  • ISC

    earthquake: Locating earthquake epicentres: …the service provided by the International Seismological Centre (ISC) at Newbury, Eng. Each month it receives more than 1,000,000 readings from more than 2,000 stations worldwide and preliminary estimates of the locations of approximately 1,600 earthquakes from national and regional agencies and observatories. The ISC publishes a monthly bulletin—with about…

  • Isca (Roman fortress, Wales, United Kingdom)

    Caerleon: …as the Roman fortress of Isca, which was, with Deva (Chester) and Eboracum (York), one of the permanent legionary bases in Britain. The foundation of the fortress, set on a terrace in a wide bend of the Usk, is dated to 74–75 ce, during the final conquest of the Silures…

  • Isca Dumnoniorum (England, United Kingdom)

    Exeter, city (district), administrative and historic county of Devon, southwestern England. It is located on the River Exe, just above the head of the river’s estuary and about 10 miles (16 km) from the estuary’s entry into the English Channel. Exeter is the county town (seat) of Devon. The

  • Iscariot, Judas (Apostle)

    Judas Iscariot, one of the Twelve Apostles, notorious for betraying Jesus. Judas’ surname is more probably a corruption of the Latin sicarius (“murderer” or “assassin”) than an indication of family origin, suggesting that he would have belonged to the Sicarii, the most radical Jewish group, some of

  • ischemia (pathology)

    apoptosis: Apoptosis in medicine: …damage resulting from episodes of ischemia in cardiac and neural tissue (ischemia is a reduction in blood flow to affected tissues). In addition, the selective control of apoptosis in the immune system can dramatically improve therapy for diseases from diabetes mellitus to HIV/AIDS. These opportunities and a basic curiosity about…

  • ischemic bone necrosis (pathology)

    Avascular necrosis, death of bone tissue caused by a lack of blood supply to the affected area. Avascular necrosis most commonly affects the epiphyses (ends) of the femur (thigh bone); other commonly affected bones include those of the upper arm, the shoulder, the knee, and the ankle. Avascular

  • ischemic heart disease (pathology)

    Coronary heart disease, disease characterized by an inadequate supply of oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle (myocardium) because of narrowing or blocking of a coronary artery by fatty plaques (see atherosclerosis). If the oxygen depletion is extreme, the effect may be a myocardial infarction

  • Ischia, Antonio Canova, marchese d’ (Italian sculptor)

    Antonio Canova, marchese d’Ischia, Italian sculptor, one of the greatest exponents of Neoclassicism. Among his works are the tombs of popes Clement XIV (1783–87) and Clement XIII (1787–92) and statues of Napoleon and of his sister Princess Borghese reclining as Venus Victrix. He was created a

  • Ischia, Island of (island, Italy)

    Island of Ischia, island, Campania regione (region), southern Italy. It lies at the northwest entrance to the Bay of Naples, opposite Cape Miseno and just west-southwest of Naples. Oblong in shape, with a circumference of 21 miles (34 km) and an area of 18 sq miles (47 sq km), the island consists

  • ischial callosity (anatomy)

    monkey: Old World monkeys versus New World monkeys: …hard, bare “sitting pads” (ischial callosities) on the buttocks; New World monkeys lack these. Many Old World monkeys have thumbs that can be opposed to the other fingers and so can handle small objects precisely. None of the New World monkeys has such manual dexterity. Indeed, in the hands…

  • Ischigualasto Provincial Park (park, Argentina)

    La Rioja: …southwestern La Rioja and adjacent Ischigualasto Provincial Park in neighbouring northeastern San Juan province were collectively designated a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2000. Together, the two parks occupy more than 1,060 square miles (2,750 square km) of the desert region bordering the mountains.

  • Ischislenie konechnykh raznostey (work by Gelfond)

    Aleksandr Osipovich Gelfond: In Ischislenie konechnykh raznostey (1952; “Calculus of Finite Differences”), he summarized his approximation and interpolation studies.

  • ischium (anatomy)

    bird: Skeleton: …with the synsacrum and the ischium, the latter of which is fused with the pubis. All three serve as attachments for leg muscles and contribute to the acetabulum, which forms the articulation for the femur. The leg skeleton consists of the thighbone (femur), main bone of the lower leg (tibiotarsus),…

  • Ischl (Austria)

    Bad Ischl, town, central Austria. It lies at the confluence of the Traun and Ischler Ache rivers, about 26 miles (42 km) east-southeast of Salzburg. First mentioned in records of 1262, it received municipal status in 1940. The centre of the Salzkammergut resort region, the town has saline, iodine,

  • ISCI (government organization, Iraq)

    Iraq: Political process: …(known since 2007 as the Islamic Supreme Council of Iraq). Another group, the Iraqi National Congress, received strong, albeit intermittent, support from the U.S. government during the 1990s. All operated outside Iraq or in areas of the country not under government control.

  • ISDN (communications)

    ISDN, all-digital high-speed network provided by telephone carriers that allows voice and data to be carried over existing telephone circuits. In the early 1980s ISDN was developed as an offshoot of efforts to upgrade the telephone network from analog to digital using fibre optics. The expense of

  • ISDS

    International Standard Serial Number: …through guidelines established by the International Serials Data System (ISDS). ISSN registrations are made available routinely by the U.S. Library of Congress, which includes the number on serial catalog cards and, when possible, in its publication New Serial Titles. The ISDS in Paris also makes comprehensive ISSN information available on…

  • Ise (Japan)

    Ise, city, eastern Mie ken (prefecture), central Honshu, Japan. It is situated on the Shima Peninsula on the southern shore of Ise Bay (Ise-wan) of the Pacific Ocean, about 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Matsuzaka. The city contains several major Shintō shrines. Central among those is the Ise Shrine

  • Ise Bay typhoon of 1959 (storm, Pacific Ocean [1959])

    Ise Bay typhoon of 1959, one of the most destructive typhoons (tropical cyclones) in Japanese history. The storm struck the Ise Bay region on the southern coast of Japan’s main island, Honshu, on Sept. 26, 1959, and wreaked havoc in the city of Nagoya. The storm killed more than 5,000 people, left

  • Ise family (Japanese family)

    Japan: Muromachi government structure: …the bakufu; and later the Ise family, who were hereditary retainers of the Ashikaga, came to inherit this office. The Samurai-dokoro, besides handling legal judgments, was entrusted with the control of the capital. Leading officials called shoshi who held the additional post of shugo of Yamashiro province (now in Kyōto…

  • Ise monogatari (Japanese literary work)

    Tales of Ise, classical Japanese work of the Heian period (794–1185), written about 980 as Ise monogatari. It is one of the uta monogatari (“poem tales”) that emerged as a literary genre in the late 10th century and is related to the literary diary form that preceded it. Tales of Ise consists of

  • Ise Shintō (Japanese religion)

    Ise Shintō, school of Shintō established by priests of the Watarai family who served at the Outer Shrine of the Ise Shrine (Ise-jingū). Ise Shintō establishes purity and honesty as the highest virtues, realizable through religious experience. The school began in the Kamakura period (1192–1333) as a

  • Ise Shrine (shrine, Ise, Japan)

    Ise Shrine, one of the principal shrines of Shintō (the indigenous religion of Japan). It is located near the city of Ise in Mie ken (prefecture), central Honshu. The large shrine complex includes scores of buildings, the two most important being the Inner Shrine (Naikū) and Outer Shrine (Gekū),

  • Ise-daijingū (shrine, Ise, Japan)

    Ise Shrine, one of the principal shrines of Shintō (the indigenous religion of Japan). It is located near the city of Ise in Mie ken (prefecture), central Honshu. The large shrine complex includes scores of buildings, the two most important being the Inner Shrine (Naikū) and Outer Shrine (Gekū),

  • Ise-jingū (shrine, Ise, Japan)

    Ise Shrine, one of the principal shrines of Shintō (the indigenous religion of Japan). It is located near the city of Ise in Mie ken (prefecture), central Honshu. The large shrine complex includes scores of buildings, the two most important being the Inner Shrine (Naikū) and Outer Shrine (Gekū),

  • Ise-Shima Kokuritsu Ko?n (national park, Japan)

    Ise-Shima National Park, national park on the Shima Peninsula, central Honshu, Japan. Its two main cities are Ise, famous for its Shintō shrines, and Toba, a seaport that guards the southern entrance to Ise Bay (Ise-wan). The bay has many islands and is renowned for its Mikimoto cultured-pearl

  • Ise-Shima National Park (national park, Japan)

    Ise-Shima National Park, national park on the Shima Peninsula, central Honshu, Japan. Its two main cities are Ise, famous for its Shintō shrines, and Toba, a seaport that guards the southern entrance to Ise Bay (Ise-wan). The bay has many islands and is renowned for its Mikimoto cultured-pearl

  • ISEE 3 (satellite)

    comet: Spacecraft exploration of comets: …Earth orbit and the third, ISEE-3, positioned in a heliocentric orbit between Earth and the Sun, studying the solar wind in Earth’s vicinity.

  • Isegrimm (work by Alexis)

    Willibald Alexis: The sequel, Isegrimm (1854), foreshadows a rebirth of patriotism.

  • Isekiri (people)

    Itsekiri, ethnic group inhabiting the westernmost part of the Niger River delta of extreme southern Nigeria. The Itsekiri make up an appreciable proportion of the modern towns of Sapele, Warri, Burutu, and Forcados. They speak a Yoruboid language of the Benue-Congo branch of Niger-Congo languages

  • Iselin, Columbus O’D. (American oceanographer)

    Columbus O’D. Iselin, American oceanographer who, as director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (1940–50; 1956–57) in Massachusetts, expanded its facilities 10-fold and made it one of the largest research establishments of its kind in the world. The scion of a New York banking family (his

  • Iselin, Columbus O’Donnell (American oceanographer)

    Columbus O’D. Iselin, American oceanographer who, as director of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (1940–50; 1956–57) in Massachusetts, expanded its facilities 10-fold and made it one of the largest research establishments of its kind in the world. The scion of a New York banking family (his

  • Isengrim (literary character)

    Isengrim, greedy and dull-witted wolf who is a prominent character in many medieval European beast epics. Often cast as a worldly and corrupt churchman, he appears first as a character in the Latin Ecbasis captivi (c. 940), in which the beasts are unnamed, and under his own name in Ysengrimus

  • Isenheim Altarpiece (work by Grünewald)

    Christology: The Middle Ages through the 19th century: …notable example is Matthias Grunewald’s Isenheim Altarpiece (1515), which depicts Jesus’ body ravaged by crucifixion yet evokes pointedly the Christian message of Jesus’ horrible suffering; originally intended for a hospital, the altar painting may have been designed to provide comfort and solace to the sick. Pieter Bruegel’s Flight into Egypt…

  • isentropic chart (meteorology)

    Isentropic chart, meteorological map that shows the moisture distribution and flow of air along a surface of constant entropy, which is also a surface of constant potential temperature (the temperature a parcel of dry air would have if brought from its initial state to a standard pressure [1,000

  • Iseo, Lago d’ (lake, Italy)

    Lake Iseo, lake in Lombardia (Lombardy) region, northern Italy, between Bergamo and Brescia provinces, at the southern foot of the Alps at an altitude of 610 feet (186 m). The lake is 15.5 miles (25 km) long with a maximum width of 3 miles (5 km), a maximum depth of 820 feet (250 m), and a surface

  • Iseo, Lake (lake, Italy)

    Lake Iseo, lake in Lombardia (Lombardy) region, northern Italy, between Bergamo and Brescia provinces, at the southern foot of the Alps at an altitude of 610 feet (186 m). The lake is 15.5 miles (25 km) long with a maximum width of 3 miles (5 km), a maximum depth of 820 feet (250 m), and a surface

  • Iseppo Porto, Palazzo (palace, Vicenza, Italy)

    Andrea Palladio: Visits to Rome and work in Vicenza: …1552, was seen in the Palazzo Iseppo Porto, Vicenza, in which he stated in its clearest form his reconstruction of a Roman house. The facade was closely based on the Roman Renaissance palace type, such as Bramante’s House of Raphael (c. 1514), which Palladio had drawn in Rome. But it…

  • Iser River (river, Czech Republic)

    Jizera River, tributary of the Elbe (Labe) River in northern Czech Republic. It rises at the southern base of Smrk Mountain on the Polish border, in the Giant (Krkono?e) Mountains, and flows generally south past Turnov and Mladá Boleslav. It reaches the Elbe northeast of Prague after a course of

  • Isère (department, France)

    Rh?ne-Alpes: Haute-Savoie, Savoie, Isère, Dr?me, and Ardèche. In 2016 the Rh?ne-Alpes région was joined with the région of Auvergne to form the new administrative entity of Auvergne-Rh?ne-Alpes.

  • Isère River (river, France)

    Isère River, river, southeastern France, originating in the Savoy Alps on the Italian frontier and flowing 180 miles (290 km) to its confluence with the Rh?ne above Valence, draining a basin of approximately 4,600 square miles (12,000 square km). It rises in an amphitheatre of glaciers at 7,900

  • Isergebirge (mountains, Europe)

    Jizera Mountains, part of the Sudeten mountain ranges in northern Bohemia, Czech Republic, extending into Poland. It comprises a small group of peaks, though it has the highest point in the Czech Republic, at Jizera (3,681 feet [1,122 m]); Wysoka Kopa in Poland is slightly higher (3,698 feet [1,127

  • Iserloh, Erwin (German historian)
  • Iserlohn (Germany)

    Iserlohn, city, North Rhine–Westphalia Land (state), western Germany. It lies at the entrance to the hilly, wooded Sauerland region, southeast of Dortmund. First mentioned in the 11th century, Iserlohn was chartered in 1237 and was famous in the Middle Ages for armaments and light metalware.

  • Isernia (Italy)

    Isernia, town, Molise region, south central Italy, between the Carpino and Sordo rivers, west of Campobasso. It originated as Aesernia, a town of the Samnites (an ancient Italic people), and later became a Roman colony. Isernia suffered severe damage in World War II but has been rebuilt. Notable

  • Isesaki (Japan)

    Isesaki, city, southern Gumma ken (prefecture), northeast-central Honshu, Japan. It lies on the Tone River, on the rail line between Takasaki (southwest) in Gumma and Oyama (east) in Tochigi prefecture. Isesaki prospered as a market town around a castle built in the early Edo (Tokugawa) period

  • Iseult (legendary figures)

    Tristan and Isolde, principal characters of a famous medieval love-romance, based on a Celtic legend (itself based on an actual Pictish king). Though the archetypal poem from which all extant forms of the legend are derived has not been preserved, a comparison of the early versions yields an idea

  • Iseyin (Nigeria)

    Iseyin, town, Oyo state, southwestern Nigeria, at the intersection of roads from Oyo to Iwere and from Abeokuta to Okaka. In the early 1860s, the Yoruba Mission opened an Anglican church in the town. The Iseyin riots of 1916 protested the policy of Lord Lugard, the British governor-general, who

  • ISF (international sports organization)

    skiing: Governing body: … competitions were governed by the International Snowboarding Federation (ISF), which was formed in 1991 and began holding world championships in 1992. The FIS recognized snowboarding as a sport in 1994 and began holding its own world championships in snowboarding in 1996. Shortly afterward, the International Olympic Committee recognized the FIS…

  • Isfahan (Iran)

    E?fahān, capital of E?fahān province and major city of western Iran. E?fahān is situated on the north bank of the Zāyandeh River at an elevation of about 5,200 feet (1,600 metres), roughly 210 miles (340 km) south of the capital city of Tehrān. E?fahān first thrived under the Seljuq Turks

  • Isfahan carpet

    E?fahān carpet, floor covering handwoven in E?fahān (Isfahan), a city of central Iran that became the capital under Shāh ?Abbās I at the end of the 16th century. Although accounts of European travelers reveal that court looms turned out carpets there in profusion, their nature is unknown except for

  • Isfahan school (Persian painting)

    E?fahān school, last great school of Persian miniature painting, at its height in the early 17th century under the patronage of the ?afavid ruler Shah ?Abbās I (died 1629). The E?fahān school’s leading master was Rezā ?Abbāsī, who was greatly influenced by the Kazvin school of portraiture,

  • I?fahānī, al- (Muslim scholar)

    Abū al-Faraj al-I?bahānī, literary scholar who composed an encyclopaedic and fundamental work on Arabic song, composers, poets, and musicians. Abū al-Faraj was a descendant of Marwān II, the last Umayyad caliph of Syria. Despite the enmity between this family and the ?Alids, he was a Shī?ite

  • Isfendiyar (mountains, Turkey)

    Turkey: The northern folded zone: …are four main ridges: the Küre, Bolu, Ilgaz, and K?ro?lu mountains. East of the Ye?il the system is higher, narrower, and steeper. Less than 50 miles from the coast, peaks rise to more than 10,000 feet (3,000 metres), with a maximum elevation of 12,917 feet (3,937 metres) in the Ka?kar…

  • isfendiyar dynasty (Turkish dynasty)

    Candar Dynasty, Turkmen dynasty (c. 1290–1461) that ruled in the Kastamonu-Sinop region of northern Anatolia (now in Turkey). The dynasty took its name from ?emseddin Yaman Candar, who served in the army of the Seljuq sultan Mas?ūd II (reigned 1283–98) and was awarded the Eflani region, west of

  • isfet (Egyptian religion)

    Maat: …maat ‘order’ in place of isfet ‘disorder,’ the king played the role of the sun god, the god with the closest links to Maat. Maat stood at the head of the sun god’s bark as it traveled through the sky and the underworld. Although aspects of kingship and of maat…

  • ISG (biology)

    therapeutics: Immunoglobulins: Immune serum globulin (ISG), obtained from the plasma of a pool of healthy donors, contains a mixture of immunoglobulins, mainly IgG, with lesser amounts of IgM and IgA. It is used to provide passive immunity to a variety of diseases such as measles, hepatitis A,…

  • Isham, John (English composer)

    John Isham, English composer and organist. Educated at Merton College, Oxford, he went to London and became an assistant to the organist and composer William Croft, whom he succeeded as organist of St. Anne’s, Soho (serving 1711–18). He accompanied Croft to Oxford and there acquired a bachelor of

  • Isham, Ralph Heyward (American collector)

    Ralph Heyward Isham, American collector of rare manuscripts who discovered the long-missing manuscripts of James Boswell’s Life of Samuel Johnson and other Boswell papers and letters. The son of a wealthy railroad executive, Isham attended Cornell University (1908–09) and Yale University (1910–11),

  • Ishanavarman (king of Maukhari kingdom)

    Ishanavarman, chief of the Maukhari family of northern India. Originally, he was a feudatory of the Gupta empire, and by the middle of the 6th century he had declared his independence from the Guptas and set himself up as a king in the Ganges (Ganga) River valley. Little is known of Ishanavarman

  • Is?āq al-Maw?ilī (Persian musician)

    Islamic arts: The Umayyad and ?Abbāsid dynasties: classical Islamic music: …Ibrāhīm al-Maw?ilī and his son Is?āq. Members of a noble Persian family, they were chief court musicians and close companions of the caliphs Hārūn al-Rashīd and al-Ma?mūn.

  • Is?āq ibn ?Abd al-?amīd (Awrāba chief)

    North Africa: The Idrīsids of Fez: …originated in the desire of Is?āq ibn ?Abd al-?amīd, chief of the powerful tribal confederation of the Awrāba, to consolidate his authority in northern Morocco by giving his rule an Islamic religious character. For that purpose he invited Idrīs ibn ?Abd Allāh, a sharif (descendant of the Prophet Muhammad) living…

  • Ishara (Hurrian god)

    history of Mesopotamia: The Hurrian and Mitanni kingdoms: … and the goddess of oaths Ishara are attested as early as the 3rd millennium bce.

  • Ishbaal (king of Israel)

    Ishbosheth, in the Old Testament (II Samuel 2:8–4:12), fourth son of King Saul and the last representative of his family to be king over Israel (the northern kingdom, as opposed to the southern kingdom of Judah). His name was originally Ishbaal (Eshbaal; I Chronicles 8:33; 9:39), meaning “man of

  • Ishbi-Erra (king of Isin)

    Isin: …Isin about 2017 bc by Ishbi-Erra, “the man of Mari.” He founded a line of Amorite rulers of whom the first five claimed authority over the city of Ur to the south. The fifth of the rulers of Isin, Lipit-Ishtar (reigned 1934–24 bc), is famous as having published a series…

  • Ishbosheth (king of Israel)

    Ishbosheth, in the Old Testament (II Samuel 2:8–4:12), fourth son of King Saul and the last representative of his family to be king over Israel (the northern kingdom, as opposed to the southern kingdom of Judah). His name was originally Ishbaal (Eshbaal; I Chronicles 8:33; 9:39), meaning “man of

  • Ishekiri (people)

    Itsekiri, ethnic group inhabiting the westernmost part of the Niger River delta of extreme southern Nigeria. The Itsekiri make up an appreciable proportion of the modern towns of Sapele, Warri, Burutu, and Forcados. They speak a Yoruboid language of the Benue-Congo branch of Niger-Congo languages

  • Ishelhiyen (people)

    Atlas Mountains: The people: The Ishelhiyen (Shluh) of the High Atlas in Morocco inhabit the river valleys that cut down deeply into the massif. Their villages, with populations of several hundred inhabitants in each, are often located at an altitude of more than 6,500 feet. They consist of terraced houses,…

  • Isherwood, B. F. (United States naval engineer)

    B. F. Isherwood, U.S. naval engineer who, during the American Civil War, greatly augmented the U.S. Navy’s steam-powered fleet. The son of a physician, Isherwood attended Albany (N.Y.) Academy (1831–36) and then learned mechanics and engineering working successively on the Utica & Schenectady

  • Isherwood, Benjamin Franklin (United States naval engineer)

    B. F. Isherwood, U.S. naval engineer who, during the American Civil War, greatly augmented the U.S. Navy’s steam-powered fleet. The son of a physician, Isherwood attended Albany (N.Y.) Academy (1831–36) and then learned mechanics and engineering working successively on the Utica & Schenectady

  • Isherwood, Christopher (British-American author)

    Christopher Isherwood, Anglo-American novelist and playwright best known for his novels about Berlin in the early 1930s. After working as a secretary and a private tutor, Isherwood gained a measure of coterie recognition with his first two novels, All the Conspirators (1928) and The Memorial

  • Ishibashi Tanzan (prime minister of Japan)

    Ishibashi Tanzan, politician, economist, and journalist who was prime minister of Japan from December 1956 to February 1957. The son of a Nichiren-sect Buddhist priest, Ishibashi studied philosophy and graduated from Waseda University and then entered the field of journalism. He joined the Tōyō

  • Ishida Baigan (Japanese scholar)

    Ishida Baigan, Japanese scholar who originated the moral-education movement called Shingaku (“Heart Learning”), which sought to popularize ethics among the common people. The son of a farmer, Ishida began studying ethical doctrines in Kyōto as a young man while apprenticed to a merchant house. In

  • Ishida Mitsunari (Japanese warrior)

    Ishida Mitsunari, Japanese warrior whose defeat in the famous Battle of Sekigahara (1600) allowed the Tokugawa family to become undisputed rulers of Japan. Distinguished in the service of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the warrior who reunified Japan after more than a century of civil war, Ishida was

  • Ishiguro, Kazuo (Japanese-British author)

    Kazuo Ishiguro, Japanese-born British novelist known for his lyrical tales of regret fused with subtle optimism. In 2017 he won the Nobel Prize for Literature for his works that “uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.” In 1960 Ishiguro’s family immigrated to

  • Ishihara Shintarō (Japanese writer and politician)

    Ishihara Shintarō, Japanese writer and politician, who served as governor of Tokyo from 1999 to 2012. Ishihara grew up in Zushi, Kanagawa prefecture, and attended Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo. While still in school, he published his first novel, Taiyō no kisetsu (“Season of the Sun”), to great

  • Ishihara Takashi (Japanese executive)

    Takashi Ishihara, Japanese business executive (born March 3, 1912, Tokyo, Japan—died Dec. 31, 2003, Tokyo), served as president of the Nissan Motor Co. from 1977 to 1985 and helped turn the company into one of the world’s largest automakers. Ishihara joined Nissan after earning a law degree from T

  • Ishii Kikujirō (Japanese politician)

    Ishii Kikujirō, (Japanese: Viscount Ishii Kikujirō) Japanese statesman and diplomat who effectively championed a cautious expansion of Japan and cooperation with the West in the decades immediately before and after World War I. In 1907 he was sent to investigate rising anti-Japanese sentiment in

  • Ishikari River (river, Japan)

    Ishikari River, river in northern and western Hokkaido, northern Japan, the third longest in the country. It rises near the centre of the Kitami Mountains and flows for about 167 miles (268 km) southwest in a broad arc, draining the Kamikawa Basin, the Sorachi River lowland, and the Ishikari Plain.

  • Ishikari-gawa (river, Japan)

    Ishikari River, river in northern and western Hokkaido, northern Japan, the third longest in the country. It rises near the centre of the Kitami Mountains and flows for about 167 miles (268 km) southwest in a broad arc, draining the Kamikawa Basin, the Sorachi River lowland, and the Ishikari Plain.

  • Ishikawa (prefecture, Japan)

    Ishikawa, prefecture (ken), western Honshu, Japan, facing the Sea of Japan (East Sea). It includes the western stretch of the Japanese Alps in the southeast and nearly all of the Noto Peninsula in the north. Kanazawa, the prefectural capital, is centrally located along the coast. Although winter

  • Ishikawa Hajime (Japanese poet)

    Ishikawa Takuboku, Japanese poet, a master of tanka, a traditional Japanese verse form, whose works enjoyed immediate popularity for their freshness and startling imagery. Although Takuboku failed to complete his education, through reading he acquired surprising familiarity with both Japanese and

  • Ishikawa Takuboku (Japanese poet)

    Ishikawa Takuboku, Japanese poet, a master of tanka, a traditional Japanese verse form, whose works enjoyed immediate popularity for their freshness and startling imagery. Although Takuboku failed to complete his education, through reading he acquired surprising familiarity with both Japanese and

  • Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company, Ltd. (Japanese company)

    Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company, Ltd., major Japanese manufacturer of heavy machinery and oceangoing ships. Headquarters are in Tokyo. The company was founded by the Mito branch of the Tokugawa family in 1853 as a shipbuilding yard in Edo (modern Tokyo); it was incorporated in 1889.

  • Ishikawajima-Harima Jūkōgyō KK (Japanese company)

    Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company, Ltd., major Japanese manufacturer of heavy machinery and oceangoing ships. Headquarters are in Tokyo. The company was founded by the Mito branch of the Tokugawa family in 1853 as a shipbuilding yard in Edo (modern Tokyo); it was incorporated in 1889.

  • Ishim River (river, Asia)

    Ishim River, river in northern Kazakhstan and Tyumen and Omsk oblasti (provinces) of south-central Russia. A left-bank tributary of the Irtysh (Ertis) River, it rises in the Niyaz Hills in the north of the Kazakh Uplands (Saryarqa), flows west through Nursultan, and then flows north through

  • Ishimbai (Russia)

    Ishimbay, city, Bashkortostan republic, western Russia. Ishimbay lies along the Belaya (White) River. It was the earliest centre of the oil industry in the Volga–Urals oil field, which was first exploited in 1932, and of the first oil refinery started in 1936. Deposits have been depleted, but the

  • Ishimbay (Russia)

    Ishimbay, city, Bashkortostan republic, western Russia. Ishimbay lies along the Belaya (White) River. It was the earliest centre of the oil industry in the Volga–Urals oil field, which was first exploited in 1932, and of the first oil refinery started in 1936. Deposits have been depleted, but the

  • Ishin Aswas (archaeological site, Iraq)

    Babylon: The present site: …from the ziggurat, and (6) Ishin Aswad, where there are two further temples. A depression called Sahn marks the former site of the ziggurat Etemenanki. A larger-than-life-size basalt lion, probably of Hittite origin and brought to Babylon in antiquity, stands north of the Ishtar Gate.

  • Ishinhō (work by Tamba Yasuyori)

    history of medicine: Japan: …Tamba Yasuyori completed the 30-volume Ishinhō, the oldest Japanese medical work still extant. This work discusses diseases and their treatment, classified mainly according to the affected organs or parts. It is based entirely on older Chinese medical works, with the concept of yin and yang underlying the theory of disease…

  • Ishinomaki (Japan)

    Ishinomaki, city and port, eastern Miyagi ken (prefecture), northeastern Honshu, Japan. It is situated at the head of Ishinomaki Bay (an embayment of the Pacific Ocean), on the estuary of the Kitakami River, about 30 miles (50 km) northeast of Sendai. The city was founded in the 4th century and was

  • Ishioka, Eiko (Japanese designer)

    Eiko Ishioka, Japanese designer (born July 12, 1938, Tokyo, Japan—died Jan. 21, 2012, Tokyo), won accolades in the worlds of theatre, film, and advertising for her sensual and compelling designs; her many honours included an Academy Award, a Grammy Award, and two Tony Award nominations. Ishioka

  • Ishiyama Hongan Temple (building, Japan)

    ōsaka-Kōbe metropolitan area: Ancient and medieval periods: …in 1532, this structure, the Ishiyama Hongan Temple, became the nucleus of a major town that was destroyed in 1580 by Nobunaga, after a siege of many years. Nobunaga’s successor, Toyotomi Hideyoshi, built a great castle on the site with massive stone walls and broad moats; the castle town that…

  • Ishizuchi, Mount (mountain, Japan)

    Saijō: …stands on the slopes of Mount Ishizuchi to the south. The mountain lies within Ishizuchi Quasi-national Park and is the highest peak on Shikoku, reaching an elevation of 6,499 feet (1,981 m). Pop. (2005) 113,371; (2010) 112,091.

  • Ishkashim Range (mountain range, Central Asia)

    Pamirs: Physiography: …Range, composed of north-south (Ishkashim Range) and east-west elements, rising to Mayakovsky Peak (19,996 feet [6,095 metres]) and Karl Marx (Karla Marksa) Peak (22,067 feet [6,726 metres]). In the extreme southeast, to the south of Lake Zorkul (Sarī Qūl), lie the east-west Vākhān Mountains.

  • Ishkur (Mesopotamian god)

    Ishkur, in Mesopotamian religion, Sumerian god of the rain and thunderstorms of spring. He was the city god of Bit Khakhuru (perhaps to be identified with modern Al-Jidr) in the central steppe region. Ishkur closely resembled Ninhar (Ningubla) and as such was visualized in the form of a great bull.

  • Ishmael (son of Abraham)

    Ishmael, son of Abraham through Hagar, according to the three great Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. After the birth of Isaac, another son of Abraham, through Sarah, Ishmael and his mother were banished to the desert. A minor figure thereafter in the traditions of Judaism and

  • Ishmael ben Elisha (Jewish scholar)

    Ishmael ben Elisha, Jewish tanna (Talmudic teacher) and sage who left an enduring imprint on Talmudic literature and on Judaism. He is generally referred to simply as Rabbi Ishmael. As a young child, Ishmael, whose parentage is not known but who traced his lineage through a high priest, was taken

  • Ishmaelites (ancient people)

    Midianite: …traditionally have been identified as Ishmaelites, in part because of an unclear passage in Genesis (37:28) that refers to the traders to whom Joseph was sold by his brothers as both Midianites and Ishmaelites. In addition, the story of Gideon in Judges contains a verse (8:24) that includes an apparent…

  • Ishme-Dagan (king of Assyria)

    history of Mesopotamia: Early history of Assyria: …the older of the two, Ishme-Dagan, succeeded his father on the throne. Through the archive of correspondence in the palace at Mari, scholars are particularly well informed about Shamshi-Adad’s reign and many aspects of his personality. Shamshi-Adad’s state had a common border for some time with the Babylonia of Hammurabi.…

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