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  • kanōn (Eastern Orthodoxy)

    Kanōn, (Greek: “canon”) one of the main forms of Byzantine liturgical office; it consists of nine odes, based on the nine biblical canticles of the Eastern Christian Church. (Compare canonical hours.) The kanōn is thought to have originated in Jerusalem in the 7th or 8th century to replace the

  • Kanon der Erdbestrahlung und seine Anwendung auf das Eiszeitenproblem (work by Milankovitch)

    Milutin Milankovitch: …Anwendung auf das Eiszeitenproblem (1941; Canon of Insolation and the Ice-Age Problem).

  • Kanonagirk’? (collection by John IV of Odzun)

    John IV of Odzun: …credited to John is the Kanonagirk’ (“Corpus of Canon Law”), the first collection of church legislation in the Armenian Church.

  • Kanonenk?nig, Der (German industrialist)

    Alfred Krupp, German industrialist noted for his development and worldwide sale of cast-steel cannon and other armaments. Under his direction the Krupp Works began the manufacture of ordnance (c. 1847). His father, Friedrich Krupp, who had founded the dynasty’s firm in 1811, died in 1826, leaving

  • Kanooru Heggadithi (film by Karnad [1999])

    Girish Karnad: …film, directing such movies as Kanooru Heggadithi (1999) and acting in Iqbal (2005), Life Goes On (2009), and 24 (2016), among others.

  • Kanopos (ancient city, Egypt)

    Canopus, ancient Egyptian city on the western coast of the Nile River delta, in Al-Iskandariyyah mu?āfa?ah (governorate). The Canopic branch of the Nile is entirely silted up, but on the shore about 2 miles (3 km) from Abū Qīr there are extensive remains, including the temple of the Greco-Egyptian

  • Kanovitz, Howard Earl (American painter and sculptor)

    Howard Earl Kanovitz, American painter and sculptor (born Feb. 9, 1929, Fall River, Mass.—died Feb. 2, 2009, New York, N.Y.), abandoned the Abstract Expressionism that was favoured by his mentor, Franz Kline, and in the early 1960s helped to usher in Photo-realism, a style in which he used his own

  • Kanoya (Japan)

    Kanoya, city, southeastern Kagoshima ken (prefecture), southern Kyushu, Japan. It is situated in the central part of the ōsumi Peninsula, with the western part of the city facing Kagoshima Bay. The built-up area of the city lies mainly in a low-lying river valley that rises to mountainous terrain

  • Kanphata Yogi (Hindu ascetic)

    Kanphata Yogi, member of an order of religious ascetics in India that venerates the Hindu deity Shiva. Kanphata Yogis are distinguished by the large earrings they wear in the hollows of their ears (kanphata, “ear split”). They are sometimes referred to as Tantric (esoteric) sannyasis (ascetics),

  • Kanpur (India)

    Kanpur, city, southwest-central Uttar Pradesh state, northern India. It lies in the Lower Ganges-Yamuna Doab on the Ganges (Ganga) River, about 45 miles (72 km) southwest of Lucknow Kanpur was only a village when it and the surrounding territory were acquired in 1801 by the British, who made it one

  • kanrei (Japanese official)

    Japan: Muromachi government structure: …appointment of Hosokawa Yoriyuki as kanrei, this post became the most important in the bakufu government. The official business of the Mandokoro was to control the finances of the bakufu; and later the Ise family, who were hereditary retainers of the Ashikaga, came to inherit this office. The Samurai-dokoro, besides…

  • Kanrin Maru (ship)

    Count Katsu Kaishū: …was appointed to command the Kanrin Maru, the first Japanese ship to sail to the West (1860). The voyage took him to the United States, and after his return to Japan he worked to modernize the Japanese navy and develop the country’s coastal defenses. He also became the leader of…

  • Kansa (people)

    Kansa, North American Indians of Siouan linguistic stock who lived along the Kansas and Saline rivers in what is now central Kansas. It is thought that the Kansa had migrated to this location from an earlier prehistoric territory on the Atlantic coast. They are related to the Omaha, Osage, Quapaw,

  • Kansai (region, Japan)

    ōsaka-Kōbe metropolitan area: …the two corresponds to the Kansai, one of Japan’s traditional cultural areas. The Kansai, a region of ancient cities to the west (sai) of the mountain barrier (kan) near Mount Fuji, is the birthplace of the earliest Japanese state. It is an area of historically dense population that until well…

  • Kansai International Airport (airport, ōsaka, Japan)

    ōsaka: Kansai International Airport opened in 1994 to handle the city’s growing international air traffic. This airport is built on a man-made island in ōsaka Bay and is connected to the mainland by a highway bridge.

  • Kansan Glacial Stage (geology)

    Kansan Glacial Stage, major division of Pleistocene deposits and time in North America (the Pleistocene Epoch began about 2.6 million years ago and ended about 11,700 years ago). The Kansan glaciation followed the Aftonian Interglacial Stage and preceded the Yarmouth Interglacial Stage, both

  • Kansas (state, United States)

    Kansas, constituent state of the United States of America. It is bounded by Nebraska to the north, Missouri to the east, Oklahoma to the south, and Colorado to the west. Lying amid the westward-rising landscape of the Great Plains of the North American continent, Kansas became the 34th state on

  • Kansas City (city, Kansas, United States)

    Kansas City, city, seat (1866) of Wyandotte county, northeastern Kansas, U.S. It lies at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri rivers and is contiguous with Kansas City, Missouri. When the Lewis and Clark expedition arrived at the river junction in 1806, it was the site of several Osage and

  • Kansas City (film by Altman [1996])

    Robert Altman: 1980s and ’90s: …the 1930s in Altman’s birthplace, Kansas City (1996) features Harry Belafonte as crime lord and Dermot Mulroney as a cocky young gangster. Some critics found its story to be neither memorable nor original but were more complimentary of its depiction of Kansas City’s rich jazz heritage. Like so many of…

  • Kansas City (city, Missouri, United States)

    Kansas City, city, Clay, Jackson, and Platte counties, western Missouri, U.S. Located on the Missouri River at the confluence with the Kansas River, the city is contiguous with Kansas City, Kansas, forming part of a large urban complex that also includes Leavenworth, Olathe, Overland Park, Prairie

  • Kansas City Athletics (American baseball team)

    Oakland Athletics, American professional baseball team based in Oakland, California, that plays in the American League (AL). The Athletics—who are often simply referred to as the “A’s”—have won nine World Series championships and 15 AL pennants. Founded in 1901 and based in Philadelphia, the A’s

  • Kansas City Chiefs (American football team)

    Kansas City Chiefs, American professional gridiron football team that is based in Kansas City, Missouri, and plays in the American Football Conference (AFC) of the National Football League (NFL). As a member of the now-defunct American Football League (AFL), the franchise won three league

  • Kansas City Confidential (film by Karlson [1952])

    Phil Karlson: Film noirs: Kansas City Confidential (1952) was another effective noir, with John Payne well cast as an ex-convict seeking retribution after nearly being framed for an armed robbery. The film was known particularly for its brutality, and it later developed a cult following. Payne also starred in…

  • Kansas City Evening Star, The (American newspaper)

    The Kansas City Star, daily newspaper published in Kansas City, Mo., the leading paper of the region and one of the great newspapers of the United States. It was established in 1880 by William Rockhill Nelson and a partner, who soon retired. From its earliest days the Star conducted campaigns

  • Kansas City Group (rocks, United States)

    Kansas City Group, division of Late Carboniferous rocks (318 million to 299 million years ago) in the United States. The division was named for exposures studied in the region of Kansas City, Mo. Rocks of the Kansas City Group underlie those of the Lansing Group and overlie those of the Pleasanton

  • Kansas City International Airport (airport, Kansas City, Missouri, United States)

    airport: Open apron and linear designs: …the linear design occur at Kansas City International Airport in Missouri, U.S., Munich Airport in Germany, and Charles de Gaulle Airport near Paris.

  • Kansas City Monarchs (American baseball team)

    Ernie Banks: …Bell signed him to the Kansas City Monarchs. Soon after, Banks spent two years in the U.S. Army, after which he returned to the Monarchs. His stay there was short-lived, however, as the major leagues, recently integrated, were eager to take advantage of the wealth of talent in the Negro…

  • Kansas City Royals (American baseball team)

    Kansas City Royals, American professional baseball team based in Kansas City, Missouri. The Royals have won four American League (AL) pennants and two World Series championships (1985 and 2015). The Royals were founded in 1969 as an expansion franchise that was granted by Major League Baseball

  • Kansas City Scouts (American hockey team)

    New Jersey Devils, American professional ice hockey team based in Newark, New Jersey. The Devils play in the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Hockey League (NHL). The franchise found little success until the 1990s, when it established itself as one of the NHL’s most

  • Kansas City Star, The (American newspaper)

    The Kansas City Star, daily newspaper published in Kansas City, Mo., the leading paper of the region and one of the great newspapers of the United States. It was established in 1880 by William Rockhill Nelson and a partner, who soon retired. From its earliest days the Star conducted campaigns

  • Kansas City style (music)

    Kansas City style, music associated with jazz musicians who, though not all born there, were based around Kansas City, Mo., during the 1930s: pianists Pete Johnson and Mary Lou Williams; singer Big Joe Turner; trumpeter Oran “Hot Lips” Page; saxophonists Buster Smith, Ben Webster, and Lester

  • Kansas City, University of (university, Kansas City, Missouri, United States)

    University of Missouri: …1933 as the privately owned University of Kansas City; it joined the system in 1963, the same year that the St. Louis campus was founded. Notable alumni of the University of Missouri include surgeon William Worrall Mayo and retail magnate Samuel Walton.

  • Kansas College of Technology (university, Kansas, United States)

    Kansas State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning consisting of two campuses. The main campus is a land-grant institution located in Manhattan, Kan., U.S., offering a full range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs. It comprises the Division of Biology, the

  • Kansas Flyer, The (American athlete)

    Glenn Cunningham, American middle-distance runner who repeatedly broke world and national records for the mile in the 1930s. At the age of 7, Cunningham and his older brother Floyd were badly burned in a schoolhouse fire; Floyd died and Glenn was not expected to be able to walk. Cunningham overcame

  • Kansas Flyer, The (American athlete)

    Glenn Cunningham, American middle-distance runner who repeatedly broke world and national records for the mile in the 1930s. At the age of 7, Cunningham and his older brother Floyd were badly burned in a schoolhouse fire; Floyd died and Glenn was not expected to be able to walk. Cunningham overcame

  • Kansas Ironman, The (American athlete)

    Glenn Cunningham, American middle-distance runner who repeatedly broke world and national records for the mile in the 1930s. At the age of 7, Cunningham and his older brother Floyd were badly burned in a schoolhouse fire; Floyd died and Glenn was not expected to be able to walk. Cunningham overcame

  • Kansas River (river, United States)

    Kansas River, stream in northeastern Kansas, U.S. It is formed by the confluence of the Republican and Smoky Hill rivers at Junction City and is joined by the Big Blue River near Manhattan. Flowing east into the Missouri River at Kansas City for a distance of about 170 miles (275 km), the Kansas

  • Kansas State Agricultural College (university, Kansas, United States)

    Kansas State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning consisting of two campuses. The main campus is a land-grant institution located in Manhattan, Kan., U.S., offering a full range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs. It comprises the Division of Biology, the

  • Kansas State College of Pittsburg (university, Pittsburg, Kansas, United States)

    Pittsburg State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Pittsburg, Kan., U.S. It comprises the College of Arts and Sciences, Gladys A. Kelce School of Business, the School of Education, and the School of Technology and Applied Science. In addition to undergraduate

  • Kansas State Normal School (university, Emporia, Kansas, United States)

    Emporia State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Emporia, Kansas, U.S. It consists of the schools of Business and of Library and Information Management, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Teachers College. In addition to undergraduate studies, the

  • Kansas State Teachers College (university, Emporia, Kansas, United States)

    Emporia State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Emporia, Kansas, U.S. It consists of the schools of Business and of Library and Information Management, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Teachers College. In addition to undergraduate studies, the

  • Kansas State Teachers College of Hays (university, Kansas, United States)

    Fort Hays State University, public coeducational institution of higher learning in Hays, Kansas, U.S. It is part of the Kansas Regents System. The university consists of the colleges of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences; Business and Entrepreneurship; Education; and Health and Behavioral

  • Kansas State Teachers College of Pittsburg (university, Pittsburg, Kansas, United States)

    Pittsburg State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning in Pittsburg, Kan., U.S. It comprises the College of Arts and Sciences, Gladys A. Kelce School of Business, the School of Education, and the School of Technology and Applied Science. In addition to undergraduate

  • Kansas State University (university, Kansas, United States)

    Kansas State University, public, coeducational institution of higher learning consisting of two campuses. The main campus is a land-grant institution located in Manhattan, Kan., U.S., offering a full range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs. It comprises the Division of Biology, the

  • Kansas Territory (historical territory, United States)

    popular sovereignty: …followed for control of the Kansas Territory (see Bleeding Kansas) illustrated the failure of popular sovereignty as a possible ground for agreement between proslavery and antislavery factions in the country. See also Dred Scott decision.

  • Kansas, flag of (United States state flag)

    U.S. state flag consisting of a dark blue field (background) with a sunflower emblem and the state seal above the name of the state in golden yellow lettering.In the flag history of Kansas an unusual distinction was made between the so-called “state banner” and the “state flag.” A state banner was

  • Kansas, University of (university, Lawrence, Kansas, United States)

    University of Kansas, public, coeducational institution of higher learning with a main campus in Lawrence, Kan., U.S. Its Medical Center campus is in Kansas City, and there is also a medical campus in Wichita. The university includes the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and 12 schools offering

  • Kansas-Nebraska Act (United States [1854])

    Kansas-Nebraska Act, in the antebellum period of U.S. history, critical national policy change concerning the expansion of slavery into the territories, affirming the concept of popular sovereignty over congressional edict. In 1820 the Missouri Compromise had excluded slavery from that part of the

  • Kansei Code (law code, Japan)

    Tokugawa Yoshimune: The resulting Kansei Code, not completed until after Yoshimune’s death, laid the basis for a more humane law than had previously been in existence. He retired in 1745 in favour of his son, although he acted as a guardian of shogunal power until his death.

  • Kansei reforms (Japanese government reforms)

    Kansei reforms, series of conservative measures promoted (largely during the Kansei era [1789–1801]) by the Japanese statesman Matsudaira Sadanobu between 1787 and 1793 to restore the sinking financial and moral condition of the Tokugawa government. Commerce, especially with the West, was

  • kanshitsu (Japanese art)

    Kanshitsu, (Japanese: “dry lacquer”), technique of Japanese sculpture and decorative arts in which a figure or vessel is fashioned with many layers of hemp cloth soaked with lacquer, the surface details being subsequently modelled with a mixture of lacquer, sawdust, powdered clay stone, and other

  • Kansk (Russia)

    Kansk, city, Krasnoyarsk kray (territory), central Russia, on the Kan River where it is crossed by the Trans-Siberian Railroad. Founded in 1640 as a Russian fort, it is a centre of the Kansk-Achinsk lignite basin, which in the early 1980s was being developed into one of the largest coal areas of

  • Kansu (province, China)

    Gansu, sheng (province), north-central and northwestern China. It is bordered by Mongolia to the north, the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region to the northeast, the Hui Autonomous Region of Ningxia and the province of Shaanxi to the east, the provinces of Sichuan and Qinghai to the south and

  • Kant und die Epigonen (work by Liebmann)

    Kantianism: Nineteenth-century Neo-Kantianism: …the young epistemologist Otto Liebmann, Kant und die Epigonen (“Kant and his Followers”), which was destined to extricate their spirits from the positivistic morass and, at the same time, to divert the Germans from Romantic idealism.

  • Kant’s Theory of Experience (work by Cohen)

    Kantianism: Epistemological Neo-Kantianism: …Theorie der Erfahrung (1871; “Kant’s Theory of Experience”), argued that the transcendental subject is not to be regarded as a psychic being but as a logical function of thought that constructs both the form and the content of knowledge. Nothing is gegeben (“given”), he urged; all is aufgegeben (“propounded,”…

  • Kant, Immanuel (German philosopher)

    Immanuel Kant, German philosopher whose comprehensive and systematic work in epistemology (the theory of knowledge), ethics, and aesthetics greatly influenced all subsequent philosophy, especially the various schools of Kantianism and idealism. Kant was one of the foremost thinkers of the

  • Kant, Krishan (vice president of India)

    Krishan Kant, Indian politician (born Feb. 28, 1927, Kot Mohammad Khan, Punjab, India—died July 27, 2002, New Delhi, India), devoted his entire life to Indian freedom, social welfare, and civil liberties and rose to become vice president in 1997. Kant, who came from a family of devout followers o

  • Kant-Laplace nebular hypothesis (astronomy)

    astronomy: Laplace: …what is now called Laplace’s nebular hypothesis, a theory of the origin of the solar system. Laplace imagined that the planets had condensed from the primitive solar atmosphere, which originally extended far beyond the limits of the present-day system. As this cloud gradually contracted under the effects of gravity, it…

  • Kanta, Muhammadu (ruler of Kebbi kingdom)

    Birnin Kebbi: …was captured about 1516 by Muhammadu Kanta, founder of the Kebbi kingdom; subsequently, it was incorporated into Kebbi, one of the banza bakwai (the seven illegitimate Hausa states), which extended over what is now northwestern Nigeria and southwestern Niger. Internal dissension led Tomo, the king of Kebbi, to move his…

  • Kantara Bridge, el- (bridge, Constantine, Algeria)

    Constantine: …of the city by the el-Kantara Bridge, a modern 420-foot (130-metre) structure built on the site of earlier bridges. North and south of the city are, respectively, a suspension bridge and a viaduct.

  • Kanté, Mory (African singer)

    African popular music: …of the previous decade, notably Mory Kanté and Salif Keita (both from the Rail Band) and Youssou N’Dour (from the Star Band de Dakar). Keita and guitarist Kanté Manfila left the Rail Band together and made several albums with Les Ambassadeurs Internationaux (including one recorded in the United States) before…

  • Kantemir, Antiokh Dmitriyevich (Russian poet)

    Antiokh Dmitriyevich Kantemir, distinguished Russian statesman who was his country’s first secular poet and one of its leading writers of the classical school. The son of Dmitry Kantemir, he was tutored at home and attended (1724–25) the St. Petersburg Academy. Between 1729 and 1731 he wrote

  • Kantemir, Dmitry (Russian statesman)

    Dmitry Kantemir, statesman, scientist, humanist, scholar, and the greatest member of the distinguished Romanian-Russian family of Cantemir. He was prince of Moldavia (1710–11) and later adviser of Peter the Great of Russia. The son of Prince Constantin Cantemir of Moldavia, Kantemir early won the

  • Kantemir, Dmitry Konstantinovich (Russian statesman)

    Dmitry Kantemir, statesman, scientist, humanist, scholar, and the greatest member of the distinguished Romanian-Russian family of Cantemir. He was prince of Moldavia (1710–11) and later adviser of Peter the Great of Russia. The son of Prince Constantin Cantemir of Moldavia, Kantemir early won the

  • Kanter, Rosabeth Moss (American social scientist)

    Rosabeth Moss Kanter, American social scientist and writer whose interests centred on the dynamics of corporate culture, management approaches, and corporate change. Kanter graduated from Bryn Mawr College with honours (1964), after which she studied sociology at the University of Michigan (M.A.,

  • Kanthapura (work by Rao)

    Raja Rao: …those stories, his first novel, Kanthapura (1938), is in a largely realist vein. It describes a village and its residents in southern India. Through its narrator, one of the village’s older women, the novel explores the effects of India’s independence movement. Kanthapura is Rao’s best-known novel, particularly outside India.

  • kantharos (cup)

    Kantharos, drinking cup in Attic Greek pottery from the period of the red-figure and black-figure styles. The kantharos is in the form of a deep cup, with loop-shaped handles arising from the bottom of the body and extending high above the

  • Kanti Rita (novel by Oculi)

    Okello Oculi: His later novels included Kanta Riti (1973) and Kookolem (1978). Malak: An African Political Poem was published in 1976. Oculi’s nonfiction works included Nigerian Alternatives (1987) and Discourses on African Affairs: Directions and Destinies for the 21st Century (1997).

  • Kantian peace (political science)

    Democratic peace, the proposition that democratic states never (or almost never) wage war on one another. The concept of democratic peace must be distinguished from the claim that democracies are in general more peaceful than nondemocratic countries. Whereas the latter claim is controversial, the

  • Kantianism (philosophy)

    Kantianism, either the system of thought contained in the writings of the epoch-making 18th-century philosopher Immanuel Kant or those later philosophies that arose from the study of Kant’s writings and drew their inspiration from his principles. Only the latter is the concern of this article. The

  • Kantipur (national capital, Nepal)

    Kathmandu, capital of Nepal. It lies in a hilly region near the confluence of the Baghmati and Vishnumati rivers, at an elevation of 4,344 feet (1,324 metres) above sea level. It was founded in 723 by Raja Gunakamadeva. Its early name was Manju-Patan; the present name refers to a wooden temple

  • Kantische-Fries’sche Religionsphilosophie (work by Otto)

    Rudolf Otto: Scholarly pursuits.: …his work, Kantische-Fries’sche Religionsphilosophie (1909; The Philosophy of Religion Based on Kant and Fries, 1931), a discussion of the religious thought of the German philosophers Immanuel Kant and Jacob Friedrich Fries, in which he sought to specify the kind of rationality that is appropriate to religious inquiry.

  • Kantner, Paul (American musician)

    Paul Kantner, (Paul Lorin Kantner), American musician (born March 17, 1941, San Francisco, Calif.—died Jan. 28, 2016, San Francisco), was a founding member and guiding spirit of the seminal psychedelic rock band Jefferson Airplane and its successor, Jefferson Starship. Kantner anchored the group’s

  • Kantner, Paul Lorin (American musician)

    Paul Kantner, (Paul Lorin Kantner), American musician (born March 17, 1941, San Francisco, Calif.—died Jan. 28, 2016, San Francisco), was a founding member and guiding spirit of the seminal psychedelic rock band Jefferson Airplane and its successor, Jefferson Starship. Kantner anchored the group’s

  • Kantō Plain (region, Japan)

    Kantō Plain, plain that is the most extensive lowland in Japan, located in central Honshu, facing the Pacific Ocean. Its 6,244 square miles (16,172 square km) contain the capital city, Tokyo, and constitute the most productive and populous area of the country. The plain is located to the east of t

  • Kantō Range (mountains, Japan)

    Kantō Range, mountain range, on Honshu, Japan, lying to the west of the Kantō Plain. Extending 80 miles (130 km) from north to south and 50 miles (80 km) from east to west, it forms the physical division between Kantō region (chihō; east) and Chūbu region (west). Geologically the range displays

  • Kantō Torishimari-deyaku (Japanese history)

    Japan: Political reform in the bakufu and the han: …up an office called the Kantō Torishimari-deyaku (“Supervisors of the Kantō District”) to strengthen police control of the area, and it ordered the villages of Kantō to form associations to assist this office. But the impetus to reform had faded, as almost a century of bakufu efforts to deal effectively…

  • Kantō, Northern (region, Japan)

    Northern Kantō, industrial region, east-central Japan, occupying portions of Gumma, Saitama, and Tochigi ken (prefectures). Situated just north of, and adjacent to, the Keihin (Tokyo-Yokohama) Industrial Zone, the area consists mostly of plains, interrupted by the Kantō Range and Echigo Range. N

  • Kantō-heiya (region, Japan)

    Kantō Plain, plain that is the most extensive lowland in Japan, located in central Honshu, facing the Pacific Ocean. Its 6,244 square miles (16,172 square km) contain the capital city, Tokyo, and constitute the most productive and populous area of the country. The plain is located to the east of t

  • Kantō-sammyaku (mountains, Japan)

    Kantō Range, mountain range, on Honshu, Japan, lying to the west of the Kantō Plain. Extending 80 miles (130 km) from north to south and 50 miles (80 km) from east to west, it forms the physical division between Kantō region (chihō; east) and Chūbu region (west). Geologically the range displays

  • Kanton Atoll (atoll, Kiribati)

    Kanton Atoll, largest and northernmost of the Phoenix Islands, a coral group, part of Kiribati, in the west-central Pacific Ocean. Located approximately 1,600 miles (2,600 km) southwest of Hawaii, Kanton’s circular coral reef encloses a lagoon extending 7 miles by 3 miles (11 km by 5 km). Sighted

  • kantongerechten (Dutch court)

    Netherlands: Justice: There are cantonal courts (kantongerechten), which exercise jurisdiction in a whole range of minor civil and criminal cases. More-important cases are handled by one of the district courts (rechtbanken), which also can hear appeals from cantonal court decisions. Appeals against decisions from the district courts are heard by one…

  • kantor (ecclesiastical official)

    Cantor, (Latin: “singer”, ) in Judaism and Christianity, an ecclesiastical official in charge of music or chants. In Judaism the cantor, or ?azzan, directs liturgical prayer in the synagogue and leads the chanting. He may be engaged by a congregation to serve for an entire year or merely to assist

  • Kantor, Benjamin McKinlay (American author)

    MacKinlay Kantor, American author and newspaperman whose more than 30 novels and numerous popular short stories include the highly acclaimed Andersonville (1955; filmed for television 1996), a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about the American Civil War. After finishing high school, Kantor became a

  • Kantor, MacKinlay (American author)

    MacKinlay Kantor, American author and newspaperman whose more than 30 novels and numerous popular short stories include the highly acclaimed Andersonville (1955; filmed for television 1996), a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel about the American Civil War. After finishing high school, Kantor became a

  • Kantorovich, Leonid Vitalyevich (Russian mathematician and economist)

    Leonid Vitalyevich Kantorovich, Soviet mathematician and economist who shared the 1975 Nobel Prize for Economics with Tjalling Koopmans for their work on the optimal allocation of scarce resources. Kantorovich was educated at Leningrad State University and received his doctorate in mathematics

  • Kantorowicz, Hermann (German legal scholar)

    Hermann Kantorowicz, German teacher and scholar whose doctrine of free law (Freirechtslehre) contributed to the development of the sociology of law. Specializing in criminal law, Kantorowicz taught at the universities of Freiburg (1908–29) and Kiel (1929–33) until the rise of the Nazis to power.

  • Kantrowitz, Adrian (American heart surgeon)

    Adrian Kantrowitz, American heart surgeon (born Oct. 4, 1918, New York, N.Y.—died Nov. 14, 2008, Ann Arbor, Mich.), was a pioneer in the development of mechanical hearts and other devices to improve heart function. In 1967 he performed the first human heart transplant in the U.S. at Maimonides

  • Kantrowitz, Arthur Robert (American physicist)

    Arthur Robert Kantrowitz, American physicist and engineer (born Oct. 20, 1913, New York, N.Y.—died Nov. 29, 2008, New York, N.Y.), helped bridge a theoretical understanding of fluid dynamics with practical applications, as demonstrated in his innovation of using shock waves through low-pressure gas

  • Kants Theorie der Erfahrung (work by Cohen)

    Kantianism: Epistemological Neo-Kantianism: …Theorie der Erfahrung (1871; “Kant’s Theory of Experience”), argued that the transcendental subject is not to be regarded as a psychic being but as a logical function of thought that constructs both the form and the content of knowledge. Nothing is gegeben (“given”), he urged; all is aufgegeben (“propounded,”…

  • KANU (political organization, Kenya)

    Kenya African National Union (KANU), Kenyan political party. Organized in 1960, KANU was one of two major political parties formed in preparation for independence—the other party, the Kenya African Democratic Union, was ultimately absorbed by KANU after independence. Led by Jomo Kenyatta, the party

  • Kanu y Gwynt (Welsh poem)

    Celtic literature: The Middle Ages: …Myrddin and Taliesin, and in Kanu y Gwynt (“The Song of the Wind”), a riddle poem that contains the germ of the later convention known as dyfaliad (kenning).

  • Kanuku Mountains (mountains, Guyana)

    Guyana: Relief: …is bisected by the east–west-trending Kanuku Mountains.

  • Kanuma (Japan)

    Kanuma, city, central Tochigi ken (prefecture), east-central Honshu, Japan. It lies at the eastern foot of the Ashio Highlands and borders Utsunomiya to the east. The central part of the city was a post town during the Edo (Tokugawa) period (1603–1867); it later developed as a market for hemp seed.

  • kanun (Ottoman law code)

    Kanun, (kanun from Greek kanōn, “rule”), the tabulation of administrative regulations in the Ottoman Empire that supplemented the Sharī?ah (Islamic law) and the discretionary authority of the sultan. In Islamic judicial theory there was no law other than the Sharī?ah. In the early Islamic states,

  • Kanuni (Ottoman sultan)

    Süleyman the Magnificent, sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1520 to 1566 who not only undertook bold military campaigns that enlarged his realm but also oversaw the development of what came to be regarded as the most characteristic achievements of Ottoman civilization in the fields of law,

  • Kanuri (people)

    Kanuri, African people, the dominant element of the population of Bornu state in northeastern Nigeria and also found in large numbers in southeastern Niger. The Kanuri language is classified as belonging to the Saharan branch of the Nilo-Saharan family. The Kanuri developed a powerful state at the

  • Kanuri language

    Kanuri language, language within the Saharan branch of the Nilo-Saharan language family. Kanuri consists of two main dialects, Manga Kanuri and Yerwa Kanuri (also called Beriberi, which its speakers consider pejorative), spoken in central Africa by more than 5,700,000 individuals at the turn of the

  • Kanva dynasty (Indian history)

    Kanva dynasty, the successors of the Shungas in the North Indian kingdom of Magadha, who ruled about 72–28 bce; like their predecessors, they were Brahmans in origin. That they originally served the Shunga line is attested by the appellation Shungabhrityas (i.e., servants of the Shungas) given to

  • Kanvayanas (Indian history)

    Kanva dynasty, the successors of the Shungas in the North Indian kingdom of Magadha, who ruled about 72–28 bce; like their predecessors, they were Brahmans in origin. That they originally served the Shunga line is attested by the appellation Shungabhrityas (i.e., servants of the Shungas) given to

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