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  • Karaganda (oblast, Kazakhstan)

    Qaraghandy, oblysy (region), central Kazakhstan. It lies mostly in the Kazakh Uplands in a dry steppe zone, rising gradually in elevation eastward to a maximum in the Karkaraly Mountains of 5,115 feet (1,559 m). The principal rivers, the Nura and Sarysu, are in the west, in the Musbel lowland. The

  • Karagas (people)

    Tofalar, Turkic-speaking people of southern Siberia who numbered about 800 in the mid-1980s. Their traditional habitat was the northern slopes of the Eastern Sayan Mountains, where they lived by nomadic hunting and reindeer breeding. Of all the peoples of Siberia, only the Tofalar failed to develop

  • Karagasy (people)

    Tofalar, Turkic-speaking people of southern Siberia who numbered about 800 in the mid-1980s. Their traditional habitat was the northern slopes of the Eastern Sayan Mountains, where they lived by nomadic hunting and reindeer breeding. Of all the peoples of Siberia, only the Tofalar failed to develop

  • Karageorge (Serbian political leader)

    Karadjordje, leader of the Serbian people in their struggle for independence from the Turks and founder of the Karadjordjevi? (Kara?or?evi?) dynasty. The son of a peasant, Karadjordje (“Black George”), so named because of his dark complexion and penetrating eyes, in his youth herded swine and

  • Karageorgevi? dynasty (Serbian history)

    Karadjordjevi? dynasty, rulers descended from the Serbian rebel leader Karadjordje (Karageorge, or Kara?or?e). It rivaled the Obrenovi? dynasty for control of Serbia during the 19th century and ruled that country as well as its successor state, the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes (called

  • Karageorgevi?, Aleksandar (prince of Serbia)

    Alexander, prince of Serbia from 1842 to 1858. The third son of Karadjordje (Karageorge, or Karaeoree), who had led the movement to win Serb autonomy from the Ottoman Turks (1804–13), Alexander lived in exile until 1842, when the Skup?tina (Serb parliament) elected him prince of Serbia. Assuming

  • Karaghiozis (puppetry)

    Greece: The arts: The traditional shadow puppet theatre, Karaghiozis, is now largely extinct, having been displaced by television and other leisure pursuits. There is, however, a lively Athenian theatrical tradition in which political satire plays an important part.

  • karaginu (jacket)

    dress: Japan: …is a wide-sleeved jacket (karaginu) that reaches only to the waist and has a pattern of hō-ō bird medallions brocaded in colours of the empress’s choice. Attached to the waist at the back of the karaginu is a long, pleated train (mo) of sheer, white silk decorated with a…

  • Karagosh, Mount (mountain, Russia)

    Khakasiya: …9,613 feet (2,930 metres) in Mount Karagosh, and to the west and northwest are the Abakan and Kuznetsk Alatau mountains, with their highest point at Mount Verkhny Zub (7,146 feet [2,178 metres]). The enclosed basin has a dry, severely continental climate that has produced steppe and forest-steppe vegetation in the…

  • Karag?z (Turkish shadow play)

    Karag?z, (Turkish: “Black Eyes,” or “Gypsy”), type of Turkish shadow play, named for its stock hero, Karag?z. The comically risqué plays are improvised from scenarios for local audiences in private homes, coffee shops, public squares, and innyards. The Karag?z play apparently was highly developed

  • ka?āh prasād (sacramental food)

    Sikhism: The worship service: …followed by the distribution of karah prasad, a sacramental food that consists of equal parts of coarsely refined wheat flour, clarified butter, and raw sugar.

  • Karah?sar?sah?p (Turkey)

    Afyonkarahisar, city, western Turkey. It lies along the Akar River at an elevation of 3,392 feet (1,034 metres). In ancient times the town was known as Acro?nus. It fell to the Seljuq Turks in the 13th century and was renamed Karahisar (“Black Fortress”) for the ancient fortress situated atop a

  • Karaikal (India)

    Karaikal, town, Puducherry union territory, southeastern India. It constitutes an enclave on the Coromandel Coast of the Bay of Bengal within eastern Tamil Nadu state, near the mouth of the Arasalar River. Karaikal, the chief town of the Karaikal territory and a former French colony in India, is in

  • Kāraikkāl Ammaiyār (Indian author)

    South Asian arts: Bhakti poetry: …first representative was the poetess Kāraikkāl Ammaiyār, who called herself a pēy, or ghostly minion of ?iva, and sang ecstatically of his dances. Tirumūlar was a mystic and reformer in the so-called Siddhānta (Perfected Man) school of ?aivism, which rejected caste and asceticism, and believed that the body is the…

  • Karaim language

    Turkic languages: Classification: … (North Caucasus), Crimean Tatar, and Karaim. The Karachay and Balkars and Crimean Tatars were deported during World War II; the latter were allowed to resettle in Crimea only after the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s. Karaim is preserved in Lithuania and Ukraine. The languages of the Pechenegs…

  • Karaindash (Kassite king)

    history of Mesopotamia: The Kassites in Babylonia: Karaindash built a temple with bas-relief tile ornaments in Uruk (Erech) around 1420. A new capital west of Baghdad, Dūr Kurigalzu, competing with Babylon, was founded and named after Kurigalzu I (c. 1400–c. 1375). His successors Kadashman-Enlil I (c. 1375–c. 1360) and

  • Kara?skákis, Geórgios (Greek rebel)

    Geórgios Kara?skákis, a klepht, or brigand chief, who played an important role in the Greek War of Independence. He is remembered both for his treachery and for his reckless courage. Kara?skákis was a native of the district of ágrafa in Epirus (Modern Greek: íperos), a region known for its bandits

  • Karaism (Jewish religious movement)

    Karaism, (from Hebrew qara, “to read”), a Jewish religious movement that repudiated oral tradition as a source of divine law and defended the Hebrew Bible as the sole authentic font of religious doctrine and practice. In dismissing the Talmud as man-made law substituted for the God-given Torah,

  • Karaite (religion)

    Israel: Karaites: The Karaites are a Jewish sect that emerged in the early Middle Ages. Several thousand members live in Ramla, and more recently in Beersheba and Ashdod. Like other religious minorities, they have their own religious courts and communal organizations. Considered part of Jewish society, they…

  • Karaite language

    Turkic languages: Classification: … (North Caucasus), Crimean Tatar, and Karaim. The Karachay and Balkars and Crimean Tatars were deported during World War II; the latter were allowed to resettle in Crimea only after the collapse of the Soviet Union in the 1990s. Karaim is preserved in Lithuania and Ukraine. The languages of the Pechenegs…

  • Karaitism (Jewish religious movement)

    Karaism, (from Hebrew qara, “to read”), a Jewish religious movement that repudiated oral tradition as a source of divine law and defended the Hebrew Bible as the sole authentic font of religious doctrine and practice. In dismissing the Talmud as man-made law substituted for the God-given Torah,

  • Karaj (Iran)

    Karaj, city, capital of Alborz province, north-central Iran. Karaj is a large suburb of Tehrān, which lies about 20 miles (32 km) to the west. Karaj is situated in the foothills of the Elburz Mountains, and a fertile agricultural plain extends to the south. Although it was a stopping point on the

  • Karaj Dam (dam, Iran)

    Elburz Mountains: …the Safīd Rūd delta; the Karaj Dam and the Jājrūd Dam, used mainly for supplying water to Tehrān and partly for irrigation; and a series of dams on other rivers of the Māzandarān ostān (province) also used for irrigation.

  • Karajá (people)

    Carajá, tribe of South American Indians living along the Araguaia River, near the inland island of Bananal, in central Brazil. Their language may be distantly related to Ge, which is spoken by most of the surrounding tribes. The three subtribes of the Carajá—the Carajá proper, the Shambioá, and t

  • Karaja rug

    Karaja rug, floor covering handmade in or near the village of Qarājeh (Karaja), in the Qareh Dāgh (Karadagh) region of Iran just south of the Azerbaijan border, northeast of Tabrīz. The best-known pattern shows three geometric medallions that are somewhat similar to those in Caucasian carpets. The

  • Karajan, Herbert von (Austrian conductor)

    Herbert von Karajan, Austrian-born orchestra and opera conductor, a leading international musical figure of the mid-20th century. A child prodigy on the piano, Karajan studied at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. He made his professional conducting debut in 1929 at Salzburg, and he was appointed to a

  • Karajī, Abū Bakr ibn Mu?ammad ibn al-?usayn al- (Persian mathematician and engineer)

    Al-Karajī, mathematician and engineer who held an official position in Baghdad (c. 1010–1015), perhaps culminating in the position of vizier, during which time he wrote his three main works, al-Fakhrī fī?l-jabr wa’l-muqābala (“Glorious on algebra”), al-Badī‘ fī’l-hisāb (“Wonderful on calculation”),

  • Karajī, al- (Persian mathematician and engineer)

    Al-Karajī, mathematician and engineer who held an official position in Baghdad (c. 1010–1015), perhaps culminating in the position of vizier, during which time he wrote his three main works, al-Fakhrī fī?l-jabr wa’l-muqābala (“Glorious on algebra”), al-Badī‘ fī’l-hisāb (“Wonderful on calculation”),

  • karajishi (Chinese ornament)

    Shintō: Shintō religious arts: …called komainu (“Korean dogs”) or karajishi (“Chinese lions”) are placed in front of a shrine. Originally they served to protect the sacred buildings from evil and defilements. After the 9th century they were used for ornamental purposes on ceremonial occasions at the Imperial Court and later came to be used…

  • Karak (ancient Korean tribal league)

    Kaya, tribal league that was formed sometime before the 3rd century ad in the area west of the Naktong River in southern Korea. The traditional date for the founding of the confederation is given as ad 42, but this is considered to be highly unreliable. The confederation was sometimes known as K

  • Karak, Al- (Jordan)

    Al-Karak, town, west-central Jordan. It lies along the Wadi Al-Karak, 15 miles (24 km) east of the Dead Sea. Built on a small, steep-walled butte about 3,100 feet (950 metres) above sea level, the town is the Qir-hareseth, or Qir-heres, of the Bible and was one of the capitals of ancient Moab. Its

  • Karakalpak (people)

    Aral Sea: Environmental consequences: Hardest hit were the Karakalpaks, who live in the southern portion of the region. Winds blowing across the exposed seabed produced dust storms that buffeted the region with a toxic dust contaminated with salt, fertilizer, and pesticides. As a result, the areas’s inhabitants have suffered health problems at unusually…

  • Karakalpak Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (republic, Uzbekistan)

    Karakalpakstan, autonomous republic in Uzbekistan, situated southeast and southwest of the Aral Sea. On the east Karakalpakstan occupies the western half of the Kyzylkum Desert, a vast plain covered with shifting sands. The central part consists of the valley and delta of the Amu Darya (river), a

  • Karakalpak language

    Altaic languages: The Turkic languages: …most of the languages; Kyrgyz, Karakalpak, and Kazakh in particular are linguistically much alike.

  • Karakalpakiya (republic, Uzbekistan)

    Karakalpakstan, autonomous republic in Uzbekistan, situated southeast and southwest of the Aral Sea. On the east Karakalpakstan occupies the western half of the Kyzylkum Desert, a vast plain covered with shifting sands. The central part consists of the valley and delta of the Amu Darya (river), a

  • Karakalpakstan (republic, Uzbekistan)

    Karakalpakstan, autonomous republic in Uzbekistan, situated southeast and southwest of the Aral Sea. On the east Karakalpakstan occupies the western half of the Kyzylkum Desert, a vast plain covered with shifting sands. The central part consists of the valley and delta of the Amu Darya (river), a

  • Karakam (Indian folk dance)

    South Asian arts: Folk dance: The karakam dance of Tamil Nadu state, mainly performed on the annual festival in front of the image of Mariyammai (goddess of pestilence), is to deter her from unleashing an epidemic. Tumbling and leaping, the dancer retains on his head without touching it a pot of…

  • Karakax River (river, Asia)

    Hotan: …oasis is watered by the Karakax (Kalakashi) and Yurungkax (Yulongkashi) rivers, which flow from the high Kunlun Mountains to the south. They join in the north of the oasis to form the Hotan (Khotan) River, which discharges into the desert to the north. The rivers have their maximum flow during…

  • Karakhan Manifesto (China-Soviet Union [1919])

    Karakhan Manifesto, manifesto issued on July 25, 1919, by Lev Karakhan, a member of the foreign ministry of the newly formed Soviet republic, in which he offered to relinquish all Soviet claims to the special rights and privileges won by the Russian tsarist government in China. The proposal, even

  • Karakhan, Lev M. (Soviet diplomat)

    China: Communist-Nationalist cooperation: Lev M. Karakhan, the deputy commissar for foreign affairs, was chosen as plenipotentiary for the negotiations. In addition to negotiating a treaty of mutual recognition, Karakhan was to try to regain for the Soviet Union control of the Chinese Eastern Railway. On the revolutionary front,…

  • Karakhanid dynasty (Asian history)

    Qarakhanid Dynasty, Turkic dynasty (999–1211) that ruled in Transoxania in Central Asia. The Qarakhanids, who belonged to the Qarluq tribal confederation, became prominent during the 9th century. With the disintegration of the Iranian Sāmānid dynasty, the Qarakhanids took over the Sāmānid t

  • Karakhitan state (Central Asian dynasty)

    Yelü Dashi: …first emperor (1124–43) of the Xi (Western) Liao dynasty (1124–1211) of Central Asia.

  • karakia (song)

    New Zealand literature: Maori narrative: the oral tradition: These include karakia (forms of incantation invoking a power to protect or to assist the chanter), paatere (chants by women in rebuttal of gossip or slander, asserting the performer’s high lineage and threatening her detractors), kaioraora (expressions of hatred and abuse of an enemy, promising terrible revenge),…

  • Karakitai dynasty (Central Asian dynasty)

    Yelü Dashi: …first emperor (1124–43) of the Xi (Western) Liao dynasty (1124–1211) of Central Asia.

  • Karaklis (Armenia)

    Vanadzor, city, northern Armenia. It lies at the confluence of the Pambak, Tandzut, and Vanadzoriget rivers. In 1826 the villages of Bolshoy and Maly Karaklis were merged into the town of Karaklis. Construction of the Tiflis-Karaklis-Alexandropol railway at the end of the 19th century speeded the

  • Karako?, Sezai (Turkish poet)

    Turkish literature: Modern Turkish literature: …half of the 20th century, Sezai Karako? blended European and Ottoman sensibilities with a right-wing Islamist perspective. His poetry collections include K?rfez (1959; “The Gulf”) and ?iirler VI (1980; “Poems VI”). Karako? also published numerous essays on Islam. The poet ?smet ?zel began his career as a Marxist, but by…

  • Karakol (Kyrgyzstan)

    Karakol, city, eastern Ysyk-k?l oblasty (province), eastern Kyrgyzstan. It is located on the Karakol River at the northern foot of the Teriskey Alatau (Teskey Ala) Mountains at an elevation of 5,807 feet (1,770 metres). The city was founded in 1869 as a Russian military and administrative outpost;

  • Karakoram Highway (road, Asia)

    Karakoram Highway, roadway that connects Kashgar (Kaxgar) in western Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, China, with Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan. The road, which took almost 20 years (1959–78) to complete, extends for about 500 miles (800 km) through some of the most rugged and inaccessible

  • Karakoram Pass (mountain pass, Asia)

    Xinjiang: Relief: …and east, such as the Karakoram in the Kashmir region and the Korgan in Xinjiang. In the east the Altun Mountains turn northeast and eventually merge with the Qilian Mountains in Gansu province.

  • Karakoram Range (mountains, Asia)

    Karakoram Range, great mountain system extending some 300 miles (500 km) from the easternmost extension of Afghanistan in a southeasterly direction along the watershed between Central and South Asia. Found there are the greatest concentration of high mountains in the world and the longest glaciers

  • Karakorum (ancient site, Mongolia)

    Karakorum, ancient capital of the Mongol empire, whose ruins lie on the upper Orhon River in north-central Mongolia. The site of Karakorum may have been first settled about 750. In 1220 Genghis Khan, the great Mongol conqueror, established his headquarters there and used it as a base for his

  • Karakorum Gonglu (road, Asia)

    Karakoram Highway, roadway that connects Kashgar (Kaxgar) in western Uygur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, China, with Islamabad, the capital of Pakistan. The road, which took almost 20 years (1959–78) to complete, extends for about 500 miles (800 km) through some of the most rugged and inaccessible

  • Karakorum Shan (mountains, Asia)

    Karakoram Range, great mountain system extending some 300 miles (500 km) from the easternmost extension of Afghanistan in a southeasterly direction along the watershed between Central and South Asia. Found there are the greatest concentration of high mountains in the world and the longest glaciers

  • Karak?se (Turkey)

    A?r?, city, in the highlands of eastern Turkey. It lies 5,380 feet (1,640 metres) above sea level in the valley of the Murat River, a tributary of the Euphrates River. The city is a centre for trade in livestock and livestock products and is a transit station on the main highway from Turkey to

  • Karakoyunlular (Turkmen tribal federation)

    Kara Koyunlu, Turkmen tribal federation that ruled Azerbaijan, Armenia, and Iraq from about 1375 to 1468. The Kara Koyunlu were vassals of the Jalāyirid dynasty of Baghdad and Tabrīz from about 1375, when the head of their leading tribe, Kara Mu?ammad Turmush (reigned c. 1375–90), ruled Mosul. The

  • Karakozov, Dmitry (Russian revolutionary)

    Alexander II: Life: …spring of 1866, when Dmitry Karakozov, a young revolutionary, attempted to kill the emperor. Alexander—who bore himself gallantly in the face of great danger—escaped almost by a miracle. The attempt, however, left its mark by completing his conversion to conservatism. For the next eight years, the tsar’s leading minister—maintaining his…

  • Karakul (breed of sheep)

    Karakul, sheep breed of central or west Asian origin, raised chiefly for the skins of very young lambs, which are covered with glossy, tightly curled black coats and are called Persian lamb in the fur trade. The wool of mature Karakul sheep, classified as carpet wool, is a mixture of coarse and

  • Karakul hat (clothing)

    Pakistan: Daily life and social customs: …more often the woolen, boat-shaped Karakul hat (popularized by Mohammed Ali Jinnah) is associated with Pakistan; however, many other hat styles are worn, especially in tribal areas. Western clothes are popular among the urban young, and combinations of Western and Pakistani styles can be seen in the streets.

  • Karakul, Lake (lake, Tajikistan)

    Tajikistan: Drainage and soils: …Pamir region; the largest is Lake Karakul, lying at an elevation of about 13,000 feet. Lake Sarez was formed in 1911 during an earthquake, when a colossal landslide dammed the Murgab River. The Zeravshan Range contains Iskanderkul, which, like most of the country’s lakes, is of glacial origin.

  • Karakum Canal (canal, Turkmenistan)

    Karakum Canal, waterway in Turkmenistan. The main section, begun in 1954 and completed in 1967, runs some 520 miles (840 km) from the Amu Darya (river) to G?kdepe, west of Ashgabat, skirting the Karakum Desert. In the 1970s and ’80s the canal was extended to the Caspian Sea coast, making the total

  • Karakum Desert (desert, Turkmenistan)

    Karakum Desert, great sandy region in Central Asia. It occupies about 70 percent of the area of Turkmenistan. Another, smaller desert in Kazakhstan near the Aral Sea is called the Aral Karakum. The Turkmen Karakum is approximately 135,000 square miles (350,000 square km) in area, extending some 500

  • Karakumsky Kanal (canal, Turkmenistan)

    Karakum Canal, waterway in Turkmenistan. The main section, begun in 1954 and completed in 1967, runs some 520 miles (840 km) from the Amu Darya (river) to G?kdepe, west of Ashgabat, skirting the Karakum Desert. In the 1970s and ’80s the canal was extended to the Caspian Sea coast, making the total

  • Karakumy Priaralskiye (desert, Kazakhstan)

    Karakum Desert: …Aral Sea is called the Aral Karakum.

  • karakurt (spider)

    Black widow, (genus Latrodectus), any of several species of black spiders distinguished by an hourglass-shaped marking on the abdomen. Black widows, especially Latrodectus mactans, are found throughout much of the world. The bite of the black widow often produces muscle pain, nausea, and mild

  • Karaman (historical principality, Anatolia)

    Bayezid I: …in Anatolia and defeated the Karaman emirate at Ak?ay (1397). These conquests brought Bayezid into conflict with the Central Asian conqueror Timur (Tamerlane), who claimed suzerainty over the Anatolian Turkmen rulers and offered refuge to those expelled by Bayezid. In a confrontation between Bayezid and Timur in ?ubukovas? near Ankara…

  • Karamanli, A?med (Karamanli ruler)

    North Africa: Ottoman rule in the Maghrib: …the chief of the cavalry, A?mad Karamanli, usurped power and established his own dynasty. The Karamanlis ruled Libya until 1835 when, in the wake of a tribal rebellion supported by the British, direct Ottoman rule was reimposed there. From the mid-16th century Libya became active in the lucrative trans-Saharan trade…

  • Karamanlis, Konstantinos (Greek statesman)

    Konstantinos Karamanlis, Greek statesman who was prime minister from 1955 to 1963 and again from 1974 to 1980. He then served as president from 1980 to 1985 and from 1990 to 1995. Karamanlis gave Greece competent government and political stability while his conservative economic policies stimulated

  • Karamanlis, Kostas (prime minister of Greece)

    Kostas Karamanlis , Greek politician who served as prime minister of Greece (2004–09). Karamanlis was the nephew of Konstantinos Karamanlis, who, as government minister, prime minister, and president, had shaped Greek politics for nearly half a century. The younger Karamanlis started his political

  • karāmāt (Islamic mysticism)

    saint: Islam: …endowed with charismatic powers (karāmāt), allowing them to go miraculously from one place to another far away; to wield authority over animals, plants, and clouds; and to bridge the gap between life and death. The Prophet Muhammad (died 632 ce) had negated the existence of saints, but the piety…

  • Karamat, Jehangir (Pakistani general)

    Pakistan: Growing unrest, tension with the military, and Sharif’s ouster: Jehangir Karamat, spoke for a frustrated public when he appeared to indicate the country was teetering at the abyss. However, Karamat’s role in the political process angered Nawaz Sharif, and in October 1998 the prime minister pressured the army high command into forcing the general’s…

  • Karamay (China)

    Karamay, city, northern Uighur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, far northwestern China. Located in the Junggar (Dzungarian) Basin, it is about 200 miles (320 km) northwest of ürümqi (Urumchi), the provincial capital. Rich oil reserves were discovered in the region in 1955, and the first oil field was

  • Karamayi (China)

    Karamay, city, northern Uighur Autonomous Region of Xinjiang, far northwestern China. Located in the Junggar (Dzungarian) Basin, it is about 200 miles (320 km) northwest of ürümqi (Urumchi), the provincial capital. Rich oil reserves were discovered in the region in 1955, and the first oil field was

  • Karamazov brothers (fictional characters)

    Karamazov brothers, fictional characters, the central figures in Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov

  • Karambar Pass (mountain pass, Asia)

    Hindu Kush: Physical features: …locally complex topography, although the Karambar Pass (14,250 feet [4,343 metres]) between the valleys of the Konar (called the Kunar or Chitral in Pakistan) and Gilgit rivers may be tentatively accepted as the boundary. The western limit also is uncertain, as the mountains lose height and fan out into minor…

  • Karami, Rashid (prime minister of Lebanon)

    Charles Hélou: …while the Muslim prime minister, Rashid Karami, favoured it. Under great pressure from Arab nations and from Lebanese Muslims, Hélou in 1969 moved to avert a crisis by accepting Karami’s proposed policy of coordination between the PLO and the Lebanese army, whereby the PLO secured the right to establish armed…

  • Karamojong (people)

    Karimojong, eastern Nilotic pastoral people of northeastern Uganda. The Karimojong are the largest of a cluster of culturally and historically related peoples, including the Jie, Teso, Dodoth (or Dodos), and Labwor of Uganda and the Turkana of neighbouring Kenya. They speak an Eastern Nilotic

  • Karamzin, Nikolay Mikhaylovich (Russian author)

    Nikolay Mikhaylovich Karamzin, Russian historian, poet, and journalist who was the leading exponent of the sentimentalist school in Russian literature. From an early age, Karamzin was interested in Enlightenment philosophy and western European literature. After extensive travel in western Europe,

  • Karan, Donna (American designer)

    Donna Karan, American designer who was internationally acclaimed for the simplicity and comfort of her clothes. Faske’s father was a tailor, and her mother was a model and a showroom sales representative in New York City’s garment district. She launched a career in fashion at age 14 when she lied

  • kara?a ?arīra (Hinduism)

    death: The fate of the soul: …moves into another body (the kara?a ?arīra), whose form depends on the individual’s karman. It could be a plant, a cockroach, a canine intestinal parasite, a mouse, or a human being. Unlike Jains, Hindus believe that whatever body the soul eventually moves into, it inhabits as sole tenant, not as…

  • Kara?akutūhala (work by Bhāskara II)

    Bhāskara II: … (“Head Jewel of Accuracy”) and Kara?akutūhala (“Calculation of Astronomical Wonders”), he wrote on his astronomical observations of planetary positions, conjunctions, eclipses, cosmography, geography, and the mathematical techniques and astronomical equipment used in these studies. Bhāskara II was also a noted astrologer, and,

  • Karanga (people)

    Zimbabwe: Ethnic and linguistic composition: …Kalanga to the southwest, the Karanga to the east around Nyanda (formerly Fort Victoria), the Zezuru to the northeast, and the Rozwi and Tonga to the north. Generations of intermarriage have to a degree blurred the linguistic division between the Shona and Ndebele peoples.

  • karanga (song)

    New Zealand literature: Maori narrative: the oral tradition: …them learn their heritage), and karanga (somewhere between song and chant, performed by women welcoming or farewelling visitors on the marae). Some chants are recited rather than sung. These include karakia (forms of incantation invoking a power to protect or to assist the chanter), paatere (chants by women in rebuttal…

  • Karanga language (language)

    Niger-Congo languages: Early records: These words probably come from Karanga, a southeastern Bantu language. From then on eastern Bantu words and phrases occur in Portuguese records, and in 1523 a vocabulary that resembles modern Akan from Ghana was also recorded. In 1591 the Italian mathematician Filippo Pigafetta included a number of Kongo words and…

  • Karankawa (people)

    Karankawa, several groups of North American Indians that lived along the Gulf of Mexico in Texas, from about Galveston Bay to Corpus Christi Bay. They were first encountered by the French explorer La Salle in the late 17th century, and their rapid decline began with the arrival of Stephen Austin

  • Karanqa (people)

    pre-Columbian civilizations: The highlands and the low countries: The Karanqa also controlled corn (maize) fields at less lofty altitudes in what today is Chilean territory, several days’ walk away. Farther west and closer to the coast were their fruit and coca-leaf gardens. Finally, even farther north, across the Atacama Desert near the modern city…

  • karaoke (entertainment)

    Karaoke, (Japanese: “empty orchestra”) Use of a device that plays instrumental accompaniments to songs with the vocal tracks removed, permitting the user to sing the lead. Karaoke apparently first appeared in the amusement quarter of Kōbe, Japan, where it became popular among businessmen in the

  • Karaosmano?lu, Yakup Kadri (Turkish author)

    Yakup Kadri Karaosmano?lu, writer and translator, one of the most renowned figures in modern Turkish literature, noted for vigorous studies of 20th-century Turkish life. Educated at a French school in Cairo and then in ?zmir, he moved to Constantinople (now Istanbul) in 1908. He attracted attention

  • Karas? (Turkmen ruler)

    Karas? Dynasty: Founded by Karas?, a frontier ruler under Seljuq suzerainty, the principality had two branches, with their respective centres in Bal?kesir and Bergama (Pergamum). Of the sons of Karas?, Demirhan was defeated by the Ottoman ruler Orhan, and Bal?kesir was annexed (c. 1345). The coastal region of ?anakkale-Troy…

  • Karas? dynasty (Turkmen dynasty)

    Karas? Dynasty, Turkmen dynasty (c. 1300–60) that ruled in the Bal?kesir-?anakkale region of western Anatolia. Founded by Karas?, a frontier ruler under Seljuq suzerainty, the principality had two branches, with their respective centres in Bal?kesir and Bergama (Pergamum). Of the sons of Karas?,

  • Karasu (river, Asia)

    Tigris-Euphrates river system: Physiography of the Euphrates: …are the Murat and the Karasu rivers in the Armenian Highland of northeastern Turkey. Considerably altered in the 20th century by water-control projects, they join to form the Euphrates at Keban, near Elaz??, where the Keban Dam (completed 1974), spans a deep gorge. The river breaks through the Taurus Mountains…

  • Karasu, Bilge (Turkish writer)

    Turkish literature: Modern Turkish literature: …vard? (1963; Death in Troy), Bilge Karasu created works that display a sophisticated narrative style. Among his novels and novellas are Uzun sürmü? bir günün ak?am? (1970; “The Evening of One Long Day”), G??mü? kediler bah?esi (1979; The Garden of Departed Cats), K?smet büfesi (1982; “The Buffet of Fate”), and…

  • Karasuk culture (archaeology)

    Central Asian arts: Neolithic and Metal Age cultures: …the Iron and historical age—the Karasuk culture was located in the Minusinsk Basin, on the Yenisey River and on the upper reaches of the Ob River. Its creators must have been in touch with East Asia, for certain bronze objects, notably elbow-shaped knives, are related to those used between the…

  • karat (gold measurement)

    Karat, a measure of the fineness (i.e., purity) of gold. It is spelled carat outside the United States but should not be confused with the unit used to measure the weight of gems, also called carat. A gold karat is 124 part, or 4.1667 percent, of the whole, and the purity of a gold alloy is e

  • Karata?, Dursun (Turkish terrorist leader)

    Revolutionary People's Liberation Party/Front: The group’s leader, Dursun Karata?, had been arrested and jailed after the events of 1980, though he escaped and fled to Europe a decade later. In the mid-1990s he served a minimal jail term in France, and he died in the Netherlands in August 2008. After Karata? died,…

  • Karata?-Semayük (ancient site, Turkey)

    Anatolia: Early Bronze Age: A single building at Karata?-Semayük was defended by a ditch, a plastered rampart, and an enclosure wall. Villages such as Demirci Hüyük relied on the outer wall of a radial arrangement of houses. The citadel of Troy had heavy stone walls with mud-brick superstructure, a clay-covered glacis, and projecting…

  • karate (martial art)

    Karate, (Japanese: “empty hand”) unarmed martial-arts discipline employing kicking, striking, and defensive blocking with arms and legs. Emphasis is on concentrating as much of the body’s power as possible at the point and instant of impact. Striking surfaces include the hands (particularly the

  • Karate Kid, The (film by Avildsen [1984])

    John G. Avildsen: …again found box-office success, with The Karate Kid. The immensely popular Rocky-ish tale centres on a teenage weakling (played by Ralph Macchio) whose life turns around after some tutelage in philosophy and martial arts from an unassuming Japanese janitor (Pat Morita); Avildsen edited the picture himself. The Karate Kid, Part…

  • Karatepe (archaeological site, Turkey)

    Karatepe, (Turkish: Black Hill) site of a Late Hittite fortress city, located in the piedmont country of the Taurus Mountains in south-central Turkey. The city, dating from the 8th century bce, was discovered in 1945 by Helmuth T. Bossert and Halet ?ambel. It was built with a polygonal fortress

  • Karatkyevich, Vladimir (Belarusian writer)

    Belarus: Literature: …novels of Vasil Bykau and Uladzimir Karatkievich. Among later 20th-century writers, the poets Yawhyeniya Yanishchyts and Ales Razanov and the short-story writer Anatol Sys should be noted. Other well-known writers of the late 20th and early 21st centuries are Svetlana Alexievich, whose Voices from Chernobyl was translated into English in…

  • Karatsu (Japan)

    Karatsu, city, northwestern Saga ken (prefecture), northwestern Kyushu, Japan. It is located on Karatsu Bay, about 30 miles (50 km) southwest of Fukuoka. The city’s name is derived from the Japanese terms kara (referring to China) and tsu (“port”), reflecting the city’s history as an ancient port

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