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  • kapok family (plant family)

    Bombacaceae, the bombax or kapok family of flowering trees and shrubs, in the mallow order (Malvales), comprising 27 genera. It is allied to the mallow family (Malvaceae), to which the cotton plant belongs, and is characteristic of the tropics. Bombacaceae members’ flowers are often large and

  • Kapoor, Anish (British sculptor)

    Anish Kapoor, Indian-born British sculptor known for his use of abstract biomorphic forms and his penchant for rich colours and polished surfaces. He was also the first living artist to be given a solo show at the Royal Academy of Arts in London. Kapoor was born in India to parents of Punjabi and

  • Kapoor, Prithviraj (Indian actor)

    Prithviraj Kapoor, Indian film and stage actor who founded both the renowned Kapoor family of actors and the Prithvi Theatre in Bombay (now Mumbai). He was best known for playing Alexander the Great in Sohrab Modi’s Sikandar (1941; “Alexander the Great”) and the emperor Akbar in K. Asif’s

  • Kapoor, Raj (Indian actor and director)

    Raj Kapoor, Indian motion-picture actor and director whose Hindi-language films were popular throughout India, the Middle East, the Soviet Union, and China. In the 1930s Kapoor worked as a clapper-boy for the Bombay Talkies and as an actor for Prithvi Theatres, two companies that were owned by his

  • Kapoor, Shammi (Indian actor)

    Shammi Kapoor, (Shamsher Raj Kapoor), Indian actor (born Oct. 21, 1931, Bombay, British India [now Mumbai, India]—died Aug. 14, 2011, Mumbai), transformed Bollywood films in the late 1950s with his spontaneous flamboyant acting and Western-style sex appeal—complete with leather jacket, swept-back

  • Kapoor, Shamsher Raj (Indian actor)

    Shammi Kapoor, (Shamsher Raj Kapoor), Indian actor (born Oct. 21, 1931, Bombay, British India [now Mumbai, India]—died Aug. 14, 2011, Mumbai), transformed Bollywood films in the late 1950s with his spontaneous flamboyant acting and Western-style sex appeal—complete with leather jacket, swept-back

  • Kapor, Mitchell (American entrepreneur and software designer)

    Electronic Frontier Foundation: …Perry Barlow and American entrepreneur Mitch Kapor, with additional support from activist John Gilmore and Steve Wozniak, a co-founder of Apple Computer.

  • Kaposi sarcoma (cancer)

    Kaposi sarcoma, rare and usually lethal cancer of the tissues beneath the surface of the skin or of the mucous membranes. The disease can spread to other organs, including the liver, lungs, and intestinal tract. Kaposi sarcoma is characterized by red-purple or blue-brown lesions of the skin, mucous

  • Kaposvár (Hungary)

    Kaposvár, city of county status and seat of Somogy megye (county), southwestern Hungary. On hills flanking the upper valley of the Kapos River (which flows northeast to the Sió), it is the chief market town of the county and has played an important role in Hungarian art and poetry. There are ruins

  • Kapp Putsch (German history)

    Kapp Putsch, (1920) in Germany, a coup d’état that attempted to overthrow the fledgling Weimar Republic. Its immediate cause was the government’s attempt to demobilize two Freikorps brigades. One of the brigades took Berlin, with the cooperation of the Berlin army district commander. Reactionary

  • Kapp, Wolfgang (Prussian politician)

    Wolfgang Kapp, reactionary Prussian politician who led the Kapp Putsch (1920), which attempted to overthrow the fledgling Weimar Republic and establish a rightist dictatorship. Kapp’s father, a revolutionary of 1848, had immigrated to the United States in 1849 but in 1870 returned to Germany, where

  • kappa (Japanese mythology)

    Kappa, in Japanese folklore, a type of vampirelike lecherous creature that is more intelligent than the devilish oni (q.v.) and less malevolent toward men. Kappa are credited with having taught the art of bonesetting to humans. They are depicted in legend and art as being the size of a 1

  • Kappa (work by Akutagawa Ryūnosuke)

    Akutagawa Ryūnosuke: …fable about elflike creatures (kappa), is written in the mirthless vein of his last period and reflects his depressed state at the time. His suicide came as a shock to the literary world.

  • Kappa Alpha (social fraternity)

    fraternity and sorority: …in existence as such is Kappa Alpha, begun in 1825 at Union College, Schenectady, N.Y.

  • kappa effect (psychology)

    time perception: Perceived duration: …called the S effect or kappa effect. The reverse is the tau effect, in which the distance is perceived as being wider when the interval between successive stimuli is longer.

  • kappa organism (biology)

    Kappa organism, gram-negative symbiotic bacterium found in the cytoplasm of certain strains of the protozoan Paramecium aurelia. These bacteria, when released into the surroundings, change to P particles that secrete a poison (paramecin) that kills other sensitive strains of P. aurelia. The

  • kappa particle (biology)

    Kappa organism, gram-negative symbiotic bacterium found in the cytoplasm of certain strains of the protozoan Paramecium aurelia. These bacteria, when released into the surroundings, change to P particles that secrete a poison (paramecin) that kills other sensitive strains of P. aurelia. The

  • Kappe, Ray (American architect and educator)

    Ray Kappe, American architect and educator known for his angular and expansive Modernist residences in southern California. In his early homes Kappe employed post-and-beam construction, whereas in his later structures he often utilized sweeping expanses of metal, wood, and glass. Kappe was an early

  • kappel (Judaism)

    religious dress: Later religious dress: …skullcap known as a yarmulke, or kappel. Because a Jewish male is not supposed to walk more than four cubits (six feet) with his head uncovered, observant Jews wear the skullcap clipped to their hair and indeed may wear it all day because they believe themselves to be in…

  • Kappel Bridge (bridge, Luzern, Switzerland)

    covered bridge: The Kappel Bridge (1333) of Luzern has been decorated since 1599 with 112 paintings in the triangular spaces between roof and crossbeams, depicting the history of the town and the lives of its two patron saints. In the 18th century the Grubenmann brothers of Switzerland built…

  • Kappel War, First (Switzerland [1529])

    Kappel Wars: The first conflict arose when five Roman Catholic member states of the Swiss confederacy, Lucerne, Uri, Schwyz, Unterwalden, and Zug, formed the Christian Union, which allied itself with Austria to prevent Zürich from spreading Protestantism over the common lordships (territories ruled by the Swiss confederates jointly).…

  • Kappel War, Second (Switzerland [1531])

    Kappel Wars: …October 1531 they suddenly declared war against Zürich. Zürich’s hastily raised troops, under J?rg G?ldli, were defeated in the Battle of Kappel (Oct. 11, 1531), and Zürich’s Protestant leader, Huldrych Zwingli, was killed. The second Peace of Kappel (Nov. 24, 1531) upheld the claims of Roman Catholicism throughout the controversial…

  • Kappel Wars (Swiss history)

    Kappel Wars, (1529 and 1531), two conflicts of the Swiss Reformation. The name derives from the monastery of Kappel, on the border between the cantons of Zürich and Zug. The first conflict arose when five Roman Catholic member states of the Swiss confederacy, Lucerne, Uri, Schwyz, Unterwalden, and

  • Kappelhoff, Doris von (American singer and actress)

    Doris Day, American singer and motion-picture actress whose performances in movie musicals of the 1950s and sex comedies of the early 1960s made her a leading Hollywood star. While still a teenager, she changed her last name to Day when she began singing on radio. She worked as a vocalist in the

  • Kapranzine (African emperor)

    Mavura: …aid in deposing his uncle Kapranzine as emperor in 1629. Converting to Christianity, he took the name Filipe and swore vassalage to the king of Portugal. In 1631, again with Portuguese assistance, he decisively defeated his uncle and ruled with complete authority as long as he lived. During his reign…

  • Kaprow, Allan (American artist)

    Allan Kaprow, American performance artist, theoretician, and instructor who invented the name Happening for his performances and who helped define the genre’s characteristics. Kaprow studied in New York City at the High School of Music & Art (now LaGuardia Arts; 1943–45) and New York University

  • Kapsukas (Lithuania)

    Marijampol?, administrative centre of a rayon (sector), Lithuania. Marijampol? lies along both banks of the ?e?up? River. The settlement developed as a monastic centre in the 18th century, when it was known as Starapol?, and achieved urban status in 1758. After World War II it developed as an

  • Kapteyn’s star (astronomy)

    Milky Way Galaxy: High-velocity stars: …the nearest 45 stars, called Kapteyn’s star, is an example of the high-velocity stars that lie near the Sun. Its observed radial velocity is ?245 km/sec, and the components of its space velocity are U = 19 km/sec, V = ?288 km/sec, and W = ?52 km/sec. The very large…

  • Kapteyn, Jacobus Cornelius (Dutch astronomer)

    Jacobus Cornelius Kapteyn, Dutch astronomer who used photography and statistical methods in determining the motions and distribution of stars. Kapteyn attended the State University of Utrecht and in 1875 became a member of the staff of Leiden Observatory. In 1877 he was elected to the chair of

  • Kaptol (Croatia)

    Zagreb: …in the 13th century; and Kaptol, the ecclesiastical settlement, which was fortified in the 16th century. These two towns continued as rival entities until the 19th century, when a spate of new building joined them together and expanded south onto the Sava floodplain, with a rectilinear new town of squares…

  • Kapton (chemical compound)

    major industrial polymers: Polyimides: …under the trademarked name of Kapton by DuPont, which is made from a dianhydride and a diamine. When the two monomers react, the first product formed is a polyamide. The polyamide can be dissolved in solvents for casting into films, or it can be melted and molded. Conversion to polyimide…

  • Kaptur, Marcy (American politician)

    Dennis Kucinich: …Democratic primary by another incumbent, Marcy Kaptur. He left office the following year.

  • Kapuas River (river, Indonesia)

    Kapuas River, chief waterway of western Indonesian Borneo (Kalimantan). The river rises in the Kapuas Hulu Mountains in the central part of the island and flows 710 miles (1,143 km) west-southwest through West Kalimantan province. It reaches the South China Sea in a great marshy delta

  • kapudan pasha (Ottoman admiral)

    Greece: The Phanariotes: …were invariably interpreters to the kapudan pasha, the admiral of the Ottoman fleet. Again their powers were wider than the title suggests: these Phanariotes, in effect, acted as governors of the islands of the Aegean archipelago, whose Greek inhabitants were a potential source from which to draw men for service…

  • Kapuni (oil field, New Zealand)

    Kapuni, locality in Taranaki local government region, a natural gas and oil field south of Mount Taranaki (Egmont), western North Island, New Zealand. Petroleum from the locality is piped to Auckland and Wellington, principally for use as a household fuel. Natural gas produced at Kapuni supplies a

  • Kapūr Singh (Sikh leader)

    India: From Banda Singh Bahadur to Ranjit Singh: Kapur Singh, the most important of the Sikh leaders of the time, operated from its vicinity and gradually set about consolidating a revenue-cum-military system, based in part on compromises with the Mughal governors of the province. Other Sikhs were, however, less willing than Kapur Singh…

  • Kapur, Shekhar (Indian director)

    Shekhar Kapur, Indian director best known for his films Bandit Queen (1994) and Elizabeth (1998). Kapur received an education at St. Stephen’s College, Delhi. He then moved to London and began a career as a chartered accountant and management consultant. Kapur returned to India and joined the film

  • Kapurthala (India)

    Kapurthala, town, north-central Punjab state, northwestern India. The city lies on a flat alluvial plain, about 12 miles (20 km) west of Jalandhar. Kapurthala was founded in the 11th century. In 1780 it became the capital of the princely state of Kapurthala, and it remained the capital until that

  • Kapuscinski, Ryszard (Polish journalist and author)

    Ryszard Kapuscinski, Polish journalist and author (born March 4, 1932 , Pinsk, Pol. [now in Belarus]—died Jan. 23, 2007 , Warsaw, Pol.), was the Polish Press Agency’s (PAP’s) only correspondent in Africa during that continent’s troubled emergence from colonialism. Between 1956 and 1981 (when his

  • Kapuskasing (Ontario, Canada)

    Kapuskasing, town, Cochrane district, east-central Ontario, Canada. It lies along the Kapuskasing River. Known as MacPherson until 1917, when it received its present Indian name, the town originated in 1914 as a station on the National Transcontinental line (now the Canadian National Railway) 80

  • Kaputt (work by Malaparte)

    Curzio Malaparte: …written, brilliantly realistic war novels: Kaputt (1944); and La pelle (1949; The Skin), a terrifying, surrealistically presented series of episodes showing the suffering and degradation that the war had brought to the people of Naples.

  • Kapuufi (African king)

    Fipa: …found new unification under King Kapuufi from 1860 until the advent of European occupation in the 1880s.

  • Kapuzinergruft, Die (work by Roth)

    Joseph Roth: Die Kapuzinergruft (1938; “The Capuchin Tomb”) is an example. Der stumme Prophet (1966; The Silent Prophet), the story of a failed revolutionary, was written in 1929.

  • Kapyong, Battle of (Korean War [1951])

    Battle of Kapyong, (April 23–25, 1951), Korean War battle in which vastly outnumbered United Nations forces checked the communist advance on the South Korean capital of Seoul. Two Commonwealth battalions—the 2nd Battalion of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry Regiment (2PPCLI) and the

  • Kaqchikel (people)

    Kaqchikel, Mayan people of the midwestern highlands of Guatemala, closely related linguistically and culturally to the neighbouring K’iche’ and Tz’utujil. They are agriculturalists, and their culture is syncretic, a fusion of Spanish and Mayan elements. Their sharing of a common language does not

  • Kaqchikel language

    Kaqchikel language, member of the K’ichean (Quichean) subgroup of the Mayan family of languages, spoken in central Guatemala by some 450,000 people. It has numerous dialects. Its closest relative is Tz’utujil. K’iche’ is also closely related. The Annals of the Cakchiquels (also called Anales de los

  • Kar (novel by Pamuk)

    Orhan Pamuk: In Kar (2002; Snow) a Turkish poet living in exile in Germany faces the tensions between East and West when he travels to a poor town in a remote area of Turkey. Masumiyet müzesi (2008; The Museum of Innocence) investigates the relationship between an older man and his…

  • Kar-Shulmanashared (ancient city, Iraq)

    Mesopotamian art and architecture: Painting and decorative arts: …bce), a country palace at Til Barsip (modern Tall al-Ahmar) was decorated in this way, with the conventional motifs of relief designs rather clumsily adapted to this very different medium. A few years later, such paintings were extensively used to decorate both wall faces and ceilings in Sargon II’s palace…

  • kara (Sikh religious dress)

    Sikhism: Guru Gobind Singh and the founding of the Khalsa: (comb), kachha (short trousers), kara (steel bracelet), and kirpan (ceremonial sword)—did not become an obligation of all Sikhs until the establishment of the Singh Sabha, a religious and educational reform movement of the late 19th and the early 20th century. The Sikh wedding ceremony, in which the bride and…

  • Kara Amid (Turkey)

    Diyarbak?r, city, southeastern Turkey. It lies on the right bank of the Tigris River. The name means “district (diyar) of the Bakr people.” Amida, an ancient town predating Roman colonization in the 3rd century ce, was enlarged and strengthened under the Roman emperor Constantius II, who also

  • Kara Koyunlu (Turkmen tribal federation)

    Kara Koyunlu, Turkmen tribal federation that ruled Azerbaijan, Armenia, and Iraq from about 1375 to 1468. The Kara Koyunlu were vassals of the Jalāyirid dynasty of Baghdad and Tabrīz from about 1375, when the head of their leading tribe, Kara Mu?ammad Turmush (reigned c. 1375–90), ruled Mosul. The

  • Kara Mu?ammad Turmush (Turkmen ruler)

    Kara Koyunlu: …head of their leading tribe, Kara Mu?ammad Turmush (reigned c. 1375–90), ruled Mosul. The federation secured its independence with the seizure of Tabrīz (which became its capital) by Kara Yūsuf (reigned 1390–1400; 1406–20). Routed by the armies of Timur in 1400, Kara Yūsuf sought refuge with the Mamlūks of Egypt…

  • Kara Mustafa Pa?a, Kemanke? (Ottoman vizier)

    ?brahim: …but ambitious grand vizier Kemanke? Kara Mustafa Pa?a, ?brahim established peaceful relations with Persia and Austria (1642) and recovered the Sea of Azov hinterland from the Cossacks. After the execution of Kara Mustafa (1644), ?brahim, acting on the advice of his new ministers, sent an expedition to Crete; thus began…

  • Kara Mustafa Pa?a, Merzifonlu (Ottoman vizier)

    Merzifonlu Kara Mustafa Pa?a, Ottoman grand vizier (chief minister) in 1676–83, who in 1683 led an unsuccessful Ottoman siege of Vienna. During the grand vizierate (1661–76) of his brother-in-law K?prülü Faz?l Ahmed Pa?a, Kara Mustafa Pa?a served as captain of the fleet, vizier in the State

  • Kara Osman (Turkish ruler)

    Ak Koyunlu: …the founder of the dynasty, Kara Osman (reigned 1378–1435), married Byzantine princesses.

  • Kara Sea (sea, Russia)

    Kara Sea, marginal sea of the Arctic Ocean, located off western Siberia (Russia), between the Novaya Zemlya islands (west), Franz Josef Land (northwest), and the Severnaya Zemlya islands (east). It is connected with the Arctic Basin (north), the Barents Sea (west), and the Laptev Sea (east). It

  • Kara Su (river, Asia)

    Tigris-Euphrates river system: Physiography of the Euphrates: …are the Murat and the Karasu rivers in the Armenian Highland of northeastern Turkey. Considerably altered in the 20th century by water-control projects, they join to form the Euphrates at Keban, near Elaz??, where the Keban Dam (completed 1974), spans a deep gorge. The river breaks through the Taurus Mountains…

  • Kara Yūsuf (Turkmen ruler)

    Kara Koyunlu: … (which became its capital) by Kara Yūsuf (reigned 1390–1400; 1406–20). Routed by the armies of Timur in 1400, Kara Yūsuf sought refuge with the Mamlūks of Egypt but by 1406 was able to regain Tabrīz. He then secured the Kara Koyunlu position against threats from the Ak Koyunlu (“White Sheep”),…

  • Kara-Bogaz-Gol Gulf (gulf, Turkmenistan)

    Kara-Bogaz-Gol Gulf, inlet of the eastern Caspian Sea in northwestern Turkmenistan. With an area of 4,600–5,000 square miles (12,000–13,000 square km), it averages only 33 feet (10 m) in depth and has a very high evaporation rate. The water is thus extremely saline, and 7,000–11,000 cubic feet

  • Kara-e (Japanese art)

    Kara-e, 618–907). It was chiefly composed of imaginative landscapes in the Chinese manner and illustrations of Chinese legends and tales. The style was employed in the Nara (645–794) and Heian (794–1185) periods. In spite of the increasing popularity of Yamato-e, an evolving native style of

  • Kara-Kalpak (people)

    Aral Sea: Environmental consequences: Hardest hit were the Karakalpaks, who live in the southern portion of the region. Winds blowing across the exposed seabed produced dust storms that buffeted the region with a toxic dust contaminated with salt, fertilizer, and pesticides. As a result, the areas’s inhabitants have suffered health problems at unusually…

  • Kara-Kalpak language

    Altaic languages: The Turkic languages: …most of the languages; Kyrgyz, Karakalpak, and Kazakh in particular are linguistically much alike.

  • Kara-Kalpakstan (republic, Uzbekistan)

    Karakalpakstan, autonomous republic in Uzbekistan, situated southeast and southwest of the Aral Sea. On the east Karakalpakstan occupies the western half of the Kyzylkum Desert, a vast plain covered with shifting sands. The central part consists of the valley and delta of the Amu Darya (river), a

  • Kara-Kum (desert, Turkmenistan)

    Karakum Desert, great sandy region in Central Asia. It occupies about 70 percent of the area of Turkmenistan. Another, smaller desert in Kazakhstan near the Aral Sea is called the Aral Karakum. The Turkmen Karakum is approximately 135,000 square miles (350,000 square km) in area, extending some 500

  • Kara-Kum Canal (canal, Turkmenistan)

    Karakum Canal, waterway in Turkmenistan. The main section, begun in 1954 and completed in 1967, runs some 520 miles (840 km) from the Amu Darya (river) to G?kdepe, west of Ashgabat, skirting the Karakum Desert. In the 1970s and ’80s the canal was extended to the Caspian Sea coast, making the total

  • Kara-yo (Japanese architectural style)

    Kara-yō, (Japanese: “Chinese style”), one of the three main Japanese styles of Buddhist temple architecture in the Kamakura period (1192–1333). Kara-yō originally followed Chinese forms that featured strict symmetry on a central axis. The word kara-yō is written with the character that stands for

  • Karabagh rug

    Karabagh rug, floor covering handmade in the district of Karabakh (Armenian-controlled Azerbaijan), just north of the present Iranian border. As might be expected, Karabagh designs and colour schemes tend to be more like those of Persian rugs than do those made in other parts of the Caucasus, and

  • Karabakh

    Armenia: Ottomans and ?afavids: …of Yerevan, Nakhichevan (Nax??van), and Karabakh. In mountainous Karabakh a group of five Armenian maliks (princes) succeeded in conserving their autonomy and maintained a short period of independence (1722–30) during the struggle between Persia and Turkey at the beginning of the 18th century; despite the heroic resistance of the Armenian…

  • Karabakh rug

    Karabagh rug, floor covering handmade in the district of Karabakh (Armenian-controlled Azerbaijan), just north of the present Iranian border. As might be expected, Karabagh designs and colour schemes tend to be more like those of Persian rugs than do those made in other parts of the Caucasus, and

  • Karabalghasun (ancient city, Central Asia)

    history of Central Asia: The Uighur empire: …city on the Orhon River, Karabalghasun, the foundations of which were probably laid by the Turks and can still be seen. A Muslim traveler, Tamīm ibn Ba?r, who visited the city about 821, speaks in admiring terms of this fortified town lying in a cultivated country—a far cry from the…

  • Karabil Plateau (plateau, Turkmenistan)

    Karakum Desert: Physiography: …on the southeast by the Garabil uplands and Badkhyz steppe region. In the south and southwest the desert runs along the foot of the Kopet-Dag Mountains, and in the west and northwest it borders the course of the ancient valley of the Uzboy River. It is divided into three parts:…

  • Karabil upland (plateau, Turkmenistan)

    Karakum Desert: Physiography: …on the southeast by the Garabil uplands and Badkhyz steppe region. In the south and southwest the desert runs along the foot of the Kopet-Dag Mountains, and in the west and northwest it borders the course of the ancient valley of the Uzboy River. It is divided into three parts:…

  • Karabük (Turkey)

    Karabük, town, northwestern Turkey, on the Yenice River. Once a small hamlet, it has grown rapidly since the establishment of Turkey’s first major iron-and-steel complex there in 1940. The works were expanded greatly in the 1950s and ’60s. Facilities include a coking plant, blast furnaces, a

  • Karaca (Turkmen chief)

    Dulkadir Dynasty: The dynasty was founded by Karaca, the chief of the Bozok Turkmen, who was recognized as nā?īb (deputy) by the Mamlūk sultan in 1337 but who, with his sons, later was defeated and killed in a revolt against the sultan. In 1399 the Ottoman sultan Bayezid I, challenging Mamlūk influence,…

  • Karaca, Cem (Turkish musician)

    Cem Karaca, Turkish rock musician (born April 5, 1945, Istanbul, Turkey—died Feb. 8, 2004, Istanbul), blended traditional Anatolian music with progressive rock and leftist political themes to become Turkey’s biggest pop star in the late 1960s and early ’70s. He had a forceful bass voice, with w

  • Karaca, Mount (mountain, Turkey)

    Turkey: The Arabian platform: …of this zone, the volcanic Mount Karaca reaches 6,294 feet (1,918 metres).

  • Karacao?lan (Turkish poet)

    Turkish literature: Epic and the emergence of the a?ik: …the Anatolian Turkmen tribes was Karacao?lan, who flourished in the later 16th century or possibly the mid-17th century (his date of death is sometimes given as 1679). He is mentioned in several biographical dictionaries (tezkires) of the period. In its formal qualities his poetry is closely related to folk verse,…

  • Karachay (people)

    Turkic peoples: Karachay, Karakalpaks, Kazakhs, Khakass, Kipchak, Kumyk, Kyrgyz, Nogay, Shor, Tatars, Tofalar, Turkmen

  • Karachay-Balkar language

    Turkic languages: Classification: …partly endangered languages, Kumyk (Dagestan), Karachay and Balkar (North Caucasus), Crimean Tatar, and Karaim. The Karachay and Balkars and Crimean Tatars were deported during World War II; the latter were allowed to resettle in Crimea only after the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s. Karaim is preserved in…

  • Karachay-Cherkessia (republic, Russia)

    Karachayevo-Cherkesiya, republic, southwestern Russia. It extends south from the foreland plains across the northern ranges and deep intervening valleys and gorges of the Greater Caucasus range as far as the crestline, which reaches 13,274 feet (4,046 metres) in Mount Dombay-Ulgen. Cherkessk is the

  • Karachayevo-Cherkesiya (republic, Russia)

    Karachayevo-Cherkesiya, republic, southwestern Russia. It extends south from the foreland plains across the northern ranges and deep intervening valleys and gorges of the Greater Caucasus range as far as the crestline, which reaches 13,274 feet (4,046 metres) in Mount Dombay-Ulgen. Cherkessk is the

  • Karachayevo-Cherkesskaya Respublika (republic, Russia)

    Karachayevo-Cherkesiya, republic, southwestern Russia. It extends south from the foreland plains across the northern ranges and deep intervening valleys and gorges of the Greater Caucasus range as far as the crestline, which reaches 13,274 feet (4,046 metres) in Mount Dombay-Ulgen. Cherkessk is the

  • Karāchi (Pakistan)

    Karāchi, city and capital of Sindh province, southern Pakistan. It is the country’s largest city and principal seaport and is a major commercial and industrial centre. Karāchi is located on the coast of the Arabian Sea immediately northwest of the Indus River Delta. The city has been variously

  • Karachi Stock Exchange (Guarantee) Limited (stock exchange, Karachi, Pakistan)

    Pakistan: Finance: The Karachi Stock Exchange (Guarantee) Limited (1947), Lahore Stock Exchange (Guarantee) Limited (1970), and Islamabad Stock Exchange (Guarantee) Limited (1989) are the largest such institutions in the country; each deals in stocks and shares of registered companies. The Investment Corporation of Pakistan (1966) and the National…

  • Karāchi, University of (university, Karāchi, Pakistan)

    Pakistan: Education: …of Peshawar (1950), and the University of Karachi (1950). Other universities established during the 20th century include Quaid-i-Azam University (1967; called the University of Islamabad until 1976), the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Agricultural University in Peshawar (1981), the International Islamic University in Islamabad (1980), the Aga Khan University in Karachi (1983), and…

  • Karadagh rug

    Karaja rug, floor covering handmade in or near the village of Qarājeh (Karaja), in the Qareh Dāgh (Karadagh) region of Iran just south of the Azerbaijan border, northeast of Tabrīz. The best-known pattern shows three geometric medallions that are somewhat similar to those in Caucasian carpets. The

  • Karadeniz (sea, Eurasia)

    Black Sea, large inland sea situated at the southeastern extremity of Europe. It is bordered by Ukraine to the north, Russia to the northeast, Georgia to the east, Turkey to the south, and Bulgaria and Romania to the west. The roughly oval-shaped Black Sea occupies a large basin strategically

  • Karaden?z Bo?azi (strait, Turkey)

    Bosporus, strait (bo?az, “throat”) uniting the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmara and separating parts of Asian Turkey (Anatolia) from European Turkey. The Bosporus is 19 miles (30 km) long, with a maximum width of 2.3 miles (3.7 km) at the northern entrance and a minimum width of 2,450 feet (750

  • Karadenizere?lisi (Zonguldak province, Turkey)

    Ere?li, town, northern Turkey. It is situated on the Black Sea coast about 20 miles (32 km) southwest of Zonguldak. The town was founded about 560 bce as Heraclea Pontica by a colony of Megarians who soon subjected the native Mariandynians and extended their control over most of the coast. In 74

  • Karadjordje (Serbian political leader)

    Karadjordje, leader of the Serbian people in their struggle for independence from the Turks and founder of the Karadjordjevi? (Kara?or?evi?) dynasty. The son of a peasant, Karadjordje (“Black George”), so named because of his dark complexion and penetrating eyes, in his youth herded swine and

  • Karadjordjevi?, Aleksandar (prince of Serbia)

    Alexander, prince of Serbia from 1842 to 1858. The third son of Karadjordje (Karageorge, or Karaeoree), who had led the movement to win Serb autonomy from the Ottoman Turks (1804–13), Alexander lived in exile until 1842, when the Skup?tina (Serb parliament) elected him prince of Serbia. Assuming

  • Karadjordjevi? dynasty (Serbian history)

    Karadjordjevi? dynasty, rulers descended from the Serbian rebel leader Karadjordje (Karageorge, or Kara?or?e). It rivaled the Obrenovi? dynasty for control of Serbia during the 19th century and ruled that country as well as its successor state, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (called

  • Karaeoree (Serbian political leader)

    Karadjordje, leader of the Serbian people in their struggle for independence from the Turks and founder of the Karadjordjevi? (Kara?or?evi?) dynasty. The son of a peasant, Karadjordje (“Black George”), so named because of his dark complexion and penetrating eyes, in his youth herded swine and

  • Karaeoreevi? dynasty (Serbian history)

    Karadjordjevi? dynasty, rulers descended from the Serbian rebel leader Karadjordje (Karageorge, or Kara?or?e). It rivaled the Obrenovi? dynasty for control of Serbia during the 19th century and ruled that country as well as its successor state, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (called

  • Karaeoreevi?i, Aleksandar (prince of Serbia)

    Alexander, prince of Serbia from 1842 to 1858. The third son of Karadjordje (Karageorge, or Karaeoree), who had led the movement to win Serb autonomy from the Ottoman Turks (1804–13), Alexander lived in exile until 1842, when the Skup?tina (Serb parliament) elected him prince of Serbia. Assuming

  • Karad?i?, Radovan (Bosnian Serb physician, author, and politician)

    Radovan Karad?i?, physician, author, and politician who was leader (1990–96) of the Serb Democratic Party in Bosnia and president (1992–95) of the autonomous Republika Srpska, a self-proclaimed Serb republic within Bosnia. In 2016 he was found guilty of committing war crimes, including genocide,

  • Karad?i?, Vuk Stefanovi? (Serbian language scholar)

    Vuk Stefanovi? Karad?i?, language scholar and the father of Serbian folk-literature scholarship, who, in reforming the Cyrillic alphabet for Serbian usage, created one of the simplest and most logical spelling systems. Karad?i? learned to read and write in the old monastery Tronosha (near his

  • Karafuto (island, Russia)

    Sakhalin Island, island at the far eastern end of Russia. It is located between the Tatar Strait and the Sea of Okhotsk, north of the Japanese island of Hokkaido. With the Kuril Islands, it forms Sakhalin oblast (region). Sakhalin was first settled by Japanese fishermen along its southern coasts.

  • Karaga (people)

    Tofalar, Turkic-speaking people of southern Siberia who numbered about 800 in the mid-1980s. Their traditional habitat was the northern slopes of the Eastern Sayan Mountains, where they lived by nomadic hunting and reindeer breeding. Of all the peoples of Siberia, only the Tofalar failed to develop

  • Karaganda (Kazakhstan)

    Qaraghandy, city, capital of Qaraghandy oblysy (region), central Kazakhstan. It lies at the centre of the important Qaraghandy coal basin. It is the second largest city in the republic and derives its name from the caragana bush, which grows abundantly in the surrounding steppe. The first

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