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  • isocarboxazid (drug)

    antidepressant: For instance, the MAOIs—chiefly isocarboxazid, phenelzine, and tranylcypromine—in general are used only after treatment with tricyclic drugs has proved unsatisfactory, because these drugs’ side effects are unpredictable and their complex interactions are incompletely understood. Fluoxetine often relieves cases of depression that have failed to yield to tricyclics or MAOIs.

  • isochron diagram (geology)

    meteorite: The ages of meteorites and their components: …or meteorite by using the isochron method. For purposes of illustration, consider the rubidium-strontium decay system. In this system, the radioactive parent rubidium-87 (87Rb) decays to the stable daughter isotope strontium-87 (87Sr). The half-life for 87Rb decay is 48.8 billion years. Strontium has a number of other stable isotopes, including…

  • isochron method (geology)

    meteorite: The ages of meteorites and their components: …or meteorite by using the isochron method. For purposes of illustration, consider the rubidium-strontium decay system. In this system, the radioactive parent rubidium-87 (87Rb) decays to the stable daughter isotope strontium-87 (87Sr). The half-life for 87Rb decay is 48.8 billion years. Strontium has a number of other stable isotopes, including…

  • isochronous cyclotron

    cyclotron: …in this way are called isochronous, or azimuthally-varying-field (AVF) cyclotrons.

  • isochronous orbit (ion)

    particle accelerator: Classical cyclotrons: …a uniform magnetic field are isochronous; that is, the time taken by a particle of a given mass to make one complete circuit is the same at any speed or energy as long as the speed is much less than that of light. (As the speed of a particle approaches…

  • isocitrate (chemical compound)

    metabolism: Formation of coenzyme A, carbon dioxide, and reducing equivalent: …in such a way that isocitrate is formed. It is probable that all three reactants—citrate, cis-aconitate, and isocitrate—remain closely associated with aconitase, the enzyme that catalyzes the isomerization process, and that most of the cis-aconitate is not released from the enzyme surface but is immediately converted to isocitrate.

  • isocitrate dehydrogenase (enzyme)

    metabolism: Formation of coenzyme A, carbon dioxide, and reducing equivalent: …the enzyme controlling this reaction, isocitrate dehydrogenase, differs in specificity for the coenzymes; various forms occur not only in different organisms but even within the same cell. In [40] NAD(P)+ indicates that either NAD+ or NADP+ can act as a hydrogen acceptor.

  • isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (enzyme)

    metabolomics: Role in understanding biochemical mechanisms of disease: …tricarboxylic acid cycle known as isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), which was known to cause certain human brain cancers, was found to convert a normal metabolite (alpha-ketoglutaric acid) into an unusual metabolite (R(-)-2-hydroxyglutaric acid, or 2HG). The unusual metabolite could serve as both a cancer biomarker and an endogenous carcinogen (a…

  • isocitrate lysase (enzyme)

    metabolism: Anaplerotic routes: …oxalosuccinate, as occurs in [40], isocitrate is split by isocitrate lyase (reaction [52]), similar to reactions [4] and [15] of carbohydrate fragmentation. The dotted line in [52] indicates the way in which isocitrate is split. The products are succinate and glyoxylate.

  • isoclinal fold (geology)

    fold: …plane, the fold is called isoclinal.

  • isocost-isoquant analysis (economics)

    theory of production: The production function: …a figure known as an isoquant diagram (Figure 1). In the graph, goldsmith-hours per month are plotted horizontally and the number of feet of gold wire used per month vertically. Each of the curved lines, called an isoquant, will then represent a certain number of necklace chains produced. The data…

  • Isocrates (Greek orator and rhetorician)

    Isocrates, ancient Athenian orator, rhetorician, and teacher whose writings are an important historical source on the intellectual and political life of the Athens of his day. The school he founded differed markedly in its aims from the Academy of Plato and numbered among its pupils men of eminence

  • isocratic mobile phase (chemistry)

    chromatography: Liquid chromatography: …of constant composition are called isocratic.

  • isocyanate (chemical compound)

    amine: Substitution: …conversion of primary amines to isocyanates: RNH2+ COCl2→ RN=C=O + 2HCl). Isocyanates are themselves acylating agents, of a type that also includes isothiocyanates (RN=C=S), ketenes (R2C=C=O), and carbon dioxide (O=C=O). They react more or less readily with primary and most secondary amines to form, respectively, ureas, thioureas (RNHCSNHR), amides, and

  • isocyanide (chemical compound)

    Isocyanide, any of a class of organic compounds having the molecular structure R―N+ ≡ C, in which R is a combining group derived by removal of a hydrogen atom from an organic compound. The isocyanides are isomers of the nitriles; they were discovered in 1867 but have never achieved any large-scale

  • isodrin (chemical compound)

    Isodrin, chlorine-containing organic compound used as an insecticide; see

  • isoelectric focusing (chemistry)

    separation and purification: Field separations: …based on this principle is isoelectric focusing (IEF). At a given pH of a solution, a specific protein will have equal positive and negative charges and will therefore not migrate in an electric field. This pH value is called the isoelectric point. A slab gel (or column) can be filled…

  • isoelectric point (chemistry)

    separation and purification: Field separations: …pH value is called the isoelectric point. A slab gel (or column) can be filled with a complex mixture of buffers (known as ampholytes) that, under the influence of an applied field, migrate to the position of their respective isoelectric points and then remain fixed. A pH gradient is established,…

  • Isoetales (plant order)

    lycophyte: Annotated classification: Order Isoetales (quillworts) Living and extinct plants with secondary growth; heterosporous, with endosporic gametophytes; Isoetites is an extinct genus; a specialized group of species from the high Andes Mountains is sometimes segregated as a distinct genus, Stylites; for many years the species of Isoetes were difficult…

  • Isoetes (plant)

    Quillwort, (family Isoetaceae), family of about 250 species of seedless vascular plants of the order Isoetales. Quillworts are the only extant members of the order and are usually placed in a single genus, Isoetes (also spelled Iso?tes). The plants are aquatic or semi-aquatic, and most are native

  • Isoetes histrix (plant)

    quillwort: Major species: Sand quillwort (I. histrix), an inconspicuous terrestrial European species, has very narrow 5–7-cm (2–3-inch-) long leaves that curl back to the ground from a fat white tufted base.

  • Isoetes lacustris (plant)

    quillwort: Major species: …common quillworts of Eurasia (Isoetes lacustris) and the very similar North American species (I. macrospora) are aquatic. Their stiff dark green recurved spiky leaves grow around a stumpy corm. Italian quillwort (I. malinverniana) has longer spiraling leaves that float on the water surface. Sand quillwort (I. histrix), an inconspicuous…

  • Isoetes macrospora (plant)

    quillwort: Major species: …similar North American species (I. macrospora) are aquatic. Their stiff dark green recurved spiky leaves grow around a stumpy corm. Italian quillwort (I. malinverniana) has longer spiraling leaves that float on the water surface. Sand quillwort (I. histrix), an inconspicuous terrestrial European species, has very narrow 5–7-cm (2–3-inch-) long…

  • Isoetes malinverniana (plant)

    quillwort: Major species: Italian quillwort (I. malinverniana) has longer spiraling leaves that float on the water surface. Sand quillwort (I. histrix), an inconspicuous terrestrial European species, has very narrow 5–7-cm (2–3-inch-) long leaves that curl back to the ground from a fat white tufted base.

  • Isoetites (fossil plant genus)

    lycophyte: Annotated classification: …growth; heterosporous, with endosporic gametophytes; Isoetites is an extinct genus; a specialized group of species from the high Andes Mountains is sometimes segregated as a distinct genus, Stylites; for many years the species of Isoetes were difficult to distinguish, but, since the discovery that frequent hybridization was obscuring the differences…

  • isoflavone (biological pigment)

    nutritional disease: Other dietary factors: …the soy foods that contain isoflavones, estrogen-like compounds that are thought to be responsible for these beneficial cardiovascular effects.

  • isogamy (biology)

    gamete: …be identical in form (isogamy), as in certain species of algae, fungi, and protozoans, or there may be more than one morphological type (heterogamy, or anisogamy), as with many green algae of the genus Chlamydomonas. Gametes of animals, some algae and fungi, and all higher

  • isogloss (linguistics)

    dialect: Geographic dialects: …own boundary line, called an isogloss (or sometimes heterogloss). Isoglosses of various linguistic phenomena rarely coincide completely, and by crossing and interweaving they constitute intricate patterns on dialect maps. Frequently, however, several isoglosses are grouped approximately together into a bundle of isoglosses. This grouping is caused either by geographic obstacles…

  • isograd (geology)

    metamorphic rock: Isograds: Reactions that introduce new minerals in rocks of a specific bulk composition are referred to as mineral appearance isograds. Isograds can be mapped in the field as lines across which the metamorphic mineral assemblage changes. Caution must be exercised to note the approximate bulk…

  • isograft (surgery)

    transplant: Transplants and grafts: …twins or highly inbred animals—isografts—are accepted by the recipients indefinitely. Grafts from a donor to a recipient of the same species—allografts or homografts—are usually rejected unless special efforts are made to prevent this. Grafts between individuals of different species—xenografts or heterografts—are usually destroyed very quickly by the recipient. (The…

  • isohemagglutinin (chemical compound)

    agglutinin: Isohemagglutinins, substances that agglutinate the red blood cells of others of the same species, are also found in humans. Thus, there are four main blood groups, which differ with respect to two antigens, A and B, in the red blood cells and two isohemagglutinins, anti-A…

  • Isoko (people)

    Isoko, people of the northwestern part of the Niger delta in Nigeria, speaking a language of the Kwa branch of the Niger-Congo family. The term Sobo is used by ethnographers as a cover term for both the Isoko and their neighbours the Urhobo, but the two groups remain distinct from one another. The

  • Isola Asinara (island, Italy)

    Asinara Island, island lying in the Mediterranean Sea off the northwest coast of Sardinia. It has an area of 20 square miles (52 square km) and rises to 1,335 feet (407 m). The island was home to one of Italy’s top-security prisons until it was closed in 1997. Asinara is now a marine and wildlife

  • Isola Capraia (island, Italy)

    Capraia Island, (from capra, “wild goat”), island of the Arcipelago Toscano, in the Tyrrhenian Sea, between the Italian mainland and the north point of Corsica. Capraia, mountainous and volcanic, rising to 1,467 feet (447 metres), produces wine and is a centre of anchovy fishing. About one-third of

  • Isola d’Ischia (island, Italy)

    Island of Ischia, island, Campania regione (region), southern Italy. It lies at the northwest entrance to the Bay of Naples, opposite Cape Miseno and just west-southwest of Naples. Oblong in shape, with a circumference of 21 miles (34 km) and an area of 18 sq miles (47 sq km), the island consists

  • Isola del Giglio (island, Italy)

    Giglio Island, mountainous, volcanic islet of the Tuscan Archipelago, in the Tyrrhenian Sea, opposite Mount Argentario, on the west coast of Italy. The island rises to 1,634 feet (498 m) and has an area of 8 square miles (21 square km). Wine is produced, and there is considerable offshore fishing.

  • isola di Arturo, L’? (novel by Morante)

    Elsa Morante: …novel, L’isola di Arturo (1957; Arturo’s Island), examines a boy’s growth from childhood dreams to the painful disillusions of adulthood. This novel, for which she won the Strega Prize, is notable for its delicate lyricism and its mingling of realistic detail with an air of unreality; it is often compared…

  • Isola di Lampedusa (island, Italy)

    Lampedusa Island, largest (area 8 square miles [21 square km]) of the Isole Pelagie (Pelagie Islands), an island group that includes Linosa and Lampione islets. Administratively Lampedusa is part of the autonomous region of Sicily in Italy. It is located in the Mediterranean Sea between Malta and

  • Isola di Montecristo (island, Italy)

    Montecristo Island, member of the Arcipelago Toscano, in the Tyrrhenian Sea, between the Italian mainland and Corsica, south of the island of Elba. Part of Livorno province, the islet is mountainous, rising to 2,116 ft (645 m), with an area of 6 sq mi (16 sq km). It is a hunting preserve owned by

  • Isola di Pantelleria (island, Italy)

    Pantelleria Island, Italian island in the Mediterranean Sea between Sicily and Tunisia. Of volcanic origin, it rises to 2,743 feet (836 m) at the extinct crater of Magna Grande. The last eruption (underwater to the west of the island) took place in 1891, but hot mineral springs and fumaroles

  • Isola di Sant’Antioco (island, Italy)

    Sant’Antioco Island, volcanic island in the Mediterranean Sea, situated just off the southwestern coast of Sardinia, Italy. It is composed for the most part of rocky and uneven terrain and rises to 889 feet (271 metres). The island is connected by rail with the Sardinian mainland, 1 mile (2 km)

  • Isola Farnese (Italy)

    Veii, ancient Etruscan town, located about 10 miles (16 km) northwest of Rome. Veii was the greatest centre for the fabrication of terra-cotta sculptures in Etruria in the 6th century bc. According to Pliny the Elder, Vulca of Veii made the terra-cotta statues for the Temple of Jupiter on the Roman

  • Isola Maddalena (Italy)

    Maddalena Island, island. It lies in the Tyrrhenian Sea (of the Mediterranean) off the northeast coast of Sardinia. It has an area of 8 square miles (20 square km) and is the principal island of the Maddalena Archipelago, which includes the islands of Maddalena, Caprera, Santo Stefano, Spargi,

  • Isola Pianosa (island, Italy)

    Pianosa Island, island of the Toscany Archipelago, in the Tyrrhenian Sea, part of Tuscany regione (region), Italy. Situated 8 miles (13 km) southwest of the island of Elba, Pianosa has an area of 4 square miles (10 square km). It is, as its name (Italian piano, “flat”) indicates, low-lying, with

  • Isola Salina (island, Italy)

    Salina Island, second largest of the Eolie Islands (Lipari Islands), in the Tyrrhenian Sea (of the Mediterranean) off northeastern Sicily. It has an area of 10 square miles (26 square km). Salina, the highest of the Eolie Islands, consists of two extinct volcanoes and rises to 3,156 feet (962 m).

  • Isola Stromboli (island, Italy)

    Stromboli Island, northeasternmost of the Eolie (Lipari) Islands, in the Tyrrhenian Sea (of the Mediterranean), off northeastern Sicily. It has an area of 5 square miles (12 square km). Of volcanic formation, the island is still active, and fluid lava flows continuously from its crater to the sea,

  • Isola Vulcano (island, Italy)

    Vulcano Island, southernmost of the Eolie Islands, in the Tyrrhenian Sea (of the Mediterranean), off northeastern Sicily. It is administered as part of northern Sicily, southern Italy. Vulcano has an area of 8 square miles (21 square km). Although the last major eruptions were in 1888–90, fumaroles

  • isolate (linguistics)

    Mesoamerican Indian languages: …some 10 language families (including language isolates) that are native to Mesoamerica. The term “Mesoamerica” refers to a culture area originally defined by a number of culture traits shared among the pre-Columbian cultures of the geographical region that extends from the Pánuco River in northern Mexico to the Lempa River…

  • isolate (genetics)

    consanguinity: Inbreeding and pedigree construction: Such groups are called isolates. Thus, the Samaritans, who have remained a small but distinctive group since the 8th century bc, are considerably inbred, and in the United States some religious groups also live in agricultural colonies as isolates (for instance, the Amish and the Hutterites). Besides these numerically…

  • isolated pawn (chess)

    chess: Steinitz and the theory of equilibrium: …adjoining files is called an isolated pawn; isolated pawns may confer middlegame compensation through control of important squares (if located in the centre) or by giving rooks adjoining open files along which to attack. A pawn on an open file whose advance is restrained by an enemy pawn on an…

  • isolated singularity (mathematics)

    singularity: …case it is called an isolated singularity. In general, because a function behaves in an anomalous manner at singular points, singularities must be treated separately when analyzing the function, or mathematical model, in which they appear.

  • Isolated State, The (work by Thünen)

    location theory: …Der isolierte Staat (1826) (The Isolated State). The Thünen model suggests that accessibility to the market (town) can create a complete system of agricultural land use. His model envisaged a single market surrounded by farmland, both situated on a plain of complete physical homogeneity. Transportation costs over the plain…

  • isolated thunderstorm (meteorology)

    thunderstorm: Isolated thunderstorms: Isolated thunderstorms tend to occur where there are light winds that do not change dramatically with height and where there is abundant moisture at low and middle levels of the atmosphere—that is, from near the surface of the ground up to around 10,000…

  • isolating language

    Isolating language, a language in which each word form consists typically of a single morpheme. Examples are Classical Chinese (to a far greater extent than the modern Chinese languages) and Vietnamese. An isolating language tends also to be an analytic language (q.v.), so that the terms isolating

  • isolation (preventive medicine)

    Isolation, in medicine, separation of an infected individual (human or animal) from the healthy until that individual is no longer able to transmit the disease. In its strictest sense, the practice of isolation differs from that of quarantine, which is the detention of an individual who may have

  • isolation (chemistry)

    Separation and purification, in chemistry, separation of a substance into its components and the removal of impurities. There are a large number of important applications in fields such as medicine and manufacturing. Since ancient times, people have used methods of separating and purifying chemical

  • isolation (psychology)

    Loneliness, distressing experience that occurs when a person’s social relationships are perceived by that person to be less in quantity, and especially in quality, than desired. The experience of loneliness is highly subjective; an individual can be alone without feeling lonely and can feel lonely

  • isolation (theatre)

    theatrical production: Isolation of the performer: Almost all productions (the so-called happenings of the 1960s and guerrilla theatre are notable exceptions) endeavour to achieve two basic aims. First, every production seeks to impart a special quality to the theatrical area. Use of a theatrical building may in…

  • isolation transformer (technology)

    transformer: Isolation transformers are usually employed for reasons of safety to isolate a piece of equipment from the source of power.

  • isolationism (foreign policy)

    Isolationism, National policy of avoiding political or economic entanglements with other countries. Isolationism has been a recurrent theme in U.S. history. It was given expression in the Farewell Address of Pres. George Washington and in the early 19th-century Monroe Doctrine. The term is most

  • isolationist (politics)

    Canada: Commonwealth relations: …and II Canada followed an isolationist foreign policy, mainly a consequence of the return to government in 1921 of the Liberal Party, which had come to depend on French Canadian support. French Canadians were overwhelmingly isolationist, and they strengthened the general disposition of Canadians to express their new national feelings…

  • isolator (scientific instrument)

    germfree life: Methodology.: …mature embryo into a sterile isolator. These young must be fed by hand to avoid contamination by the mother. Subsequent reproduction of hand-reared germfree mammals allows routine production of germfree colonies. Germfree rats or mice can be purchased from breeding companies and transferred via a shipping isolator into a laboratory…

  • Isole Egadi (islands, Italy)

    Egadi Islands, small mountainous group of islets belonging to Italy, in the Mediterranean just off the western coast of Sicily, with a total area of 15 square miles (39 square km). The principal islands are Favignana, the largest (7 square miles [18 square km]), Levanzo, and Marettimo. In the

  • Isole Eolie (islands, Italy)

    Eolie Islands, volcanic island group in the Tyrrhenian Sea (of the Mediterranean) off the north coast of Sicily, Italy. The group, with a total land area of 34 square miles (88 square km), consists of seven major islands and several islets lying in a general “Y” shape. The base of the Y is formed

  • Isole Pelagie (island group, Italy)

    Pelagie Islands, group of islands in the Mediterranean Sea between Malta and Tunisia, south of Sicily; administratively they form the commune of Lampedusa. The group consists of the islands of Lampedusa and Linosa and the Isolotto (islet) Lampione, standing on the eastern edge of the submarine

  • isolecithal yolk (embryology)

    yolk: …uniformly distributed yolk are termed isolecithal. This condition occurs in invertebrates and in all but the lowest mammals. Eggs with abundant yolk concentrated in one hemisphere of the egg are termed telolecithal. This occurs in many invertebrates and in all vertebrates lower than marsupial mammals. In arthropods, the yolk is…

  • isoleucine (chemical compound)

    Isoleucine, an amino acid present in most common proteins, sometimes comprising 2 to 10 percent by weight. First isolated in 1904 from fibrin, a protein involved in blood-clot formation, isoleucine is one of several so-called essential amino acids for chicks, rats, and other higher animals,

  • isolierte Staat, Der (work by Thünen)

    location theory: …Der isolierte Staat (1826) (The Isolated State). The Thünen model suggests that accessibility to the market (town) can create a complete system of agricultural land use. His model envisaged a single market surrounded by farmland, both situated on a plain of complete physical homogeneity. Transportation costs over the plain…

  • Isolobodon portoricensis (extinct rodent)

    hutia: Natural history: For example, the Puerto Rican hutia (Isolobodon portoricensis) was probably indigenous to Hispaniola and introduced to Puerto Rico and some of the Virgin Islands, but it is now extinct. Some hutias are not endangered, but others are rare and becoming more so owing to human population expansion and…

  • Isolt (legendary figures)

    Tristan and Isolde, principal characters of a famous medieval love-romance, based on a Celtic legend (itself based on an actual Pictish king). Though the archetypal poem from which all extant forms of the legend are derived has not been preserved, a comparison of the early versions yields an idea

  • isolysergic acid (chemical compound)

    Ipomoea: Major species: …the alkaloids d-lysergic and d-isolysergic acids (similar to LSD), and the seeds are traditionally used among Mexico’s Zapotec peoples for ceremonial and curative purposes.

  • isomer (nuclear physics)

    Isomer, in nuclear physics, any of two or more nuclides (species of atomic nuclei) that consist of the same number of protons and the same number of neutrons but differ in energy and manner of radioactive decay, and that exist for a measurable interval of time. The half-life of the more energetic

  • isomer shift (physics)

    M?ssbauer effect: Applications: The isomer shift, the change in the energy of a nuclear gamma ray due to the electrostatic interaction between nuclear and electronic charge, provides a measurement of the change in the nuclear-charge radius when the nucleus is raised to an excited state. The splitting of nuclear…

  • isomerase (enzyme)

    Isomerase, any one of a class of enzymes that catalyze reactions involving a structural rearrangement of a molecule. Alanine racemase, for example, catalyzes the conversion of L-alanine into its isomeric (mirror-image) form, D-alanine. An isomerase called mutarotase catalyzes the conversion of

  • isomeric transition (physics)

    radioactivity: Isomeric transitions: ) There is a wide range of rates of half-lives for the gamma-emission process. Usually dipole transitions (see below Gamma transition), in which the gamma ray carries off one ? unit of angular momentum, are fast, less than nanoseconds (one nanosecond equals 10?9 second).…

  • isomerism (chemistry)

    Isomerism, the existence of molecules that have the same numbers of the same kinds of atoms (and hence the same formula) but differ in chemical and physical properties. The roots of the word isomer are Greek—isos plus meros, or “equal parts.” Stated colloquially, isomers are chemical compounds that

  • isomerization (chemical reaction)

    Isomerization, the chemical process by which a compound is transformed into any of its isomeric forms, i.e., forms with the same chemical composition but with different structure or configuration and, hence, generally with different physical and chemical properties. An example is the conversion of

  • isometric contraction (physiology)

    muscle: Load-velocity relation: …increases, just as in an isometric contraction, and, when the force is equal to the load, the muscle begins to shorten and lifts the load. When both the activity of the muscle and the force in it begin to decline, the load stretches the muscle back to its initial length.…

  • isometric drawing

    Isometric drawing, method of graphic representation of three-dimensional objects, used by engineers, technical illustrators, and, occasionally, architects. The technique is intended to combine the illusion of depth, as in a perspective rendering, with the undistorted presentation of the object’s

  • isometric projection

    Isometric drawing, method of graphic representation of three-dimensional objects, used by engineers, technical illustrators, and, occasionally, architects. The technique is intended to combine the illusion of depth, as in a perspective rendering, with the undistorted presentation of the object’s

  • isometric system (crystallography)

    Isometric system, one of the crystal systems to which a given crystalline solid can be assigned. Crystals in this system are referred to three mutually perpendicular axes of equal lengths. If the atoms or atom groups in the solid are represented by points and the points are connected, the resulting

  • Isometroides vescus (arachnid)

    scorpion: Food and feeding: …known specialist scorpion is the Australian spiral burrow, or spider-hunting, scorpion (Isometroides vescus), which feeds solely on burrowing spiders.

  • isometry (geometry)

    differential geometry: …surfaces are said to be isometric if one can be bent (or transformed) into the other without changing intrinsic distances. (For example, because a sheet of paper can be rolled into a tube without stretching, the sheet and tube are “locally” isometric—only locally because new, and possibly shorter, routes are…

  • isomorphic graph

    combinatorics: Definitions: …H are said to be isomorphic (written G ? H) if there exists a one–one correspondence between their vertex sets that preserves adjacency. For example, G1 and G2, shown in Figure 3, are isomorphic under the correspondence xi ? yi.

  • isomorphism (mathematics)

    Isomorphism, in modern algebra, a one-to-one correspondence (mapping) between two sets that preserves binary relationships between elements of the sets. For example, the set of natural numbers can be mapped onto the set of even natural numbers by multiplying each natural number by 2. The binary

  • isomorphism (chemistry)

    J?ns Jacob Berzelius: Mineralogy: …resolved by the law of isomorphism, the recognition that chemically similar substances possess similar crystal forms, discovered in 1818 by the German chemist Eilhardt Mitscherlich. Berzelius had provided both the patronage and the foundational concepts for Mitscherlich’s own career. In contemporary mineralogy disputes, Berzelius frequently sided with René-Just Haüy, who…

  • isomyarianism (mollusk anatomy)

    bivalve: External features: …still of similar size (the isomyarian form). Such structural features adapt the animal for rapid movement through the sand; long siphons project to the surface above. Deep burrowing has been achieved by a different mechanism in the razor shells (e.g., the family Solenidae), where the anterior region of the shell…

  • Isondega River (river, United States)

    Savannah River, river formed by the confluence of the Tugaloo and Seneca rivers at Hartwell Dam, Georgia, U.S. It constitutes the boundary between Georgia and South Carolina as it flows southeastward past Augusta and Savannah, Ga., into the Atlantic Ocean after a course of 314 miles (505 km). Its

  • isoniazid (drug)

    Isoniazid, drug used in the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis. Isoniazid commonly is used in combination with other drugs, such as rifampin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide, or streptomycin; these drugs are used with isoniazid in order to prevent, or at least delay, the development of

  • isonicotinic acid hydrazide (drug)

    Isoniazid, drug used in the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis. Isoniazid commonly is used in combination with other drugs, such as rifampin, ethambutol, pyrazinamide, or streptomycin; these drugs are used with isoniazid in order to prevent, or at least delay, the development of

  • isonipecaine (drug)

    Meperidine, synthetic drug used in the treatment of moderate to severe pain. It is an opioid analgesic, and thus its effects on the body resemble those of opium or morphine, one of opium’s purified constituents. A common trade name for meperidine is Demerol. The drug acts principally on the central

  • isonitrile (chemical compound)

    Isocyanide, any of a class of organic compounds having the molecular structure R―N+ ≡ C, in which R is a combining group derived by removal of a hydrogen atom from an organic compound. The isocyanides are isomers of the nitriles; they were discovered in 1867 but have never achieved any large-scale

  • Isonokami Shrine (shrine, Tenri, Japan)

    Japan: Rise and expansion of Yamato: …have been concentrated upon the Isonokami Shrine at Tenri, south of Nara. The rulers there seem to have been somewhat more military in nature than their Miwa predecessors, and archaeological findings suggest that the most treasured items of the Isonokami Shrine were in fact weapons—especially the so-called “seven-pronged sword” (shichishitō),…

  • isonomia (political principle)

    Cleisthenes of Athens: Isonomia, the principle of equality of rights for all, was one of the proudest boasts of the reformers, and there is no doubt that Cleisthenes’ work led to a much wider and more active participation by all persons in public life.

  • Isonzo (river, Europe)

    Battle of Caporetto: …an Austro-German offensive on the Isonzo front in northeastern Italy, where the Italian and Austrian forces had been stalemated for two and a half years. In the wake of the successful Austrian and German advance, more than 600,000 war-weary and demoralized Italian soldiers either deserted or surrendered.

  • Isonzo, Battles of the (World War I)

    Battles of the Isonzo, (1915–17), 12 battles along the Isonzo River on the eastern sector of the Italian Front in World War I. Although it is now located in Slovenia, the Isonzo River at the time ran roughly north-south just inside Austria along its border with Italy at the head of the Adriatic

  • Isonzo, Twelfth Battle of the (European history)

    Battle of Caporetto, (October 24–December 19, 1917), Italian military disaster during World War I in which Italian troops retreated before an Austro-German offensive on the Isonzo front in northeastern Italy, where the Italian and Austrian forces had been stalemated for two and a half years. In the

  • isooctane (chemical compound)

    hydrocarbon: Chemical reactions: …material in the preparation of 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane), which is a component of high-octane gasoline.

  • Isoodon (marsupial)

    bandicoot: The three species of short-nosed bandicoots, Isoodon (incorrectly Thylacis), are found in New Guinea, Australia, and Tasmania. Rabbit-eared bandicoots, or bilbies, are species of Thylacomys (sometimes Macrotis); now endangered, they are found only in remote colonies in arid interior Australia. As the name implies, they have big narrow ears,…

  • isoparaffin

    petroleum refining: Saturated molecules: … figure) or branched chains (isoparaffins). Most of the paraffin compounds in naturally occurring crude oils are normal paraffins, while isoparaffins are frequently produced in refinery processes. The normal paraffins are uniquely poor as motor fuels, while isoparaffins have good engine-combustion characteristics. Longer-chain paraffins are major constituents of waxes.

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