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  • Karnaphuli River (river, Bangladesh)

    Karnaphuli River, major watercourse of the Chittagong region, Bangladesh. Rising in the Mizo Hills of Mizoram state, northeastern India, it flows about 170 miles (270 km) south and southwest through the southeastern arm of Bangladesh to empty into the Bay of Bengal, 12 miles (19 km) below the city

  • Karnatak music (Indian music)

    Karnatak music, music of southern India (generally south of the city of Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh state) that evolved from ancient Hindu traditions and was relatively unaffected by the Arab and Iranian influences that, since the late 12th and early 13th centuries, as a result of the Islamic

  • Karnātaka (linguistic region, India)

    Karnataka, linguistic region of the Deccan plateau, south-central India, generally corresponding to Karnataka state. Of irregular shape, and defined as the area in which Kannada (Kanarese) is spoken, Karnataka was unified during the Vijayanagar kingdom (c. 1300–1600) until successive conquests by

  • Karnataka (state, India)

    Karnataka, state of India, located on the western coast of the subcontinent. It is bounded by the states of Goa and Maharashtra to the north, Telangana to the east, Tamil Nadu to the southeast, and Kerala to the south and by the Arabian Sea to the west. The state extends for about 420 miles (675

  • Karnataka Coast (lowlands, India)

    Karnataka Coast, coastal lowlands in western Karnataka state, southwestern India. Constituting an area of about 4,000 square miles (10,000 square km), it is bounded by Konkan to the north, the Western Ghats to the east, the Kerala Plains to the south, and the Arabian Sea to the west. It stretches

  • Karnataka Plateau (plateau, India)

    Karnataka Plateau, upland region of Karnataka state, southern India. The plateau has an area of about 73,000 square miles (189,000 square km) and an average elevation of about 2,600 feet (800 metres). The name of the plateau is derived from Karnad (“Land of Black Soil”). The Karnataka Plateau is

  • Karnatic (linguistic region, India)

    Karnataka, linguistic region of the Deccan plateau, south-central India, generally corresponding to Karnataka state. Of irregular shape, and defined as the area in which Kannada (Kanarese) is spoken, Karnataka was unified during the Vijayanagar kingdom (c. 1300–1600) until successive conquests by

  • Karnatic music (Indian music)

    Karnatak music, music of southern India (generally south of the city of Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh state) that evolved from ancient Hindu traditions and was relatively unaffected by the Arab and Iranian influences that, since the late 12th and early 13th centuries, as a result of the Islamic

  • Karnatic temple architecture (Indian architecture)

    Karnatic temple architecture, style of architecture employed largely in the Karnātaka (formerly Mysore) area of southern India. Closely allied to the South Indian style, it developed a distinctive idiom in the mid-12th century under the Hoysa?a dynasty. The temples of this dynasty are

  • Karnatic Wars (Euro-Indian wars)

    Carnatic Wars, series of military contests during the 18th century between the British, the French, the Marathas, and Mysore for control of the coastal strip of eastern India from Nellore (north of Madras [now Chennai]) southward (the Tamil country). The name Carnatic properly refers to the region

  • Karnattah (Spain)

    Granada, city, capital of Granada provincia (province) in the comunidad autónoma (autonomous community) of Andalusia, southern Spain. It lies along the Genil River at the northwestern slope of the Sierra Nevada, 2,260 feet (689 metres) above sea level. The Darro River, much reduced by irrigation

  • Karner blue butterfly (insect)

    blue butterfly: The Karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis), once found throughout the savanna and barrens habitats of North America, is listed as endangered in the United States. Its numbers have declined as a result of habitat fragmentation and a lack of natural disturbances such as wildfire, which…

  • Karneval (carnival)

    Fasching, the Roman Catholic Shrovetide carnival as celebrated in German-speaking countries. There are many regional differences concerning the name, duration, and activities of the carnival. It is known as Fasching in Bavaria and Austria, Fosnat in Franconia, Fasnet in Swabia, Fastnacht in Mainz

  • Karneval der Kulturen (festival, Berlin, Germany)

    Germany: Arts festivals: …the German-speaking world; and the Karneval der Kulturen (“Carnival of Cultures”), a festival of world cultures. Munich has an opera festival in July and August, with emphasis on Richard Strauss. Festivals in Würzburg and Augsburg are dedicated to Mozart. Ansbach has a Bach festival, and Bonn has one celebrating Beethoven.…

  • Karnian Stage (stratigraphy)

    Carnian Stage, lowermost of the three divisions of the Upper Triassic Series, representing those rocks deposited worldwide during Carnian time (235 million to 228 million years ago) in the Triassic Period. The stage name is probably derived from the Austrian state of K?rnten (Carinthia), where the

  • Karnice-Karnicke, Count (Russian noble)

    death: The point of no return: …Poe’s macabre short stories that Count Karnice-Karnicke, a Russian nobleman, patented a coffin of particular type. If the “corpse” regained consciousness after burial, it could summon help from the surface by activating a system of flags and bells. Advertisements described the price of the apparatus as “exceedingly reasonable, only about…

  • Karnische Alpen (mountains, Europe)

    Carnic Alps, range of the Eastern Alps, extending along the Austrian-Italian border for 60 miles (100 km) from the Pustertal (valley) and the Piave River (west) to the Gailitz (Italian Silizza) River (east). The mountains are bounded by the Dolomites (southwest), the Gail River and the Gailtaler

  • Karnival Kid, The (cartoon)

    Mickey Mouse: …first words (“Hot dogs!”) until The Karnival Kid (1929). Steamboat Willie was an immediate sensation and led to the studio’s dominance in the animated market for many years.

  • karn?ffel (card game)

    card game: Origins: …earliest game known by name—karn?ffel, played from 1428 in Germany—was such, though certain cards of a randomly selected suit possessed trick-taking powers of varying degrees of superiority. Trump suits as such were a European invention (see tarot game), as was the subsequent idea of bidding to select a trump…

  • K?rnten (state, Austria)

    K?rnten, Bundesland (federal state), southern Austria, bordered by Bundesl?nder Salzburg (north and east) and Steiermark (Styria; north), on the south by Slovenia and Italy, and on the west by East Tirol. Drained by the Drava (Drau), Gail, M?ll, Gurk, and Lavant rivers, it occupies an area of 3,681

  • karo (shrub)

    Pittosporaceae: Karo (P. crassifolium) often is planted as a windbreak on seacoasts. The genera Hymenosporum, Bursaria, and Sollya also contain ornamental species.

  • Karo, Joseph ben Ephraim (Jewish scholar)

    Joseph ben Ephraim Karo, Spanish-born Jewish author of the last great codification of Jewish law, the Bet Yosef (“House of Joseph”). Its condensation, the Shul?an ?arukh (“The Prepared Table,” or “The Well-Laid Table”), is still authoritative for Orthodox Jewry. When the Jews were expelled from

  • Karok (people)

    Shastan: Like the Yurok and Karok, the Shastan subsisted largely on acorns and salmon and traded with other northern California Indians, using such currency as dentalium shells and scarlet woodpecker scalps. Shastan villages, dwellings, and communal sweat houses were similar to those of other tribes in the region, though Shastan…

  • Karok language

    North American Indian languages: Language contact: For example, among the Karuk of northwestern California, a tribe that suffered harsh treatment at the hands of whites, there are only a few loanwords from English, such as ápus ‘apple(s),’ and a few calques (loan translations), such as the ‘pear’ being called vírusur ‘bear’ because in Karuk the…

  • Karoline Amalie Elisabeth (queen of United Kingdom)

    Caroline of Brunswick-Lüneburg, wife of King George IV of the United Kingdom who—like her husband, who was also her cousin—was the centre of various scandals. The daughter of Charles William Ferdinand, duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, Caroline married George (then prince of Wales) on April 8, 1795, but

  • Karoline von Brandenburg-Ansbach (queen of Great Britain)

    Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach, wife of King George II of Great Britain (reigned 1727–60). Beautiful and intelligent, she exercised an influence over her husband that was decisive in establishing and maintaining Sir Robert Walpole as prime minister (1730–42). The daughter of a German prince,

  • Karolinska Institute (Swedish organization)

    Karolinska Institute, a Swedish institute for medical education and research, founded in 1810. The primary interest of the institute is research; it has achieved international renown for its biomedical research in particular. As a centre of medical education, the Karolinska Institute trains

  • Karolus Magnus et Leo Papa (Latin epic)

    Latin literature: The Carolingian renaissance: …but known by the title Karolus Magnus et Leo Papa (“Charlemagne and Pope Leo”). Its example was followed in the next generation by Ermoldus Nigellus, writing about the deeds of Louis the Pious, and the tradition of earlier Carolingian authors is extended by two major political poets, Walafrid Strabo and…

  • Károly Durazzói (king of Naples)

    Charles III, king of Naples (1381–86) and king (as Charles II) of Hungary (1385–86). A leading figure of the Hungarian branch of the Angevin dynasty, he was an astute politician who won both of his thrones by triumphing over rival claimants. Charles was educated at the court of Louis I of H

  • Károly Róbert (king of Hungary)

    Charles I, courtly, pious king of Hungary who restored his kingdom to the status of a great power and enriched and civilized it. Charles was the son of Charles Martel of Anjou-Naples and Clemencia of Habsburg, daughter of the Holy Roman emperor Rudolf I. As great-grandson of Stephen V and with

  • Karolyi, Bela (Romanian gymnastics coach)

    Nadia Com?neci: Bela Karolyi, later the Romanian gymnastics coach, when she was six years old. She first competed in the national junior championships in 1969, placing 13th, and she won the competition in 1970. In her first international competition, in 1972, a pre-Olympic junior meet for the…

  • Károlyi, Gyula, Gróf (prime minister of Hungary)

    Hungary: Financial crisis: the rise of right radicalism: His successor, Gyula, Count Károlyi, was unable to cope with the situation. Political agitation mounted, and on October 1, 1932, Horthy appointed as prime minister the leader of the right-wing radicals, Gyula G?mb?s.

  • Károlyi, Mihály, Gróf (Hungarian statesman)

    Mihály, Count Károlyi, Hungarian statesman who before World War I desired a reorientation of Austro-Hungarian foreign policy toward friendship with states other than Germany. He also advocated concessions to Hungary’s non-Magyar subjects. After the war, as president of the Hungarian Democratic

  • Károlyváros (Croatia)

    Karlovac, city in western Croatia. It lies southwest of Zagreb at the confluence of the Korana and Kupa rivers. Karlovac has Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic cathedrals and the oldest public library in Croatia. An important railway and road junction, the city has a considerable transit trade in

  • Karomama (Egyptian noble)

    Egyptian art and architecture: Copper and bronze: …period is the figure of Karomama. The exceptionally elegant modeling of the female form is greatly enriched by inlays of gold and silver reproducing the feathered pattern of the gown and an elaborate collar of floral motifs.

  • Karonga (Malawi)

    Karonga, town, northern Malawi, situated on the western shore of Lake Nyasa (Lake Malawi) in the traditional homeland of the Ngonde people. Karonga became the stronghold of the Swahili-Arab trader Mlozi about 1880. The modern town, however, was founded with the opening of a British trading post

  • Karoo (region, South Africa)

    Karoo, arid to semiarid geographic region of Eastern Cape, Western Cape, and Northern Cape provinces, South Africa. The Karoo is best defined by its vegetation, which consists of assorted succulents and low scrub bushes spaced from one foot to several feet apart. The area is devoid of surface

  • Karoo National Botanic Garden (garden, Worcester, South Africa)

    National Botanic Gardens of South Africa: Karoo Botanic Garden at Worcester, for example, maintains more than 5,000 varieties, mostly South African succulents, and the Edith Stephens Cape Flats Flora Reserve specializes in flowering bulbs of the iris and lily families.

  • Karoo System (geological system, Africa)

    Karoo System, geologic system of rocks outcropping over a 1,560,000-square-kilometre (600,000-square-mile) area of Africa from the Equator south to the Cape of Good Hope. The time span of the Karoo System extends from the Carboniferous and Permian periods (about 359 million to 251 million years

  • Karoui, Nabil (Tunisian businessman and politician)

    Tunisia: Dissatisfaction with the political establishment and the election of Kais Saied: …moved to ban media mogul Nabil Karoui from running for president, because of his use of what many viewed as unfair campaign tactics. But Sebsi was either unwilling or unable to sign the bill. He became severely ill just days later and died the following month. In July Karoui was…

  • Karouiine (mosque and university, Fès, Morocco)

    Qarawīyīn, mosque and Islāmic university in Fès, Morocco. The Qarawīyīn Mosque, which was enlarged to its present form in the 12th century, is the largest in North Africa and can accommodate about 22,000 worshipers. Only Muslims are admitted into the mosque, but the interior can be glimpsed

  • Karp, David (American Web developer and entrepreneur)

    David Karp, American Web developer and entrepreneur who founded the blogging site Tumblr. Karp grew up on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, the elder of two sons of a teacher and a composer. He became interested in technology and programming at a young age, teaching himself HTML at 11. When he was 15,

  • Karp, Natalia (Polish-born concert pianist)

    Natalia Karp, (Natalia Weissman), Polish-born concert pianist (born Feb. 27, 1911, Krakow, Austria-Hungary [now in Poland]—died July 9, 2007, London, Eng.), survived a Nazi concentration camp in part on the strength of her musical talent. She made her professional debut in Berlin in 1929 with the

  • Karp, Richard Manning (American mathematician and computer scientist)

    Richard Manning Karp, American mathematician and computer scientist and winner of the 1985 A.M. Turing Award, the highest honour in computer science, for “his continuing contributions to the theory of algorithms including the development of efficient algorithms for network flow and other

  • Kárpathos (island, Greece)

    Kárpathos, island of the Dodecanese (Modern Greek: Dodekánisa) group in the Aegean Sea, southeastern Greece. With neighbouring islands, it constitutes the perifereiakí enótita (regional unit) and dímos (municipality) of Kárpathos in the South Aegean (Nótio Aigaío) periféreia (region). The principal

  • Kárpáti, Rudolf (Hungarian athlete)
  • Karpaty Mountains (mountains, Europe)

    Carpathian Mountains, a geologically young European mountain chain forming the eastward continuation of the Alps. From the Danube Gap, near Bratislava, Slovakia, they swing in a wide crescent-shaped arc some 900 miles (1,450 kilometres) long to near Or?ova, Romania, at the portion of the Danube

  • Karpinsk, Mount (mountain, Russia)

    Ural Mountains: Physiography: … (6,217 feet [1,895 metres]) and Mount Karpinsk (6,161 feet [1,878 metres]). These first two sections are typically Alpine and are strewn with glaciers and heavily marked by permafrost.

  • Karpiński, Franciszek (Polish poet)

    Franciszek Karpiński, Polish Enlightenment lyric poet who is best known for his religious and patriotic verses. Karpiński attended a Jesuit school, where he received a traditional education. He served as a court poet for the princely Czartoryski family until he retired to his family farm. Some of

  • Karplus, Martin (American-Austrian chemist)

    Martin Karplus, American Austrian chemist who was awarded the 2013 Nobel Prize for Chemistry for developing accurate computer models of chemical reactions that were able to use features of both classical physics and quantum mechanics. He shared the prize with American-British-Israeli chemist

  • Karpov, Anatoly Yevgenyevich (Russian chess player)

    Anatoly Yevgenyevich Karpov, Russian chess master who dominated world competition from the mid-1970s to the mid-1980s. Karpov moved to Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) with his family early in life. A child prodigy, he learned to play chess at the age of four and was rated a first-category player by

  • Karppinen, Pertti (Finnish athlete)

    Pertti Karppinen, Finnish sculler who won gold medals in three consecutive Olympic single sculls events (1976, 1980, 1984). His Olympic success, coupled with world championships in 1979 and 1985, tied him with Peter-Michael Kolbe of Germany as the only five-time single sculls champions. Standing

  • Karrāmīyah (Shī?ite sect)

    Qarmatian, a member of the Shī?ite Muslim sect known as the Ismā?īlites. The Qarmatians flourished in Iraq, Yemen, and especially Bahrain during the 9th to 11th centuries, taking their name from ?amdān Qarma?, who led the sect in southern Iraq in the second half of the 9th century. The Qarmatians

  • Karras, Alex (American football player and announcer)

    Alex Karras, (Alexander George Karras), American football player and actor (born July 15, 1935, Gary, Ind.—died Oct. 10, 2012, Los Angeles, Calif.), was the stalwart defensive lineman (1958–70) for the NFL Detroit Lions before enjoying a career in Hollywood films, notably in such zany comedies as

  • Karras, Alexander George (American football player and announcer)

    Alex Karras, (Alexander George Karras), American football player and actor (born July 15, 1935, Gary, Ind.—died Oct. 10, 2012, Los Angeles, Calif.), was the stalwart defensive lineman (1958–70) for the NFL Detroit Lions before enjoying a career in Hollywood films, notably in such zany comedies as

  • Karre Mountains (mountains, Central African Republic)

    Karre Mountains, mountain range, western Central African Republic. The range rises to 4,625 feet (1,410 m) at Mount Ngaoui, the highest point in the country. The granite hills, split by southwest-northeast fractures, extend westward across the border into Cameroon. Their southward and eastward

  • karren (geology)

    cave: Pavement karst: These are collectively known as karren. Karren include solutionally widened joints (kluftkarren, or cleftkarren), small runnels (rinnenkarren, or runnelkarren), small residual pinnacles (spitzkarren, or pinnacle karren), and many other forms.

  • Karren, Der (work by Traven)

    B. Traven: …series are Der Karren (1931; The Carreta), Regierung (1931; Government), Der Marsch ins Reich der Caoba (1933; March to the Monteria), Die Rebellion der Gehenkten (1936; The Rebellion of the Hanged), and Ein General kommt aus dem Dschungel (1940; General from the Jungle).

  • Karrer, Paul (Swiss chemist)

    Paul Karrer, Swiss chemist who investigated the constitution of carotenoids, flavins, and vitamins A and B2, for which he shared the 1937 Nobel Prize for Chemistry with Sir Norman Haworth of Great Britain. Born in Russia of Swiss parents, Karrer was educated in Switzerland and received his doctoral

  • karri (plant)

    eucalyptus: Major species and uses: botryoides); karri (E. diversicolor); Tasmanian bluegum; white ironbark, or yellow gum (E. leucoxylon); jarrah (E. marginata); messmate stringybark (E. obliqua); red mahogany (E. resinifera); northern gray ironbark; and others. The bark of many species is used in papermaking and

  • Karroo (region, South Africa)

    Karoo, arid to semiarid geographic region of Eastern Cape, Western Cape, and Northern Cape provinces, South Africa. The Karoo is best defined by its vegetation, which consists of assorted succulents and low scrub bushes spaced from one foot to several feet apart. The area is devoid of surface

  • Karroo (plateau, South Africa)

    Little Karoo, intermontane plateau basin in Western Cape province, South Africa, lying between the east-west oriented Groot-Swart Mountains (north), the Lange Mountains (southwest), and the Outeniqua Mountains (southeast), with the discontinuous Kammanassie Mountains running between those ranges.

  • Karroo System (geological system, Africa)

    Karoo System, geologic system of rocks outcropping over a 1,560,000-square-kilometre (600,000-square-mile) area of Africa from the Equator south to the Cape of Good Hope. The time span of the Karoo System extends from the Carboniferous and Permian periods (about 359 million to 251 million years

  • Karroubi, Mehdi (Iranian cleric and politician)

    Mehdi Karroubi, Iranian cleric and reformist politician who emerged as a leading critic of the Iranian government during his presidential candidacies in 2005 and 2009. The son of a mullah, Karroubi attended a Qur?ānic school in Najaf, Iraq. He received advanced religious training in Qom, Iran,

  • Karrūbī, Mehdī (Iranian cleric and politician)

    Mehdi Karroubi, Iranian cleric and reformist politician who emerged as a leading critic of the Iranian government during his presidential candidacies in 2005 and 2009. The son of a mullah, Karroubi attended a Qur?ānic school in Najaf, Iraq. He received advanced religious training in Qom, Iran,

  • Kars (Turkey)

    Kars, city, northeastern Turkey. Kars is situated on a plateau 5,740 feet (1,750 metres) above sea level on the Kars River, a tributary of the Aras River, near the border with Armenia. The city, divided into an older upper section and a newer part to the south, stretches out on either side of the

  • Karsavina, Tamara Platonovna (Russian ballerina)

    Tamara Platonovna Karsavina, Anglo-Russian ballerina whose partnership with Vaslav Nijinsky in Michel Fokine’s avant-garde ballets helped to revive interest in ballet in western Europe. The daughter of a famous dancer, Platon Karsavin, she was educated at the Imperial Ballet School, St. Petersburg,

  • Karsh of Ottawa (Armenian-Canadian photographer)

    Yousuf Karsh, Armenian Canadian photographer known for his portraits of important and famous men and women of politics, Hollywood, and the arts, from Albert Einstein and Sir Winston Churchill to Walt Disney and Grace Kelly. As an Armenian in what is now Turkey, Karsh endured persecution and

  • Karsh, Yousuf (Armenian-Canadian photographer)

    Yousuf Karsh, Armenian Canadian photographer known for his portraits of important and famous men and women of politics, Hollywood, and the arts, from Albert Einstein and Sir Winston Churchill to Walt Disney and Grace Kelly. As an Armenian in what is now Turkey, Karsh endured persecution and

  • Karshi (Uzbekistan)

    Karshi, city, southern Uzbekistan, in the Karshi oasis, on the Kashka River. At least 1,000 years old, it lay on the caravan route from Samarkand and Bukhara to Afghanistan and India; it was known as Nakhsheb, or Nesef, until the 14th century, when a fort (Turkic karshi, “against”) was built there.

  • Karshi Steppe (region, Uzbekistan)

    Kashkadarya: …it consists largely of the Karshi Steppe, an extensive foothill plain intersected by the Kashka River. In the east and southeast are spurs of the Zeravshan, Gissar, and Kugitangtau mountains. The climate is continental and dry, precipitation occurring mainly in winter. Cotton, grown on irrigated land along the river, is…

  • Kar?i (Uzbekistan)

    Karshi, city, southern Uzbekistan, in the Karshi oasis, on the Kashka River. At least 1,000 years old, it lay on the caravan route from Samarkand and Bukhara to Afghanistan and India; it was known as Nakhsheb, or Nesef, until the 14th century, when a fort (Turkic karshi, “against”) was built there.

  • karsikko (Finnish custom)

    kalma: Finns had a custom, called karsikko, of stripping a tall fir or pine tree in memory of the dead and making offerings to it. The Cheremis were also known to put presents on the trees for the dead. A karsikko made somewhere between the former home of the deceased and…

  • Kar?iyaka (Turkey)

    Kar?iyaka, former town, west-central Turkey. It is located on the north shore of the Gulf of ?zmir, and it constitutes a northwestern district of ?zmir city. Kar?iyaka is a shipbuilding centre with port facilities. The adjoining area is mostly agricultural; manufactures include cotton and woolen

  • Karski, Jan (Polish hero)

    Jan Karski, (Jan Kozielewski), Polish-born Resistance hero (born April 24, 1914, Lodz, Pol.—died July 13, 2000, Washington, D.C.), as a member of the Polish Resistance during World War II, endured considerable hardship to infiltrate the Warsaw Ghetto and Nazi concentration camps and report back to

  • Karskoe More (sea, Russia)

    Kara Sea, marginal sea of the Arctic Ocean, located off western Siberia (Russia), between the Novaya Zemlya islands (west), Franz Josef Land (northwest), and the Severnaya Zemlya islands (east). It is connected with the Arctic Basin (north), the Barents Sea (west), and the Laptev Sea (east). It

  • Karskoje More (sea, Russia)

    Kara Sea, marginal sea of the Arctic Ocean, located off western Siberia (Russia), between the Novaya Zemlya islands (west), Franz Josef Land (northwest), and the Severnaya Zemlya islands (east). It is connected with the Arctic Basin (north), the Barents Sea (west), and the Laptev Sea (east). It

  • Karskoye More (sea, Russia)

    Kara Sea, marginal sea of the Arctic Ocean, located off western Siberia (Russia), between the Novaya Zemlya islands (west), Franz Josef Land (northwest), and the Severnaya Zemlya islands (east). It is connected with the Arctic Basin (north), the Barents Sea (west), and the Laptev Sea (east). It

  • karst (geology)

    Karst, terrain usually characterized by barren, rocky ground, caves, sinkholes, underground rivers, and the absence of surface streams and lakes. It results from the excavating effects of underground water on massive soluble limestone. The term originally applied to the Karst (or Kras)

  • Karst (region, Europe)

    Bosnia and Herzegovina: Relief: …south and southwest is the Karst, a region of arid limestone plateaus that contain caves, potholes, and underground drainage. The uplands there are often bare and denuded (the result of deforestation and thin soils), but, between the ridges, depressions known as poljes are covered with alluvial soil that is suitable…

  • KarstadtQuelle (Germany company)

    Thomas Middelhoff: …mail-order business KarstadtQuelle (later called Arcandor), and in 2005 he was made CEO. Middelhoff left Arcandor in 2009, just before the company went bankrupt. That same year he cofounded the investment company Berger Lahnstein Middelhoff & Partners.

  • Karstens, Harry (American mountaineer)

    Denali: …7, 1913, Hudson Stuck and Harry Karstens led a party to the South Peak, the true summit. A climbing party was first airlifted onto the mountain’s flanks in 1932; beginning in the 1950s, that became the standard way to attempt a summit climb, as it reduced the trip by several…

  • kart (Finno-Ugric religion)

    Kart, in Finno-Ugric religion, the sacrificial priest of the Mari people of the middle Volga River valley. The term kart was derived from a Tatar word meaning “elder.” The kart was either a lifetime representative of a clan or a temporary official chosen by lot to oversee common sacrificial feasts

  • Kart-hadasht (ancient city, Tunisia)

    Carthage, great city of antiquity on the north coast of Africa, now a residential suburb of the city of Tunis, Tunisia. According to tradition, Carthage was founded by the Phoenicians of Tyre in 814 bce; its Phoenician name means “new town.” The archaeological site of Carthage was added to UNESCO’s

  • Kartalinian Plain (region, Georgia)

    Georgia: Relief, drainage, and soils: …high plateau known as the Kartli (Kartalinian) Plain. Surrounded by mountains to the north, south, east, and west and covered for the most part by deposits of the loess type, this plateau extends along the Kura (Mtkvari) River and its tributaries.

  • Kartarpur (Pakistan)

    Nanak: Life: …his life were spent in Kartarpur, another village of central Punjab. Tradition holds that the village was actually built by a wealthy admirer to honour Nanak. It was presumably during this final period that the foundations of the new Sikh community were laid. By this time it must be assumed…

  • Kartarpur Pothi (Sikh text)

    Arjan: …the Sikhs and prepared the Kartarpur Pothi, the volume upon which the canonical Adi Granth, or Guru Granth Sahib (“The Granth as the Guru”), the sacred scripture of the Sikhs, is based. He was also a prolific poet who created hymns of great lyrical quality.

  • Kartēr (Zoroastrian priest)

    Kartēr, influential high priest of Zoroastrianism, whose aim was to purge Iran of all other religions, especially the eclectic Manichaeism founded by the 3rd-century Persian prophet Mani. What little is known of Kartēr comes from inscriptions on cliff faces, mostly dating from the reign of Shāpūr

  • Karteria (ship)

    Frank Abney Hastings: …only one was completed, the Karteria, which was the fastest and most modern ship in the Mediterranean at the time, with two small steam engines and an armament of four 68-pound guns featuring a method of heating and firing red-hot shells that Hastings himself had invented.

  • karthausi, A (work by E?tv?s)

    József, Baron E?tv?s: His first novel, A karthausi (1839–41; “The Carthusians”), expresses disappointment at the July Revolution in France (1830); E?tv?s intended it as a criticism of feudalism in Hungary. His essays and prose works also advocated a modernized penal code and an end to poverty. A falu jegyz?je (1845; The…

  • Kartheiser, Vincent (American actor)

    Mad Men: …account executive Pete Campbell (Vincent Kartheiser); and the effortlessly savvy head secretary, Joan Holloway (Christina Hendricks). While the show generated many of its story lines from the lively dynamics of the office, it also focused intently on the domestic sphere and specifically on Don’s wife, Betty (January Jones), who…

  • karting (motor sport)

    Karting, driving and racing miniature, skeleton-frame, rear-engine automobiles called karts, or GoKarts. The sport originated in the United States in the 1950s after the kart had been devised from unwanted lawn-mower engines. The karts usually have no protective bodywork, and the driver sits only a

  • Kartini, Raden Adjeng (Javanese noble)

    Raden Adjeng Kartini, Javanese noblewoman whose letters made her an important symbol for the Indonesian independence movement and for Indonesian feminists. Her father being a Javanese aristocrat working for the Dutch colonial administration as governor of the Japara Regency (an administrative

  • Kartini, Raden Adjeng, Lady (Javanese noble)

    Raden Adjeng Kartini, Javanese noblewoman whose letters made her an important symbol for the Indonesian independence movement and for Indonesian feminists. Her father being a Javanese aristocrat working for the Dutch colonial administration as governor of the Japara Regency (an administrative

  • Kartinki s vystavki (work by Mussorgsky)

    Pictures at an Exhibition, musical work in 10 movements by Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky that was inspired by a visit to an art exhibition. Each of the movements represents one of the drawings or artworks on display. Although originally composed in 1874 for solo piano, Pictures became better

  • Kartir (Zoroastrian priest)

    Kartēr, influential high priest of Zoroastrianism, whose aim was to purge Iran of all other religions, especially the eclectic Manichaeism founded by the 3rd-century Persian prophet Mani. What little is known of Kartēr comes from inscriptions on cliff faces, mostly dating from the reign of Shāpūr

  • Kartli (ancient kingdom, Georgia)

    history of Transcaucasia: Early history: …eastern Georgia (called Kartli or Iberia) in the north and Armenia in the south. The culture and ethnic character of both can be traced to the period of the breakup of the Hittite empire in the 12th century bc, and both were converted to Christianity early in the 4th century…

  • Kartli Plain (region, Georgia)

    Georgia: Relief, drainage, and soils: …high plateau known as the Kartli (Kartalinian) Plain. Surrounded by mountains to the north, south, east, and west and covered for the most part by deposits of the loess type, this plateau extends along the Kura (Mtkvari) River and its tributaries.

  • Kārttikeya (Hindu deity)

    Skanda, Hindu god of war who was the firstborn son of Shiva. The many legends giving the circumstances of his birth are often at variance with one another. In Kalidasa’s epic poem Kumarasambhava (“The Birth of the War God”; 5th century ce), as in most versions of the story, the gods wished for

  • Kartuli ena (language)

    Georgian language, official language of the republic of Georgia, whose spoken form has many dialects, usually divided into East Georgian and West Georgian groups. These, together with the related Mingrelian (Megrelian), Laz (Chan), and Svan languages, make up the Kartvelian, or South Caucasian,

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