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  • Istropolitana, Academia (university, Bratislava, Slovakia)

    Slovakia: Education: …the largest and oldest is Comenius University in Bratislava (founded 1919). Also in Bratislava are the Slovak University of Technology, the University of Economics, and several arts academies. Ko?ice also has universities and a school of veterinary medicine. Since independence, additional colleges and universities have opened in Trnava, Banská Bystrica,…

  • Istroromanian (dialect)

    Romanian language: …and southeastern North Macedonia; and Istroromanian, also nearly extinct, spoken in Istria, a peninsula that is part of Croatia and Slovenia. Mutual intelligibility between the major dialects is difficult; the Meglenoromanian, Istroromanian, and Aromanian are sometimes classed as languages distinct from Romanian proper, or Dacoromanian, which has many slightly varying…

  • Isturgi (Spain)

    Andújar, city, Jaén provincia (province), in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southern Spain, northwest of Jaén city, on the Guadalquivir River. Called Isturgi, or Ilurgia, by the Celto-Iberians, it was besieged and captured by the Roman general Scipio Africanus the Elder

  • István Báthory (king of Poland)

    Stephen Báthory, prince of Transylvania (1571–76) and king of Poland (1575–86) who successfully opposed the Habsburg candidate for the Polish throne, defended Poland’s eastern Baltic provinces against Russian incursion, and attempted to form a great state from Poland, Muscovy, and Transylvania. The

  • István, Count Tisza (prime minister of Hungary)

    István, Count Tisza, Hungarian statesman who became prime minister of Hungary as well as one of the most prominent defenders of the Austro-Hungarian dualist system of government. He was an opponent of voting franchise reform in Hungary, and he was a loyal supporter of the monarchy’s alliance with

  • István, Szent (king of Hungary)

    Stephen I, ; canonized 1083; feast day August 16), first king of Hungary, who is considered to be the founder of the Hungarian state and one of the most-renowned figures in Hungarian history. Stephen was a member of the árpád dynasty and son of the supreme Magyar chieftain Géza. He was born a pagan

  • ISU

    shooting: International competition and organization: …changed its name to the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF) in 1998.

  • ISU (ice skating organization)

    figure skating: Pioneers of the sport: The International Skating Union (ISU), founded in the Netherlands in 1892, was created to oversee skating internationally. It sanctions speed skating as well as figure skating and sponsors the world championships held annually since 1896. With more than 50 member nations, the ISU establishes rules about…

  • ISU (tank)

    tank: World War II: …128-mm-gun Jagdtiger and the 122-mm-gun ISU, which in effect were turretless tanks. In addition, all armies developed lightly armoured self-propelled antitank guns. The U.S. Army developed a specialized category of tank destroyers that resembled self-propelled guns in being relatively lightly armoured but that, like tanks, had rotating turrets.

  • ISU Grand Prix (ice skating competition)

    figure skating: Grand Prix and Junior Grand Prix: The Grand Prix consists of six events: Skate America, Skate Canada, Sparkassen Cup on Ice, Trophée Lalique, Cup of Russia, and NHK Trophy. Each event includes no more than 12 (singles events) or 10 (pairs events) entrants. Skaters who finished in the top six positions at…

  • ISU Junior Grand Prix (ice skating competition)

    figure skating: Grand Prix and Junior Grand Prix: The Junior Grand Prix series gives international competition experience to promising future world-level skaters. Skaters are invited to participate by their home countries, and they must be under 19 (singles skaters) or 21 (pairs and dance) years of age when they enter. There are a total…

  • Isua (Greenland)

    geologic history of Earth: Formation of the secondary atmosphere: 8 billion years ago) at Isua in West Greenland, and thus this process must have been operative by this time. Iron formations dating to early Precambrian time (4.6 billion to 541 million years ago) are so thick and common that they provide the major source of the world’s iron. Large…

  • Isum, John (English composer)

    John Isham, English composer and organist. Educated at Merton College, Oxford, he went to London and became an assistant to the organist and composer William Croft, whom he succeeded as organist of St. Anne’s, Soho (serving 1711–18). He accompanied Croft to Oxford and there acquired a bachelor of

  • Isurus (fish)

    Mako shark, (genus Isurus), either of two species of swift, active, potentially dangerous sharks of the mackerel shark family, Lamnidae. The shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) is found in all tropical and temperate seas, and the longfin mako (I. paucus) is scattered worldwide in tropical seas. Mako

  • Isurus oxyrinchus (shark)

    mako shark: The shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) is found in all tropical and temperate seas, and the longfin mako (I. paucus) is scattered worldwide in tropical seas.

  • Isurus paucus (fish)

    mako shark: …and temperate seas, and the longfin mako (I. paucus) is scattered worldwide in tropical seas.

  • Isvekov, Sergey Mikhailovich (Russian patriarch)

    Pimen, 14th Russian Orthodox patriarch of Moscow and of all Russia. He served as spiritual leader of his church during the final years of official Soviet repression and the subsequent period of religious renewal following the dissolution of the U.S.S.R. Pimen was tonsured a monk in 1927 and o

  • ISWA (Nigerian Islamic group)

    Boko Haram, (Hausa: “Westernization Is Sacrilege”) Islamic sectarian movement, founded in 2002 by Muhammed Yusuf in northeastern Nigeria, that since 2009 has carried out assassinations and large-scale acts of violence in that country. The group’s initial proclaimed intent was to uproot the

  • ISWAP (Nigerian Islamic group)

    Boko Haram, (Hausa: “Westernization Is Sacrilege”) Islamic sectarian movement, founded in 2002 by Muhammed Yusuf in northeastern Nigeria, that since 2009 has carried out assassinations and large-scale acts of violence in that country. The group’s initial proclaimed intent was to uproot the

  • It (poem by Christensen)

    Inger Christensen: …her long poem Det (1969; It) brought Christensen international acclaim. A 200-page exploration of the word it, the poem reveals the intellectual influence of thinkers such as Lars Gustafsson, S?ren Kierkegaard, Noam Chomsky, and R.D. Laing. The volume Alfabet (1981; Alphabet) builds on her earlier analogies between language and physical…

  • It (work by Glyn)

    Elinor Glyn: …filmed, including Three Weeks and It (1927), which had an American setting. The film version of It for some years made the word “it” a synonym for sex appeal. Unable to manage her finances in Hollywood, she returned to England in 1929. She completed her autobiography, Romantic Adventure, in 1936.

  • It (novel by King)

    Stephen King: …1983); Thinner (1984; film 1996); It (1986; TV miniseries 1990; film 2017 and 2019); Misery (1987; film 1990); The Tommyknockers (1987; TV miniseries 1993); The Dark Half (1989; film 1993); Needful Things (1991; film 1993

  • It (film by Muschietti [2017])

    Stephen King: …It (1986; TV miniseries 1990; film 2017 and 2019); Misery (1987; film 1990); The Tommyknockers (1987; TV miniseries 1993); The Dark Half (1989; film 1993); Needful Things (1991; film 1993); Dolores Claiborne (1993; film 1995

  • IT band syndrome (pathology)

    Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS), inflammation of the band of fibrous tissue known as the iliotibial band (or tract), which extends from the ilium of the hip to the tibia (shinbone). Typically, iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) results from overuse injury, seen most commonly in distance runners and

  • IT calorie (unit of measurement)

    calorie: …of heat energy, is the International Table calorie (IT calorie), originally defined as 1860 international watt-hour. It is equal to 4.1868 joules and is used in engineering steam tables.

  • It Came from Outer Space (film by Arnold [1953])

    Jack Arnold: …next film was the groundbreaking It Came from Outer Space (1953). Based on a Ray Bradbury story, the quietly creepy yarn about aliens who take over the identities of small-town Arizonans after their spaceship crashes is considered one of the seminal films in the science-fiction genre. It also boasted one…

  • It Can’t Happen Here (novel by Lewis)

    It Can’t Happen Here, novel by Sinclair Lewis, published in 1935. It is a cautionary tale about the rise of fascism in the United States. During the presidential election of 1936, Doremus Jessup, a newspaper editor, observes with dismay that many of the people he knows support the candidacy of a

  • It Catches My Heart in Its Hands (poetry by Bukowski)

    Charles Bukowski: …1963, the year he published It Catches My Heart in Its Hands—a collection of poetry about alcoholics, prostitutes, losing gamblers, and down-and-out people—Bukowski had a loyal following. Notable later poetry collections include Mockingbird Wish Me Luck (1972), Love Is a Dog from Hell (1977), War All the Time (1984), and…

  • It Changed My Life: Writings on the Women’s Movement (work by Friedan)

    Betty Friedan: In 1976 Friedan published It Changed My Life: Writings on the Women’s Movement and in 1981 The Second Stage, an assessment of the status of the women’s movement. The Fountain of Age (1993) addressed the psychology of old age and urged a revision of society’s view that aging means…

  • It Gets Better Project (social media project)

    Dan Savage: The video kicked off the It Gets Better Project, which compiled thousands of similar user-created support messages, including videos by U.S. Pres. Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Lady Gaga, Stephen Colbert, and Ellen DeGeneres.

  • It Goes Like It Goes (song by Shire and Gimbel)
  • It Had to Happen (film by Del Ruth [1936])

    Roy Del Ruth: Middle years: …the more serious political drama It Had to Happen (1936), although George Raft and Rosalind Russell made for an unlikely pairing. Private Number (1936) was a sodden soap opera, with Robert Taylor as the scion of a wealthy family; he secretly marries a housemaid (Loretta Young), to the displeasure of…

  • It Happened at the World’s Fair (film by Taurog [1963])

    Norman Taurog: Elvis movies: …featured “Return to Sender”; and It Happened at the World’s Fair (1963), with Presley performing at the Seattle World’s Fair. Although they were box-office successes, critics derided the films as formulaic and musically uninspired.

  • It Happened Here (film by Brownlow and Mollo [1965])

    It Happened Here, British war film, released in 1965, that was an outstanding achievement in independent filmmaking; the pseudodocumentary imagines what would have happened if Germany had defeated England during World War II. The movie is set in 1944–45, with Britain under Nazi control. Pauline

  • It Happened One Night (film by Capra [1934])

    Frank Capra: The golden period: Capra’s “golden period” began with It Happened One Night (1934), the first motion picture to win an Academy Award in five major categories: best picture, best actor, best actress, best director, and best adapted screenplay. The making of this enduring romantic comedy about a runaway heiress (Claudette Colbert) and the…

  • It Happened to Jane (film by Quine [1959])

    Richard Quine: …with Quine on the comedy It Happened to Jane, which also starred Doris Day.

  • It Happens Every Spring (film by Bacon [1949])

    Lloyd Bacon: Later years: It Happens Every Spring (1949) was a baseball comedy, arguably one of the best ever made; Ray Milland portrayed a chemistry professor who discovers a formula that makes bats repel baseballs, inspiring him to embark on a new career as a star pitcher.

  • It Hurts to Be in Love (song by Pitney)

    Gene Pitney: …Break a Heart” (1962), “It Hurts to Be in Love” (1964), and “I’m Gonna Be Strong” (1964). As his career waned in the United States, Pitney enjoyed continued popularity in Europe. An Italian-language country album sold well in 1966, and he appeared regularly on the British pop charts through…

  • It Is Never Too Late to Mend (novel by Reade)

    Charles Reade: It Is Never Too Late to Mend (1856) attacked conditions in prisons, and Hard Cash (1863) exposed the ill-treatment of mental patients, especially in private asylums; Put Yourself in His Place (1870) dealt with the coercive activities of trade unionists. Foul Play (1868), written with…

  • It Might as Well Be Spring (song by Rogers and Hammerstein)
  • It Should Happen to You (film by Cukor [1954])

    George Cukor: Films of the 1950s: It Should Happen to You (1954) starred Holliday in Kanin’s modern fairy tale about an ambitious model’s extraordinary efforts to get noticed in New York City.

  • It Started in Naples (film by Shavelson [1960])

    Clark Gable: Gone with the Wind, tragedy, and later films: … (1958), with Doris Day, and It Started in Naples (1960), with Sophia Loren.

  • It Started with Eve (film by Koster [1941])

    Henry Koster: Early work: It Started with Eve (1941) was the sixth and last of Koster’s films to star Durbin. It was arguably the actress’s finest movie.

  • It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (album by Public Enemy)

    Public Enemy: …Bum Rush the Show (1987), It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (1988), Fear of a Black Planet (1990), and Apocalypse 91: The Enemy Strikes Black (1991).

  • It Takes a Village: And Other Lessons Children Teach Us (work by Clinton)

    Hillary Clinton: First lady of the United States: Her first book, It Takes a Village: And Other Lessons Children Teach Us (1996), described her views on child rearing and prompted accolades from supporters and stark criticism from her opponents.

  • It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels (recording by Wells)

    Kitty Wells: …hit with the classic “It Wasn’t God Who Made Honky Tonk Angels” (1952), a rejoinder to Hank Thompson’s “Wild Side of Life”, which blamed a woman met in a bar for the breakup of a marriage. Her plaintive vocals and emotion-packed delivery were also featured in such honky-tonk ballads…

  • It’s a Battlefield (novel by Greene)

    English literature: The 1930s: community; and Graham Greene’s It’s a Battlefield (1934) and Brighton Rock (1938) are desolate studies, in the manner of Conrad, of the loneliness and guilt of men and women trapped in a contemporary England of conflict and decay. A Clergyman’s Daughter (1935) and Keep the Aspidistra Flying (1936), by…

  • It’s a Family Affair, We’ll Settle It Among Ourselves (work by Ostrovsky)

    Aleksandr Nikolayevich Ostrovsky: His next play, Bankrot (“The Bankrupt”), later renamed Svoi lyudi sochtemsya (It’s a Family Affair, We’ll Settle It Among Ourselves), written in 1850, provoked an outcry because it exposed bogus bankruptcy cases among Moscow merchants and brought about Ostrovsky’s dismissal from the civil service. The play was banned…

  • It’s a Gift (film by McLeod [1934])

    Norman Z. McLeod: Marx Brothers and W.C. Fields: McLeod rebounded with It’s a Gift (1934), which is considered one of Fields’s masterpieces. The comedian starred as a hapless grocer who decides to move his family to California, where he plans on growing oranges.

  • It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (film by Kramer [1963])

    It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World, American screwball comedy film, released in 1963, that featured an all-star cast of comedic actors directed by Stanley Kramer, who was known primarily for his dramas dealing with controversial topics. The dying words of a career thief (played by Jimmy Durante) to a

  • It’s a Wonderful Life (film by Capra [1946])

    It’s a Wonderful Life, American dramatic film, released in 1946, that is widely considered one of the most inspirational and beloved movies in American cinema. The film, which was produced and directed by Frank Capra, has become synonymous with Christmas, when it is frequently televised. The film

  • It’s a Wonderful World (film by Van Dyke [1939])

    W.S. Van Dyke: Powell and Loy, Eddy and MacDonald: It’s a Wonderful World (1939) was a screwball comedy inspired by Frank Capra’s It Happened One Night (1934); Stewart starred as a fugitive on the run, and Claudette Colbert was a runaway poet (rather than a runaway heiress, as in Capra’s film). Although predictable, the…

  • It’s About Time (album by the Jonas Brothers)

    Jonas Brothers: Their first album, It’s About Time (2006), featured songs cowritten by Desmond Child and pop star Adam Schlesinger of the band Fountains of Wayne. Although it was given only a limited marketing push, the album sold 62,000 copies; still, the label dropped the band.

  • It’s All in the Game (song by Dawes and Sigman)

    Charles G. Dawes: …became the pop standard “It’s All in the Game” (1951).

  • It’s All Over Now (song)

    Bobby Womack: …a Love” (1962) and “It’s All Over Now” (1964). The latter song, cowritten by Bobby, gained further exposure through a contemporaneous cover version by the Rolling Stones.

  • It’s All Right: Chicago Soul

    Berry Gordy, Jr., and his Motown Records, based in Detroit, Michigan, overshadowed the Windy City during the 1960s. But several black music producers—including Roquel (“Billy”) Davis and Carl Davis (who were not related), Johnny Pate (who also was an arranger), and Curtis Mayfield—developed a

  • It’s Always Fair Weather (film by Donen and Kelly [1955])

    Stanley Donen: Films of the 1950s: …Kidd, and Dan Dailey in It’s Always Fair Weather (1955), a somewhat downbeat Comden-Green story about three army veterans whose 10-year reunion illustrates that they no longer can be friends. Donen’s next film, Funny Face (1957), was among his best. Originally developed at MGM by Arthur Freed but directed by…

  • It’s Blitz! (album by the Yeah Yeah Yeahs)

    TV on the Radio: …in that band’s 2009 album It’s Blitz!, which featured Adebimpe as a guest artist and Sitek as coproducer. Sitek also produced Scarlett Johansson’s Anywhere I Lay My Head (2008), which featured the actress’s interpretation of Tom Waits songs. Malone released a solo album titled Rain Machine in 2009, and the…

  • It’s Complicated (film by Meyers [2009])

    Alec Baldwin: 30 Rock, SNL, and later films: …included Scorsese’s The Departed (2006); It’s Complicated (2009), a comedy in which he starred as a man having an affair with his ex-wife (played by Meryl Streep); and Woody Allen’s To Rome with Love (2012) and Blue Jasmine (2013). In Still Alice (2014) he portrayed the husband of a woman…

  • It’s Garry Shandling’s Show (American television series)

    Garry Shandling: …star of the television series It’s Garry Shandling’s Show (1986–90) and The Larry Sanders Show (1992–98).

  • It’s Gonna Rain (work by Reich)

    Steve Reich: …with tape loops, documented in It’s Gonna Rain (1965) and Come Out (1966), allowed Reich to observe interlocking rhythmic patterns that he would later reproduce compositionally; some of his works even combined both live and taped performers. Reich drew additional inspiration from American vernacular music, especially jazz, as well as…

  • It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp (song by Houston, Coleman, and Beauregard)
  • It’s Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (film by Linklater [1988])

    Richard Linklater: First films: Dazed and Confused and Before Sunrise: …of his first feature film, It’s Impossible to Learn to Plow by Reading Books (1988). His second film, Slacker (1991), is a narrative-free piece that meanders across mostly unconnected vignettes featuring Austin bohemians over the course of a single day. It was a film-festival hit and helped launch the American…

  • It’s Love I’m After (film by Mayo [1937])

    Archie Mayo: Films of the 1930s: Mayo’s success continued with It’s Love I’m After (1937), a first-rate screwball romance starring Davis, Howard, and Olivia de Havilland. Mayo demonstrated a lightness of touch that had been absent from most of his work to date. The comedy, however, proved to be his final work for Warners.

  • It’s My Way! (album by Sainte-Marie)

    Buffy Sainte-Marie: Early life and breakthrough: …release of her first album, It’s My Way! (1964). The recording contained a number of songs that became stylistic benchmarks in the development of her musical corpus. “Now That the Buffalo’s Gone” addressed Native American land rights and intercultural relationships. The song featured Sainte-Marie’s distinctive tremolo vocal technique, which is…

  • It’s Not for Me to Say (song by Allen and Stillman)

    Johnny Mathis: The dreamily romantic tunes “It’s Not for Me to Say” (1957) and “Chances Are” (1957) further highlighted his smooth and precisely controlled tenor. Mathis found additional success with the albums Johnny’s Greatest Hits (1958)—believed to be the first-ever compilation of an artist’s previously released hit singles—and the holiday-themed Merry…

  • It’s Not Unusual (recording by Jones)

    Tom Jones: …his big breakthrough with “It’s Not Unusual,” which became a major hit in the U.K. and in the United States. More hits followed, including “Once upon a Time” and “With These Hands,” as well as the theme songs “What’s New Pussycat?” for the Woody Allen movie (1965) of the…

  • It’s Only Money (film by Tashlin [1962])

    Frank Tashlin: Films of the 1960s: It’s Only Money (1962), which featured Lewis as a TV repairman who aspires to be a private detective, is less sentimental than the standard Lewis vehicle. Lewis also starred in Who’s Minding the Store? (1963), this time as an inept department-store clerk with a crush…

  • It’s Time (album by Bublé [2005])

    Michael Bublé: Bublé’s breakthrough album, It’s Time (2005), was named both album and pop album of the year at the 2006 Juno Awards. Alongside standards by George and Ira Gershwin and Cole Porter and pop tunes from the 1950s and ’60s, it included a single cowritten by Bublé, “Home,” which…

  • It’s Too Late (song by King)

    Carole King: …a Friend”), best single (“It’s Too Late”), and best female vocal performance. Other noteworthy numbers on the album included “I Feel the Earth Move” and “So Far Away.”

  • ITA (British government agency)

    British Broadcasting Corporation: …commercial channel operated by the Independent Television Authority (later the Office of Communications [Ofcom]) in 1955. A second commercial channel commenced broadcasting in 1982. The BBC’s radio monopoly ended with the government’s decision to permit, starting in the early 1970s, local commercial broadcasts.

  • ITA

    Initial Teaching Alphabet, alphabet of 44 characters designed by Sir James Pitman to help children learn to read English more effectively. The Initial Teaching Alphabet is based on the phonemic (sound) system of English and uses the Roman alphabet, augmented by 14 additional characters, to

  • ITA (international trade)

    tariff: Tariff reduction and the growth of international trade: In 1997 the WTO’s Information Technology Agreement (ITA) and Basic Telecommunications Agreement (BTA) reduced the tariffs on computer and telecommunications products and some intangible goods considered to be drivers of the developing knowledge-based economy. The rapid growth of the Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) represented

  • Itá (town, Paraguay)

    Itá, town, southern Paraguay. It was founded in 1539 as one of the original fort settlements of Paraguay and later became a centre of Jesuit missionary activity. Located on the southern flank of the Cordillera de los Altos (a highland that projects westward to Asunción) and on a headstream of the

  • Itabuna (Brazil)

    Itabuna, city, southeastern Bahia estado (state), northeastern Brazil. It lies just west of Ilhéus on the Cachoeira River at 174 feet (53 metres) above sea level. Itabuna, which was elevated to city status in 1910, is the trade centre for a rich zone yielding cacao, livestock, and other

  • itacism (linguistics)

    biblical literature: Types of manuscript errors: …swallowed up in victory”—becomes by itacism (pronunciation of the Greek letter ē) “Death is swallowed up in conflict” (neikos). Another problem of itacism is the distinction between declensions of the 1st and 2nd persons in the plural (“we” and “you”) in Greek, which can sound the same (hemeis, “we”; humeis,…

  • Itacoatiara (Brazil)

    Itacoatiara, city and river port, northeastern Amazonas estado (state), northwestern Brazil. Formerly known as Serpa, the settlement lies on the left (north) bank of the Amazon River, downstream from its junction with the Madeira River and approximately 110 miles (180 km) east of Manaus, the state

  • Itagaki Taisuke, Hakushaku (Japanese politician)

    Hakushaku Itagaki Taisuke, founder of Japan’s first political party, the Liberal Party, or Jiyūtō. Born into a middle-ranking samurai family, Itagaki entered the service of his feudal lord in 1860 and emerged from subsequent factional struggles to become the military commander in Tosa, the large

  • Itagüí (Colombia)

    Itagüí, city, Antioquia departamento, northern Colombia. It lies along the Porce River between the Andean Cordilleras (mountains) Occidental and Central, at 5,148 feet (1,569 m) above sea level. Formerly a resort and a local commercial and manufacturing centre, Itagüí has become part of the

  • Itaipú Binacional (Paraguayan company)

    Paraguay: Economy: …several state companies, most notably Itaipú Binacional, set up in 1973 to build a huge hydroelectric dam on the Paraná, and steel, cement, and alcohol-distillation plants. Impressive economic growth, particularly in the 1970s, was not matched by government efforts to distribute its benefits equitably. Most Paraguayans, especially in rural areas,…

  • Itaipú Dam (dam, Brazil-Paraguay)

    Itaipú Dam, hollow gravity dam on the Alto (Upper) Paraná River at the Brazil-Paraguay border. It is located north of the town of Ciudad del Este, Paraguay. In terms of power output, Itaipú Dam is one of the world’s largest hydroelectric projects. Its 20 massive turbine generators, located in the

  • Itaipú, Treaty of (Brazil-Paraguay [1973])

    Paraguay: Energy: …the terms of the 1973 Treaty of Itaipú, believing that Brazil was not paying enough for the energy it was using. Under the treaty it had been agreed that Paraguay would own one-half of the electricity generated but that it would sell its excess power exclusively to Brazil at predetermined…

  • Itajaí (Brazil)

    Itajaí, city, eastern Santa Catarina estado (state), southern Brazil. It lies at the mouth of the Itajaí River, at 20 feet (6 metres) above sea level. Founded in the mid-19th century by German and Italian colonists, Itajaí is now the commercial centre and Atlantic port for an agricultural region

  • Italia

    Italy, country of south-central Europe, occupying a peninsula that juts deep into the Mediterranean Sea. Italy comprises some of the most varied and scenic landscapes on Earth and is often described as a country shaped like a boot. At its broad top stand the Alps, which are among the world’s most

  • Italia (ancient Roman territory, Italy)

    Italy, in Roman antiquity, the Italian Peninsula from the Apennines in the north to the “boot” in the south. In 42 bc Cisalpine Gaul, north of the Apennines, was added; and in the late 3rd century ad Italy came to include the islands of Sicily, Corsica, and Sardinia, as well as Raetia and part of P

  • Italia illustrata (work by Biondo)

    Flavio Biondo: …two greatest works were the Italia illustrata (written between 1448 and 1458, first published in 1474) and the Historiarum ab inclinatione Romanorum imperii decades (written from 1439 to 1453, first published in 1483; “Decades of History from the Deterioration of the Roman Empire”). The Italia illustrata, based on the author’s…

  • Italia militare, L’? (Italian army journal)

    Edmondo De Amicis: …life for the army journal L’Italia militare and became its editor in 1867; his stories were collected in La vita militare (1868; Military Life in Italy, 1882), followed by Novelle (1872; “Short Stories”), which some critics have thought his best work. He also wrote poetry (collected in Poesie, 1880), novels,…

  • Italian (people)

    Italy: Ethnic groups: Italians cannot be typified by any one physical characteristic, a fact that may be explained by the past domination of parts of the peninsula by different peoples. The Etruscans in Tuscany and Umbria and the Greeks in the south preceded the Romans, who “Latinized” the…

  • Italian Ars Nova (music history)

    Ars Nova: …which is also known as Italian trecento music. The most important theorist of this school was Marchettus of Padua, whose treatise Pomerium (in the early 14th century) outlines certain rhythmic innovations in Italian notation of the time. The most important composers of 14th-century Italy are Jacopo da Bologna, Francesco Landini,…

  • Italian bread

    baking: White bread: …on this simple mixture include Italian-style bread and French or Vienna breads. Such breads have a hard crust, are relatively light in colour, with a coarse and tough crumb, and flavour that is excellent in the fresh bread but deteriorates in a few hours. In the United States, commercially produced…

  • Italian Campaign (World War II)

    World War II: The Allies’ invasion of Italy and the Italian volte-face, 1943: From Sicily, the Allies had a wide choice of directions for their next offensive. Calabria, the “toe” of Italy, was the nearest and most obvious possible destination, and the “shin” was also vulnerable; and the “heel” was also very attractive. The two…

  • Italian Civil Code (Italy [1865])

    Napoleonic Code: Dissemination of the Napoleonic Code and its influence: The Italian Civil Code of 1865, enacted after the unification of Italy, had a close but indirect relationship with the Napoleonic Code. The new Italian code of 1942 departed to a large extent from that tradition. In the early 19th century, the code was introduced into…

  • Italian Comedians (painting by Watteau)

    Antoine Watteau: Period of his major works.: …subject very dear to him, “Italian Comedians.”

  • Italian Communist Party (political party, Italy)

    Democrats of the Left, former Italian political party and historically western Europe’s largest communist party. The party was originally founded in January 1921 as the Italian Communist Party (Partito Comunista Italiano; PCI) by dissidents of the extreme left wing of the Italian Socialist Party

  • Italian Confederation of Free Workers (Italian labour union)

    Italian Confederation of Workers’ Unions, Italy’s second largest trade union federation. The CISL was formed in 1950 by the merger of the Free General Italian Confederation of Labour (Libera Confederazione Generale Italiana dei Lavoratori) and the Italian Federation of Labour (Federazione Italiana

  • Italian Confederation of Syndicated Labourers (Italian labour union)

    Italian Confederation of Workers’ Unions, Italy’s second largest trade union federation. The CISL was formed in 1950 by the merger of the Free General Italian Confederation of Labour (Libera Confederazione Generale Italiana dei Lavoratori) and the Italian Federation of Labour (Federazione Italiana

  • Italian Confederation of Workers’ Trade Unions (Italian labour union)

    Italian Confederation of Workers’ Unions, Italy’s second largest trade union federation. The CISL was formed in 1950 by the merger of the Free General Italian Confederation of Labour (Libera Confederazione Generale Italiana dei Lavoratori) and the Italian Federation of Labour (Federazione Italiana

  • Italian Confederation of Workers’ Unions (Italian labour union)

    Italian Confederation of Workers’ Unions, Italy’s second largest trade union federation. The CISL was formed in 1950 by the merger of the Free General Italian Confederation of Labour (Libera Confederazione Generale Italiana dei Lavoratori) and the Italian Federation of Labour (Federazione Italiana

  • Italian cooking

    cooking: Cuisines driven by class, climate, and politics: …how political fragmentation can affect cuisine. Blessed by a favourable climate, the region produces a full range of grains, fruits and vegetables, which is ideal for culinary diversity. That diversity persisted in the absence of political unity, which otherwise may have favoured one regional style over another. Until Italy was…

  • Italian corn salad (plant)

    lamb's lettuce: Italian corn salad, Valerianella eriocarpa, thrives in warmer areas. Both plants are hardier than regular lettuce.

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